Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Gator Homecoming: joy And Sadness
* x
See Pictures, Pages 1617

Pacemaker
All-American

VoL 61, No. 31' University of Florida, Gainesville Monday, November *4,1968

IN GATORADE DISPUTE
Regents Form
Study Group

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writar
Floridas Board of Regents
joined the Gatorade controversy
at Fridays meeting here.
Board Chairman Chester
Ferguson named a special
investigating committee to find
out all the facts and take
appropriate action to protect the
rights of all involved.
Ferguson named Julius Parker
chairman of the committee and
appointed members Henry
Kramer and Dr. Louis Murray to
serve with Parker.
The committee will work
with Vice Chancellor Phil Ashler
in making a detailed study of
Gatorade and the possibilities of
the state sharing in the profits
from its sale.
There is hardly sufficient
information so far on which to
base a conclusion, Ashler said,
This situation is far more
complex than we anticipated.
Ferguson said the questions
appear as to whether Gatorade
was developed as part of a
federal project or on Dr. Robert

EULOGIZED BY OFFICIALS
Smothers Ends
Career In Tears

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Emotions accomplished
Friday what many a politician
thought unattainable: silencing
retiring U.S. Sen. George
Smathers.
The 51-year-old Senator was
choked by tears as he a
attempted to thank the cream of
Florida public officials gathered
at the Florida Gym to pay
tribute to one of Florida Blue
Keys most successful alumni.
For over two hours, Smathers
listened as speaker after speaker
expanded on the retiring
senators and former UF Student
Body presidents brilliant career.
And, when his turn came,
Smathers searched for words
with which to conceal a cascade
of emotions betrayed by a
reddened face. He couldn't do it.
One of the great privileges
of my life has been to serve in
Congress with Spessard
Holland. Smathers said
hurriedly, his voice vanishing
into a whisper.

The
Florida Alligator

Cades (developer of Gatorade)
own time.
If the money was
appropriated by Congress, then
Dr. Cade has no rights, Florida
has no rights, and the University
has no rights. If it was part of
the federal project, then the
(SEE 'REGENTS' PAGE 3)
I GOING
Gary Walker looks happy
before the lightning struck.
GOING
Larry Rentz reflects
anxiety felt by most Gators
in the final minutes of the
game.
GONE
Gator Princess Patty
Bohannon (left) is near tears.
Homecoming Sweetheart
Suzanne Rogers (right) clasps
her hands together as the
clock runs out on the
Gator-Auburn game ending
'6B Homecoming in a bitter
13-24 defeat.
PHOTOS BY NICK ARROYO

I want to thank personally
all those other people.the
Senator started again as tears
flooded his eyes. With a wave of
(SEE 'SMATHERS' PAGE 2)

Marshall Bar Skits Hit Everybody

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
This is the show which
allows neglected politicians their
big chance to break into show
business after busted out of
politics."
With that, Ted Hacks
Original Political Amateur Hour
began its annual attack on
national and state politicians.
Sponsored by the John
Marshall Bar Association of the
l)F, the program took digs at
Tuesday's national elections
focusing interest on George C.
Wallace, Lester Maddox and
<* W? the b >*
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ITS 12. DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR GOVERNOR IS?'

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who put BIG in bigotry."
Governor Claude Kirk was
introduced several times during
the show but never appeared.
Questions were thrown to the
announcer during these times,
Have you tried Berlin, Rio de
Janeiro or Brazil? How about
Tallahassee?
Toward the conclusion .a
question was raised, Its 11
pjn., do you know where your
governor is?
Mayor Richard Daley and the
Chicago riots were the subject of
one skit. Daley and his Electric
Cattle Prods snag a song,
Tiptoe through the Hippies.
There were two commercial

breaks. One was for Riotal, a
potion composed of LSD,
marijuana and Pete. This
product was guaranteed to get
your tired Florida town off the
ground."
Another commercial was for
Birth Control Pills presented by
Pope Paul.
President Lyndon Johnson
showed slides of highpoints in
his career, commenting on his
daughter's weddings, the Pueblo
incident, and the riots in various
American cities during his seven
years in office.
He introduced Hubert H.
Humphrey. Humphrey brought
up thee t pointttyat, T 1 *. t r + p >

America's
Number I
College
Daily
i

promised his help for the
Humphrey campaign throughout
Humphrey's time of hard work,
cleaning the bam, feeding the
cattle and keeping the flies off
Luci Bird and Lynda Bird until
they got married.*
"You promised," said
Hubert. Yes, but I lied,"
smirked LBJ.
Supreme Court justices were
portrayed as the Swingin'
Supremes" and presented in
song decisions on reservists going
to Vietnam, obscenity, and the
racial marriage laws.
Leoy Collins and Ed
Gurney were the targets of barbs
(SE| 'MARSHALL* PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator,' Monday, November 4, 1968

Politics For Breakfast And Lunch

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Senatorial candidate Leoy
Collins, told a gathering in
Gainesville Friday the
governments purpose should be
to give everyone a chance to
work for something to win.
He was campaigning once in a
ghetto, he said, and after
chatting with a young child, the
boy said, 1 sure hope you win,
Governor.
Collins thanked him and said,
I hope you win, too.
Whereupon the boy answered, I
aint got nothing to win.
Collins said government
should make sure everyone
whether they be disadvantaged
minorities or small businessmen
has the opportunity to seek
something to win.
Collins was addressing the
John Marshall Bar Association
(JMBA) luncheon Friday at the
Holiday Inn. He was introduced
by Bruce Smathers, son of
retiring U.S. Sen. George
Smathers, whose post Collins is
seeking. The younger Smathers
repeated his fathers
endorsement of Collins.
Speaking to the association of
UF law students, Collins called
upon thenl as future lawyers to
play a larger role in then thencommunity,
community, thencommunity, to root out injustice
and correct irresponsibility .sm,
Lawyers obligations are far

Smathers Quits Politics,
Eulogized By Officials

BOM PA6I
nis left hand, Smathers left the
podium while the 1,300
dignitaries present rose to their
feet in a deafening ovation.
Smathers is retiring after 17
years in the Senate because of an

£ :, :;|j> ,x juK^
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GEORGE SMATHERS
...retiring from politics
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to the official fetutent of the University of Florida*
and to published five ttnu weukly except during June, July and August whan It to published
semi-weekly, sad during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only Ike
official opinions at their authors. Address oorrespomtonna to the Florida Alligator, Relts
Union Building, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32001. The Alligator to entered
Tg ml rim Hal 1 tha unit* - iyk qfftne at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subicription rate it SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter, f
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone at ell edver edver-1
-1 edver-1 ttosmeeto aid to ravine or turn away copy vhloh it oooelders objectionable.
Ike Florida alligator will not oonekter adjustments at payment tor any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous lnsertton unless notice la given to tha Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. Iks Florida Alligator will
not bo responsible tor more then one Incorrect lneertloa of an advertisement scheduled
to run aovoral times Notices tor correction must he given before next Insertion.

FROM OPPOSING SENATE CANDIDATES

LEROY COLLINS
... something to win
greater than their privileges, he
said.
Turning to national affairs, he
stated a belief that Congress
should not be allowed to
overrule Supreme Court
decisions; separation-of-powers
should not be tampered with.
Collins said the best way to
maintain a constitutional
government was by insuring
what he called competent
legislation.

illness the nature of which has
not been disclosed.
He was presented a silver tray
in behalf of his colleagues in the
U.S. Senate by Holland, a senior
to Smathers by 21 years.
Fred O. Bud Dickinson,
state comptoller, was the first of

§g ., M..' M
EJI p J
; wjk Jm
aHH
ED GURNEY
... big change in politics
The only way to enact
competent legislation in
Congress is by hard work, or as
he put it, drudgery. Lawyers,
as well as legislators, should take
the time to be precise, through
hard work, he said.
Slipping back to politics, he
pledged to do all in his power to
enact competent legislation, if
elected Senator.

several speakers to eulogize
Smathers.
Dickinson read what was to
have been his seconding speech
at the Democratic National
Convention last August for the
nomination of Smathers as
Floridas favorite son candidate
for President.
Smathers had then declined
the favorite sons nomination
and endorsed Humbert H.
Humphrey.
Other speakers included U.S.
Rep. Sam Gibbons of Tampa
and Gainesvilles U.S.
Preacher Gordon, pastor of
the First Presbyterian Church
and longtime friend of Smathers.
Among local and state
dignitaries present was Governor
Claude Kirk, who was made the
target of humorous remarks
made by various speakers.
Also attending were four
former Florida- Governors:
Charley Johns, Leoy Collins,
Farris Bryant and Haydon
Bums.

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SUMMER JOB GUIDE
Box 397, Lansing, Michigan 48902
Name
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By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
| Predicting major changes in
national government, U.S. Rep.
Ed Gurney, in Gainesville
Saturday morning, said he
j expected many Republican
victories, including his own, on
! Nov. 5.
I Nearing the end of his
i campaign for re-election, Gurney
spoke at a breakfast sponsored
by Alpha Kappa Psi, a UF
business fraternity.
The senatorial candidate
predicted a GOP gain of eight to
ten in the U.S. Senate and 20
to 32 or 33 in the House of
Representatives. Richard M.
Nixon will probably win, he
said, and if he does, he will win
by a large margin in the electoral
college.
For himself, Gurney claimed
victory in every county except
Hillsborough and Dade counties.
The race in Alachua County will
be a close one, Gurney
conceded.
Inflation, riots and crime, and
the Vietnam war are the three
major issues of the campaign
according to Gurney.
Inflation was caused by too
much government spending, he
said. His answer to
unemployment and poverty was
to provide jobs through private
enterprise. He discounted the
Democratic programs such as the
Job Corps as failures.
Vietnam would have been
settled two or three years ago if
the administration had backed
up the young men with the full
effective force of our Navy and
our Air Force Gurney said.
Regarding education, the
Federal Government should be a
merely tax collecting agency
which would distribute funds to
state and local officials leaders
to be used as they saw fit.
Gurney took time out to
attend several Homecoming
highlights, including the John
Marshall Bar Association skits
and the Homecoming game
against Auburn.
I Tour Generator
I Overhauled soacSi!
\ s 6 -V
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
W-4011

Marshall Bar
Skits Satirize
Uj. Politics
Fm* tut oar^J
during the final take-off of
televisions Laugh-In.
Gurney is the fastest talker I
know, with 275 words per
minute and gusts up to 450.
One asked Who won that
high school debate.
Another question was, Did
you know that Leoy Collins
has been endorsed by the
Florida Citrus Commission?
The answer was, Anybody with
a name like Leoy is bound to
get the fruit vote.
The Fickle Finger of Fate
award was given to the City of
Orlando for their efforts to get
the capital moved to that city.
They already have another
Mickey Mouse outfit there,
Disneyland, the announcer
said.
Aside from politicians, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
was portrayed saying to a
student, Hi, Im Steve
OConnell. Does my name
sound familiar? The students
reply was Well, you know how
it is. You meet so many people
here every day.
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Regents Form Group In Gatorade Probe

F ftOMMttOtt J
federal government retains all
rights,** he said.
Adder said the Board had
notified all interested parties,
Dr. Cade and StokleyVan
Camp, the company which
purchased the rights from Cade,
that the state will assert any
rights it has in the matter.
Regents member Mrs.
Margaret Behringer proposed
Quake Hits
Yugoslavia
BELGRADE (UPI) An
earthquake smashed a school, a
church and many houses Sunday
on Yugoslavias southern coast,
about 200 miles north of
Aristotle and Jacqueline Onassis
honeymoon site.
Belgrade radio said at least
one person was killed and many
more persons injured in the
Black Mountain towns clustered
near the Adriatic Sea, a few
miles from the Albanian border.
The tremor registered eight
on the 12-point Mercalli scale
and was felt almost 115 miles to
the east, the site of the Yugoslav
city of Skopje where 1,100
persons were killed July 26,
1963 in this nations worst
quake.
Mr. and Mrs. Onassis were on
their yacht some 200 miles
south, on the west coast of
Greece.

u ' ..
i- ..
, people are looking at this ad. Replace it with your ad next week.
'~\ )
( : .. - ... : j v
*
t '*-

9
- -

regents meetings be opened with
prayer.
Ferguson said the purpose of
the board was that of official
business and while I might be
stimulated and receive spiritual
satisfaction from prayer and
while I agree in principle, it
might be offensive to others
(members not of Christian
faith).*
Mrs. Behringer pointed out
that several states, including
California, opened meetings with
prayer. Unless I am overruled
by the board, I will not entertain
a motion on the proposal,
Ferguson said. Board members
were silent and the proposal died
for lack of motion.
In business related to the UF,
the board approved bids on
university buildings including
the UF museum building, a
human development center for
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
and a music building.
Former regents chairman
Baya Harrison was honored for
his services by the board. A
portrait of Harrison was
presented and will be hung in
the regents meeting office in
Tallahassee.
Harrison served as chairman
of the Baord of Board of
predecessor to the Board of
Regents and as first chairman of
the regents board from
1961-65.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell presented a request
that the regents remove the
accounts receivables record of

the Shands Teaching Hospital
and Clinic, 825 accounts totaling
$314,849,150 which have been
deemed uncollectable.
He pointed out the hospital
cannot survive with the little
state help it receives.
Dr. Samuel Martin, provost of
the College of Medicine, said the
hospital receives a total of only
19 per cent of its operating
funds from the state.
No other teaching hospital
receives so little aid from its
state,* he said.
Ferguson relinquished his
position as chairman to make a
statement demanding a
retraction of remarks made
against him by Gary
Wetherinton, GOP candidate for
the legislature from Tallahassee,
and printed in a UPI news story.
Wetherington charged a
conflict of interest existed

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CLOSED SUNDAYS butt#r

Monday, November 4, 1968, The Florida ANigetor,

because Fergusons law partner,
John Allison is a member of the
Board of Morrisons, Inc., and
serves as their legal counsel.
Morrisons supplies student food,
service at several state
universities including Florida
State University.
I have sent Mr. Gary
Wetherington a letter asking him
to outline his charges against
me, Ferguson said. When I
receive his answer, I will either
chose to ignore it or take some
course of action as prescribed by
law.
Write all the facts you
want, he charged the news
media but this type of attack
will stop as of now. 1 will simply
not have such attacks on me,
Ferguson said.
Kramer told reporters all such
contract considerations go

through the finance committee
and that Ferguson only signs the
contracts. Any attacks,
therefore, should be made at
me, Kramer said.
We are looking for the finest
food service at the most
reasonable prices, he said.
The board members backed
up Fergusons demand for a
retraction of the statement with
a resolution.
i
Good Sorvico Starts
at
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SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
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506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 4, 1968

WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN Ai\3 GRATIFYING
ARTIS: Those of you who are
pleased by art are in luck today.
Stuart Purser, senior art
professor at UF, begins display
of some of his creative drawings
in the University Gallery. The
exhibit will be on display until
Wednesday, Nov. 27.
If Chinese art appeals to you,
then you can drop your
chopsticks and run to the
Teaching Flospital of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center. In the
main lobby of that building,
Canning Young has on display a
collection of traditional-style
Chinese landscape paintings
which, incidentally, he himself
painted.
After viewing that exhibit,
you can catch the nearest
rickshaw to the Arts and Crafts
Center of the Reitz Union,
where a demonstration of
Chinese watercolor techniques
will be demonstrated at 7:30
tonight.
IN THE E AND I BUILDING
BOYS: The American Institute
of Industrial Engineers and the
Gator Amateur Radio club share
that noble edifice tonight. The
AIIE meets in room 270 at 7:30;
the GARC in room 525 at 8.
IN COULD IT BE
FIREFLIES?: Dr. Franklin
Roach (I was tempted, but I
figured the poor guy must take
enough ribbing as it is) speaks of
Nightglow, the lonosphere, and
the Equitorial Anomaly at a
Physics and Astronomy
Colloquim in room 133 of Bless
Auditorium today at 4 p.m.
IN WHO HAS THE
TIME?: The Student
Association for Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation
meets in the Union Auditorium
tonight at 7.
IN THOSE WHO KNOW ALL
ABOUT HORSE SENSE: The
Block and Bridle Club meets in
room 347 of the Union tonight
at 7:30.
AND SPEAKING OF HORSE
SENSE: UFs Interhall Council
meets tonight at 7 in room 363
of the Union to determine
whether it used that in its
decision to put on its
Homecoming review.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Alpha Phi Omega
meets in room 361 of the Union
tonight at 7.
Lewis Rothlein said War
Eagle under his breath and
snickered at the Homecoming
game.
Talks Force
Secret Meets
PARIS (UPI) Diplomatic
sources said U.S. and North
Vietnamese officials Sunday
secretly discussed how to
arrange expanded war talks
which the South Vietnamese
government has vowed to
boycott and to which the Viet
Cong was sending a woman as
delegation chief.
According to the reports, the
secret planning was being done
by U.S. Ambassador Cyrus R.
Vance and Hanois Col. Ha Van
Lau.
The two men, deputy leaders
of their respective delegations,
six months ago used similar
behind-the-scenes huddles to fix
the opening of U.S. North
Vietnamese preliminary talks.

DROPOUTS

Sal? 1
v. sy YOUR TURN/
t- IHI k Ur lid I*:

Hassle Develops
Over Union $$

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The money going to the
Reitz Union through the Union
Board of Managers is separate
and apart from the $6.25
Student Government receives
from each students fees, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
said.
The allocation of funds for
the union is made through the
Board of Regents and the
legislature, OConnell added.
However, OConnell said,
since the Board of Managers
consists of eight students,
students will still have a say in
union affairs.
The other six board members
are non-students appointed by
OConnell.
OConnell has taken this
stand without any consultation
with student leaders, Student
Body Vice President Gary
Goodrich said, at least to my
knowledge.
Before I am convinced,
OConnell will have to show me
statutes or Board of Regents
manual regulations that override
present student body laws,
Goodrich said.
OConnell has not
investigated the history relating
to union finances, he said.
As of OConnells arrival at
UF, Goodrich continued,
union control was clearly under
student body law and was so
stated in the Board of Managers
charter.
SG claims that it controls all

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7 \ ( Vou WUST NEVER^I
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non-academic student funds and
therefore has further authority
over organizations using student
funds.
Recent Board of Regents
policy revisions concerning
student activity fees,
non-academic student funds,
provide that funds must be
dispursed and spent under the
supervision of a student
government of similar group.
SG leaders therefore contend
since the union uses student
funds over which SG has
control, SG should have a voice
in how appropriated money is
spent.
EXCEPTIONAL EARNING
OPPORTUNITY
for
Science teachers or science
graduates to teach and travel in a
science lecture program of nuclear
education presented in secondary
schools throughout the United
States.
During each full week of travel,
science educators are paid $63
subsistence, $25 premium pay
and lodging cost plus a minimum
base salary of S6OO monthly.
Vehicle is provided (with credit
card).
Qualifications: Degree in science
or science education. Capable of
extensive travel. Good health and
speaking ability.
Employment to begin in
December, 1968, January, 1969,
or July, 1969.
For application and further
information, write:
Personnel Office
OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED
UNIVERSITIES
P.O. Box 117
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830
An Equal Opportunity Employer

BY HOWARD POST

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Down To The Wire With Campaign *6B

HHH Will Hold Electors

WASHINGTON (UPI) Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
Sunday all but ruled out
releasing any of his electoral
votes to prevent a possible
deadlocked presidential race
from being thrown into the
House.
The prospect would come
about if neither Humphrey, his
Republican rival Richard M.
Nixon and third party candidate
George C. Wallace could obtain
the 270 electoral votes required
to win in Tuesdays election.
The Democratic presidential
candidate said the Constitution
practically bars him from giving
his electors to another candidate
in the event none receives a
majority of the popular vote.
When you take an oath to
uphold the Constitution, you
mean it, he said in a broadcast
interview, noting that the
Constitution provides for the
House to select the President if
the Electoral College cannot
agree.
Humphrey has consistently
refused suggestions by Nixon
that they work out an
arrangement that would
guarantee the candidate with the

Both Parties 'Hang Tight

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Democrats and Republicans are
braced for a cliff-hanger running
into Wednesday and possibly
days later-for a decision on
which party controls the House
of Representatives in the new
Congress.
The GOP needs a net gain of
30 seats to reach the 218 needed
Wallace Holds
Electoral Key
ATLANTA (UPI) George
Wallace said Sunday that if there
is an electoral deadlock he will
throw his support only to a
candidate who vows to carry out
the promises tire third party
candidate has made.
In a television interview
Wallace said questions about the
possibility that none of the three
candidates would get an
electoral majority were
hypothetical" because he
expected to win outright.
But when pressed for what he
would do in case no candidate
gets the required 270 electoral
votes. Wallace said whoever
becomes the President is going
to have to promise what we have
promised them-it it is not
me."

most votes the others electoral
support should Wallaces
candidacy create a deadlock.
In a reference to Nixons
law and order campaign
theme, Humphrey said one of
the first matters of law and
order is to respect the
Constitution and he said a
candidate who runs on such a
pledge ought to adhere to it.
The vice president, however,
predicted that he would get a
plurality in Tuesdays balloting.

to organize the House.
Republican congressional leaders
are predicting that they will win
those seats while electing
Richard M. Nixon to the
presidency.
But Republican Party
managers privately show less
confidence and believe that it
will be very tough to gain more
than 20.
Their Democratic
counterparts long have been
confident that they will keep
control of the House. They
expect to lose eight to 12 seats if
Nixon wins.

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Gene Doubts
His Influence
Helps HHH
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Eugene J. McCarthy said Sunday
he doubted whether either his
own endorsement of Hubert H.
Humphrey or President
Johnsons decision to end the
bombing of North Vietnam
would elect Humphrey in
Tuesdays presidential balloting.
McCarthy said Humphrey
can win but he did not appear
to be optimistic about that
prospect. He said it was an
election year in which 30 or 40
or 50 per cent of the people
including the supporters of
George C. Wallace had
demonstrated their discontent
with the workings of the
two-party system.
McCarthy said of his own late
endorsement of Humphrey I
think it will bring him victory.
McCarthy said the bombing
halt should strengthen the
chances of Senate doves for
whom he has campaigned but I
dont see it as having quite as
much effect on the presidential
race.

Monday, November 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Nixon Offers Viet Trip
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Richard M. NixQn said Sunday that if he is
elected President he would be willing to go to Paris or Saigon before
his inauguration to help get the Vietnam peace talks off dead
center.
The GOP presidential candidate, appearing on a nationally televised
panel program, said he wanted to cooperate with President Johnson in
any helpful way and that he was not making the suggestion as a
grand stand stunt.
Nixon was winding up his campaign in California whose 40
electoral votes could swing the election. The former vice president will
remain in Los Angeles until Tuesday morning.
Nixon also said that despite contrary opinions of some of his aides
he did not believe President Johnson was playing politics with the
Vietnam bombing halt. He added that he did not think Johnson
would have ended the bombing if he had expected a backlash from
South Vietnam. South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu said
his government would not join expanded Paris peace talks if it meant
sitting across from representatives of the Viet Cong.
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$1.03 Value Only 85C plus tax |
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FNTIR THE
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FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl
Place an X" in the box of the team you think will
win Saturday, Nov. 9 Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will* be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
0 ALABAMA VS. D L s u
D AUBURN VS. Q TENNESSEE
D FLORIDA vs. Q GEORGIA
D PENN ST. vs. MIAMI
MEMPHIS ST. VS. D HOUSTON
MICH. ST. vs# p INDIANA
MIAMI (OHIO) VS. Q DAYTON
O N. CAROLINA vs. Q VIRGINIA
a S. M. U. VS. TEXAS A&M
PENNSYLVANIA VS. O YALE
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Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.,
Nov. 8 4n case of tie, prizes will be divided equally
among winners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
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IC2O West University Avenue UNIVERSITY Plaza
SIGNATURE
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ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

Page 5



Page 6

, Th Florida Alligator, Monday. November 4. 1968

Snow-Bound For Vietnam

Editors note: This is the first
of a series by Alligator special
writer Rick Benson, recently
returned from Vietnam. Benson
chronical* his experiences in and
his reactions to the War in
Vietnam.
By RICK BENSON
Alligator Special Writer
With the continuing concern
over the war in Vietnam, one
may wonder what it is like for an
artillery battalion to prepare for
combat in that country.
Our fighting unit of 380
conscripts and regulars sloshed
through snow in below zero
weather during field problems foi
two months in Colorado. Even
to the first year ROTC student
or armchair strategist this kind
of preparation does not sound
kosher, but ours is not to reason
why.
Our unit includes a mixture
of recently graduated basic
trainees, regulars, and short
timers, those with less than six
months left in the service.
Included in the menagerie are
such distinct personalities as a
self-proclaimed conscientious
objector, a Canadian enlistee
who was never seen after
Christmas Leave, and in general
not the type of GI Bob Hope
usually speaks of.
When the field problems were
completed and the Christmas
holidays drew closer it was
suspected that letting the men
go home on leave would be a
calculated risk, considering that
some would not be so inclined
to return.
After leave, and when most
of the men had returned, the
process of loading vehicles for
shipment was begun. Drivers
took their trucks to the rail
yards where they drove them on
to flat cars, and in one instance
off again as a hapless jeep driver

Bare All The Facts,
Candidates Urged

NEW YORK (UPI) Two
girls and two men took off their
clothes in front of the Board of
Elections office Sunday to
encourage the presidential
candidates to reveal the bare
facts about themselves.
The psuedo-pol i t ica I
happening was one of a series of
naked be-ins staged around
the city on Sundays by Japanese
pop-op artist Yayoi Kasuma.
Earlier sites included Wall Street
and the United Nations.
As the four young people
stood naked on the steps of the
Board of Elections building, the
fully clothed Miss Kusama
painted red dots on their bodies.
These, she said, represent self
obliteration and the
destruction of the phony self.
The chilly group posed
holding mask-like cutouts of the
faces of candidates Richard M.
Nixon, Hubert H. Humphrey
and George C. Wallace. Miss
Kusama said each candidate
should be given an equal chance.
But first lets learn the naked
truth about them.
The happening ended
abruptly when Miss Kusamas
lawyer, Robert Chan, acting as
lookout, reported a policeman
standing at a highway ramp
several hundred feet away was

(1

misjudged distances and wound
up between two flat cars.
Next on the schedule was
packing. And into the huge
wooden boxes went the
necessities of war: eight cases of
whiskey and champagne
glasses, one lawn chair, and
seven framed drawings depicting
the history of the U.S. Army.
According to the master plan
we will deplane in California
laden with full combat gear. If
we don't incite a peace riot at
the airport, our next move will
be to load on a troop ship for

taking a noticeable interest in
the group gathered in the
otherwise deserted
neighborhood.

Urry's PORE-BOY SAYS
THANKS
1 hank you. As our first year of business draws to a close we here at
Pore-boy wish to thank all of you U of F students, faculty, and office
personnel for making it a wonderful success.
To each of you, we extend our sincere wish for future dealings and
pledge ourselves to the improvement of our convenient delivery service
and variety of food.
And to you potential patrons you have a real treat in store for you
on your first order. 1 y
i
FREE DELIVERY 378-1492
WATCH FOR OUR ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS
j -*

RICK BENSON
.. .'our man' in Vietnam

the month long voyage to the
Far East.
Although our initial itinerary
is rather limited, everyone is
looking forward to the five day
rest and recouperation leave
given to soldiers in Vietnam.
Uncle Sam pays for the plane
ticket to any one of ten cities
from Tokyo to Sydney. And
from the way the boat voyage
looks, well probably need it as
soon as we get off the ship.
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FREE ESTIMATES
323 N.Vy. 6th ST.
376-2558
East Side ACL Oepot

Sick Former Premier
Gets Breathing Gear

LISBON (UPI) Vital
respiration equipment for ailing
former Premier Oliviera Salazar
was flown from London Sunday
in an attempt to prolong his life.
Tubes for the respirator
which has helped Salazar breathe
since his September stroke were
on a Portuguese airliner which
landed this afternoon. They
were rushed from the airport to
the hospital to replace the
machines old tubes.
Salazars breathing has
depended on the respirator for
much of the past seven weeks.
Hospital sources said he now

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Candidates for bachelors, masters, and
doctors degrees in any of the above fields
are invited to schedule interviews with the
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Those who for any reason are unable to
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could no longer do without the
respirator.
The same sources described
Salazars condition as verv
poor.
They said: Its a hopeless
case, but with a man like
Salazar, a prognosis on how he
can maintain his fight i s
impossible.
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- ~
Campus Crier
Sponsored by Student Government.

WHAT IS SAMSON?
SAMSON is an organization of University
students interested in helping the underprivi underpriviledged
ledged underpriviledged in Gainesville and its surrounding
communities. SAMSON is based on the be belief
lief belief that there are many students with the
desire and the abilities to assist the local
anti-poverty agencies.
HOW YOU GET INVOLVED:
You can get involved in a program of life lifelong
long lifelong significance through SAMSON if all
the talent you have is a little willgoodwill,
that is. Call Student Government at the Uni University
versity University of Florida and let us know. Student
Government can be reached through the
University's main number (376-3261). If you're
concerned and have an hour or two week,
we need your help in building a better com community.
munity. community. This is your opportunity to help solve
the mpst serious problem facing American
youth today.

Operation Awareness
Today, OPERATION AWARENESS will try to acquaint the voters of Alachua County with the issues of the '6B campaign and the
presidential candidates, stands on them. From 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. there will be speakers in the Plaza of the Americas representing each
of the three candidates Humphrey, Nixon, and Wallace. The Young Democrats and the Students for Humphrey will supply the Democratic
candidates spokesmen. The Young Republicans and the Students for Nixon group will serve as spokesmen for the Republican candidate. The
Students for Wallace will represent the American Independent Partycandidate.

ATENTION
The following organizations
are requested to have an
informed representative at the
Budget and Finance Committee
meeting on Monday, Nov. 4, in
room 347 of the Reitz Union:
Council of International
Organizations
Gator Guard
Interhall Council
Mayor's Council
Meat's Judging Team
Men's Glee Club
Women's Glee Club
University Choir.

MANTOVANI
CONCERT

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Florida Gymnasium
Wednesday, November 6, 1968 - 8:15 p.m.
Tickets: $2.50, $1.50, SI.OO at the Union Box Office
A Student Government Production

The Student Senate has
questions concerning the second,
third, and fourth quarter
budgets of the above
organizations.
Got A Problem?
If you have a problem with
landlords, professors, or the
administration, contact Student
Governments OMBUDSMAN in
305 Reitz Union from 2:30
5:00 P.M. Monday thru Friday
or call 376-4001. the
Ombudsman. 24 hours a day, 7
days a week. All cases are
confidential.

SAMSON
HOW WE WORK:
SAMSON serves as a liaison between
interested students and local anti-poverty
agencies. It informs students about the pro programs
grams programs in need of their talents and, in turn,
lets these agencies know what talent is
gyailable.

Agronomy And Soils
Agronomy and Soils Club
Monday, Nov. 4, at 7:15 p.m.
In McCarty, Room 210
i :
UNION MOVIES
Nov. 8.-Fri DARLING 7:00 & 9:15 P.M.
STARRING Julie Christie
Nov. 9 Sat FAHRENHEIT 451 7:00 7 9:15 P.M.
STARRING: Julie Christie, Oscar Werner

Mantovanithe most distinctive personality in the world of light music musicrose
rose musicrose meteorically eighteen years ago when London Records released Char Charmaine,
maine, Charmaine, now his theme song. Fueled by the lush string sound and the
superbly disciplined orchestra that is uniquely Mantovani, his star becomes
brighter every year. Over eighteen million Mantovani records have now
been sold. He was the first artist to sell a million stereo LPs and sales of
Mantovani stereo recordings are now approaching the five million mark.
His music is heard throughout the world wherever there is.a television set,
radio or phonograph available.

Monday. November 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

I;::
WHAT WE DO:
*

Tutor
(Kindergarden through
Twelfth Grade)
Sports
Games
Arts and Crafts
Discussion Groups

*
Adult Education
Hobby Group*
Dancing
Drama
Music
Health

Campus Crier
The Campus Crier page is
sponsored by Student
Government and appears each
Monday. Any campus
organization desiring to place an
announcement in this page must
turn it in the preceeding
Wednesday, before the
announcement is to appear.
Announcements can be turned
in to Mrs. McLeod or John
Skeath in Room 305 Reitz
Union.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 4, 1968

EDITORIAL

Dont Dump Hump

Americans will select the next President
of the United States tomorrow, and their
decision has been heralded as one of the
most crucial since the Depression.
Because Americas future is clearly at
stake.
Millions of words have been written
about this campaign for Americas highest
office, but in the end it should be obvious
that America most needs a man who can
lead America to the fulfillment of a dream.
That American dream is, simply stated, a
humane society.
There is a candidate for whom the dream
has become a frame of reference, away of
political life. His name is Hubert Horatio
Humphrey.
He began his political career in
Minneapolis more than 25 years ago as an
establishment renegade, and his fists have
swung for Americas trampled minorities
ever since. He has proved himself a
determined and untiring adversary.
He has fought s 6 long and so hard
because he believes in Americas oldest and
best dream that free and equal men should
live in a society of love and charity rather
than one of hate and avarice.
As president his attacks on racism,
bigotry and hate will have even greater

The Rational Observer

Please read this column
today. It contains facts which
you should know facts which
havent been presented to this
area. Very important facts.
I speak of the National
Boycott of California Table
Grapes.
This may sound silly to you.
But it is no little thing. Im dead
serious. The grape sales in New
York are down 50%. In Boston,
as well as Detroit and Chicago,
grape sales have closed down. In
Miami, Food Fair-Frederichs
have agreed to stop selling
grapes, cutting down grape sales
by 1/3.
In Gainesville, no one has
been told about this, hence, this
column.
So what is the national grape
boycott all about? Basically this:
To begin with, farm workers
are specifically excluded from
the National Labor Relations
Act (NLRA), which guarantees
employees to engage in the
practices and procedures of
collective bargaining. One facet
of this is that all employers are
required to hold elections to see

LI in i -
The Florida Alligator
Publiriied by students of the University of Florid* under the
unices of the Boerd of Student Publications.
CdHoHd, Burin*, AdHiring offices in Room 39, Reid Union. Phone
1 But. 3832
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are thorn of'the editors or of
She riter of the article d not thoaeof thcUnfrcrsity of Florida."

Dont Buy The Grapes Os Wrath!

if the workers want to form a
union or not, and the employer
must comply. It was political
pressure from the farm bloc
which excluded farm workers
from this right.
In California, as in the rest of
the nation, the farm worker lives
in deplorable conditions. The
life expectancy of a farm worker
is 49 years. Infant and maternal
mortality are 125 per cent
higher than the national average.
The farm workers are excluded
from unemployment insurance.
They are discriminated against in
minimum wage coverage
($1.15-farm workers,
$ 1.60-others) and social security
laws (they must earn $l5O or
work 20 days for one employer
in order to be covered.) Without
contracts, they dont have
protections that other workers
take for granted, for instance,
job security, overtime pay,
holidays and vacations with pay,
sanitary toilets (often the
women have to squat between
rows) and drinking water, health
insurance, rest periods and
grievance procedure,

impact on Americans who sleep without
dreaming.
He may not cure all the ills of the
American people, but he at least will not
ignore the pains, as Richard Nixon might,
nor will he make America sicker, as George
Wallace might.
Americas sickness is an issue close to the
hearts of youth, because if the illness
continues, if the polarization of the
American people goes on, there may be no
tomorrow for America.
Let it be clear that the Alligator cannot
condone all of Humphreys views, nor can
we accept all his methods.
For example, we cannot forgive his
endorsement of the futile deaths of
thousands of Americas sons in Vietnam.
We cannot ignore his acquiescence when
hundreds of Americas children were kicked
and beaten in the streets of Chicago because
they believed President Johnsons war was
immoral.
We also realize that the past cannot be
changed. But with the bombing halt and the
whisper that peace is near, Americans can go
to the polls tomorrow with greater hope for
the future of their country.
If they want those hopes fulfilled, if they
still love America and her people, they will
elect Hubert Humphrey.

A group of farm workers in
Delano, California formed a
union in Sept. 1965, called the
United Farm Workers Organizing
Committee (UFWOC), under the
leadership of Cesar Chavez. They
asked their employers, the wine
grape growers, for recognition so
their conditions could be
improved. The growers refused
to hold elections. The UFWOC
held a national boycott (mostly
effective in northern cities,
however) which proved to be
remarkably successful and
resulted in contracts throughout
the industry.
On August 3, 1967, the
UFWOC asked the Giumarra
Corporation (Californias largest
table grape grower) to hold
elections. It wouldnt, even after
950 of the 1,000 workers went
out on strike. Giumarra, with,
cooperation of the State
Department of Labor and
immigration officials illegally
hired other workers (illegal
blue card workers).
The same has happened on all
of the table grape farms. The
growers are refusing to recognize
the workers, who want to form a
union, so as to improve their
conditions.
The UFWOC has called for a
national boycott of California
table grapes with the hopes that
the growers will realize that
there is widespread concern for
the future of the farm worker in
the country, and that their
businesses may be hurt if they

The Florida Amgator
"The price of freedom
the exercise of responsibility."
o i Dave Doucette
r MlfrtfJtlfo Managing Editor
All Raul Ramirez James Cook
AuMM Eycut ive_Sd_itof -News Friiw
I ?'-^*pSryv
I ;;*v
j *£ yySjy'
wWF
Nixon's The One

refuse to recognize the workers.
This is the only way that farm
workers can act because they are
excluded from the NLRA.
The support for the drive has
been tremendous. The late
Robert Kennedy supported the
strike from the beginning. The
National Council of the
Churches of Christ, many
Catholic officials, and the Jewish
Federation Council have
expressed their support. Among
the senators supporting the
boycott are McCarthy,
McGovern, Javits, Morse, and
Edward Kennedy. Also giving
their support are the Mayors of
New York, Baltimore, Cleveland,
Detroit Pittsburgh, and Boston.
The AFL-CIO, Teamsters
Union, the International!
Longshoremens and
Warehousemens Union, and the
Canadian Labor Congress passed
resolutions supporting the
boycottt and requested their
members not to buy grapes.
So this is what its all about.
To some people it is something
big, because if the workers win
in California, (which handles 38
per cent of the nations fruit and
vegetables) they can win
elsewhere, for example, in
Florida.
Ninety-eight per cent of the
table grapes in this country are
grown in California. These
companies, unable to sell in the
North because of the boycott
have put their grapes into cold

By Lewis Rothlein

storage, and will be trying to sell
them in the South for the next
several months.
All of the table grapes in this
area come from California. If
you think the situation of the
farm worker in California
specifically, or nationally is
wrong, you are being urged by
the NFWOC not to buy grapes.
If you are a store owner, you are
urged not to sell them.
In Gainesville, an
organization is being formed for
those concerned about farm
workers. Its purpose will be to
urge store owners not to sell
grapes and to get area support
for the boycott.
I am just presenting you with
the facts, because it is unfair
that they be withheld. I
personally agree with the
boycott and dont feel the
sacrifice is too much,
considering the long range
effects.
Do you?
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in die interest of
space.



Speaking Out

In the last few weeks one insult after another has
been leveled at the Greek system. As a member of a
sorority, I feel compelled to speak out against what
I consider little more than a sham.
Dave Doucette's article on the dismissal of Cathy
Eicher from the cheerleading squad is not only
obviously prejudiced but an example of poor
journalism. Dave, as a journalist, should have
learned somewhere in his career that editorializing is
reserved for the editorial page.
I did not have to read past the first two or three
paragraphs to realize just where the article was
aiming. His practice of emphasizing the fact that
members of the cheering squad are Greeks by listing
their respective chapters was highly insulting. The
cheerleaders, like all other Greeks, are proud of
their affiliations, but I feel sure were dismayed at
the use to which their membership was put in this
article. When it was pointed out that Clyde Taylor,
president of the student body, is a Sigma Nu, 1 had
read enough.

OPEN FORUM:
jAdriia ml VIAAMt
There is no hope for the complacent man.
/ .... ' .. v

Waiting In Line For Tickets
Inspires A Poet To Write

MR. EDITOR:
Under the light of the blazing
sun
We stand
Or sit
In the cool shadows of standers
With words of gatoradic
controversies
And hallucinogenic trippers
round about
World news of hate and fight
and killing
Upon our fingertips
Woolen sweaters on our
shoulders
Seeking shelter from the cool
blast
Os autumns first breeze
Letter writing all around
And students peering absently
Through the boundaries of
infinite space
An aura of hopelessness
Pervades the memories of such
days
Long past
A mere ticket
All we ask
But still they do refuse
And yet we paid for privileges
With povertys wares
Long months ago
And we know
With burning knowledge
That we are as exhausted
Cigarette butts under bare and
leathered feet
At least they believe us so
But we are not as they claim
Olympic gods seeking our
revenge

Don't Insult UFs Greek System

We seek and yes we covet
Only that which is rightfully
ours
A ticket
They tell Jude dont be afraid
Take a bad song and make it
better
But in the core of the apple also
They talk about a revolution

Gator In Conspiracy?
MR.EDITOR:
It is unfortunate that THE ALLIGATOR has such power that it is
able to mold all opinion on campus. If it were only a reflection of
student incompetence it would not be alarming. But obviously there is
a CONSPIRACY among certain elements in student government and
THE ALLIGATOR staff manipulated from the omniscient Tigert Hall.
Thus, there has been a complete news blackout surrounding the Lavon
Gentry case. His persecution by the administration and police
department because of association with SDS has led to his impending
trial. A group of students and faculty has attempted to create a
dialogue on campus that will circumvent this control. The group, the
Symposium on Student Movements has failed in its attempts to have
its programs on student movements publicised. The Latin American
Colloquium has been ignored innewsreleases, perhaps because subjects
such as **lll6 Negro as a second class citizen have been scheduled.
It is recognized that the use of the word CONSPIRACY may
appear a facile term to cover up ignorance of the working of the
university system. But the word is appropriate when applied to a
system in which members of an elite, (i.e. frightened bureaucrats,
student and administrative) manipulate activities to the extent of
creating such inane mammoth as the Inter-Organizational Council
which serves as a means of drowning legitimate grieviances in a maze
of the correct channels of cummunication. THE ALLIGATOR is
just part of this system, hoping against hope to perpetuate itself on
timeworn foundations of paternalism in our era of dynamic indeed,
revolutionary-chaise.
ROBERT IBARGUEN

I will be the first to admit that I am unfamiliar
with the practices of the cheerleading board of
directors. However, Doucettes article hints, and the
accompanying editorial blandly states that Miss
Eicher was dismissed because she is an independent.
In my opinion, this claim cannot be substantiated
primarily because there is presently an independent
still on the squad. Why hasnt she been dismissed?
Why were three independents (one later pledged)
placed on the squad in the first place if Taylor and
Grubbs, both Greeks, are supposedly prejudiced
against independents?
Sororities and fraternities have as one of their
goals service to the community. This is
accomplished in two ways by individual members
and by a group effort. Examples of group service are
to be found all over campus and beyond the city
limits. Delta Chi fraternity this week donated SIOO
for a music roll for Century Tower in response to an
Alligator editorial. Alpha Epsilon Pi is in the midst
of a showerthon staged for benefit of the United
Fund. IFC, a representative body of the 28

These impressions were
written while waiting in the mob
trying to obtain tickets to the
UF-Aubum homecoming game. I
believe I am merely expressing
the feelings of many UF-student
football fans.
MICHAEL E. SMITH

Monday, Novanfbar 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

'Speaking Out

Salvage From
The Wreckage

Since the time of the
Democratic National Convention
Hubert Humphrey has taken an
increased interest in
international affairs. Its now up
534 per cent.
*
Though much maligned,
universities are making a very
real contribution to society in
the field of Pharmaceuticals.
Nearly every one in college
today has had some sort of drug
experience.
*
There was an apparent air
conditioning failure at the
Republicans National
Convention held in Miami Beach
this summer. At least I detected
the presence of smoke filled
back rooms.
*
Ive long been under the
misapprehension that bigot is a
contraction for big idiot.
* a *
This convention did much to
refine Nixons Tricky Dicky
image. Its now Trick Richard.
Actually Nixon has become far
more self assured and less
cautious in his campaign
speeches since the nomination.
At his public appearances real
solutions are finally being posed
to such problems as Viet Nam,
lawlessness, and poverty.
Hopefully, they may eventually
find their way to the podium.
*
As a bit of a commentary on
our own recent student
government elections, 1 actually
redeved three write in votes;
placing me just behind Minnie
Pearl... and just ahead of Minne
Mouse.
*
Those who are given to vocal
defense of Third Party candidate
George Wallace, neednt.
Laughable ineptitude speaks well
enough for itself.

By Kay Usborne

fraternities, also undertakes service projects and is
keenly aware of its responsibility to the student
body.

Sororities collectively and individually round out
the Greek dedication to service. Panhellenic, IFCs
counterpart, has actively supported Teresita, a
foster child, for the past few years. A Panhellenic
Ball will be held winter quarter in order to raise
money for the annual scholarships sponsored by this
organization. Individual chapters have worked at the
VA hospital, undertaken care of needy families, and
other projects too numerous to mention.

Greeks are to be found in every aspect of the
university community. They are active in student
government, AWS, athletics . and cheerleading.
Greek enthusiasm and sincerity can hardly be
questioned when it pervades so thoroughly all these
areas. Perhaps what should be judged, instead, is the
sincerity of those who constantly clamor against the
Greek system.

By Ricky Freideb

Seemingly Spiro Agnews
most sizeable contribution to the
Nixon campaign has been his
somewhat tedious and
overplayed crime in the
streets issue. For the first time
in our history we may literally
find ourselves with a Vice
President. As Nixon, if elected,
will be permitted to choose an
entire cabinet, shouldnt Agnew
at least be permitted a squad?

One of the reasons for the
great impasse in the efforts of
the New Left at this university
has been their rather misguided
and needlessly dissonanf
approach; which is somewhat
odd as this would seem to
furnish an obvious common
ground with the administration.
* *
Those who strongly maintain
that things always turn out for
the best are merely trying to
salvage something from the
wreckage.
*
Czechoslavakia furnishes no
definite indication that the
Russians are going to continue in
their policy of aggression, after
all, they might be slightly tired
from the ordeal.
* A
If you feel my observations
have been too negative you must
remember the comments have
been limited by the truth.
* A
I admonish all those who
bring to this presidential election
a pledge of inactivity and
indifference. Im most definitely
going to cast my ballot into at
least 12 feet of water.
* *
1 trust that you have found
this column somewhat liberating
- perhaps not too dissimilar to
[Mimes.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 4, 1968

New Constitution Eases
Amendment Procedures

By BILL SADOWSKI
Alligator Special Writer
(Third of a four part series)
Article Xi (Amendments),
according to many of its
supporters, contains the most
significant language in the
proposed constitution.
Prior to the mid-1960s a
single amendment to the 1885
Constitution could not pertain
to more than one article Thus, a
total revision, such as the one
presented to us now, was not
constitutionally possible.
In 1964 the 1885
Constitution was amended to
allow a single amendment to
cover revision of the entire
Constitution. Even with this
change, the 1885 Constitution
still requires all amendments to
go through the Legislature
before they can be placed on the
ballot.
The authors contend that the
proposed constitution would be
much more easily amendable,
than its predecessor because it
would not be necessary to go
through the Legislature and that
reforms ( as opposed to
revisions) could also be
instituted with greater facility.
Most commentators regard the
amending procedures contained
in the new article as very liberal
because of the presence of an
initiative provision.
Amendments may be
proposed four ways by the
Legislature; by a Revision
Commission to be called ten
years following the adoption of
the proposed constitution and at
20 year intervals after that
(new); by constitutional
convention which may be called
by initiative of the people (new);
and by initiative.
Under the initiative provision,
any citizen may get a
constitutional amendment on
the ballot by filing a petition
containing the proposed
amendment signed by a
number of electors in each of
one half of the congressional
districts of the state ... equal to
eight percent of the votes cast in
each.. .such district and in the
state as a whole in the last
preceding. .. presidential
election.
It is principally on the basis
of this initiative provision that
supporters of the proposed
constitution contend that it is a
vehicle for reform, as opposed
to the reform document some
people urge.
They maintain that basic
governmental changes could be
instituted more easily under the

STARTS TONIGHT
HAPPY HOUR AT SHAKETS
15t Par Stein, 1 SIOO Per Pitcher.
<*OOpm til 10:00pm MON. through IHURS.
You Mu* be 21 to get into the
OiE PUMP ROOM during HAPPY HOUR
& MZZA PAELOK &
mAhAb t If ye Public house
JUST 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE UNIVERSITY
35X>&W.nh&

proposed constitution than
under the old one. There is some
apprehension expressed with
reference to sych a liberal
amending procedure,
particularly in light of
Californias experience with a
similar provision which resulted
in innumerable amendments
being offered every election.
Some Florida legislators
suggest that the initiative ought
to be utilized two times: the
first time to get an amendment
in which they are interested into
the Constitution; the second
time to remove the initiative
from the Constitution.
Experts in public finance
view the tax article of a
constitution as functioning to
define the bounds within which
the Legislature must work to
find sources of revenue for the
financing of governmental
services.
Thus, the more potential
sources of revenue (e.g. income
tax) forbidden to the Legislature
by a constitution, the more
difficult it becomes to fine
revenue to finance governmental
activities education, for
example. And, over long periods
of time, it lessens the
Legislatures flexibility to meet
changing needs.
So, too, the entrenching of
tax exemptions in the basic
document ties the Legislatures
hands in their periodic search for
additional funds to run
government.
All participants agree that the
major battleground of the
Florida Legislatures
constitutional revision sessions
was Article VII (Finance and
Taxation).
One observer suggests that a
persons philosophy of
government is most manifested
in the tax area: There are those
individuals who have confidence
{complete xerox!:
:j and
OFFSET FACILITIES :j
$ Specializing in >
>, Thesis and Dissertations :
\ #*
£ Reductions and :j
> Enlargements :j
\ Open Til 11 P.M. ij
j Highest Quality
| We Guarantee it! jj
j 7 days
| OUIK-SAve |
§ University Plaza j
11620 W. University
I 378-1001

in the ability of government to
deal with problems and who are
willing to entrust their elected
representatives with discretion
and flexibility in the conduct of
government.
Then there are those who
believe that that government is
best which governs least and
who would seek to set exacting
limits on the descretionary
power of their elected
representatives.
Proponents of the proposed
constitution use the tax article
to illustrate their contention
that this is a revsion document.
During the session there were
several attempts by
reform-minded legislators to
delete such provisions as the
homestead exemption and the
income tax prohibition. But
these efforts were unsuccessful.
The basic tax structure of the
state remains intact.

IK DRAFT:
The draft
young men and a bad way |B: Sui'y
to build our armed forces.
Elect Richard Nixon Presi- (i S'
dent Heres what he woud
do: ;ftggr § Warnm.-
After Viet Nam, elimin eliminpletely.
pletely. eliminpletely. Change to an all allvolunteer
volunteer allvolunteer armed force,
with better pay so that it
becomes an attractive ca career.
reer. career. Professional, highly
trained armed forces are
needed for modern de- v^Jr^.
sense, and this elective HhHHHhHHHhHH
service" would remove
much uncertainty from the
lives of young Americans.
THIS TIME,
VOTE LIKE YOUR
WHOLE WORLD
DEPENDED ON II
Paid Political Advertisa went

sjimiiiiniiiMiinniMimiK
i SPECIAL NOTICE i
n
To all student* and university personnel
5 DISCOUNT i
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5 JKfc FOOD TASTES MUCH BETTER AT 9
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5 m/m* 111:30 AM 2:00 PMI
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9 GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER 9
S (Just Four Minutes From Campus)
TiaismaiaiaiaiaisiaiaiaimawiawM



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
*. V
1968 305 cc Honda Scrambler. Just
like new S6OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-2742. Philco port, tv 19 In. S4O.
With stand. 2 new VW Goodyear tires
S4O. Hoover vacuum cleaner $35.
(A-7t-25-p)
Yamaha 1967 60cc. One owner,
excellent condition. Helmet & tools
included. Low mileage. SIBO. Call
Karl at 378-7661. (A-st-28-p)
ROYAL' portable typewriter with
carrying case. Brand new. S4O. Call
after 5, 378-9043. (A-3t-29-p)
Ex-Yamaha mechanic must sell own
1968 Yamaha 350. Kept in perfect
condition. Only 4300 miles. Call
372-0009 after 5:30. (A-st-28-p)
Rest your feet, Vespa 125 cc, best
buy for money, starts easy, 55 to 60
mph. Excellent running shape, call
Russ at 378-9710 after 3:00 p.m.
SIOO. (A-st-28-p)
Are you a woman who wants to
increase your bustline or firm up and
support your heavy bosom?
SYMBRA'ETTE custom fitted
lingerie is now being introduced to
Gainesville. Call 378-7811, 376-7387.
(A-st-28-p)
Philco portable stereo & 20 albums.
Also 45s. Must sell to pay rent.
$90.00. 6 months old. Call 378-8096.
Ask for Mike. (A-3t-38-p)
to.il i iii IT' I" V ilie If

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check*
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

1,1 i I
j
i
* #
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME. DATE
>,!. for rent 1 day
n wanted d 2 days ADDRESS. '- ..
help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos D 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE, IZIE I
CD personal Q 5 days and over
Q lost-found (*20% discount)
Q services
WORDING
1 1 n 11 11 1 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 u 11 11 1 1 m~n~.
al 11 I I I I I I ITT I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i TTTTT
3171 II I I I I TTTTTTTTI I I 111 I II I I I I I 111 I
4.rrrrn 11 it i i i i 11 1 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 1mr

Monday, November 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

FOR SALE |
4. S
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
Two boy kittens desire warm secure
home. Love humans. 378-0036 after
5. (A-3t-29-p)
FOR SALE Two general admission
reserved seat tickets for
HOMECOMING GAME Call
378-7945. (A-2t-29-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Honda S-90. New
brakes! Just rewired the electrical
system! Inspected! Call 378-8893
after 4:30 p.m. (A-3t-31-p)
1962 Austin Healy 3000 MK2
Excellent condition. Complete
overhaul with removable hardtop.
SIIOO.OO or offer. Call Glenn at
481-2769 after 5 p.m. (A-3t-31-p)
1968 Bultaco racing motorcycle,
125 cc Sherpa. & 3-bike trailer. Buy
both for only $550. Call 372-3947.
Also 1966 Honda 50. $125.
(A-3t-31-p)
Camera, pacemaker 4x5 Speed
Graphic. Film holders, pack adapters,
hangers & trays. 2 flash & 1 slave.
Solenoid release. $250. 378-0159 or
378-7124. (A-st-31-p)

| FOR SALE |
\v.\w.-.v£-;vxsnnns^'
Trailer Bx4o. Perfect for young
couple. Completely carpeted, new
appliances, AC, 10x20 cabana.
Completely furnished. Asking SI4OO.
Call 376-7637 after 4:30 p.m.
(A-3t-31-p)
FOR RENT 1 |
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p).
Homecoming room for couple in
spacious mobile home. S6O. Includes
kitchen. Contact Randy, Andrews &
Connell Trailer Pk no. 11, evenings!
(B-st-27-p)
Modern 7 bedroom, carpet, Air
conditioned, furnished apt. Couple or
2 graduate students only. Call
376-5828. (B-st-23-o)
House for Rent leaving as soon as
possible. Will sublet or can take over
lease. Furn., rent S7O per month. Call
Steve 378-0088. (B-3t-29-p)
House trailer 1 bdr., furnished. $55
mo. Will move to any park. Call R.
Schmidt, 376-9914 Os 376-0285 or
write Box 356 JHM Health Ctr.
(B-4t-30-D)
| WANTED
&x*x-x*x.sNw;*x*xc*xopixsw;YxsX'Sif
Will pay sl4 for two gen. admission
tickets to Georgia game. Call Cheryl,
*>37B-1502, room 1301. (C-st-30-p)
WANTED: One set of 1968 Dodge or
Plymouth mag wheels. Call Tom
376-3424. (C-3t-30-p)
Need 1 male roommate. Share l Dr.
Summit House Apt. Call Managers
Office anytime before 6 p.m. at
376-9668. (C-st-31-p)
2 guys to share nice 3 bedroom
house. Everything furnished.
Available Jan thru June. 376-9681.
(C-lt-31-p)
Female dorm resident to deliver
morning newspaper. 378-9058.
(C-2t-29-p)
HELP WANTED f
::hvvX*;-Xpxow.%v.v.w>xox*x.x.x.x*i^
Listeners wanted Will pay $1.50
fcr 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
HIGHLY QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent Job, excellent
pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Engineering student; maintenance
work, apply Ramada Inn, will fix
hours to fit class schedule, ask for
Col. Krause before 4 p.m. (E-3t-30-p)
Women Girls: Telephone & survey
work part time or full time. Salary.
Apply 14 East University Avenue
upstairs. Offices 1 & 2. Apply 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. (E-10t-31-p)
AUTOS
XX-X-X-X-X-VXv^X-X-^frX-X.VX-X-X-XX-X':*
1967-mG Midget, radio, heater, wire
wheels, luggage rack. Excellent cond.
$1650 or best offer. 378-1219 after 6
p.m. (G-st-28-p)
XKE 1967, excellent condition. All
accessories, except air. Best offer
over $4450. Terms available. Call
378-6654 weekdays afte' 6 p.m.; Sat.
and Sun. after 12. (G-st-28-p)
1965 Alfa Romeo Sedan. 5-speed,
oirellis radio, reclining seats, heater,
disc brakes. SBOO or best offer.
372-8818. (G-st-29-p)
BLAST WTH
> 7i 14 j r 1
iLAsTrTnniplilWr^i
-JB

Page 11

I AUTOS |
Plymouth Wagon 1959. Power brakes
and steering, inspected. S3OO. Phone
372-9860. after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)
MGB 64 A Superb driving machine.
Clean & in good shape. RAH. Must
sell. $1175. Way below market.
Come by and test drive. 378-6917.
(G-st-29-p)
196 P Saab 850 GT Monte Carlo.
Winning performance, Luxury of air
cond., Am/Fm. Rugged
dependability. Excellent local service.
sl6oo.Call 372-2647 evenings,
weekends. (G-4t-27-p)
1963 GRANO PRIX Pontiac Bucket
seats, all power. Come see a GOOD
BUY at 207 B Flavet Village 3.
(G-4t-23-p)
1960 Pontiac Ventura 4-door
hardtop automatic transmission. In
excellent condition, reliable,
inexpensive transportation. $325 Call
376-9034. (G-st-31-p)
1957 Chevy six, 4-door, new muffler,
oil change, R&H, smells nice, S2OO.
1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Apt. 1.
372-7111. (G-2t-31-p)
1965 Alfa Romeo 1600 veloce race
car. scca prodified, limited slip
'Complete spare 512 rear street
equipment included. $2,000. 4030
Ortega Blvd., Jax, Fla. 904 388-3030.
(G-4t-31-p)
1966 Oatsun Sports Car with new
white leather grain vinyl top. 1600 cc
with disks up front, an excellent car
for highway and town. 378-0451.
(G-st-27-p)
| PERSONAL |
iv*XW*K-X>X*X-X.SS*: i*>X<*X-X*X-S!: ; ;*XC'U£.
Would like to hear from
non-professionals who have
experienced encounter, marathon,
sensitivity or **T M groups, and who
would share their opinions positive
and/or negative. Call C.W. Duncan,
ext. 2370, 2003 or 2004. (J-st-29-p)
Need an ant eater? Baby ocelot?
Penguin? How about snakes, owls, or
a Ceratophrys calcarata? Call the
Underground Zoo, 378-8810.
(J-st-28-p)
Dear Rachel Baby, I am sorry I
missed you last night but you know
how busy Anthony's is. Please,
another chance and at lunch. Love
Marvin. (J-st-28-p)
Sweet Lovable Bob, please forgive
me. You should have told me that
those cute little escargots they serve
at Anthony's were snails. Liz.
OPEN AT 6:30
HAYLEY EESf
MILLS. J
Technicolor* Bpjin?ri
IMWMOMnw
"""ALSO AT 9:30
'THE REPTILE"
HALF WOMAN HALF SNAKE

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G General Audiencee
M Mature Audiences
> (Parent's Piration)
R Restricted (under 16 must be
accompanied by adult guardian or
parent)
X-UndirWnidmitti^^^
I?
| AT *4MNMI amm
I 7xo? iHEsmsiurc
I 0:47 lanSuill'
WALTER MATTHAU xo
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1 ALSO PATRICK OtMLAL
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Sf & Thniis!
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DOUBLE ACTION
& EXCITE MINT I
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Q 1
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under 16
admitted
without
I parents



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 4, 1968

GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL |
TIM: Roses are red, violets are blue,
if I had it my way, I'd be there with
you. Weve made it one month, lets
make it a lifetime. Love, M.G.W.
(J-lt-31-p)
Regretfully extending condolences to
P |. G. for losing the Miss Dempsty
Dumpster Contest. Better luck next
year! Modine Gunch. (J-lt-31-p)
ATTENTION GATORS! WDVH 980
on your dial, has a MISSION for you,
which is not IMPOSSIBLE. The
WDVH GOOD GUYS have hidden
the KEYS to a 1969 FORD
MUSTANG FASTBACK somewhere
in the Gainesville area. YOUR
MISSION, should you accept it, is to
find the KEYS and CLAIM the
MUSTANG valued at $3,004. CLUES
are given HOURLY on WDVH 980.
Good Luck. (J-3t-31-c)
SPOCK needs a good home hes
a cute 9wk old kitten litter trained
and free see him at 1536 NW 3
Ave, Apt. 64 or call 376-3573 after 4
p.m. (J-31-lt-p)
| LOST A FOUND |
* v
LOST: black wallet near new library.
Ten dollars reward for return to
Anthony Martinich. Address:
Georgetown Apts., no. 74.
(L-3t-29-p)
Red Wallet lost at Med Center
library. Keep money. Please return to
Jennings Hall Desk. (L-4t-30-p)
FOUND: Girls watch. Grove parking
lot, Wed. morning. Call 378-5809.
(L-3t-30-nc)

l AWIHKi 1 I
(jVAAj \jOAaH
USE \
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR \
Call
Unlv Ext
1831
; .... v : ' , I , ;.


| LOST & FOUND |
;J ..v.v,v.v.v.?
Lost: red miniature dachshund pup
last seen outside Williamsburg Apt.
56. Desperate, dog not mine.
REWARD. Call 378-5534.
(L-3t-30-p)
LOST: black prescription sunglasses
in flowered case. Needed badly. Call
378-9035 Reward. (L-3t-31-p)
SERVICES
*
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c?
Buy, Sell, or trade used articles.
Confidential loans our specialty. A to
Z Pawn Shop 378-5575. 1326 E.
University Ave- (M-st-28-p)
Homecoming special color 8 x 10
prints of date or parties $2.50 black
white Bxlo SI.OO I will come to you,
At your convenience. Call Ron Koru
376-6042 fast service (M-st-26-p)
Need kerosine or fuel oil? Good
credit means no payment till
December. Call United Fuel Oil,
378-5333. (M-30-st-c)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-31-p)

GREEKS
and
GRADS
**>
PICTURES for the Seminole will be taken November 4-22 in room 346 ot the
Student Union. Appointments must be made in advance, between the hours ot 1
and 5, and must correspond to the weekly schedule below. Beginning October -8,
phone the Union, extension 2832 for an appointment.
NOVEMBER 4-8
Alpha Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Gamma Rho
Alpha Omicron Pi
Alpha Tau Omega I""""""T
All prospective graduates, last g e^a pj All prospective graduates, last
names beginning Omega names beginning
Chi Phi A
b If Delta Chi MX mm Ij
NOVEMBER 11-15
: J
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Gamma
Delta Phi Epsilon
Delta Sigma Phi
___ Delta Tau Delta
All prospective graduates, last Delta Upsilon All prospective graduates, last
names beginning Kappa Alpha names beginning
Kappa Alpha Theta
HA I Kappa Delta M A I
mm IM Kappa Sigma I |\|
* Lambda Chi Alpha i
NOVEMBER 18-22
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Epsilon Pi
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Tau
Phi Mu
Phi Sigma Sigma p I
AN proepective graduates, last Pi Kappa Alpha All prospective graduates, last
names beginning Pi Kappa Phi names beginning
0 W Pi Lambda Phi
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Chi Nm#
Sigma Kappa
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tau Epsilon Phi
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Theta Chi
Zeta Tau Alpha



UF Administration Censured By AFT

By JAN SCHMALENBERGER
Alligator Staff Writer
The American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) has censured the
UF administration for denying
tenure to Dr. Marshall Jones.
The Action Conference
Wednesday discussed a
resolution asking UF President
Stephen C. OConnell or his
representatives to meet with the
AFT to discuss removal of the
censure. This resolution was
referred to an ad hoc committee
for further investigation.
The censorship was decided
at the National Convention of
the AFT, AFLrCIO, held in
Cleveland. The meeting was held
in late August, according to Dr.
Robert Sherman, president of
the AFT chapter at UF.
The national AFT has gone
on record as condemning the UF
administration, Sherman said.
We feel that we have the
right to be involved in making
those (tenure) decisions and
should not be overruled by
persons or groups who do not
have the competence to do so.
He said the decisions should be
made by the peers of the persons
Students Riot
In Panama
PANAMA CITY (UPI)
National Guard troops battled
students protesting the military
junta with tear gas, rifle butts
and warning shots Sunday as
Panama marked the 65th
anniversary of its independence.
Several youths were hurt and
scores were arrested.
The demonstration was
directed against the National
Guard officers who deposed
President Arnulfo Arias on Oct.
11 in a bloodless coup. Arias
took refuge in the U.S.
administered Canal Zone and
later flew to Washington.

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being considered, and their
decisions should be taken into
consideration when the
administration makes the final
ruling. According to Sherman,
the overturning of the facultys
decision to grant Jones tenure
was a miscarriage of democratic
participation.
If the UF was interested in
getting the censure lifted it
would necessitate getting
together with the AFT
officials, Sherman said.
He said that one condition
for the lifting of the censure
would probably be a guarantee
that this kind of activity would
not occur again.
Mel Sharpe, administrative
assistant to the president, said
0 Connells office had no
comment as to the censorship.
We just heard about it this
morning, he said.
The president hasnt yet seen
the letter from the AFT
Presidential
Reps Speak
In UF Plaza
Representatives of presidential
hopefuls, Hubert H. Humphrey,
Richard M. Nixon, and George
C. Wallace will present issues
surrounding the presidency in
the Plaza of Americans from
noon 4 p.m.
Three faculty members will
moderate audience questions
after representatives present
their candidates views on the
various issues as they see it.
The representatives hope to
inform and educate students and
the general public as to how the
man who might be the next
president feels... said Howard
Rosenblatt, director of
Operation Awareness sponsor of
the program.

FOR JONES TENURE DENIAL

informing him of their censure,
Sharpe said.
Clyde Ellis, a student member
of the AC, was appointed to the
committee which will try to get
more information on the
censorship. The committee is
composed of one student, one
administrator, and one faculty
member.
U.S. Carriers
Leave War
SAIGON (UPI) Two of the
three U.S. aircraft carriers which*
had been used in air raids against
North Vietnam may now be
withdrawn from the war zone,
informed military sources said
Sunday.
The carriers steamed out of
waters off North Vietnam last
Friday when the United States
stopped bombarding North
Vietnam and were assigned
targets in South Vietnam. But
qualified military informants
said Sunday there are not
enough objectives in South
Vietnam to justify use of all
three flattops.

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Monday, November 4, 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Were going to go over to
the AFT and talk to them on
Monday and report on
Wednesday, he said.
Jones, a psychiatry professor,

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was allegedly denied tenure
because of his political beliefs,
rather than his professional
qualifications which were
attested to by his peers.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator. Monday, November 4, 1968

Bailey: Wallace Can Be Next President

By BILL KING
Alligator Correspondent
Jimmey Bailey, chairman of
UF students for Wallace,
appeared before the students of
Jennings Hall, last Monday, in
support of George C. Wallace.
He spoke frankly about what
he considers the many virtues of
Wallace.
As many as seventeen
students listened and voiced
their opinions of Wallace.
Several hot issues were
brought up and Bailey took his
usual redundant stand.
Sitting in the lobby smoking
a 100 milimeter cigarette and
wearing a Wallace for President
button, he began the discussion
with an opening statement about
the false image the pools have
built.
'The Gallup Poll is controlled
by money interests in the East.
And the eastern businessmen
favor Nixon, Bailey began.
Through his unbiased attack
on the polls, he also mentioned
the Harris Poll.
The Harris Poll was bought
by the Humphrey people,
Bailey said.
The students freely
interrupted and challenged
Baileys statements.
Student: Are the polls
helping Wallace?
Bailey: They are helping
Wallace. George Wallace can be
elected president of theseJUnited
States as easily as Nixon or
Humphrey.
|
MIGHTY HERCULES
The nekt Mr. America?
Perhaps. The basement of the
Florida Gymnasium has become
a mecca for weightlifters and
bodybuilders.
Equipment is available from 8
a.m. to 9:45 p.m. weekdays,
Saturday until 5 p.m. and
Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
§ i> ki * tli .. u 3d

Bailey didnt duck the racial
issue.
Student: Do you seriously
believe colored people are not
suppressed?
Bailey: Some individuals are
suppressing colored persons.
Student: Can you support a
racist?
Bailey: Whos a racist?
Student: George Wallace."
Bailey: Hes not a racist."
Student: Oh, come on.
Bailey: Everyone has their
own personal pet prejudice.
Bailey made a vague challenge
of the poverty program. A
student interrupted in hope of
finding out Baileys exact stand
on the matter.
Student: Whats bad about
the poverty program.
Bailey: Whats good about
it.
Student: What kind of
attitude is that?

NSA speaks your language

And furthermore, if you are especially
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the National Security Agency is ready
to give you immediate linguistic
assignments or may even train you
in an entirely new language.
Demonstrated ability in language
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sophisticated duties. The systematic
accumulation of information,
examination of data and preparation
of special reports are important parts of
these assignments. And scientific
linguists will find nowhere else the
opportunities for practical applications
of their craft.
At NSA you will be joining an Agency
of national prominencea unique
civilian organization responsible for

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Bailey: I have nothing
against helping someone, but 1
dont want to be forced to help
someone. Two wrongs dont
make a right. Im not against
helping poverty-stricken people,
but lets do it our own way. If
they dont have the incentive to
get a good education ...
Student: They dont have
the money.
Bailey: Some people are
poor because they dont want to
work. They want to sit and
watch a color TV and get a
welfare check.
Student: You cant make
4 generalization.
y few of the students
.ung to Bailey were falling to
Baileys side. None of the
students present were
completely silent on the issues
being discussed.
Student: Under Wallace,
Alabama had a high crime rate.
Can we expect that from him as
a president?
Bailey: I know where youre
getting that from the
newspapers!
Student: Wallace has made

developing secure communications
systems to transmit and receive
vital information.
NSA offers you this opportunity to
further broaden your knowledge of
modern language or area studies, and
to use your talents in a challenging
and rewarding career while you enjoy
also the broad, liberal benefits of
Federal employment. In return, we ask
that you not only know your language,
but that you be flexible, naturally
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Thats a lot to ask.
Do you fit the picture?
Where to go ... what to do
Language applicants must take the
Professional Qualification Test (PQT)

two promises. He would keep
and restore law and order and he
would bring the government to
the people. How can he do
both?


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as a prerequisite to NSA interviews for
employment. Pick up a PQT Bulletin
at your Placement Office, the sooner
the better. It contains* brief registration
form which must be received in
Princeton, N.J. by November 22
(for the December 7 test).
College Relations Branch, National
Security Agency, Ft. George G. Meade,
Maryland 20755. Attn: M 321,
An equal opportunity employer M/F
national
security
agency

Bailey: The way we gonna
do this is by training the
individual officer in training
centers and train them to
enforce the law.



By 808 BERRETT
Alligator Features Writer
The Philosophy of the
Body is the name of a course
being offered in the spring
quarter by the UF Philosophy
Department.
Enrollment is limited to
majors and graduate students of
the Philosophy Department.
Lest you feel cheated, Dr.
James Millikan hastens to add
that it wont be a lab course
anyway.
Dr. Millikan, developer of the
course, describes it as having an
informal symposium format.
The participants will attempt to
develop a better understanding
of the increasing lack of
identification of modem man

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HALLOWEEN TALES
Sixty-seven members of the Delta Phi Epsilon sorority sponsored a
Halloween party for underprivileged children at the Northwest Day
Care Center last Thursday.
The sisters invited Vice-President of Student Affairs Lester Hale to
entertain the children with Halloween tales.
The balance of the afternoon was spent with a party, dancing,
games and, of course, trick or treat.

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New Course Offered In Philosophy

with his environment.
In a talk he gave Wednesday
night before a large audience
attending the first of the
seasons Mensa lectures, Dr.
Millikan described the
philosophical background of the
problem. A direct conflict
between philosophers ancient
and modern formed the
framework of his talk.
Socrates and Plato were rabid
advocates of the rational. All
things were evaluated on the
basis of whether they were
arisen from the power of mans
reason or were merely
reflections of the mans
environment. They valued the
power of mans reason because it

ABOUT THE BODY

gave hint independence from
outside influences. In effect.
Socrates was saying you cant
get me. You cant grip me,
because he was secure within his
mind and beyond-the reach of
others.
A man who isnt afraid to
die can never be made a slave,
said Dr. Millikan.
v
The slave-master relationship
figured prominently in Dr.
Millikans description of Hegels
philosophy. Hegel was the first
to break with the
Socratic -Platonic tradition of
rationalism, which had endured
through the Renaissance, or
Age of Reason.
Hegels break was complete.
To him the only way man could
hope to advance was by relating
to his environment. It was as if
the environment was a transit
system of advancement. If a man
was to advance he had to climb
aboard.
In Hegels theoretical
construction, at one time there
were two men. They became
involved in a struggle for
domination and one was
victorious. The loser was
prepared to accept slavery to
avoid death.
Thus the master could
become a perfect consumer, a
veritable garbage disposal of
consumer goods who had merely
to snap his fingers to get
anything he desired, whatever
the cost in effort to the slave.
But the slave, according to
Hegel, was the superior of the
two, for he was forced to relate
to the environment in order to
wrest from it the things desired
by his master. The master,
completely divorced from the
realities of the environment,
stagnated.
These are the two basic lines
of philosophical thought that
will be adapted to the question
at hand in Dr. Millikans course.
For the rationalism of
Socrates and Plato led to the
Age of Reason of the
Renaissance, which in turn grew
into our modern technological
era. Technology is the beautiful
child of rationalism, is how Dr.
Millikan put it.
Hegels theories are
immediately suggested by the
term consumer economy,
often applied to western
technical society.

Monday. Novembar 4, 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Most members of the society
are essentially consumers. Their
jobs, usually a small part of a
complex process, dont allow
them to make a logical
connection between their effort
and their consumption.
The estrangement of
modern man from his
environment and other men is

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presumably the result.
The problem before The
Philosophy of the Body
symposium course is to develop
an understanding of this
estrangement and of possible
ways to alliviate it.
Dr. Millikan will be as
interested in the results of the
course as any of his students.

Page 15



. Th* Florida Alligator. Monday. Nowmbar 4. 1968 '* ,r

Page 16

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. f / PETE KNOCKE

It was a weekend of
alumni, bands, and girts, girts,
girls, girls.
Clockwise beginning at top
left, alumni and fans gather in
Florida Field for the football
game with Auburn.
The Florida A & M
marching band performs
before a packed house at
Friday night's Gator Growl.
The band received a standing
ovation from the audience.
Charlie McSwam sits in the
hot seat at Interhall Council's
Americana '6B, a feature
complete with show girls.
McSwain was taken out of
the audience to be pampered
by six of the beauties.
In keeping with the theme
"Gators Reign in '6B
Campaign," this UF coed
urges people along the parade
route to vote Tuesday.
And the last girl, well,
maybe she's taking aim on a
favorite beaux, or maybe on
an Auburn Tiger, or well
maybe on you.
In all it was a wild
weekend... a homecoming
weekend.

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. * NICK ARROYO

Gator
Homecoming

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NICK ARROYO



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NICK ARROYO
5>
But after the comic skits, the
flare of Growl fireworks, the
hushed excitement of the
Homecoming Sweetheart
announcement, after the first
half of the game, tension built
As the ill-fated homecoming
game drew to a dose, anxiety,
pain, discouragement replaced
the grins and smiles of Gators on
the field and in the stands.
The Gators lost.

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Gators 13
-
-
Auburn 24
(t ;lii:

Monday, Nowmbor 4, 1968, Tho Floridi AMgator,

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NICK ARROYO

Page 17



Page 18

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, November 4, 1968

Homecoming Defeat; A Tough One
nngMMf

The Truth Hurts j
By MARC DUNN 0
Alligator Sports Editor V

What is there to write about a 24-13
homecoming defeat?
We played our hearts out.
In the beginning, it looked like the Year of the
Gator all over again.
A record 63,122 homecoming fans cheered
frantically as the team took a 10-0 first quarter lead.
Auburn, not to be undone so early in the game,
gathered together and started striking back. When
they had finished UF had lost 24-13 and Auburn
had its first win at Florida Field since 1960.
Coach Graves has been criticized by the state
press for his first quarter move when he put the
second unit in.
Think about it for a minute
Imagine yourself as an Auburn team member.
You are favored to win and you find yourself in
Florida Field losing by 10 points in the first quarter,
the crowd is yelling, its UFs homecoming and the
Gators have just put their second string in.
How much more could you demoralize a team?
Unfortuanately it didnt work out that way.
Auburn fought back until they won.
Coach Graves made what should have been a
strategic psychological move. He says he would do
the same thing if he had to do it over again.
So would I.
On the statistics side the Gators had one of their
best afternoons, in fact except for the score it was
their best effort to date.
Larry Rentz averaged 40 yards per punt
TOM KENNEDY
YARBROUGH'S TD
. . Jim grabs a pass from Eckdahl in first quarter
for UF's lone TD.

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The Florida Field pressbox
offers a view of the game you
cant get anywhere else in the
stadium. From there, you can
look over an entire city, as well
as a football field.
Saturday, there was a lot to
see from the pressbox. Piece by
piece, it meant nothing, but
when taken as a whole, a
football game became more than
just a few hours of work. It is a
total experience.
There are only a few minutes
left in the game. Jim Yarbrough,
who has had his finest afternoon
ever, sits on the Florida bench,
not looking at the game. Along

the sidelines is the forgotten
man. Harold Peacock, who
bounces a football on the field.
Usually, it rebounds into his
hands, but this time it catapults
onto the field.
The defense comes in.
Auburn has been stopped with
just over two minutes to go. Jim
raises himself off the bench in
preparation to go out onto the
field. Peacock uses the change in

Saturday, his average before that had been 35
yards. He also completed 12 of 23 passes for 123
yards. Jackie Eckdahl was on his way to a great
afternoon before lightning struck and Eckdahl was
injured with a sprained arch and out for the second
half.
Jim Yarbrough, who got the lone TD of the
afternoon, went on to catch six passes for 55 yards.
Without Larry Smith it was plain that the Gators
lacked a potent running game.
Auburn came to town with the leading rushing
defense in the nation. Even though Smith saw very
limited action the Gators gained 166 yards on the
ground, below their average before the game, but
100 yards more than Auburns average yield before
the game.
There isnt any doubt as to why we lost.
It wasnt costly mistakes, injuries during the
game (although Smiths presence throughout the
game might have made a difference) or lack of
determination.
We got beat by a better team.
That hurts but it is the truth.
What even hurts more is that we play Georgia
next week, Kentucky the week after that and finally
Miami during Thanksgiving.
Things arent going to get any easier.
The Georgia game has become one of our biggest
rivalries and it is going to take another spirited team
like we had this week to beat them.

NICK AKROYO
DAMN GOOD DEFENSE
. .UF's tough defense contained Auburn's running game Saturday.

Viewing Sports
NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor

personnel to recover the footbail
out on the field.
Now. Steve Tanncn sits on
the sidelines. With him is a
coach, who does all the talking.
Tanncn's head hangs at knee
level, recovering his breath.
The rest of the defense
crowds the sidelines, where
Harold had bounced a ball a few
minutes earlier. The team stares
at Larry Rentz, scrambling for

Km
A
BRIGHT MOMENT N,CK ARROYO
.. Paul Maliska is hit by Auburn defender as he goes up for a pass
reception.

Held position from within their
own territory.
And out on the massive ramp
leading from the east stands, a
trickle of expediency-minded
football fans have decided the
game cannot be won, and wish
to beat the crowd to their autos.
On the field, Tom Christian
carries the ball across half the
field. The crowd on the ramp
hears the cheering, and

TOM KENNEDY
,_v
QB GOES DOWN
UF's Ghesquire gets to Auburn's Carter, to
throw him for a loss.

momentarily stops to see what
has happened.
Then, there is a fumble, and
the defensive unit starts for the
field in the closing seconds. The
stands, now only three-quarters
filled, clap their approval for the
team.
Perhaps a minute later, the
game has ended, and the visiting
Auburn band strikes up their
teams victory song. The crowd
on the ramp has long been a
torrent.
A pall of smoke has hung
across the city, and it has not
changed. The campus has not
changed. The football players
walking off the field have not
changed. Century tower as
viewed from the pressbox has
not changed.



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TOM KENNEDY

PIGSKIN PIX
In the top photo Auburn
quarterback Loran Carter (18)
pitches the bass out to Mike
Durrier, the tailback. The Gator
busted through to hold Currier
for no gain.
In the bottom photo Steve
Tannen, (22), UF comerback,
bas blocked the Auburn punt.
Tannen also blocked a field goal.
The afternoon was one of
Tannens best, but not
score wise.
Alumni Plan
Georgia Bus
UFs Alachua County Alumni
Club will sponsor a charter bus
trip to Jacksonville Nov. 9 for
the UF-Georgia football game.
The bus will depart from the
Jfropus parking lot west of the
entury Tower and University
Auditorium at 9:30 ajn. It will
ar rive in Jacksonville in time for
Passengers to attend the
P r e-game barbecue at the
coliseum adjacent to the Gator
Bowl.
Round trip cost will be $5
Per person, including tax and
refreshments aboard the bus.
arne tickets must be purchased
separately.
Checks payable to Alachua
ounty Alumni Club may be
p. nt to Betsy Burwell, 212 SE
rrst St. Acknowlegements will
e mailed or telephoned to
purchasers.
N.o^ ea( Br ne for reservations is

Auburn Leads SEC,
Vo/s, Dogs, Tide Waiting

ATLANTA The Auburn
Tigers have taken over
undisputed possession of first
place in the Southeastern
Conference but theyre going to
have a tough time staying there.
The Tigers moved into the
No. 1 spot in the SEC Saturday
by beating faltering Florida
2413 on the three-touchdown
passing of senior quarterback
Loran Carter.
But, the Tigers next three
games are with sth-ranked
Tennessee, which routed UCLA
42-18; 7th-ranked Georgia,
which staged a strong comeback
to tie 13th-ranked Houston
10-10; and 18th-ranked
Alabama, which beat Mississippi
State 2013.

Soccer Club Boots FPC, 5-1

The UF Soccer Club kept its undefeated season intact Saturday,
defeating Florida Presbyterian College 5-1.
Max Ventura scored the first UF point with only one minute gone
in the game, after which Florida Presbyterian came back to tie it up
with a score by Britt Dean.
The UFSC then proceeded to add three more points within a
period of five minutes, starting with Ventura scoring on a nalty ck
S*h 36 minutes gone in the first half. Fred Knalh pushed another
into the goal two minutes later, and Hector Camberos kicked m still
another two minutes after that.
The lining point was kicked in by UFs Everardo Gonzales with
16 minutes gone in the second half.
The UFSC substituted freely thoughout much of the game, even
going to the extent of moving all five starting halfbacks and fullbacks
up to occupy the front line for the last five minutes of the game.

UF.AUBURN LOCKER ROOMS

UF Sad And Silent;
Auburns Sweetest Win

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Special Writer
It was very depressing,
standing there in the middle of
abject failure. It was the locker
of UF after Aubum finally
closed the last chapter of the
Year of the Gator,24-13.
Tight end Jim Yarbrough sat
in a lonely comer of the locker
room, head in hands, sobbing
sadly. Quarterback Harold
Peacock came by and gave an
unsuspecting locker door a stiff
forearm. Guard Mac Steen stared
through moistened eyes at his
shoelaces.
Center Kim Helton and tight

BB '''':..-''Wk
TOM KENNEDY
HURSTON STOPPED
...Healey reaches out to stop Aubum runner as he tries to sweep.

Florida, the pre-season
favorite to win the league crown,
jumped off to a 100 lead over
Auburn, even with SEC rushing
leader Larry Smith out with an
injury. But Carter, last years
SEC total offense leader, threw a
touchdown pass in each of the
last three periods and, to quote
Auburn coach Shug Jordan, It
took a tremendous effort to spot
Florida 10 points and come back
arid win.
As it now stands in the SEC,
Auburn leads with a 3-0-0 mark,
Georgia is second at 3-0-1 and
Tennessee and Mississippi are in
a percentage tie for third.
Mississippi moved back into
the picture Saturday night by
edging 12th-ranked Louisiana

Monday. November 4. 1968. Tha Florida Alligator.

end George Dean didnt say
anything either-they just looked
straight ahead, through everyone
and everything.
Thats the way it was in UFs
room of defeat.
One player broke the silence,
but for a moment.
Whats happening? said
split end Don Gramling. We
had the momentum going for us.
We had the points. We had the
fans. We played a great game.
And lost.
But as hard put for words the
Gators were, Auburn was the
opposite. Its coach, Shug
Jordan, was the most prolific.

State 27-24 at Baton Rouge.
Sophomore quarterback
Archie Manning, hurt the
previous week when the Rebels
lost to Houston connected on 24
of 40 passes for 345 yards and
two touchdowns, the second
with only 55 seconds left in the
game, and scored on a run
himself.
Vanderbilt beat Tulane 217
in a game that counts in the SEC
standings; Kentucky beat West
Virginia 3516; Virginia Tech
surprised Florida State 40-22;
Duke upset Georgia Tech 4630
in another big surprise; Miami
crushed Pitt 480; Memphis
State tightened its Missouri
Valley lead by beating Tulsa
32-6 and Louisiana Tech upset
Southern Miss 2720.
Senior Bubba Wyche and
sophomore Bobby Scott shot
down UCLA Saturday by setting
four Tennessee passing records
and tying a fifth. The two
quarterbacks, whom the Vols
recruited in Georgia, combined
to complete 24 of 40 passes for
319 yards.
Jim McCulloughs 38-yard
field goal with 12 seconds left to
play gave Georgia the tie that
kept the Bulldogs unbeaten in
6B. Houston's Paul Gipson
gained 230 yards rushing and the
Cougars rolled up 532 yards
for naught.

Youve got to believe this
was one of the sweetest victories
Ive ever had in 18 years of
coaching, said Jordan. We
were battling Homecoming
enthusiasm and were away from
home, especially in Gainesville.
Jordan could readily cite
some of his players as
outstanding, but he was hard
pressed to find anybody from
UF.
Im sure somebody on
Florida did a fine job, said
Jordan. But I cant remember
any names right off hand. But
Florida did a better job of
containing our linebackers than
Miami did last week.
But it was a bit different in
naming Tiger stars.
Carter (Loran) did a fine job
throwing, Christians touchdown
catches were tremendous and
Connie Fredericks pass receiving
was a great surprise.
Our offense played a great
game considering we spotted
them 10 points in the first
quarter. This is the first time in
17 games when we havent
fumbled a ball of offense.
But Auburns offense
particularly pleased Jordan,
especially that of Frederick.
Frederick! called a play that
resulted in a game-clinching
touchdown pass in the fourth
quarter.
Frederick came to me and
said Floridas safety man was
edging up on him close and he
thought he could beat him, said
Jordan. So we let him call the
play.
Frederick caught the 41-yard
scoring toss from Carter to
insure the Tigers victory for
keeps.
Jordan closed out his
make-do press conference with
his biggest statement of the day.
Wallace for President, and
you can quote me on that.
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NICK ARROYO
SECOND EFFORT
...Coleman (85) makes a valiant
. stab at Carter's pass.

Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 4, 1968

| DOUBLE-DECK HAMBURGH
WERE NOT IN IPLAYfRjrThrWEEKI
so wt JUST -TUESDAY SPECIALi
X-RAYED THE CAR lULM/MI JrLvIML
ioi2 south main Jim Yarbrough 2035 n.w. \ 3th street
OPEN m< - I~i Till Umiil
TIL9P.NI. Ph. 378-2311 TELEPHONE 378-2304
;v.*tf.vAv.vA-.v.vrtv.v.w^w.w^K*waw;w>occcc
Kmjy Announcing
Moiogrcms* |{j| Hi Cota-flavored
Robbie Rebol Dave Ghesquire
The soft brogue that says comfort in any mans .. # r ,-...,
language. Only Bass makers of the famed Bass This Week S Player of the Week award goes to three
:STCtr M ;:K CUSP? Gators for their fine play in an other-wise dismal day
ounc.s lighter than any oth.r brogue. Long wt, tip, here in "Gatorland" for the University of Florida
seamless toe and tassel styles in Black and Wine 1 mam m
Mira Corfam* and Black, Golden and Aawthorn fOOtball team. 9 _
piatla "suitable 3 i or^engravkig^cortam''poromeric If there were any bright spots this weekend, they I It QfIHK Ov
man-made upper material. were supplied by tight end Jim Yarbrough, defensive
end Dave Ghesquire, and defensive guard Robbie CrtltllSf ItOW
tL ) Auburn some trouble, with the former rushing Carter IHCKM& VCMT
viciously on many occasions, and the latter closing the m
door on numerous runs around his end. In addition, I*OQUICB* DBBBIBe
Ghesquire intercepted an Auburn pass at the Florida fwwppww
46, and it was Rebol who caused the bad pass.
As for Yarbrough fans were happy to see him
being used more than he has been, and Jim returned
the thanks by showing that he is the best receiver on
the squad, and has been for some time. The giant end
caught six passes good for 55 yards and one TD.
A v^^B^BK
Tflr.THitcheHs for players
x who knock each other over
\ and knock cactl other out in IgBHPLj v f J
H, V | the process, now tastes like cola.
| Cola-flavored Gator ade 1
/ 11 *1 >| || $ is something like miniature
In Ihe mall golf, horseshoe pitching, or
exactly like the Gatorade
§ athletes drink. But it tastes like
- Jf * (pnci AC § the cola peopledrink. Available w< 4
\\ // $ wherever soft drinks are sold. -? r Mt 1 --
1