Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
October 31st Syndrome: The Spooks

LESTER HALE
.. holds the axe
ROBERT MAUTZ
. . found secret passage
to tower
LA VON GENTRY
. bothered by drafts
GARY GOODRICH
. . rattles SG chains
3
4
ROBERTCADE
. . cauldron boiled over

STEVE HULL
. .conjured up Pacemaker

Kenown rumpkin ouccumbs

(API) The Great Pumpkin is
dead.
Pumpkin, long known as a
Spirit of Benevolence to the
young at Halloween, expired
Wednesday at 9:27\p.m. in the
7 Grand Canyon Gourd Hospital.
He had been taken there after he
collapsed at work.
Cause of death was listed as
heart failure, hardening of the
arteries, and mumps.
Pumpkin had been in his
workshop when he collapsed. At
the time he was packing his
Chevy pick-up truck, with

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 29 University of Florida, Gainesville Halloween

Pumpkin Pro-Gator

By RONNIE BLOOM
And
JEFF WEIL
Alligator Special Interest Writers
The Great Pumpkin, on his death bed, predicted
Wednesday that the battered Florida Gators will
heal their wounds, rise from their Graves, and make
pussycats out of the Auburn Tigers, 2 p.m.,
Saturday on Florida Field.
I Many reasons were given for the Great pumpkin's
overwhelming confidence in this Gator victory.
The fight back spirit of the UF student body
will build up at the Pep Rally this afternoon and
explode at 2 p.m. Saturday, with such a force,* said
the Great Pumpkin, that the Tigers will be afraid
to even play on the same field with the Gators.
The Gators wont have time to trick-or-treat
this Halloween because of intensive game
preparations, said the Great Pumpkin. But he
noted, the Gators will present their overflowing
bag of tricks to the Tigers Saturday afternoon, and
collect their treats Saturday Night.
Gator fullback Larry Super-gator Smith,
slowed by injuries from last weeks game, will be
riding at top speed on the back of Albert Alligator,
Pumpkin said. Albert said he is tired of being
caged-up and would love nothing better than a
Tiger-meat sandwich for lunch Saturday.
Before his departure, the Great Pumpkin left a
HARVEY ALPER
. . sinister censor?
' f if**'

12-lapdog drive, with goodies to
be delivered to believing children
who waited for him to rise from
sincere pumpkin patches.
The noted childrens
benefactors death was greeted
by much sadness around the
world.
Ill never smile again,
sobbed seven-year-old Linus,
who alternated his sobs with
sneezes. He had been waiting in
a sincere-looking, but cold
pumpkin patch since the fall of
1962.
lm shocked, Im really upset

America's Number 1 College Daily

LARRY JORDAN
. .Black magic
I

iff 1 m
By ByliC
liC ByliC
id
m I
THE GREAT ONE
. .a tragic loss
victory celebration recipe for all the happy Gator
fans. Mix 4 parts Gatorade with a side order of
vodka and stump syrup. Then you too will be a
high-flying Gator fan.
p
CLYDE ELLIS
... boots Alper

that the ol* figment of our
imagination finally kicked the
bucket, said seven-year-old
Lucy, who immediately left to
track down a Beethoven-loving j
piano player. I
it grieves us greatly that this /
fine American hey, Hubert, he f
IS American, isnt he? that this V
fine American has departed from
our midst. Such upstanding
greatness, such giving, such
dedication to his friends shall
not be soon forgotten, said
President Lyndon Johnson, who
ordered flags to be flown at
half-mast until after the funeral.

STEPHEN C. OCONNELL
...the head spook
CLAUDE KIRK
.. known to haunt campus
RAY GRAVES
. .. playful spirit
BETTY COSBY
... ghosts coeds
CALLAHAN
phantom politico



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator,.Thursday, October 31,1968

Apportionment At Issue

Editors Note: This is the second in a series of
articles examining the UF Faculty Senate as it is
now and as it may change.
By RICHARD THOMPSON
Alligator Staff Writer
A critical element of the task force on
Governance of the University proposal for
restructuring he faculty senate is the
apportionment formula it suggests.
It is on this issue that the nine members of the
task force split their recommendations.
The committee has three administrators, three
faculty members and three students in it. Provost
E.T. York, IFAS; Dean Franklin Doty, University
College and Dean Edmund Ackell, Dentistry are the
administrators in the committee.
The Faculty members are chairman Ruth
McQuown, political science; Irving Goffman
business administration and Ernest Jones, law.
Students in the task force are SG President Clyde
Taylor; Norma Munn, 4AS; and Jeanne Johnson, SG
cabinet. All nine members unanimously agreed to
all of the proposals except the apportionment
formula to which the three administrators object.
The apportionment formula has two provisions:
FTE student enrollment and FTE faculty. FTE
means Fulltime Teaching Equivalents.

|NBl\ jj 1U Plvii W K wLf% Jp fl
Jh H a|HI MBBBi MBBM 9HHL \w
JH '' wiu pul
BRIAN GOODHEIM
GATOR CHEERLEADERS

Some people seem to think that the Gators are
up in the air over their chances against Auburn
Saturday.
Far from it.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official Student newspaper of the University of Florida
P w liar Fnr TltA jAiiii and Is published five Haas woakly except during June, July and Augvat when It U published
in* wutwla semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rails
_ . Union Bffidtag, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32801. The Alligator la entered
Today as secs* dans matter at the United Stains Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, *2BOI.
Subscription rate it S 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
m. ai e The Florida Alllgaior reserves the right to regulate the typagrsphtcsl tone at nil adver-
M Ww tlsements snd to revtee or turn sway copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Altlpter wUI ast consider adjustments of payment lor say advertiseaaeat
involving typographical anon or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. Urn Florida Alligator will
Tflt Dill field not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
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IN ACTION PROPOSAL

It is a formula used by the Board of Regents to
determine budget allocations and its net effect is to
try to balance all learning-situation variables as
much as possible in order to bring out the working
load of a college.
The FTE fulltime faculty provision means, in
effect, one-man, one-vote and is known by that
name. It guarantees each college has at least one
member in the legislative body.
The three administrators say this is the only truly
representational formula to use.
The three faculty and three students say the
one-man, one-vote provision is good, but not
good enough because it permits colleges with a
disproportionate ratio of faculty to students to have
a correspondingly disproportionate representation.
IFAS, opponents quickly point out, has five per
cent of the student enrollment but 25 per cent of
the senate membership.
They propose the second apportionment
provision, FTE student enrollment to balance the
first. This, they say, permits the largest
student-enrollment colleges (university college and
arts and sciences) to have the largest membership
since they have the largest number of students and
corresponding work load.
(SEE 'APPORTIONMENT' PAGE 7)

If UF cheerleaders are any indication of the
Homecoming spirit on campus, the Gators are off to
a flying start.

STOPfT
DotfT MISS
OUR TURK m
BOOK ft RECORD
-SALE Ur
November 6 7*B vlj 3 \
C**ni V y
and DookstorefiV/ /I I
located in the HUB yjy
*Ks
y. x-/:
After another year of striving for
a more perfect Volkswagen,
we bring you the only visible results.
Four nice new shades.
Os course, some people wont be ter terribly
ribly terribly impressed.
The way they see it, we let year after
year go by without ever really trying to im improve
prove improve our appearance.
Never a bug with dramatic new tail fins.
Never a bug with a revolutionary new
grille.
Well, making sensational outside
changes just isnt like us. Right frQm the
start we've believed in unsensational in inside
side inside changes.
Take this year's bug. Nice though all its
13 improvements are, there's not a one
you can exactly call the stuff of high drama.
Certainly not the new night-and-day
inside mirror.
Or the better kind of weather stripping
between the engine cover and the body.
Or the new electric rear window de defogger.
fogger. defogger.
Or even the new ignition lock that com combines
bines combines with the steering wheel lock.
Over the years, the result of our striving
has mostly been li*le things. 2218 little
things to be exact.
But it's the little things that make for
MILLER-BROWN
4<222 N.W. 13U1 St. \TU
376-4552 authorized
tEAICK



Proposed Constitution Accents Flexibility

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a three-part
analysis of Floridas proposed
constitution which will be voted
oft Nov. 5. The author, a UF law
student, was a legislative aide in
1967 to the Senate Constitution
Revision Committee and an aide
to Rep. Sandy DAlemberte
(D-Dade) during the special
revision session last summer.)
By BILL SADOWSKI
Alligator Special Writer
Article I (Declaration of
Rights) of the proposed
constitution contains a
statement of the basic rights of
citizens and is essentially the
same as the provision in the

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 29 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, October 31, 1968

AS SENATE PRESIDENT
Goodrich Moves Out,
Pro-Tem Takes Over

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Tuesday night for the first
time in the history of the
Student Senate, an active
president pro tern was elected.
Jack Vaughn was chosen to
serve as the active president pro
tem when Gary Goodrich,
Student Body vice-president,
leaves to attend to his official
duties apart from the Senate.
Goodrich says he hopes to
return to the executive branch
and allow the senate to operate
separately.
The efficiency of the senate
should be increased greatly with
this move,' Senate majority
leader Charles Harris said.
Gary (Goodrich) will be able
to help other people with their
problems and will be able to
fulfill his elected postion,
instead of worrying about
administrative problems.
Vaughn has served on the
senate for nearly three years.
For nine months he served as
Secretary of Legislative Affairs
and was selected as last years
outstanding cabinet member.
Other appointments
announced Tuesday include
Betty Jo Padron, secretary;
Marshall Costitino,
Parliamentarian; Micki McCartin,
chaplain; Karen Kinnen,
Rally
For The
Gators
At 4:15
On The
Drill Field

Alligator^

current constitution. It is
analagous to the Bill of Rights of
the United States Constitution
and treats areas such as the
freedoms of speech, press,
assembly, and religion and the
right to bear arms.
The only change of note in
the proposed constitution is the
addition of a provision relating
t o the unreasonable
interception of private
communications by any means
- referring to wiretapping,
electronic eavesdropping, etc. A

The
Florida Alligator

representative to course and
teacher evaluation; and Nancy
Isenberg, representative to
Accent.
In the way of legislative
housecleaning, several bills were
adopted, including the
controversial Student Body
Budget Act which alloted funds
only for the first term budget
requests.
The charter of the Alpha
Delta chapter of Sigma Alpha
Eta, a freshman mens scholastic
honorary, was approved along
with a special request for funds
for campus improvements.
Included in campus

UF Spirit Rises,
Funds Still Low

In an effort to show the Gators UF students are behind them, the
spirit committee has made plans for a Homecoming pep rally
Thursday at 4:15 on the Gator practice field.
This is the best way to let the Gators know were 100 per cent
behind them, said assistant Spirit Chairman Ronnie Bloom.
Students will be led to the lower drill field by the Gator Band, UF
cheerleaders and UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
Another type of spirit is being sold in the form of 1,000
Homecoming 6B buttons sold at todays pep rally and Fridays
parade by members of the Arnold Air Society.
The buttons, decorated with the words Homecoming 6B and a
fighting Gator, are on sale at 25 cents each.
Remaining buttons will be sold at Saturdays football game.
The Spirit Committee is disappointed at the apparent lack of spirit
among organizations in response to their request for S6OO.
The money is used for shakers to be given away at the Auburn and
Georgia games. Only $415 has been collected at this point.
The latest donation date is Friday, said Spirit Chairman Jeff Weil. I
wish all the fraternities and sororities would follow the initiative of
Tau Epsilon Phi with their SIOO donation, Weil said.
Roddy Grubbs, head cheerleader, said the spirit shakers were very
effective in boosting spirit at the Gators biggest victory against FSU.
I think the shakers are great morale boosters for the team, said
Grubbs.
Without the necessary $lB5, the shakers cannot be distributed to
the students at the game.
Tuesday the Reitz Union Barber Shop donated $25 to the spirit
shaker fund and $l4O was added by Tolbert Area Council.

ANALYSIS

warrant would be required for
such action.
The rule excluding evidence
gained by an unreasonable
search and seizure from courts is
raised to the level of a
constitutional provision.
Article II (General Provisions)
includes such things as a
description of the state
boundaries, seat of government
and state flag. The only new
provision specifically declares it
is the policy of the state to
conserve and protect natural

improvements was a $450
request for water fountains.
Before the close of the
meeting a special resolution was
passed praising the work of
Goodrich during the time he led
the Senate.
I thank for this resolution
even though it is the second time
I heard it, Goodrich said. I
was going to quit at an earlier
time and got the first reading.
Im sure the author of the
resolution still regrets his
gesture.
Senator Goodrich? yes,
I, regret it, Bill Sadowski,
author of the resolution side.

resources and scenic beauty.
Article 111 (Legislature) is
perhaps the longest of the entire
constitution. It contains several
changes from the 1885
Constitution. The new
constitution would provide for
annual sessions of the legislature.
Currently, regular sessions are
held every two years.
Advocates of annual sessions
argue that the innumerable
special sessions which have been
called in recent years
demonstrate the insufficiency of
the present constitutional
requirements. For example, in
1967 Floridas citizen-legislators
were in session for some six
months and during 1967-68 they

II ML
~
Wk I
.yb - W*W* Mlpispi
BRIAN GO^HEIM
"I SAID 'GIMME AN ORANGE'
... that's a tangerine."
FOR HOMECOMING
Curfew Cancelled

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alliaator Staff Writer
Curfew suspension and
extension of open house hours
for Halloween and Homeconrng
were approved Wednesday.
Curfew for Thursday has
been extended to midnight, but
girls wishing to work on
Homecoming decorations may
ask for an extension from their
area counselers.
Curfew for Friday and
Saturday has been completly
lifted.

Thursday, October 31,1968.TK* Florida Alligator,

were in session for over eight
months.
One of the most important
changes in the proposed
legislative article is the inclusion
of a fail- safe method for
apportionment. Briefly, the new
constitution would require the
Legislature to reapportion itself
after each decennial census.
If it fails to do so during the
regular session, the Governor is
required to call a special session
for the sole purpose of
reapportionment. Upon the
adoption of an apportionment
by the Legislature, the
Attorney-General is directed to
seek the review of the state
(SEE 'll' PAGE 4)

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Open house hours have been
extended to midnight Thursday,
and to 2 a.m. on Friday and
Saturday.
I think that the students in
accepting these additional
freedoms are very much aware
of the concurrent responsibility.
Both the AWS and Interhall are
aware of this increased trust and
are confident that the students
will accept it as responsible
members of the university
community, Mike McNemey,
president of Interhall Council,
said.

Page 3



Page 4

l The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 31,1968

1881 Document Would Serve As Statute

page
Supreme Court.
If the Court rejects the
apportionment plan, the
Legislature is given one more
chance to produce a proper
apportionment. If the plan is
rejected by the Court a second
time, the Supreme Court is
required to apportion the state.
The apportionment provision in
the 1885 Constitution has been
declared unconstitutional by the
United States Supreme Court.
The final substantial change
made by the proposed
constitution in this section is to
set a limit on the number of
legislative seats. The Senate
would be reduced to not less
than 30 nor more than 40 seats
(there are ncfw 48) and the
House to not less than 80 nor
more than 120 (presently 119).
The present Constitution sets
a maximum of 32 Senators and
68 Representatives. However,
the existing provision is part of
the apportionment article which
has been declared unconstitu unconstitutional.
tional. unconstitutional.
Other additions include
provision for a legislative auditor
a kind of legislative
ombudsman and a
requirement that the Legislature
enact a code of ethics for all
state employees and non-judicial
officers.
Article IV (Executive) is
noteworthy because it sets a
maximum of 25 on the number
of executive departments in
state government. Today there
are over 145 state agencies.
The office of Lieutenant
Governor is also created. He
would succeed to the office of
Governor if there were a
vacancy. Further succession is to
be prescribed by law. The
cabinet is also formally
recognized. The 1885
Constitution does not
specifically refer to a cabinet.
The present Article V
(Judiciary) would be carried

FREE BEER FREE BEER
IF YOU ARE 21 YRS. OLD, ALL THE BEER YOU
CAN DRINK, OR BRING YOUR OWN BOTTLE
FREE SOFT DRINKS FOR ALL
big DANCE CONTEST and DOOR PRIZES
/Music Provided By
LEWIS CLARK & THE CYKLES
from 9p.m. till 2a.m. ''
You must bo at Least 18 yrs. old.
THE WHITE RABBIT

A1 ligator

i analysis!
. i

over from the present
constitution. The existing
Article V was thoroughly revised
in 1956.
Article VI (Suffrage and
Elections) retains the existing
21-year-old voting age and will
be subject to a separate vote.
Article VIII (Local
Government) is subject to a
separate vote on the ballot
because it contains an expanded
home rule provision, which
% many interests oppose because it
reduces the power of the
Legislature over local
governments.
Counties seeking home rule
under the current constitution
must get individual
constitutional amendments
passed. This article also provides
for a procedure whereby the
governments of a county and
any number of its municipalities
may be consolidated.
The phrase as provided by
law appears throughout the
proposed constitution,
particularly in the Local

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Government article. The authors
contend that the phrase would
eliminate the necessity of
constantly amending the
constitution and would afford
considerably more flexibility in
the day-to-day administration of
government.
Article IX (Education) is
substantially the same as the
present article. The principal
change would permit the
consolidation of school districts.
In this way, if two or more
contiguous counties should
decide to combine their school
districts they may do so subject
to a referendum in each county
affected. Such action would
require a constitutional
amendment under the 1885
Constitution.
Article X, entitled
Miscellaneous, is a catch-all
for those provisions which do
not fit elsewhere in the
constitution. It includes rules
governing construction of the
document.
Under this article the state
militia is expanded to include all
able-bodied inhabitants
(presumably, this includes
females). The 1885 Constitution
restricts the state militia to
males.
Eminent domain and lottery
prohibitions are also included in
Article X. A new provision
establishes a state policv of

paramount public interest in
state-owned submerged lands.
The last Article XII, is the
Schedule. It functions to provide
for an orderly transfer from the
old constitution to the new.
According to the Schedule, on
adoption of the proposed
constitution, the 1885
Constitution becomes statute,
except those sections conflicting
with the new document.
The Legislature is also
authorized to delete sections of
this article as they become
obsolete -a procedure which
requires a constitutional

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amendment under the oresent
constitution.
6,789 Rtkhnh
The normal capacity of the
81 on-campus student residential
brick buildings at UF was 6,789
persons in the fall of 1967.

TIGER MEET
ONCE A
WEEK



SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSttCTEP HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE S 2" m* frt nme.
SBHBWSWfiBIW Sausage 'iff 59* Picnics lb 39*
££££ JgfSJ. ; Mp Butt 49-
PotoOSt__ 59* Beef oHHam 3 iff $1 59
Imperiai HRoasT"* 89* S 59* fWUK# % Rib 59*
<*>, fi3Kr:~ u. 59* Hocks p.39*
P.?. e T Roast p. 99* ss ny ,l ~ <=-_. . r* t*** cr^**
Beef Short Rik* Atu tiS?£2!!. - 55 sliced Bologna 25* 45* 59* Sauerkraut J£ 33*
Deer inort Ribs p. 49* Hostess Hams . | 6"; *S ,n
OU Milwaukee . 9*. _j__ *+* 1
l§fegiMP| MmiDcmrssfj
ffl s VOTING 130071-1 JPsjL JPsjLfc
fc* JPsjLfc ln us m# ry shopping day -and we never forget it! r
f// If: ! Freedom of choice is the very heart of the supermarket business _
f/ f' hf If And it starts with your freedom to choose where you shop OOM?9S J^I'OCwM CC dRMMP
// / II So, we work hard to make our stores the most inviting and most pleasant places to shop. Jlllcy fwnhltt
(/ /^r 1 : I And, we price our items competitively Some people have the idea that it costs them a few I aaeepaesaat beg es 4Ad
If \ A fflmt i! i pennies more each week to en t oy the many happy differences at Publix. Not sol Comparison tWilv* 9w
\\ /Vw \ ; shoppers tell us that their total food purchases, for equal quality, averaged over a period of Mall* lIMMt Baking
hme, cost no more at Publix. Ptfl#OMS |f| 4Qf
Yes, freedom of choice is the name of the game at Publix Our continuing growth tells us we've FV V?T* s-- IV hog UT
been playing the game well. Clilf Firm MclntO*b
Royal Crown wTjCjtatoes 10*
I 60& On. Hw Dapodl |p prices effective TomatOCS b# 2Sn # 33*
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED LIMIT 4 K # |MIDIIV*I THURS -. FRI., SAT.
I; rUDUA 001 30 31; nov. l seafood tremU
nMABKiTi tM 1968 lertied Trees, leery Harfde J
s=- f^seSw
niHtl !tri ggs *- 39 Salami*"'***!££ 49* 1 mHlm}
SBhblSEaSJoSSSOH^ ar 9 anne '<* 45* Delicioui Kitchen-Fresh P U [ 16-OX. TUMBLER
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Page 6

I, Thw Florida Alligator, Thursday, Octobar 31,1968

2 Americans
Awarded
Nobel Prizes
STOCKHOLM (UP!) The
coveted Nobel prizes in physics
and chemistry were awarded to
Americans Wednesday. Each
award is worth $70,000.
The physics laureate, Prof.
Luis W.* Alvarez of the
University of California, was
honored for atomic research on
the smallest particles in nature.
The 57-year-old scientist helped
develop radar and the atomic
bomb.
Thw winner of the chemistry
prize, Norwegian-born Prof. Lars
Onsager, 65, of Yale University,
was cited for discovering the
fourth law of thermo thermodynamics.
dynamics. thermodynamics. Onsagers law
concerns chemical alterations
which resulted from changes in
pressure or temperature.
Youre kidding! Alvarez, a
native of San Francisco, said
when told he had won the
physics prize.
He is the leader in the
field, Prof. Erik Rudberg of the
Royal Swedish Academy of
Science and of Alvarez. The
Academy selects the winners of
the Nobel prizes in medicine,
physics and chemistry. Three
Americans shared the 1968
medicine award, announced
earlier this month.
Alvarez and his research
group discovered in 1960 a new
elementary particle with a
lifetime of a billionth of second.
This was made possible through
the big cyclotron at Berkeley.

Peace Talks End Abruptly

PARIS (UPI) The last
regular Vietnam talks session
before the U.S. presidential
election ended abruptly
Wednesday. North Vietnams
chief delegate emerged with a
clenched fist and vowed no
progress toward peace until
America unconditionally ends its
bombing of his country.
U.S. Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman walked out of the
shortest of all the 28 sessions
and said each side had made a
brief statement.

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HHH Emulates
Truman Tradition

NEW YORK (UPI) Hubert
H. Humphrey, sensing possible
victory in pivotal New York
state, carried his presidential
campaign into the heart of the
citys foment district Wednesday,
following the tradition of Harry
Truman and John F. Kennedy.
For the sixth time in his
presidential campaign,
Humphrey invaded New York
City where he must build up a
big majority to offset
Republican strength upstate-and
told thousands of cheering
unionists I ask for your help
now as I have never asked for
your help before.

UPI
NEWS

Both sides announced they
would resume the talks next
Wednesday, a day after
American voters pick their next
president.
There had been hopes among
diplomats that both sides could
agree on the key issue blocking
progress on calling a full peace
conference-Hanois demand for
an end to U.S. bombing.
But Xuan Thuy, Hanois chief
delegate, raised the clenched fist
to newsmen.

I came to the streets of New
York several weeks ago and
there werent many people but
theyre here now, Humphrey
said. Lets go out and fight like
we never have before.
Meanwhile, in St. Petersburg,
Fla, vice presidential candidate
Spiro Agnew, shouted down by
peace demonstrators Wednesday,
charged the hecklers are
following the tactics of Fidel
Castro.
Jeers from about 100 white
youths forced the Republican
candidate to digress from his
prepared speech on Social
Security.
The Maryland governor
charged that the Johnson-
Humphrey administration is
encouraging this kind of
dissent.
And in West Virginia George
Wallace said Wednesday that as
President he would seek
restrictions on steel and textile
imports to protect the jobs of
American working men.

There will be no discussion
of any other matters here before
a complete U.S. bombing halt,
he said.

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Apportionment At Issue

It is on this point that the whole Faculty Senate
proposal might die, because this strikes at the heart
of the whole moderate-liberal-conservative conflict.
The faculty reapportionment issue is not a
single-dimensional issue, nor are its roots only in
activities of 1968.
Liberals and conservatives trace its development
from the early 19605.
Shortly after JFK was elected President in 1960
the federal government became an active advocate
of eliminating discrimination, especially the
southern racial variety.
That example served as a catalyst for individuals
throughout the country to do the same, locally.
Thus began efforts to integrate UF and Gainesville.
Also, the effects of the McCarthy committee
nationally and the Johns Committee locally, were
beginning to wear off.

WHATS
HAPPENING

by DAVID CHAFIN "*
Alligator Staff Writer
IN NO, JONES, ITS NOT THE CHICAGO POLICE: How could
anyone think that the son of Frankenstien, the Creature from the
Black Lagoon, Trantula, the Deadly Mantis, and the Mummy could
ever be.. .oh, well. You can see all these beautiful people (?) and
more in the Reitz Union cafeteria today at the gala Halloween Movie
Spooktacular. The showings are continuos all day long starting at 11
a.m.
AND SPEAKING OF HORROR MOVIES: The Alachua County
Alumni Club showes films of the Gators naval disaster at the hands of
the Commodores tonight. The documentaries begin at 8 in the Union
Auditorium. (This column is rotten today because Ive just been in the
library sleeping with Plato, if you know what I mean.)
IN THE GREAT DORMRAT BOOKING AGENCY, INC.: UFs
Interhall Council meets tonight in room 118 of the Union, no doubt
to discuss its homecoming revue.
IN THE DRAFT, PRO: The Young Democrats meet in room 362
of the Union tonight at 8.
IN THE DRAFT, CON: The SDS-SSOC has a draft counselling
seminar in room 347 of the Union tonight at 8.
AND SPEAKING OF CON: versations in Spanish, that is. They will
be organized in room 150 F and Gof the Union at noon today.
AND SPEAKING OF BEING ORGANIZED: The Christian Science
Organization meets in room 357 of the Union tonight at 7.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS-ON: Gamma Beta Phi society meets
in room 363 of the Union tonight at 7:30; Alpha Kappa Psi gathers in
room 355 at 7:30 tonight.
Do your homework in 201 today.
(Sorry about that, Lewis.)

1968
HOMECOMING SWEETHEARTS
Coronation Halt
LEE CASTLE and his FAMOUS, S'
JIMMY DORSEY ORCHESTRA yK
Friday, Nov. 1,1968 10p.m. 2a.m.
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DRESS: COAT AND TIE

Local moderates and liberals created or
revitalized organizations to achieve power on
campus and community levels.
Gradually, some changes set in. UF was
integrated in 1961. Slowly, white-only signs began
to disappear in the city.
The nature of the issues and the methods of
presenting them escalated into
gradually-more-serious proportions until in 1967 the
legality of the Vietnam war is openly questioned on
national television by some senators.
Locally, some students and professors are
challenging the moral basis and rightness of the
UF administrations power. Radicals organize at UF.
Suddenly there is Columbia, the liberal fortress
shutdown. Memories of Berkeley stir. Every campus
administrator holds his breath.
Locally, the governor gives the UF president the
power to summarily dismiss any student suspected
of taking part in an unauthorized demonstration.
Police prepare.

There is school integration.
Open housing is passed. Massive
anti-war demonstrations became
common
The system escalates its use
of force, its challengers reply
sometimes, in kind, and
righteousness.
Suddenly the issue is no
longer change within the system,
but changing the system itself.
This concept becomes The
Movements thrust.
Just as quickly the words
radical and revolutionary
become household terms and
mean anyone who advocates
changing the system.
Teaching Rooms
There were 4,011 rooms
devoted to instruction at UF in
the fall of 1967. This was 29.9
per-cent of the total UF area.
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Thursday, October 31,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

1. Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 31,1968

EDITORIALS
Reefer Rules Too Rigid

Jeff Arnold and Bruce Harrison did not
keep off the grass. .And it may cost them
five years in prison and a $5,000 fine.
The two UF students were arrested last
week for possession of marijuana, found
accidently by university and city police in
the boys dormitory room during a search
for stolen property. The stolen paraphernalia
was later found elsewhere, and Arnold and
Harrison have not been connected with it.
But the two face a fate forced upon
literally thousands of this nations youth
months and possibly years in jail with
possible heavy fines for using an intoxicant
which many experts claim is no worse than
alcohol.
In 1965, 29,604 Americans were arrested
for violation of narcotics laws. More than
11,000 of them were between the ages 18
and 24.
A large percentage of them were college
students convicted of smoking marijuana.
Os what crime were they guilty?
Time was when marijuana smoking was
thought to lead directly to use of more
dangerous drugs such as heroin. It was
then -for the public good that marijuana
was included in the list of forbidden
narcotics.
Marijuana served only to hook its users
on drug use and to push them down the path
to other more dangerous drugs the path to
destruction. People must be stopped from
using it. Thus state and federal governments
enacted heavy penalties for its use and sale.
Now-fully 30 years later people still
hold to that mistaken notion, despite expert
opinion to the contrary and the same laws
continue to stand.
$
A recent article in the Medical Letter of
the American Association states that no
lasting physical or mental changes could be
found in marijuana smokers.
Dr. James C. Goddard, former secretary
of Health, Education and Welfare, has been
quoted as saying that use of marijuana is no
worse than use of alcohol.
No one not even Goddard is saying,
however, that marijuana is completely
harmless. The AMA Medical Letter went on
to say that marijuana has effects which

Toadstools

America isnt up for this
one.
The athletic adage that has a
team either up or down for
a game can be seriously applied
to this years political
atmosphere.

The Florida Alligator
Pubfahcd by students of tIM University of F lor ids under the
auspices of the Boerd of Student Publications.
EdHorid, B* utnem, Advertising offices a. Room SSL Reid Union. Phono
Ext. 2832
Opinions siprun/ in the Florida Alligator arc thoaa of the edUora or of
tht nritor of tho ankle id not thorn of tha UakcwHy of Florida.** __

Election Games For Camelia Bowl

And it is obvious that this is
not a year of the national
favorites, the Notre Dames,
Southern Cals, Alabamas and
Oklahomas of the political
world. It is not a year for
Lindsays, Kennedys,
Rockefellers, Percys or
McCarthys.

may be associated with psychotic illness.
Another scientific report went on to say
that marijuana users may experience
temporary symptoms of panic, gross
confusion, impulsive and aggressive behavior,
depression, depersonalization and paranoid
behavior.
*
These reactions however distasteful
sound surprisingly like those of a person
drunk on alcohol.
But we find it incongruent that use of a
drug that has been demonstrated to be little
more dangerous than alcohol should be so
heavily penalized.
We could not advocate complete freedom
to use marijuana, as we believe that the drug
is still too unknown and potentially
dangerous for that.
State laws require a minimum of two
years imprisonment or a SSOO fine for first
offenders. Third time offenders face a
possible $20,000 fine and up to 20 years of
imprisonment.
u
This for use of a drug that has been
expertly judged as harmless as alcohol.
For such a crime college sophomores,
such as Arnold and Harrison, face years in
jail and the accompanying loss of civil
rights during their most creative years.
Marijuana use is not safe and should not
be allowed. But to attempt to end it with
such laws is like killing a mosquito on your
arm with a sledge hammer.
Present state laws are too harsh. are
costing the state creative manpower and the
cost hundreds of thousands of dur tax
money -of arresting and imprisoning people
who are not dangerous to society.
It is time for the state legislature, led by
people like State Senator Bob Saunders and
Rep. Ralph Turlington, to remove marijuana
from the list of dangerous narcotics and to
follow the example of California in making
marijuana use a misdemeanor, on the same
scale as public drunkenness.
This will not stop the use of marijuana.
Very probably nothing will, just as laws
against public drunkenness failed to stop use
of alcohol. There is probably no way to keep
people off the grass.
But the crime can be placed in its proper
perspective.

Instead, it is a game with the
flavor of the Rutgers-Delaware
dogfight, the Brown-Rhode
Island grid clash or the
Toledo-Kent State rivalries on
the football field.
Those are the kind of games
you go to if there isnt anything
good on television; not the kind
you spend the night waiting in
the ticket line for.
And so is this years election
ballot like a football program
not a roster of players for the
Super Bowl but more like
lineups for the Camellia Bowl.
The presidential candidates
lineup doesnt have a real

The Florida Alligator 1
'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
VumSw Managing Editor
All Amwm Raul Ramirez James Cook
Fxecutive Editor News Friitnr

Question: Do you know how
to tell from the funeral
procession if an Auburn man is
being buried?
Answer: The lead tractor will
have its lights on.
Question: Do you know how
to tell a Greek from an
independant at Auburn?

Mi
CZECHS.;
fk i !}
*
! r^rf
!f { 5
U U
Yo-Yo

All-America with the punch of
O.J. Simpson or Leroy Keyes. It
has players about whom you
dont really know too much.
They do not have the consistent
delivery of a Bart Starr or
Johnny Unitas. They dont have
the offense of the Dallas
Cowboys and they spend most
of their time between the two
forty yard lines taking pokes at
one another.
You do have conservative and
liberal teams but both lack the
imagination of a club coached
by a Vince Lombardi or Ara
Parseeian.
All the men know their

Questions?

Answer: The independents
are barefooted and the Greeks
wear white socks.
The mascot at Auburn used
to be a cow but they changed it
to a tiger, do you know why?
Because none of the guys
wanted to date a tiger.

By Bill Dunn

arithmetic. Wallace. Humphrey.
Nixon. They know what it al;
looks like on the blackboard but
the big question is how will it
turn out on the field.
Whats missing besides
imagination are the passionate
fans. Wallace may have an edge
here but he lacks in experienced
teammates.
But as the townfolk of
Slippery Rock get up for the
local game against Bucknell,
there will be sectional spirit in
the air. To the rest of us fans,
well, well be hoping Michigan
State and Notre Dame play the
same game in four years.
This is a building year.



OPEN FOUJ*

Millers Colleague Disagrees
About Things Literary Merit

MR. EDITOR:
The Campus Thing roused
my colleague David C. Miller,
2MD to express his opinion* on
literature, blasphemy, profanity,
and nudity. In turn, his letter
prompted me to shake off my
usual lethargic social apathy to
write this. Thus, by providing
for the publication of student
literary efforts (however feeble)
and by stimulating student
readers to thought and action,

UF Not Growling

MR. EDITOR:
Anyone who has followed the
Gators these past two seasons
has probably noticed, as have I,
the contrast in the relationships
between the fans and the team.
Last year was one of the
rebuilding and strengthening
of the squad and its depth. Fans
were called upon to fill the gap
and everyone was pleased and
proud with the 6-4 almost bowl
bid record, including losses to
arch-rivals LSU, FSU, Miami and
Auburn. On the basis of this
spirit and pride, SEC schools
came to recognize a game at
Florida Field as having great
disadvantage because of superb
student backing, using as a
precedent the standing ovations
for the defense against LSU
(even though trailing by a great
margin).
The press, too, obviously
took this major factor into
consideration as they rated
Florida in the top five
nationally. Many coaches and
players always repeat the
statement that student backing
is a prime factor in any
competitive sport.
Prior to the second game
all knew and said that should
one game be won all season, it
should be Florida State. The
Gators came home with a solid
9-3 victory and as many as thirty
fans greeted them at the airport
to let them know they were
happy, proud and pleased.
One would think a whole new
set of 20,000 students had

Speaking Out

Which is the more important criterion in your
acceptance of material for inclusion in the Alligator:
donation of a pint of blood, or membership in one
of the prestigious in-groups on campus? Lets get
down to cases.
Last Thursday (Oct. 24) I personally brought to
the Alligator office, material for an article for
inclusion in Mondays (Oct. 28) Alligator. The
article was to have announced the visit and talk on
campus of the Director for Cultural Affairs of the
Pan American Union. One of your editors assured
me that the visitor was important enough to include
a photograph of him along with the article. I

jAdoiaoMji ViMtot

There is no hope for the complacent man."

replaced last years student
body. The rightin Gator spirit
hasnt been growling. If any
group should feel let down, it
should be the players; they have
more grounds. The fans seem to
have the advantage though; they
can always publicly voice their
criticisms. The players have to
accept what support they get for
what it is. They cannot give any
excuse for the outcome of games
or blame it on the fans (which
they shouldnt have to do).
The situation that sparked me
to write this letter is the
returning of the Gators from a
hard-fought Vanderbilt clash
ending in a stalemate. Upon
receiving an accurate report of
the arrival of the team, I
personally phoned several radio
stations, fraternities, and
sororities to spread the word,
assuming that if some were
informed, they would care
enough to go. Some responses
were, Sure, any reason . .?,
or If we had won ... As many
as ten people were on hand to
welcome the team home. To say
the least I was let down in my
school and a little frustrated that
these students classified
themselves as Florida Gators for
the wins and busy party-goers
for the others.
If I was let down, I wonder
what the team felt Saturday
night the after effects of an
SEC tie, a few bruises, crucial
injuries, and very few fans.
NAME WITHHELD

Alligator Remiss In Obligations

The Florida Alligator has
fulfilled the highest goals of
responsible journalism.
The basic problems of literary
merit, the propriety of human
mammae, and the viability of
God are questions of taste not
amenable to argument. There is
however, a large body of opinion
which contradicts popular
concepts of prurience. Recently
Dr. John Marquis, chief
psychologist at Palo Alto
Veterans Hospital, suggested

that semi-nude females can be
therapeutic for desensitizing
anxieties about nudity and sex,
directing interest toward healthy
heterosexual relations, and
reducing marital problems which
arise because women are anxious
about their own nudity.

I hold religious, moral,
political, and racial fanatics
responsible for most of the
horror of this world, and for
many of its tragedies at all levels
from personal to global. We need
more of the spirit of Voltaire
who said: I disapprove of what
you say, but I will defend to the
death your right to say it.

CHARLES E. NUTTALL, 2MD Angeles.

Wow! Love Them Dirty Pictures

MR. EDITOR:

I enjoyed your literary supplement, but, as regards the pictures
why doesnt the Alligator ever publish any pictures of briefly-clad,
well-built young men. Surely you know there are other interests on
campus.
NAME WITHHELD

supplied the photograph early Friday morning in
time for its inclusion with the article on Monday.
On this occasion, I was again assured, by an editor,
that the article would appear on Monday. Well, the
article did not There was not even a short
notice announcing the meeting.
There are two issues involved here. First, is the
Alligator a forum for all University activities, or the
privileged preserve of certain official or non-official
campus in-groups? Second, while your editorial
staff undoubtedly, has the right to approve or reject
any material, why the big put-on? Why was I not
told out-right that the article wouldnt appear, or at

Reflections

Too Hot To Live

Hot country that Texas. Even in late November the billboard
thermometer points near on ninety degrees. Seems almost too hot to
live in that kind of weather. Nathan and Hardy were going to go skeet
shooting this weekend but all things considered, they cancelled those
plans. Joyce and Frank, married two years today, decided not to have
their giant anniversary party. Even Mr. Franklin, a golf addict, broke
his Saturday appointment. Just too hot to live out there. With all this,
the parade was still held on schedule. Five sleek and shiny black
limousines reflecting the heat like charcoal broilers. In the first two
cars, shielded from the sun and people, sat what appeared to be gray
flannel executives. Their manner of coolness contrasted directly with
what would follow. In the third car rode two men and two women.
It was obvious that the couple in the back seat attracted the most
attention. Why, there were even well dressed men running about ten
yards behind the car vainly attempting to catch up. The woman in the
back seat seemed to be some kind of star. Dressed in a pink suit and
matching pillbox hat, she carried long stem roses and smiled at
everyone. Her escort was a bit older than she, about fortyish and quite
handsome. With his hair combed down on his forehead you just knew
he was really with it. He waved at everyone and his gray pinstriped
sleeve would slide down past his wrist. The crowd waved and cheered
back to them and the heat went unnoticed for a while.
Later that day, on the other side of town, seemingly in another
world, was a cab driver doing his usual Thursday afternoon business.
As he drove down the street there were no crowds and not the faintest
cheer as he slowed to pick up a fare. The gentleman got in and the
driver turned for instructions.
John Kennedys been shot, the man said. The driver, sweat now
pouring down his cheeks said, I know, the radio . . There was
silence now as each burned in the heavy heat. Only after a few
moments did the driver murmur, Where to next? The man in back
did not even lift his bowed head for more than a second to say, Los
Anceles _

Thursday, October 31,1968, The Florida Alligator.

; By Frederick Gifuncx

least that its appearance was doubtful? Common
courtesy alone should suggest that you have the
decency to level with people instead of cavalierly
and high-handedly ignoring a reasonable request
under the guise of outward acceptance.
The conclusion seems unavoidable, that if some
people missed hearing our speaker simply because
the meeting was not even hinted at in Mondays
Alligator, that you were more than a little remiss in
your obligation to inform the University
community of important functions. This is my
second such experience with the Alligator, and
others report similar treatment.

By Bruce Greer.

ROIC Service
Spoils Date
MR. EDITOR:
Homecoming at the
University is considered by
many to be the event of the
year. A most basic part of the
celebration is Gator Growl on
Friday night. I, like many other
students, have asked a date to
come a .distance to enjoy
the festivities with me.
I have learned recently that
the juniors in the Army ROTC
program have been assigned to
serve as ushers from 5:30-11:00,
or the entirety of the program,
as part of the regular academic
course. When I entered ROTC, I
was proud to be in the program.
My pride in the program has
been greatly diminished by the
consequences of this duty
assignment. My date will have to
go to Growl alone or stay home
and miss it. I am sorry that the
ROTC Dept, has deemed it duty
that the cadet uniform be worn,
while performing the duties of
an usher. I feel that we of the
Junior Class in Army ROTC
have been assigned extraneous
duty, completely foreign to the
goals of the service were being
trained for, and to the nature of
the program we enlisted in
voluntarily.
JUNIOR CADET

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florkle AHigotor, Thursday, October 31,1968

iss) fegsr
is "|N THE BAG"!
rnwTMtmtnk iwwfMnpmtk irnwntipmisk irnsmnUEEfih wffnrgirfli
liinwiij f rlwiiM (ull9L|7 jjEQoj^
BraHlrara
COMPARE! iSFg v COMPARE! WjSMP
LYKES POTTED MEAT 10* 2/29# 9# f EEEI E ) Grem Giant SWEET POTATOES IT£J. 3/31.00 3/$1.05 5*
PANTRY PRDE FROZEN WAFFLES -* 10/SI.OO 10/$].45 45# I %Wrrhll I SUM AID APPLE JELLY 35* 39c 4*
PANTRY PRIDE COFFEE 49* 69# 20* I I SCOTT BATHROOM TISSUE 2/27* 2/31# 4*
LYKES BEEF STEW 3/31.00 3/$1.17 17* I I FYNE TASTE STRAWBERRY PRES.*""* 58* <9* 11*
MIMDLE BEE RED SAIMON " 99# $1.09 10* I HESSI JB C I KRAFT BBQ SAUCE "* 49* 59* 10*
PANTRY PRIDE CATSUP -- 29* 33# 4* I 10502] F ERS I BUIE RIBBON PRINT NAPKINS * 29* 39* 10*
HILTON OYSIR SIEW -** 3/SU)O 3/$1.17 17# IBp ,lb *" W# I TURKEY DINNER >i3B* 49# 11#
WHITE RAIN HAIR SPRAY"- 99* $1.49 50* I WP=3 I KRAFT MACARONI DINNR ~ ~ 19* 23* .4*
VO 5 CREAM RINSE 27* SI.OO 73* I pantry ERCR.I PANTRY PRIDE COOKING OIL"- 69* 93* 24*
LUSTRE CREME HAR SPRAY"- 59* 99* 40* I 6323 pride "RDf | PANTRY PRIDE FLOUR 37* 47* 10*
O-TIPS COTTON SWABS 4/31.00 4/$1.56 56# I fl 1 uc*n I ALUMINUM FOIL 4/SI.OO 4/31.32 32#
CLAIROL NICE W EASY $1.59 $2.00 41# I W I OXFORD ROYAL MUSHROOMS 4/31.00 4/31.32 32*
COLGATE INSTANT SHAVE i'CJS 11 39* 79# 40* 1 UMn OF your choicc with 5.00 or mors order/ CHOCOLATE JUMBO PIES 3/31.00 3/31.17 17*
ASPIRIN 100's ~ 19* 49# 30# V S MANDARIN ORANGES - 4/31.00 4/31.16 16*
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TOWN TALK SYRUP-.* 49* 59# 10# I UA E fSmm) save up to i# I *** **** WMMIIA 4/*U Ifc
PANIRY MAID LUNCH BAGS 5/31.00 5/31.15 15# I WW" (**/ I . 9* 13# 4#
7 oz. COLD DRWK CUPS- 79* 89# 10* I CREAM RINSE ** I mSItSL* WIIR 8 " 10
BOOK MATCHES H* 13# 2# I CKtA R I **** 89* 99# 10#
PANTRY PRIDE BLEACH 28# 31# 3# I SECRET SPRAT DEODORANT at I .V* I ?_y 38# 59# 21*
CHKKEN POT PIE 6/SI.OO 5/31.00 20# f nil FRESH LOTION --"-Tm! I TOMATQ */3100 8/31.12 12#
PRLSBURY CAKE MIX-- 3/31.00 3/31.23 23# | O .T,RS COTTON SWA ISJ "* ** 47 < 24
GALVANIZED GARBAGE CAN $1.89 $1.99 10* 1 mlrwtitiami J TWTS 39# 42 < 34
WHISTLE SPRAY CIEANER-" 49* 59# 10# V *** UQill $1.09/ J?/BEANS ** 5/3LOO 5/31.45 45#
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SUAVE SETHNG WHON 39* 99# 60# I jmm) / fSSfi riTr*WAIJ M**a
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LONG GRAM RICE 39* 43* 4* V n< BN / iYi traii
MIRACLE WWP 59# 67# 8* CHOCOLATEC*M~9SG



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SIRLOIN I PORK BUTTS I SLICED I
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l / PIONROSE COOKEI NAM >. s* WIC 4i r 4
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I itfijCMF GMGr. I TMfT MAYONNAISE" 59c 69c 10c Steuffer's Fr'n Chicken & Needles, 11 77* 79*
i 3hHhH, Bi J PACKER BE SAITINB c 29c 10c Steuffer's Frozen Macoroni & Beef 67* 69* 2c
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Thursday, October 31,196, Ths-Florlda Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
; v
Roberts /Vox stereo tape recorder
with mikes. Custom-made. Cover
slightly used. $325.00. 376-3543
evenings. (A-st-25-p)
1964 Honda Super Hawk, very good
condition, helmet and tools, $335 or
best offer. Must sell, call 378-3120.
(A-st-25-p)
1968 305 cc Honda Scrambler. Just
like new S6OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-2742. Philco port, tv 19 in. S4O.
With stand. 2 new VW Goodyear tires
S4O. Hoover vacuum cleaner $35.
(A-7t-25-p)
RCA Portable solid state stereo with
solid state reverb only $65.00 Cali
Paul at 372-9438 after 8 (A-st-26-p)
1965 Allstate Crusair motorscooter.
125 cc Runs good. SBO. Silvertone Hi
Fi phonograph with mahogany
cabinet S2O. Phone 376-3591.
(A-3t-27-p)
Yamaha 1967 60cc. One owner,
excellent condition. Helmet & tools
included. Low mileage. SIBO. Call
Karl at 378-7661. (A-st-28-p)
Honda 50. Like new, top economy
and dependability, new parts, electric
start. 1965, only $l6O. Call
372-3188 anytime. (A-3t-28-p)
Have four student date tickets for
Homecoming game. Call 376-9738.
(A-lt-29-D)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
lines are requiredMrnimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4' lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check,
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
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Page 12

FOR SALE
y
jwwWMWWWBWAX Philco portable stereo & 20 albums.
Also 45's. Must sell to pay rent.
$90.00. 6 months old. Call 378-8096.
Ask for Mike. (A-3t-29-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 90 C2OO, 1964,
2 seater, with helmet, in good
condition $150; Call Jack Campbell
at 2081 or 378-4401 (home); may be
seen at Reitz Union, Room B-32.
(A-3t-28-p)
ROYAL portable typewriter with
carrying case. Brand new. S4O. Call
after 5, 378-9043. (A-3t-29-p)
Two boy kittens desire warm secure
home. Love humans. 378-0036 after
5. (A-3t-29-p)
Ex-Yamaha mechanic must sell own
1968 Yamaha 350. Kept in perfect
condition. Only 4300 miles. Call
372-0009 after 5:30. (A-st-28-p)
Fender Pro reverb amp, $250. New
Gibson EB-2 bass guitar, burgundy,
S3OO. Owner drafted, must sell.
John, Ph. 372-9415. fA-3t-28-p)
SAVE Big! Do your own rug and
upholstery cleaning with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer. SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-29-c)
Rest your feet, Vespa 125 cc, best
buy for money, starts easy, 55 to 60
mph. Excellent running shape, call
Russ at 378-9710 after 3:00 p.m.
SIOO. (A-st-28-D)

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 31, 1968

| FOR SALE I
increase your bustline or firm up and
support your heavy bosom?
SYMBRAETTE custom fitted
lingerie is now being introduced to
Gainesville. Call 378-7811, 376-7387.
(A-st-28-p) ....
.;.>%VWYXwX*XX X<*X-V-V.*. i*i .>:v.v.-V-V.>;
FOR RENT
'CAME LOT FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Cameiot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Apartment for rent. Colonial Manor.
Call 372-7111. (B-st-23-c)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS
1700 SW 16th Ct. model apartment
now for rent includes: spreads,
pillows, bath accessories, bric-a-brac
etc. Call 376-9668 (B-st-26-c)
Excellent horse boarding facilities.
Hunters preferred. 12x12 box stall,
ring, jumps, tack room. 10 minutes
from UF. 378-8016 mornings.
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-c)
Will rent completely furnished
apartment to RESPONSIBLE persons
homecoming wknd. Accommodates 6
people. Ext. 5394. 378-5296 after 6.
SIOO. (B-3t-27-p)
Homecoming room for couple in
spacious mobile home. S6O. Includes
kitchen. Contact Randy, Andrews &
Connell Trailer Pk no. 11, evenings!
(B-st-27-p)
Homecoming only room for two or
three. Central air, comfortable. SSO
for November 1 and 2. Ask for Bob.
372-9370. (B-3t-28-p)
Modern 2 bedroom, carpet. Air
conditioned, furnished apt. Couple or
2 graduate students only. Call
376-5828. (B-st-23-p)
House for Rent leaving as soon as
possible. Will sublet or can take over
lease. Furn., rent S7O per month. Call
Steve 378-0088. (B-3t-29-p)
HOMECOMING WEEKEND Will
rent new 1-bdrm. apartment.
Furnished, kitchen, best offer. Call
372-6265. (B-2t-29-p)
WANTED |
TWO TICKETS TO HOMECOMnNG
GAME. Cali after 1 p.m., 378-8769.
(C-2t-28-p)
Need tickets to Homecoming Call
Dan Mason. 376-6461 or 378-7760.
(C-3t-28-p)
Roommate Male 1 block from
campus. AC, TV only 33.75 per mo.
Ca 11376-6101 or come to 1316 N.W.
Ist Ave. (C-3t-27-p)
Used guitar wanted. Must be in good
condition. Call 378-8968. (C-lt-29-p)
Female dorm resident to deliver
morning newspaper. 378-9058.
(C-2t-29-p)
Female Roommate French Quarter
57. Call 378-2729. (C-lt-29-p)
Need two tickets for Homecoming
Game. I am desperate, so will offer a
good price. Call 378-7635.
(C-2t-29-p)
HELP WANTED |
Listeners wanted Will pay $1.50
for 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
|pp |ppiSHOWING
iSHOWING |ppiSHOWING 7:00 ONLY
ft, wncr
SA MSN BT
IMoifwiYiau
1:V |I£J I1 I
HALLOWEEN HORRORHT
SHOW
ALSO AT 9:20

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t,t< km Ir |
Pill
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*£s^l
O IIMitU isssMas nP

9 RrWffl
!33PTan!^KW*?!jik)y(lIlMM9M^teZ!i!(v?g
no one under 16 from conception to birth
admitted without
Helga;
O 1 1:36 3:35 5:34
I wiw 1 w. 7:38 9:42 COLO* J
f tt,CMr /n^JI
kwha:i 1 ]****B7eUfTsH|***:
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Seeeeeeettt.Jf jgtik 3:10 7:20 e
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MMMMMMM CENT PRICE COLOR j

pnseMrlte'TiuMfo rmsm cm sm mm k fokiver.
TINS KOTIN PICTURE IS MONT TIE NT.
- -~- JANUS FILMS .
POWERFUL! (][||U
There are at least two All
seauences which deal with wlwAI
sexual shockers The audience
is brouftit veiy close to the f
set. very powerfully so There i BB H
could be no question of the I9J B
sincerity and art intention of m M
this pocturc It should probably L-^s. < LJ
be limited to a mature.
serious minded audience / VB^B/B
enur Winifen, N f B'^R^Bl^|
SHOCKING! 4|Ml
A violent and admittedly :
shockmf film, we |0 beyond 1 111 H
homosexuality into penrersion i BBjW
and sadism the dominant yTy n
enter fulfills the purpose M
the film. The intent is a serious
and artistic / |IJ9
Judith Cnrt, Hrold Tnbunt MB Sj;
ADULT! i|Np
A worthwhile film for free, B U *'G/Nji
adult moirndsf |f
#9 *WCKOfdpihm t
Kemamptav My lon 6tm
>KMM * HIKUhOn *
P*pacp-o*mMi pok
uoout uuofnn runs or
B *st win ot AOMirrio



CLASSIFIEDS

I HELP WANTED
nfSriLY (QUALIFIEDSEC
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Need 20 students for on campus
work during Christmas Break. Inquire
about qualifications in Rm 23 Tigert
Hall, Student Employment.
(E-25-6t-c)
Is there a bright Hausfrau with a
good general education who would
like to grade exam papers in a field
which she may not be familiar?
Prefer a relatively permanent resident
maybe a professors wife. Two to six
hous a week. Reasonably good
hourly rate. Write a note to box
14321 University Station. (E-st-26-c)
Students for stage crew. Knowledge
of lighting or technical procedures
desired. £all ext. 3484. (E-st-25-c)
MALE have several' part time
cashier, grill and carhop openings.
Help needed during noon hour. Allpy
Kings Food Host 1430 SW 13th.
AUTOS |
1964 Porshe 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2500.00.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-26-St-p)
1967 MG Midget, radio, heater, wire
wheels, luggage rack. Excellent cond.
$1650 or best offer. 378-1219 after 6
p.m. (G-st-28-p)
XKE 1967, excellent Condioon. All
accessories, except air. Best offer
over $4450. Terms available. Call
378-6654 weekdays after 6 p.m.; Sat.
and Sun. after 12. (G-st-28-p)
1963 GRAND PRIX Pontiac. Bucket
seats, all power. Come see a GOOD
BUY at 207 B Flavet Village 3.
(G-3t-23-p) t
Plymouth Wagon 1959. Power brakes
and steering, inspected. S3OO. Phone
372-9860 after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. IG-st-l*-n>
62 Olds Fm3s. Engine 'in fop shape,
new paint, tires, brakes a good
running reliable car, but must sell. To
see or offer call Art 376-5432.
(G-3t-28-p)
199? Saab 850 GT Monte Carlo.
Winning performance, Luxury of air
cond., Am/Fm. Rugged
dependability. Excellent local service.
sl6oo.Call 372-2647 evenings,
weekends. (G-4t-27-p)
1965 Alfa~Romeo Sedan. 5-speed,
pirellis radio, reclining seats, heater,
disc brakes. soo'or best offer.
372-8818. (G-st-29-n>
MGB 64 A Superb driving machine.
Clean & in good shape. R&H. Must
sell. $1175. Way below market.
Come by and test drive. 378-6917.
(G-st-29-p)
1966 Datsun Sports Car with new
white leather grain vinyl top. 1600 cc
with disks up front, an excellent car
for highway and town. 378-0451.
PERSONAL
Grad Student Behav. Sci. would like
to meet companionable girls 24-30.
Ph. 376-5691. (J-lt-29-p)
Would like to hear from
non-professionals who have
experienced encounter, marathon,
sensitivity or would share their opinions positive
and/or negative. Call C.W. Duncan,
-ext. 2370. 2003 or 2004. I J-st-29-o>

v
- k
\
got the ...-Bml
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>> : :
*'.** .*' ;:... '*.-. *r*:-.->r ** -.- '"/Tv T\~:~'' :
Sl&fei V I
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... ....,., .......v.v.-.-:.: ~ /...) "*
>^-^>;i-;-;*i iw. ; iwi% ii ; -v->xix>;--Xw>.v..-. **
Who cares! Whos got the Coke? Coca-Cola has the
refreshing taste you never get tired of. That s why things go Q^ggj|
better with Coke, after Coke, after Coke.
laNM Mfer Mm i J l r f Dm fin 'V- Cimpi )Mr Gainesville Coca-Cola Bottling Co. GalneerWa. Fla.

PERSONAL |
missed you last night but you know
how busy Anthonys is. Please,
another chance md at lunch. Love
Marvin. (J-st-28-p)
Sweet Lovable Bob, please forgive
me. You should have told me that
those cute little escargots they serve
at Anthonys were snails. Liz.
(J-st-28-p)
Plagued with motor or transmission
problems? Foreign cars or otherwise,
major or minor repairs, call Jack for
guaranteed results. 372-3322.
(J-lt-29-p)
Need an ant eater? Baby ocelot?
Penguin? How about snakes, owls, or
a Ceratophrys calcarata? Call the
Underground Zoo, 378-8810.
(J-st-28-p)
Homecoming parade seats in front of
Baptist Student Center, 1604 W.
Univ. Front row, sl, 2nd and 3rd,
75c. To reserve call 372-4711.
(J-lt-29-p)
I LOST A FOUND f
FSU class ring lost around Fla. Gym
area. Shape of football, initials ES.
Reward. Contact Elisabeth, 135
Tiqert Hall. (L-2t-28-p)
LOST: black wallet near new library.
Ten dollars reward for return to
Anthony Martinich. Address:
Georgetown Apts., no. 74.
(L-3t-29-p)
Post Versalog Slide Rule. Lost at
MTL 300 test Oct. 24. Please call
378-9733 or contact Rolf Sorensen,
College Terrace no. 429. (L-lt-29-p)
Lost: lighter in Union snack bar
inscribed Seminole florist.
Sentimental Value. Reward. Call
Sandi, 378-1502, rm. 1208A.
f L-3t-27-p)
SERVICES
y
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-cl
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
PROF ESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE Fast professional results.
Computer Management Corporation
Administrative Services Division,
1105 W. University. Phone 378-8077.
(M-24-st-p)
Buy, Sell, or trade used articles.
Confidential loans our specialty. A to
Z Pawn Shop 378-5575. 1326 E.
University Ave. (M-st-28-p)
Homecoming special color 8 x 10
prints of date or parties $2.50 black
white Bxlo SI.OO I will come to you,
at your convenience. Call Ron Koru
376-6042 fast service (M-st-26-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
THE TEDDY BEAR NURSERY will
be open for Florida Football games.
Hours of operation will be 7:00 a.m.
until 6:00 p.m. Night service for all
home games, contact Mrs. Townsend
at 376-0917 or 372-4021 for
reservations. (M-2t-4-p)

By TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
Lee Castle and his Jimmy
Dorsey Orchestra will provide
the music for the 1968 UF
Homecoming Sweetheart's
Coronation Ball. The event will
take place tomorrow night in the
Reitz Union Ballroom.
The new UF Sweetheart will
be crowned at midnight after
having been announced
previously at Gator Growl.
Finalists for the title are Donna
Betts, Patty Bohannon and
Suzanne Rogers.
According to Steve Wood,
chairman of the ball, this dance
is the only one of its type during
CAROL STILL
... last year's Sweetheart
Poetry
Readings
Professor Butler Waugh will
present the third in a series of
contemporary poetry readings
held at Reitz Union next
Thursday, Nov. 7.
These readings are from the
works of major British and
American poets. The poetry of
William Carlos Williams will be
the topic of the afternoon next
Thursday.
The readings are held in
lounges 122 and 123 of the
Union during the 9th period
from 4:30 to 5:30 pjn. All
students are invited to attend.

.;.y.v.v.v
§

ft
>:

Sweetheart To Be
Crowned At Ball

TOMORROW NIGHT

the year. The dress is
semi-formal and the dance will
last from 10 til 12 pjn.
Bob White, WUWU disc
jockey, will be the master of
ceremonies for the evening.
Free refreshments will be
provided by Pepsi-Cola of
Gainesville. Door prizes ranging
from a weekend vacation
donated by Trans-World Imports
of Gainesville and Orlando to
gift certificates from various
Gainesville merchants will be
given away.
Tickets for the ball may be
purchased at the Union riox
Office which is open from noon
until 4:30 p.m. today and

Q COOL DAYS AHEAD?
/fWmKL. AND THE ANSWER CAN
[tf vrn&m be found in
WJ£m SWEATER COMFORT
. Lamb's wool Alpaca
jMPffl Shetlands Orlons
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wMm ft fff/ .Cardigan
gSf mUMthf Vm Neck
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91? W. Ui*|yr*Jty
OR PM WHILE YOU WORK
AT
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IN @IL[BIF(DIL PHOENIX
Motorola offers the student at the BS or MS level an op opportunity
portunity opportunity to advance his career and education concurrently.
Work and achieve a Master's or PhD Degree in an environ environment
ment environment of constant challenge and tremendous growth.
THE ENGINEERING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS or MS graduates in Electrical Engineering,
Chemical Engineering or Physics with a B average or better.
While pursuing an MS or PhD degree at Arizona State Uni University
versity University each trainee is placed in a rotational program cov covering
ering covering four engineering activities at Motorola.
THE MARKETING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS graduates in Electrical Engineering or Physics
with a B-average or better. Marketing trainees may work
toward an MBA or an MS or PhD degree. Rotational assign assignments
ments assignments are in the marketing area.
Frank Meyers and Jerry Fulton will be recruiting
on your campus on November 4,1968.
Direct Placement at all Degree Levels for. ..
Electrical Engineers Organic & Physical Chemists
Physicists Chemical Engineers Metallurgists
In Research and Development, Quality Control,
Marketing, and Production.
If you are unavailable for an interview at this
time write directly to: Director of College Relations,
Motorola Inc., Semiconductor Products Division.
5009 Cast McDowell, Phoenix, Arizona 8500 S.
MOTOROLA INC.
enHconcriicfor Producte Hfvfefon

Thursday, October 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

tomorrow. Admission is 52.50
per person or $5 per couple. No
reservations can be taken but
tickets will be available at the
door.
Good Service Starts
at
CRANEJMPORTS
(voEvo)
W
SALES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

Page 13



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 31, 1968

Page 14

JlKy F QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED-PRIG? GOOD THRU NOV. 2 /
MNUKHZI WH OK. "A" ALL WHITE FLA. Jt A
MEDIUM EGGS 2-89' jffjfsf£
Ffcg. AlltOtA
Bath Tissue .iflflMh
Paper Tewels 3/sl. a NQf V
40-01 DEEP SOUTH M |1 4IS iTji rs TLJ Jl I E V
Peanut Butter 89*
Beer or Ale $1.59
Con THIIFTY MAID SLICED ft HALVES
MMim v ipr Tal THWTY MAID
KRAFT . or Mora Purchase Excluding
UU* MAYONNAISE 49
HBiff SHORTENING 3 59
* T
Tuna Fish 4/$l. jflA, . */
Sauce" .fR| H" PEAS a/a-
t.? 10 5 i rowfoEZzrJ/s!:
?.L|es */*! WV KGif.soliP7.To7s 1.
Or. Limas 6/SI. GRFRUIT JUICE 3/SI.
I 1 (IrTTiyiEX/T m^S} MIJII, ir^^^ujuuijjijuijM
COUGH SYRUP. 1.19 If "Mr: iris bISB^I
|PPP| n *2^MninraMra E o " a nw MOV E
f|ll I 111 Ti 1 !HP F 9 ffr i i l i l I ll i

* y%



mm ft v < ft a f d >v l
VISHh H&A v I \ \ \it4\W>
ww f V v k ''^teiilife^SrJfc
NfUfCMATK LOW CAICMK
CMtF OtUGMT
VAtNTTY PACK Ot
Aft RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU
I
USDA CHOICE W-0 BRAND CORN FID T-BONE OR
SIRLOIN STEAK s 1 IW
UHAOOCt WOHANDCOMFeOHMHHI UM 0(001 WO BAND COM HD DM KM 2 J
Round Steak 98* Shld. Roast -79*
Club Steak... s l* Short Ribs... 49*
Chuck Steak -59* Beef Stew 3-99* RHUiS.
Pet Roast.... 69* Meat Sfew,....*r tF^|^_
HARVEST FRESH PRODUCE ,_ FROZEN FOODS
u^na_iHguueaHkeyjf Bb astcm*twnjtw pla.(n-.c_vsu*.cm
POTATOES... 10 s 59* ABB, ORANGE JUICE6/sl.
RED APPLES 5*69* |Bn| MEAT P1E5..... 5/sl.
FANCY CORN 8-59* jHWKi CHUNKEES $1.99
STRING BEANS..-29* KlHipl P1E5....3/SI.
POTATOES 3 39* TBglggiP GREEN BEANS 2/f f.
Cranberries 39* cOffee rich...2/si.
0N10115.........3 s 29* POTATOES...... 4/SI.

Thursday, October 31.1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i. Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, Octobsr 31,1968


uiyissmns

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor
They sit in coeducational dorm lobbies and watch the people walk
in and across and through and about and out. They sit there on
couches and chairs and benches and hold books and watch.
Two girls walk by. One holds a hamburger and a soda, the other a
bag of potato chips. They will walk with these things through the
lobby, under the scrutiny of the pseudo-haves, the once-hadsand the
never-to-be-hads. They will walk through that lobby, through those
doors that lead down the hall and up the stairs and down another hall
and through another door and into a room. And down in that
suffocating claustrophobic lounge they sit there and they know all
about it.
They know for a fact what those girls are doing up there. In a room
that never changes. Eating food that never changes. Blinds drawn
against wandering eyes. Repeated conversations to keep from going
insane. And up there in that room that is like all other rooms the girls
know that the lobby-watchers know, and it is a circle of knowing and
counter-knowing.
In the lobby the pseudo-haves sit with open books and sharpened
pencils that will not dull. He wears glasses and talks of
mutually-known things. Because she is starved and needful she takes it
in and makes it into something. They sit there watching each other
and watching the passers-by. They talk empty words, external things,
each longing for something different, some change, some excitement.
Both know the hell of it is no relief will come.
Passions and secrets will never find their way into the atmosphere
here. There is no love here. No hate. No inspiration. There is only the
eternal flood of the people walking in and across and through and
about and out. And there are only the watchers.
And to the outsider the one there for a date, perhaps, to take
out of that lobby and those rooms, or the one come for a friend out
of sympathy to him it is a fearful place, full of silence and stares
and unspoken never-to-be-spoken passion. It is sterile and without life.
It is created out of fear and the need to stay sane. Bring it up and it
will be denied. Mention it and people will laugh at you. But they
know. They know it inside and outside and they have it in their eyes
and in the way they sit and watch. You probably wont notice it
unless you look for it. Its like that.
Campus life Lists Deadlines

The Campus Life Department
of the Florida Alligator reminds
all campus organizations
(fraternities, sororities,
honoraries, interest groups,
dames clubs, professional groups
and honoraries and faculty,
administration and students that
the only way news can be
published is if you bring it in.
Deadlines are 48 hours in
advance:
Mondays news: noon Friday
Tuesdays news: noon
Sunday (fiat news also)
HOLIDAY
MOTEL and
RESTAURANT
HOMECOMING
ACCOMODATIONS
AVAILABLE
24 miles from
stadium~on
Archer Road
(Ha. 24) in Bronson
Reservations
call 486-2121

Wednesdays news: 3 p.m.
Monday
Thursdays news: 3 pjn.
Tuesday
Fridays news: 3 p.m.
Wednesday
five till nine dining room
I carry
?99c\ U y
CHICKEN
DINNER
% Golden Fried
Chicken, served with
potatoes and tangy
coleslaw
1a a regular P*
V $1.25 I
j
2slo S.W. 13th St. 376-2896
1506 N.W. 13th St. 376-2481

'The Thing Wants You
For November Issue

The Features Dept, of the
Florida Alligator is once again
accepting material for the
November issue of The Campus
Thing, which, incidentally,
wont be called The Campus
Thing in November, but will be
called something else, a name of
dignity and sparkling wit, one
which has not been thought up
yet.
The Features Department will
accept all submitted material
and will consider it for

NOW ON SALE
college imm,
,Jp> SAMPLER

SAMPLER INCLUDES :
Soft-Blush Duo
Four Lip Colors
Complexion Brush
(jMfm Star BOOKSTORE
located in*the HUB

publication. The only reason the
supplement is coming out again
is because of the warm,
open-minded and modem
reception it received in October.
Thanks to all of those
complimentary letters, phone
calls and telegrams, and thanks
to the excellent review given to
it by the Associated Press and
Floridas dependable, impartial
newspapers, papers dedicated to
fair reporting and staying strictly
away from sensationalism

thanks to all of these factors,
and, most important, to the
support of students and faculty,
you will once again be able to
enjoy fine poetry, excellent
fiction, thought-provoking
opinion and artistic photos.
All material submitted must
be typed and triple-spaced, with
the authors name, address and
phone number on the front
page. Lets really swamp that
Features Desk, gang!



Razzle- Dazzle Powder Puff Football

i
N THE AIR
Laura Conway gives extra effort

v|raw |
<- jSp Ks *> '."-s.*
HtSW§ *'" "" r l,U Jl jp ill*'null 'I""
, *:^pM s: < ?ipHMlni^MliMiN^

"MY BALL!
Conway rushes in for in for the interception
I Jl If \
3pippg >~ i.. w~ ,i T Vi1111 i 'j'' 1 1 ~
''jf <. ,;kf4jp- ;/ %|.
|L %?* m.
,-. a- '.: : -:.;^3i^a^ffliSkw^$sfc
' j; M
:i ii^^--M^.£ &*L# l /^^' k%W&y y, ~
/*'- <.yy .*. yy /' /. y . WMM HHHHIHH
Diane Borchardt and Sue Patteoon wipe put pint lized
Laurie Lauflhlin Grahm Greaser quarterback.

HUME 24. GRAHAM 6

Jjr Jl, |Hxl H
TRIPLE REVERSE
Kaye Thacker gives off to Susan Johnson

*-- | ft
*J£ Jj^B
V I
STATUE OF LIBERTY
Tina Lowell fakes pass as Conway grabs it on the run.
Photos By Nick Arroyo
*
*?[ i

/j.-i' &ifm< % ~* y -fc-
.>: .^bflfti^^^^HPi^-
'IF m':t' .' _-x r : '< ;
. 38?
mm ' ' ~ o *^\ %*** ': \ .f'
STEAM STEAMROLUNG FOR TD
Tina Pounds out one of her romping 3T D's for Hume

Thursday, October 31,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, .Thursday, October 31, 1968

WAREHOUSE TIRE SALE
PRICES GOOD TO NOW. 25, 1968
GUARDIAN
RDF R£ 111 AJ| # Modern Wrap Around
rntMIUIVI T^ a p d slotted
Mk m m m mm Wk m TrSCtiOfI'TTGBCJ DGSi^fl
NYLON CORD
520x13 $1559 Whitawoh 13 2 1.35
600 xl3 1777 SaOO I 16 14 1.58
650 xl3 1852 B* I 18 44 151
700 x 13 18.97 I 10 1 1-02
695 x 14 1840 I 6 6 195
735 x 14 18*8 I 3 3 2 06
775 x 14 2056 I 16 79 2.19
825 x Zl4 2174 I 18 114 2.35
855x14 22.92 I 12 78 2.56
885x14 24*4 I 10 2 285
685 x 15 19*2 I 10 7 185
735 x 15 1951 I 15 8 2,05
775x15 2019 I 5 14 2.21
815 x 15 2157 I 11 23 2.36
845x15 23X8 I 14 15 2.54
900 x 15 24*4 I 20 29 2.81
135/145/380 1872 | 4 6 1-74
# GRADE, LINE, LEVEL OR QUALITY REPRESENTATION RELATES TO PRIVATE STANDARD
OF MARKETER OF THE TIRE. NO SUCH INDEPENDENT STANDARDS EXIST
INTRODUCING MISS UNIROYAL FOR FALL
QUARTER 1968 MISS CYDNEY ARONSON
CYDNEY ARONSON WILL pH| CYDNEY WILL BE SEEN IN
SERVE AS MISS UNIROYAL E HOWE COMING PARADE
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FOR THE FALL OUARTER
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1968. CYDNEY IS A PLEDGE \ \
OF ALPHA EPSILON PHI A jA BELOW OWNED AND
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GAINESVILLES LARGEST AUTOMOTIVE CENTERS



v ~

'By Albert the Alligator

Albert has decided to lay off the bottle until this weekend, and, by
doing so, I think I can do a good job this week on the games.
However, come Friday, this alligator will have a pair of blood shot
eyes.
Os course, this is Homecoming weekend, and after we beat
Auburn, theres a party planned. More about that later however.
First, there are upsets in the air. The Georgia Bulldogs are going to
take a beating at the hands of Houston this weekend, as will Ole Miss
when they tangle with LSU.
In other games:
FSU over Va. Tech by 10 Alberts drink of the week is a healthy
mixture of Sprite, Gatorade and vodka in diminishing proportions. Its
great for dates.
Alabama over Mississippi State by 30 Would you believe that the
campus is coming alive for Homecoming? The campus cops ought to
check the bushes by the University Auditorium more often.
Miami over Pitt by 24 Maggie, thanks for the letter, and you can
drop over to the cage any ol time.
Southern Cal over Oregon by 10 Somebody walked up to a well
known campus politico the other day, pointed up toward the clouds
and asked if the sun or the moon was overhead. Dont ask me,
replied the politico, I dont live around here.
Georgia Tech over Duke by 11 People are still trying to move my
cage. Ive been sharpening my teeth waiting for the occasion.
Purdue over Illinois by 20 Neal Sanders is a lover.
Penn State over Army by 7- I dont know how the above
statement came but one of these days, Im going to slip
something through. Ignore it, otherwise.
Ohio State over Michigan State by 5 Cold weather is great. It
brings out all those night nice sweaters on the girls. Alligators notice
those things.
Tennessee over UCLA by 3 It does my heart good to know that
Sanders has to sit in the press box during the game, and cant take a
date. Eat your heart out.
Michigan over Northwestern by 10 Sitting around in the cage is
great, but if Albert can swing it, hes going to be down on the drill
field to join in the rally this afternoon.
And finally, Albert says the polls are wrong, and Florida will wipe
up the pussycats by no less than 7 points.
After the win, Gators everywhere are welcome to come over to the
cage, where 1 will singthe alma mater.

SEC Writers Name
Spurrier All Time QB

ATLANTA (UPI) Charlie
Trippi and Frankie Sinkwich,
teammates on the Georgia team
which played in the 1943 Rose
Bowl, were the leading
votegetters for an all-time
Southeastern Conference
football team.
The 35th anniversary SEC
team was compiled by Atlanta
Journal college editor Bill Clark
with balloting mainly by the
Skywriters, a group of
sportswriters who toured the
SEC schools last month.
Paul Bear Bryant of Alabama
edged out the late Gen. Bob
Neyland of Tennessee as the top
coach in the 35-year history of
the conference.
In the offensive backfield
with Trippi, who ended his
collegiate career in 1946, and
Sinkwich 1942 were Billy
Cannon 1959 of Louisiana State
and quarterback Steve Spurrier
1966 of Florida.
The writers went back to the
early days of the conference for
two of the offensive linemen
end Don Hutson 1934, who was
Bryants teammate at Alabama,
and tackle Bruiser Kinard 1937
t Mississippi.
The rest of the offensive line
included end Barney Poole 1948
f Mississippi, tackle Don
Whitemire 1942 of Alabama,
guards Bob Suffridge 1940 of
Tennessee and Zeke Smith 1959
t Aubrun and center Bob
Johnson 1967 of Tennessee. Ed

Dyas 1960 of Auburn was
named the SECs all-time
piacekicker.
Leroy Jordan 1962, the
former Alabama grat who now is
a linebacker for the Dallas
Cowboys, was the leading
vote-getter on the all-time SEC
defensive unit.
Other linebackers named to
the team were Larry Morris
1954 of Georgia Tech and Carl
Hinkle 1937 of Vanderbilt. The
remainder of the defensive unit:
ends Gaynell Tinsley 1936 of
Louisiana State and Doug Atkins
1956 of Tennessee; tackles Bob
Gain 1950 and Lou Michaels
1957, both of Kentucky; middle
guard Steve DeLong 1964 of
Tennessee; halfbacks Billy Stacy
1958 of Mississippi State and
Beattie Feathers 1933 of
Tennessee; safety Tucker
Frederickson 1964 of Auburn
and punter Ralph Kercheval
1933 of Kentucky.
Tennessee thus topped the
24-man all-time squad with five
representatives while Alabama,
Auburn and Kentucky had three
each.
Rally ForTh* GtfoH
Today
At 4:15
On Th* Drill Hold

Blue League Champ Near

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Chi Phi moved into the finals
of Blue League volleyball as Phi
Kappa Psi issued them a free
pass with a forfeit.
Phi Tau and Theta Chi,
competing for the other berth in
the finals, each won a game
before the match was called due
to darkness. That game, as well
as the finals, were played
yesterday after news deadline.
In other action TEKE beat
Delta Sigma Phi, 6-15, 15-6,

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Sheaf fers big deal gets you through
29 term papers, 3 book reports,l7exams,
52 quizzes and 6 months of homework.
Sorry about that. Sheaffers big deal means you can
write twice as long. Because you
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How much do you think you can
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3 1968 W. SHEAFFER PEN COMPANY. FORT MADISON. IOWA. A TEXTRON COMPANY
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9 '

THETA CHI, PHI TAU PLAY

15-13. Delta Chi narrowly edged
the AGRs 15-12, 9-15, 17-15.
In the only other action, DU
walloped the Phi Eps 15-6,15-3.
Team 1 managed a close
20-13 win over Mag-7 to enter
the Law League finals against
Browns Bandits.
The Independent basketball
finals begin Thursday at 7:30
pjm. in the Fla. Gym. This years
finals will be in the fonn of a
tournament with six teams
participating. Tonight the
Flavett Tigers face the English

Thursday. Octobar 31,1968, ThrFttHda Alligator,

Dept, at 7:30 for the right to
play the Spudnuts Monday
night.
The other quarter final match
will be between Diamond Village
and a yet undetermined team.
The winner of this game will
meet A.C.U. on Monday night
with the finals being held at
7:30.
yvsw.*.v.sw-Vs*>v.v.%sw.
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Page 19



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 31J9^}

Page 20

\l jmjjj P SUPER RIGHT VAC-PACKED SLICED j| |
WHOF i SPICED LUNCHEON 6o, Pkg A AGES fl
1559-1967...108 TEARS YOUNB ;J ....., UM
Two Convenient Locations SAL AAAI 6oz. Pkg. jK
Wj 2 PiCKLE L AF ... 6 ZPk9 ft

CLOROX $£ 49C
[ instant a&p 99^^^H
I COFFEE 10 oz.jar
\ SUNNYFIELD
1 WAFFLES p^IOC^BH
DEL MONTE LIGHT CHUNK
tuna 3/89cI
TIP TOP FROZEN
DRINKS can lOt^BI
SULTANA APPLE BASE
JELLY jar* 3/sl.oo^B
I A & P SLICED OR HALVES 1
I PEACHES 3/899
A NORTHERN ROLL
ATOWELS 3/799
M FLUFFY ALL GIANT
Ldetergent 599
B i
1
6 PACK CARTON OF 16 oz. BOTTLES I
R. C. COLA 39cssu1

SUPER RIGHT TENDER DELICIOUS
PICNIC SHOULDER £ 8 b 399
SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
CLOSE TRIMMED, SQUARE CUT
BEEF CHUCK ROAST 499
SUPER RIGHT HARD CORN FED WESTERN
Va pork loin sliced
pork CHOPS a 69<
|j
FIRM CRISP K|
_ LETTUCE > 25c fj
CARROTS S? 23C H
TOMATOES 29 c B
BAKERY 9
w|
JANE PARKER WHITE P|
BREADS" 2/55C U
JANE PARKER FQ
SWEET ROLLS pkg z 3/SI.OO N
I | JANE PARKER LARGE
IJL FOOD ca ke 17oz 39< uj
urn Hfliie