Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
A
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A pep rally and student petitions will highlight a "Back the ij:
ij: Gators" week on campus as the UF football team prepares for iji
v Saturday's homecoming game.
iji UF students will be able to sign petitions showing their ij
v support of the Gators today and Thursday. UF cheerleaders will ij;
ij: circulate petitions to all residence areas, fraternity and sorority
iji houses, the Reitz Union information desk, first floor and the ij
ij: Union activities desk, third floor and the main desk in the Hub.
Friday night at Gator Growl, the petitions will be presented
:j: to Coach Ray Graves.
Thursday afternoon at 4:15 UF cheerleaders, the Gator jij
ij: Band, and UF President Stephen C. O'Connell will lead the jij
:: students to the lower drill field where the Gators will be jij
:j:j completing their final practice prior to Saturday's game against $j
jij Auburn. j
jjj The pep rally was called in response to an Alligator editorial
jij Tuesday. \
' |
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Spirit Shaker
Goal Neared
The Student Government
Spirit Committee is halfway to
its goal of S6OO for
Homecoming spirit shakers.
Jeff Weil, chairman, said a
total of $304 had been donated
thus far. Deadline is Thursday.
Donations have come from
Student Government, slol;Tau
Epsilon Phi, $100; UF Alumni
Assn., $102; and a student
donation, sl.
Six thousand orange and blue
shakers will be distributed to
students at the UF-Auburn game
Saturday.

IHWfefc Hi
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OPERATION AWARENESS

Operation Awareness met yesterday under the
pines in the Plaza of the Americas. A debate broke
out between the Collins faction and a group

7 The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 30 University of Florida, Gainesville Wednesday, October 30, 1968

BEFORE ACTION CONFERENCE
Tigert-Faculty Senate
Separation Considered

See Editorial, Page 8
By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writor
Proposals recommending the
revision of the University
Faculty Senate and calling for
the effective decentralization of
policy making will be brought
before todays Action
Conference meeting.
The proposals, including a
request for strengthening of
college-level policy-making
machinery, are being presented
in an eight page report from the
Task Force On Governance Os
The University, appointed by
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell in June.
As proposed, the University
Senate composed of deans,
faculty and administrators,
would be converted into a 100
per cent faculty senate.
The revisions call for the
predominantly-appointed
Faculty Senate to be 100 per
cent elective.
The senates size would be
reduced from 573 to 150
members to insure more
effective and orderly
deliberation, but each college
would still be assured
representation.
To permit more junior
members, tenure would be
eliminated as a requisite for
membership.
Also, the UF president would
be eliminated as the presiding
officer and his executive veto
could be overridden by a
two-thirds vote.
The apportionment formula,
providing for Fulltime Teaching
Equivalents (FTE) student
enrollment and FTE faculty, has
caused disagreement among the
nine members of the committee.
The three administrator
members call the formula truly
representational.
The three faculty members
and three students on the
committee argue that colleges
with a disproportionate ratio of
faculty and students would have

supporting continuation of the American war effort
in Vietnam. For the story, see page 5.

a corresponding dispropor disproportionate
tionate disproportionate representation.
According to Manning Dauer,
vice chairman of the Action
Conference, the report was
handed out to members last
week to study.
The Action Conference meets
at 3:30 today in room 101,
Little Hall.

1 A =
FACULTY SENATE PROPOSAL
Will Changes
Bring Anarchy
See Editorial, Page 8
Editors note: This is the first of a series examining the UF
Faculty Senate as it stands and as it may change.
By RICHARD THOMPSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Urgent memo to the UF administration: restructure the
University Senate into a Faculty Senate and decentralize
policy-making and you can
head off a serious burst in the
That is the proposal for
change. ;j:
Urgent memo to the UF
administration: Restructuring jjj
. ,| i* I Interpretive!
decentralizing policy-making :j; ;
would be a takeover of
administration power and
lead to eventual anarchy. jjj
That is an argument for /^MWAv.wiv.vMw.v.v.v. l
keeping the status quo.
The memos and their authors are scheduled to cross swords
today.
The issue is important to UF students because the University
Senate is almost completely responsible for the tenor of student
life at UF. Any change in its structure or composition could
conceivably change the entire tenor of student life.
Today is Action Conference (AC) meeting day.
Today AC is scheduled to hear the first report of its Task
Force On Governance Os The University, a study committee
appointed by UF President Stephen C. OConnell in June.
The Task Force recommends in its report that OConnell
place the proposals before the present senate and that he urge it
to consider the constitutional changes necessary to implement
the proposals at the earliest possible time.
(SEE 'WILL' PAGE 3)

Dauer says the conference
will also discuss the question of
whether to increase the number
of credit hours, thus decreasing
the number of courses for which
a student would enroll.
A proposal to drop members
who fail to attend meetings will
also be discussed, he said.

Champion
Calls NCAA
Penally 'Fair
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida State Athletic Director
Vaughn Mancha said Tuesday
that basketball coaches involved
in practices resulting in the
school being placed on
probation by the NCAA showed
poor judgment** and had been
reprimanded by university
officials.
I am disappointed the
violations took place in the
(SEE FSU PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

IN ACCENT SYMPOSIUM

Wayne Morse To Outline
'Dimensions Os Freedom

Sen. Wayne Morse, critic on
the present U.S. Vietnam War
policy, will discuss The
Dimensions of Freedom during
the Accent 69 Symposium on
the UF campus, Feb. 3-8.
Morse has been a senator
from Oregon for 24 years, and is
currently seeking re-election.
The senators experience in
Congress equips him with the
vast knowledge and resources to
bring about a strong relationship
between the legislative processes
and freedoms interactions,
Larry Berrin, Accent 69
chairman,said.
During the last session of
Congress, Morse was a member
of the Senate Committees of
Foreign Relations, Labor and
Public Welfare, Small Business,
and the Special Committee of
Aging. He is currently chairman
of the Foreign Relations
Subcommittee of the Labor and
Public Welfare Committee.
Sen. Morse is just another of
our growing list of speakers who
will participate in the Accent
Symposium, Berrin said.
As part of Accents attempt
to bring national speakers to
campus, several new features and
approaches have been added.
This years program will include
a photo and poster contest
delving further into the aspects
of freedom.

FSUs Champion Calls
NCAA Penalty 'Fair

PA6E ONt^j

basketball program, Mancha
said in a prepared statement. I
feel the basketball coaches used
poor judgment in allowing these
infractions to take place.
The NCAA announced at its
St. Louis meeting that Florida
State had been placed on
probation for conducting drills
and practice sessions for
prospective scholarship winners
and setting up mandatory
practice sessions in the off
season.
The NCAA ruling means the
Seminole cage team will be
ineligible to participate in any
post season games or appear on
television during the coming
year.

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We're the student's friend, so stop in
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CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 So. Main Phone 376-7771
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la tha official Student newspaper of the University of Florida
sad la pubUshed five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Poet Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or 53.50 per quarter.
Urn Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or errongpus Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. Tha Florida Alligator will
aot bo responsible for more then one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement schedule
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

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SENATOR WAYNE MORSE
... staunch Vietnam war critic

Accent 69 is the new
beginning for the Symposium, in
an effort to establish this
program as the academic
tradition of the University,

John Champion said the
school planned to make the
necessary changes in the
program to comply with NCAA
regulations.
Champion said he believed
the school had been treated
fairly in the matter.
We appreciate the
commendation given by the
NCAA to the university for its
cooperation, he said. We
believe fair consideration has
been given to the circumstances
and the degree of violation, as
well as to the corrective action
taken by Florida State.
Investigators from the NCAA
were on the Florida State
campus several months ago
inquiring into the basketball
program.

Berrin said.
In the weeks to come, more
speakers will be announced and
further parts of the program will
be revealed, he said.

The penalty was seen as an
especially hard blow for the
Seminole cage fortunes, since
last years squad compiled the
best record since the school
began playing major opponents
and hopes were high for the
coming season.
Last years team was 19-8,
capped by the Seminoles First
trip to the NCAA mid-east
regional playoffs. Florida State
was beaten in the first round of
the tournament by East
Tennessee State

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State Theatre
Didnt Censor

§ A story published in the
§ Alligator last Wednesday
J implied that officials of the
| State Theater had censored
a risque portion of a movie
§ entitled The Silence.
§ That is so ridiculous, its
beyond belief, says State
:j Theater owner Bill
j: Henderson. How long do
j: you think Id stay in business
if we censored films?
i; The article described how

j; just as a nude love scene was
J about to begin, the projection
5 light went out and the film
1 stopped. The obvious
: implication of the story was
: that the writer assumed the
j film had been deliberately
: stopped to censor the
: scene.
I Henderson said the film
i ripped and the projectionist
B stopped the projector to
j; respindle it. It was,
: Henderson says, a
:j coincidence that the film
\ broke at the nude scene.
I We dont censor anything
here. I may not buy a film,
l but once weve got it, thats
5 the way it runs. Unless
\ something like this happens.
I It happens occasionally to all
theaters. The film itself may
ij be defective or frayed,

WH THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR... /ffl)
iMj THE REFRESHING ONE _jt[
H Loans Up To S6OO
Budyat Payday Ant*
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376-5333
222 W. University Avs.
WITB
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'THE SILENCE*'

Our Mistake
An article published by
the Alligator last Wednesday
implied that the State
Theater had censored a
nude love scene during a
showing of Ingmar Bergmans
The Silence.
The Alligator wishes to
rectify the impression the
story may have given many
readers. The film was not
censored. It broke and had to
be respindled, inadvertently
deleting the nude scene.
The Alligator also wishes
lo apologize to State Theater
owner Bill Henderson and the
projectionist on duty during
the showing for any harm the
story may have caused them.
causing it .to break, he
explained.
He also pointed out that
the projectionist was
offended by the articles
implication because he is
very dedicated to doing his
highly technical job to the
best of his ability.
He emphasized again that
the State theater has never
and will never censor a film.



- FACULTY SENATE PROPOSAL*"
Will Changes
Bring Anarchy!
f FROM PAGE ONt J
The nine-member task force is chaired by Ruth McQuown, S
political science professor, who strongly recommends the task S
force proposals and warns: Maintaining the status quo at the <
present slight rate of change only invites a serious burst in the v
system. $
Outspoken and active critic of any attempt to change the UF i
power structure, especially to erode the presidents authority,
is agriculture economics professor John Greenman. >
In many respects McQuowns and Greenmans attitudes are 5
symbolic of the growing polarity of campus and national >
political thought. :
To liberal McQuown and many moderatp-liberals the £
proposal is the last hope for reasonable change. Greenman ;
and other moderate-conservatives see the proposal as an £
invitation to eventual anarchy.
In a world where change has become a byword to success and
existence, the nature of the issue behind the task forces ?
proposals is almost changeless: the changing of the guard.
How do you distribute or redistribute power, broaden jjj
its base, and somehow fulfill the promise of democracy but still §
keep intact the interests of those who have invested everything
into the system as it was?
What is wanted, in short, is that workable proposal which $
will please the greatest consensus of campus and non-campus §
political views.
The moderate-liberals think they have found it. (The
moderate conservatives think it already exists.)
Their proposal, they say, is based on evolutionary not
revolutionary change.
It is aimed at greater participation in the decision-making §
processes by a broader base of people but still remains within §
the current system. 'i
It seeks not to change the system, but personnel within the §
system. §
Specifically, in its eight-page report, the task force §
recommends three changes: 1) restructuring the present §
University Senate into a Faculty Senate, 2) effective 5
decentralization of university policy-making to the college level S
and 3) strengthening of college-level, policy-making machinery. $
Proposals two and three deal essentially with the mechanics ij
of bringing back to each department the right to work on and |
solve its own special problems. £
It is the first of the three proposals that holds the greatest ij
potential for significant change. By its changes the senate would >
transform from an advisory to a legislative body.
As proposed, the University Senate composed of faculty, £
deans and administrators would be converted into a 100 per |
cent Faculty Senate.
This would have the democratic effect of eliminating the §
executive branch from participating in the legislative branchs |
deliberations. §
As proposed, the Faculty Senate would be 100 per cent
elective. Only 50 of 573 members are elected now, the rest are
appointed by the administration. £

Doctor Wins Prize
A second year resident in
internal medicine in UFs
College of Medicine has won
first prize in the annual
American Diabetes Association
Research Award competition.
Dr. David Pawliger received
SSOO for his research paper of
diabetes and related disorders,
particularly control of
cholesterol formation in man.
Among Dr. Pawligers
numerous professional
organizations are Tau Beta Pi,
Alpha Omega Alpha and Phi
Kappa Phi. /
MAULDINS
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O'Connell Selects 22
For 5 UF Committees

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Tuesday appointed 22
students to positions on five
university committees.
Selected to serve on the
Committee on Student Affairs
are Clyde Taylor, student body
president; Renee Millard, Mortar
Board president; Jean Hanna,
past Panhellenci Council
president; John Kessler, Hume
Area president; Mike McNemey,
Interhall Council president, and
Frazier Solsberry, past Student
Senate minority floor leader.
Students named to the
Committee on Student Conduct
are Mike Katz, SG Secretary of
Legal Affairs; John Mica, past
SG Secretary of Academic
Affairs; Joan Schaffel, president
of the Association of Women
Students; Bob Mandell, SG

25 Seniors Named
To Hall Os Fame

Twenty-five seniors have been
selected for UF Hall of Fame
and 17 others named to Whos
Who Among Students in
American Colleges and
Universities.
Selected for both the Hall of
Fame and Whos Who were
Harold Aldrich, Phil Burnett,
Marti Cochran, John Dodson,
Martin Edwards, Gary Goodrich,
Roddy Grubbs, Sharyn
Hackney, Mary Jo Holland,
Manny James, Jean Johnson, Ric
Katz, John McPhail, Renee
Millard, Hames Moody, John
Morton, and John Ritch.
Also chosen were Joan
Schaffel, Larry Smith, John
Topzee, Jack Vaughn, Sue Ellen
Winkle, Bill Zewadski and Pete
Zinober.
Students named to Whos
Who were Skip Berg, Sam Block,
Roger Brown, David Chesser,
Gary Christianson, Jim
DeVaney, Janet Dippenworth,
Dave Doucette and Debbie Fein.
Also chosen were Judy
Graham, Joe Hilliard, Greg
Johnson, Doug Lamb, Phil

Wednesday. October 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator/

Secretary of Insurance; and Tom
Warner.
Three alternates were also
named to the Student Conduct
Committee: Kitty Oliver, Janet
Dippenworth, past SG Secretary
of Womens Affairs; and Ken
Howell, president of Sigma Chi.
Serving on the Committee on
Intercollegiate Athletics are
Miles Wilkins, SG Secretary of
Athletics; Greg Johnson, past
majority floor leader; and John
Morton, track star.
Four students were named to
the Board of Student
Publications: Bill Zewadski,
former member; Ed Tolle, SG
Secretary of Legislative Affairs;
Steve Wood; and Lee Pletts,
president of Alpha Chi Omega.
Serving on the Committee on

Lazarra, Lee Pletts, Tom
Thoman and Bill Wack.
The Hall of Fame and UF
nominees to Whos Who were
selected by a committee
including John Ritch, Blue Key
president; Renee Millard, Mortar
Board president; Sue Ellen
Winkle, SAVANT-UF president;
and Clyde Taylor, student body
president.
COIFFURES
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Student Organizations and
Social Affairs are Jim DeVaney,
Interfraternity Council
president; Bob Buck, SG
Secretary of Organizations;
Susan Johnson, president of
Graham Area; and Tom
Blackmom, past chairman of
Budget and Finance committee.
Appointments _to other
university committees will be
announced at a later time.
Why Do
Words
Fail You?
A noted publisher in Chicago reveals
a remarkably effective method for
building a working knowledge of over
2,000 powerful, expressive words
quickly and easily.
People uneble to express
themselves effectively often loee
many business and social
opportunities. Others who use their
vocebulary improperly, subject
themselves to ridicule and cause
others to misunderstand what they
mean.
We need a good vocabulary, says
the publisher, to understand more
clearly what we read and hear, to
think with greater clarity and logic,
and to express ourselves more
effectively when we speak or write. A
command of words instills
confidence in one's ability to speak
convincingly and impress others with
one's knowledge and understanding.
To acquaint the readers of this
paper with the easy-to-follow rules
for developing a large vocabulary, the
publishers have printed full details of
their interesting self-training method
in a new booklet, "Adventures in
Vocabulary," which will be mailed to
anyone who requests it. No
obligation. Send your name, address,
and zip code to: Vocabulary Studies,
835 Diversey Parkway, Dept.
164-010. Chicago, 111. 60614. A
postcard will do.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Wednescty, October 30, 1968

Conflicts Entered Into Law Complex Delay

By DAVID OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs new $3 million Law
Center north of Fraternity Row
has cost a lot more than
expected.
The gray concrete and red
brick main faculty building, now
substantially completed, has
been the cause of many
headaches.
One of the biggest has been
the many delays in construction.
Althought slated to open this
fall, the center is now scheduled
for classes the first week of
January.
One of the main hold-ups was
the result of a workmans strike
last spring.
Though the strike lasted only
a few days, getting back to work
after it was over caused further
delay, construction
superintendent Bill Holley said.
Because the strike was so
short, it probably wasnt the sole
reason for extending the opening
date, said Holley who heads the
project for Smith and Sapp
Construction Co.
New Airline
Right Slops
In Gainesville
Shawnee Airlines, based in
Orlando, has extended service to
Gainesville, with flights to
Jacksonville, Orlando, Lakeland,
Miami, Tallahassee, Daytona
Beach, Tampa, Fort Lauderdale
and West Palm Beach.
The service, using Beachcraft
99 planes, went into effect
Monday.
Allergy Shots
Available
Fulltime students can receive
de sensitization injections for
allergies at the Infirmary
without charge.
The student should take his
vaccine and instructions for
dosages to the Infirmary to
make arrangements for receiving
the injections.
The service will be provided
every weekday from Monday
through Friday, 8 to 11:30 a.m.,
and 1 to 4:15 p.m.
Each student is asked to
arrange a convenient time with
the clinic nurse within this
schedule. He should then come
in each week on the same day
for repeat injections.

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The five month delay in the
opening date appears result of
many changes in supervisory
personnel.
Smith and Sapp has had
seven or eight superintendents
since construction began,
Holley said. Ive been here only
about five weeks.
When I got on the job it
appeared Smith and Sapp had
been getting very little
cooperation with the architects
epresentative, he said.
There were apparently
personality conflicts involved,
he said.
Pancoast, Ferendino and
Grafton, a Miami based
architectural firm, supervised the
construction in liasion with the
Board of Regents.
According to the
construction contract, Smith
and Sapp could be slapped with
a S4OO-a-day penalty for not
meeting the completion date.
However, the decision is up
to the Board of Regents.
Presently, no recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations have been made for such a
penalty, Board of Regents
architect C.L. Klonis said.
But, Holley said, the College
of Law could have moved in
piecemeal several weeks ago. He
cited a Florida State University
policy of moving in as soon as
each floor is completed.
On a tour of the new
building, Holley pointed out
several sections of the building
have been completed for some
time and only slight corrections
have been needed.
However, FSU has a bad badpolicy
policy badpolicy of moving in before total!
completion, since construction!
may hamper routine, Klonis!
said. I
Final inspection of the!
building will be in two weeks,!
Klonis said. He said he could not I
comment on the dalays since he I
was not here during the strike or I
personnel changes. |
Two-thirds of the buildings!
cost was shouldered by the state 1
while the federal government!
furnished the rest. I

However, Smith and Sapp!
will take about a $250,000 loss!
in the project, Holley!
estimated. Any penalties!
incurred for delays are extra, he I
said. I
Some of architectural!
techniques used in the building!
are new to this campus, Holley!
said. I

r l
RIGHT
. .C.L. Klonis: "moving in j
piecemeal bad policy"
LEFT |
. .Bill Holley: personality
conflicts were apparently I
involved" -I
One of the most noticeable is I
bare structural concrete on the |
inside of the building. 1
This is supposed to be
esthetic, Holley said.
Stairwells appear to be half
finished though they are
completed and walls have a
texture similar to the underside
of a concrete highway bridge.
The College of Law will move
in after classes are over this
term. Dedication ceremonies are
slated for Jan. 31 and Feb. 1.

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Forum Debates War

Operation Awareness a
newly formed Student
Government open forums series
-met yesterday in the Plaza of
the Americas
The forum centered
around the upcoming senatorial
race between Ex-Governor
WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN STRIPPING AWAY THE
ENCUMBERANCES: Prof.
James Millican drops all pretense
and speaks on Philosophy of
the Body at a MENSA lecture
tonight at 8 in room 105 B of
the Architecture and Fine Arts
Building.
IN SELECTIONS TODAY
ARE WALTZ OF THE
TOY-ADORS, BILLY TELLS
OVERTURE, AND
BIGBADWOLF*S FIFTH: The
University Symphony Orchestra
will give a Childrens Concert
today at 10 a.m. in the
University Auditorium.
IN LOOK, GANG, EITHER
THAT GUY IN THE SHEET
WAS IN THE KLAN OR ELSE
HE WAS A- ULP!: The
Florida Speleological Society
meets tonight to discuss the
Halloween party it held in a cave
last Saturday. The whispers will
be heard in the Reitz Union
tonight at 7.
IN ALL IN FAVOR OF
CALLING THE PRESIDENT
FIELD MARSHALL SAY
AYE: The Veterens Club
meets tonight at 7:30 in room
349 of the Union to vote on
constitutional changes for their
club, pick up Homecoming
tickets, and do other business.
IN I THOUGHT I WAS
WATCHING ATILLA THE
HUN BUT IT TURNED OUT
TO BE NEWSREELS OF
CHICAGO: The SDS-SSOC
shows a movie tonight in the
Union Auditorium at 8.
AND SPEAKING OF
PICTURES: The Class in Motion
Picture Techniques meets in
roomC-4of the Union tonight at
7.
IN SETTING RECORDS:
The Stereophiles meet in the
Fidelity Shop on 604 NW 13th
St. tonight at 8.
IN WOULD YOU LIKE A
CUP OF C| s oi P23 +
The
Pharmacy Dames have a fall
welcoming coffee in room Pill
of the Pharmacy wing of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center
tonight at 8.
AND HERES SOME OTHER
PEOPLE WHO THINK THEY
HAVE THE FORMULA (NN +
HHW = EWTV): The Young
Republicans meet in room 150 C
and D or the Union tonight at 8.
IN GREAT NEW IDEAS
FOR COED SELF- DEFENSE
(THE SCABBARD MIGHT BE
A BIT AWKWARD,
THOUGH The Fencing
Club gathers in the Basement
Recreation Room of the Florida
_Gym tonight at 7 p.m.
GATOR ADS SELL!
an
mh W K

SGs OPERATION AWARENESS

Leoy Collins and Rep. Ed
Gurney. Representatives from
both Collegians for Collins and
students from the Gurney
organization opened up the
activities by stating their
candidates qualifications.
Major issues of the campaign
were tackled throughout the
afternoon, monitored by four
faculty members.
Moderated each hour by a
different faculty member, topics
included the Vietnam War,

time to put up...
The generation that's running the show right now
Is everything you say it is. \
It makes war,
Persecutes minorities, wallows in hypocrisy
And abominates your idols. \
But it is a good many things
You sometimes forget it is, as well. It's
Tom Dooley, Dag Hammarskjold, Jack Kennedy.
It is concepts: the Peace Corps, Ecumenism.
The United Nations, Civil Rights.v 4 v
It is awesome technology, inspired research, ennobling dreams.
You can take credit for
None of its accomplishments. \
Blame for none of its sins.
But the time is near when \
The terrible responsibility will be \
Yours. X.
You can stand on the shoulders of this generation
And reach for the stars v
Quite literally. Or \
You can keep to the ground \
Snapping at its heels. \
It's your choice. ~~ \
You're the candidates of the future. X
You are our life insurance. \ v
* \ \
v \
Phoenix ||
Mutual 11
1 LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Ejflg /
% HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT Bjjjj Jg #

aid to education, Supreme
Court, foreign policy, the House
bill prohibiting federal aid to
students participating in
demonstrations, gun control, the
poverty program, and defense
spending.
Faculty members
participating included Dr.
Augustus Burns, professor of
social sciences, 1-2 p.m.; Fred
Breeze, graduate assistant,
3-3:30 p.m.; Dr. Merlin Cox,
associate professor of social
sciences, 3:30-5 p.m.

Wednesday, October 30, 1968. The Florid* Alligator,

I More Contributions!
j To Fund Requested!
§ . S
In an open letter to the university community, the UF §
i United Fund co-chairman has requested faculty members to :|j
increase their contributions within the next few days.
At this point in the United Fund effort the UF is not doing
nearly so well as the Gainesville community outside the jj
jjj university, Dr. George M. Harper said. §
The letter urges faculty members and university personnel in J
general to respond generously to the local drive. jj:
Unless there is a greater acceptance of United Fund Jjj
responsibility among university personnel in the next day or :
| two, the results will be disappointing to those who consider this £
ft kind of civic effort important, the letter said. f.

Page 5



Page 6

I, Tbs Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

Genes Hold-Out Ended,
Endorses HHH In Stretch

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Eugene J. McCarthy endorsed
Hubert H. Humphrey for
President Tuesday, just one
week before the election, and
renounced any plans to return to
the Senate or to seek the
presidency in 1972 as a
Democrat.
Still embittered by his defeat
as a peace candidate for the
Democratic presidential
nomination in Chicago,
McCarthy urged his youthful
followers likewise to vote for
Humphrey but said he would
not ask them again to work
within the established political
processes* of the Democratic
Party.
He put his attitude toward
Humphrey and the election
succinctly in a paraphrase of his
statement for radio and
television in the Senate gallery.
His position on Vietnam,
foreign policy and the reform of
draft laws falls far short of what
I think they should be, but the
choice is between the vice
president and Richard Nixon,
and I support Mr. Humphrey.
The wording of the statement
issued to newsmen by his aides
raised immediate questions
whether McCarthy was
considering formation of a
splinter party to run for the
Senate in 1970, when his term
expires, or for the presidency
four years hence.
McCarthy said in reply to a
question whether he was bowing
out of all future Senate and
presidential races that its still
unclear.
Pressed on the question of a
new political party, he merely
smiled and referred to his
Hanoi Rejects
Concessions
PARIS (UPI) Mai Van 80,
the senior North Vietnamese
official in France, Tuesday flatly
ruled out any military or
political concessions by Hanoi in
exchange for a U.S. bombing
halt. He spoke on the eve of a
possibly crucial negotiating
session with American
diplomats.
0
As both sides prepared for
the 28th meeting Wednesday
since the Washington-Hanoi talks
began May 13, the South
Vietnamese government and the
Viet Cong demanded full
representation to the exclusion
of the other at any formal peace
conference.
The meeting Wednesday is
regarded as critical because it
will be the last before the UJS.
presidential election.
80, who serves as senior
adviser to the North Vietnamese
delegation at the talks, made
Hanois position clear in a
statement Tuesday night to a
meeting of the Friends of
Vietnam Association.
We will not pay for any
cessation of bombing, Bo said.
The United States must end the
bombings completely and
unconditionally. After the
bombings halt, we are prepared
to discuss other matters of
mutual interest with the aim of
finding a peaceful solution.

one-page statement, which said:
In order to make it clear
that this endorsement is in no
way intended to reinstate me in
the good graces of the
Democratic party leaders, nor in
any way to suggest my having
forgotten or condoned the
things that happened both
before Chicago and at Chicago, I
announce at this time that I will
UFi
REPORT
RFK Memorial
To Perpetuate
Ideals,Work
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Kennedy family announced
Tuesday creation of a
foundation to carry forward
the ideals... and work of Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy, assassinated
last June in Los Angeles.
The announcement of the
Robert F. Kennedy Memorial
was made by the late senators
widow, Ethel Kennedy, and his
brother, Sen. Edward F.
Kennedy, at a news conference
at Mrs. Kennedys home in
suburban McLean, Va.
Included on the foundation's
board of directors were Mrs.
Kennedy and the widows of two
other assassination victims, Mrs.
Aristotle Onassis, recently
remarried widow of President
John F. Kennedy and Mrs.
Martin Luther King.
We hope to develop a small
action force to identify the
central needs of our
country ... to bring together
people of sensitivity and
creativity, Edward Kennedy
said.
Mrs. Kennedy, pregnant with
her 11th child, remained
secluded in her huge Hickory
Hill home, but issued a
statement through her
brother-in-law which said it was
the family's hope that the
foundation would carry
forward the ideals and carry on
the work so important in the life
of my husband.
Kennedy told reporters the
memorial foundation would not
be politically active and would
not finance any projects.
Instead, he said, it would focus
attention to problems and ask
other foundations and
government agencies to provide
money to solve them.
Co c hairmen of the
foundation will be the late
senators parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph P. Kennedy. Thomas J.
Watson Jr., chairman of the
board of IBM, will be finance
chairman. The executive director
will be Frederick G. Dutton,
former assistant secretary of
state under President Kennedy.

not be a candidate of my party
for re-election to the Senate
from the State of Minnesota in
1970. Nor will I seek the
presidential nomination of the
Democratic Party in 1972.
Asked to elaborate, McCarthy
said, My publisher wont let
me. Itll take a book to explain
the situation. He is writing a
book about his bid for the
nomination.
He said he would discuss his
support for Humphrey in
speeches later this week in
Oregon and California. He said
he had not discussed his
statement with Humphrey.
McCarthy previously has said
he would not lead a fourth-party
movement in this election.
Regents Meet
The Board of Regents will
meet Friday in Room 144 of the
Graduate Library.
The regular meeting will
begin at 9 a jn. and will conclude
at noon.

WE APOLOGIZE
f
|r ; :- -. v'-. ; Y /. ;
eeanae el seen riwiXie wimms to ear s.M cMchen spoil last mnaiiiy,
eteenr et em customers nag to wait tee tang for OsNvary. rr~|~n
Tauag we me waving the seme .H cMchen special with french fries, hash
puppies an# slew, an we*re reeoy for yen. Free OeMvery PM 178-1468.
Thanhs
Larry* Para hop
You Need Gas
Anyway! Right?
\ 1 /
Then Buy Your Gas At
H&Y CAR WASH And Get
A FREE CAR WASH Too!
Ael Save The Tokens Given With Every
Geion Os Texaco Gas And Get Your
Car Washed REE. HAY CAR WASH
Juts 2 Blocks Hos Campus 303 NW 13ih

Out of my way
Dearies!
rushing to answer a
AD!
1968
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DRESS: COAT & TIE



Interhall Council Asks
For Curfew Suspension

UF Interhall Council
recommended freshman curfew
be lifted for Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday of Homecoming
Week in a letter to Vice
President Lester Hale.
The curfew suspension was
proposed for three reasons,
Interhall President Mike
McNemey said.
First, it would let all students
participate in the building of
Homecoming decorations.
Second, the students would
be able to participate fully in all
functions related to
Homecoming.
Finally, it would remove the
inequity faced by male students
who chose freshman dates, and
must comply with the present

'Appreciation
Honors Veterans

Operation Appreciation, the
UFs unique system of
recognizing Vietnam veterans,
honors the 82nd Airborne
Division this week.
Four Vietnam veterans from
the Ft. Bragg, N.C. base, all
decorated officers, will represent
the entire base as Homecoming
weekend guests of the
University.
During the two-day event
Friday and Saturday, the four
will get royal treatment
including pretty university coeds
for escorts.
Started three years ago,
Operation Appreciation has
become a traditional part of the
annual Homecoming celebration.
But the idea of honoring an
entire air base is being done for
the first time this year.
Officers taking part are: Ist
Lt. Thomas Glenn Alfano, a
Fairleigh Dickinson University
graduate; Capt. Roger S. Pitts,
University of Alaska graduate;
Ist Lt. Reginald G. Moore, U.S.
Military Academy and
capt. Joseph S. Prince,
University of Georgia graduate.
Escorts will be: Tina
Lindberg, Jo Young, Dianna
Leach, and Joan Bradbury.
Clifford Davis, Operation
Appreciation chairman, said
the delegation will arrive
No New Word
On KilcerCase
No new developments have
occured in the John Kiker
murder case, according to
Gainesville Police Detective Lt.
Thames.
Kiker was arrested last week
and charged with homicide when
police were called to his home
and found his wife, Mary, shot
dead on the bathroom floor.
There was no apparent
motive for the shooting at the
time of Kikers arrest, and police
are still unable to give any
additional information on the
case.
A preliminary hearing has not
been set yet for the 62-year old
Kiker, head of UFs department
of Bioenvironmental
Engineering.

curfew, or be responsible for the
girls resulting offense
McNerney said.
Copies of the proposal were
Jennings Hall
Unhurt By Fire
No damage was reported in a
grease fire last night at Jennings
cafeteria.
Gainesville Fire Department
was notified of the grill fire after
the automatic extinguisher in
the ventilator hood failed to
function and hand extinguishers
could not quell the blaze.
Cafeteria officials said the
grill would be in operation this
morning.

Thursday and stay at the
Holiday Inn in Alachua.
Activities begin with an
official welcome, followed by a
whirlwind of fraternity parties, a
tour of campus and exposure to
UF students and functions.
Shifting into high gear
Friday, the veterans take part in
the big Homecoming parade that
starts at 1 p.m., then go to the
Florida Gymnasium for the
traditional Florida Blue Key
Smoker and a first-hand view
of politicking Florida-style.
The Florida Blue Key
Banquet follows, with the scene
moving to Florida Field and
Gator Growl at 8 p.m. The
Coronation Ball in the Reitz
Union ends the night.
On Saturday, the big event
will be the Florida-Auburn
football battle at 2 p.m. at
Florida Field.
five till nine
dining room only
{ITALIAN
/ SPAGHETTI DINNER\
U 99c
y H real Italian
V v sauce ladled on
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Ms
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LOCATION
1505 N.W. 13th Street 378-2481
2310 S.W. 13th Street 376-2696

sent to Frank Adams, dean of
men; Betty Cosby, dean of
women; Director of Housing
Harold Riker and Joan Schaffel,
president of Association of
Women Students.
Tuesday, McNerney had
heard no word concerning
acceptance of the proposals.
We anticipate that the
Deans Office will cooperate
with the Homecoming effort by
allowing the freshmen women to
fully participate in all the
activities on Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday, McNerney said.

NOW ON SALE
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Wadnaaday, Octobar 30, 1968, Tha Florida AHigator,

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across from the New Law School
A

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florida AHipetor, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

_ Th e Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
A is the exercise of respomitMirty."
Dave Doucette
i MI/hUuUA/ Managing Editor
Atl Raul R mirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
If "What Was That?" UK*m|hk

The Alligator Inquizitor
I
I; By LEWIS ROTHLEIN >
5 v

Howdy. Its Wednesday. You know, Wednesdays
| have had particular importance. For instance, once
JJack the Ripper did a disasterous deed on a
>:Wednesday, and that day was known to him,
j: thereafter, as Slash Wednesday.
>
Gawd! Arent 1 terrible? Todays questions.
I
i
1. What' was the name of Vanderbilts
quarterback last week?
2. Who was the chief counsel for the prosecution
at the Monkey Trial at Dayton, Tennessee, in
: 1925? Who was the chief defense counsel?
)
3. What does the word Charisma mean?
t
i
4. What was the name of the Prime Minister of
Australia who recently drowned?

Watching

The thermometer has been
sagging, the football team has
been sagging, as grades are
returned spirits start sagging.
Homecoming kicks off Friday
on a student population that
needs a real good kick. The
attitude on the UF campus is
sombre. Somehow the
excitement of a brand new
academic year has been lacking
it is dull and quiet on the
campus and it shouldnt be. You
cant blame a disappointing
football season for the lack of
enthusiasm. Its something more.

Is Century Tower Dropping Bricks?

attitude of entering freshmen
and returning students has
changed. The quarter system was
blamed over and over last year
for the pressure it placed on the
students. But thats not the
answer to this morose scene.
Freshmen are smarter (senior
placement scores are higher) and
older students are more serious
about their grades.
The draft, the war, the
election, the riots, and the peace
talks all seem to bear down and
Create a weary burden.
They are not all new
problems but their effect seems

I
5. What were the colors of the Florida license
plates last year? (a toughie) How about the year§
before that? $
6. Is it true that a book is being written about !:
the end of a famous Jewish dance, called The Last?:
Hora?
Yesterdays answers: s
L A project responsible for the development of?
the atomic bomb, headed by Leslie R. Groves?
2. Mississippi State, Fran Curci, University of?
Miami 3. Bob Woodruff 4. Bill Killeen 5. a.TheJ:
Whiteoaks series by Mazo de la Roche b.THE?
FORSYTE SAGE by John Galsworthy c.ROGUE?
HERRIES by Hugh Walpole d.THE CONSTANT §
NYMPH by Margaret Kennedy e.Little Women by?
Louisa May Alcott j:
fell your girl youre against marriage today. :

EDITORIAL

The Forgotten Ones

The Action Conference today will
consider one of the most significant,
sweeping proposals ever officially advocated
at the university.
The University Governance Task Force is
slated to present to the conference a plan
calling for the complete revamping of the
method used to determine university
policies.
But for all the much-needed changes
suggested, including abolishment of the
totally unrepresentative University Senate
and decentralization of academic decisions
to the college level, the task force apparently
overlooked something.
A very important something, as a matter
of fact. Namely, the students.
Admittedly, a faculty, senate elected by
the faculty would be a radical step forward
in curing the archaic ills of the UF.
But and there may be those who would
dispute this students are what a university
exists for.
And they should have a voice in how
their university and their education is
conducted.
The issue student involvement in their
own educational development is an
extremely critical one and is one Action
Conference members should analyze
painstakingly before passing this
recommendation on to President OConnell.
This is whats happening in nearly every

to be cumulative. The problems
are building up and weighing
everyone down.
Every year the Greeks are
critisized for running the
university and envied for having
so much fun. But even the
Greeks are edgy this year.
Instead of friendly rivalries,
open street brawls break out
between houses.
A story about a hassle in the
cheerleading squad and
fraternity and sorority houses
are in a rage because they are
being singled out for criticism.

Editors Viewpoint

And She Cries

A sigh. A blink. A tear. A
shining drop of sorrow.
America cries.
The worlds best last hope.
She cries.
A people divided. White and
black. Rich and poor. Old and
young. A nation asunder.
And she cries.
Golden waves of grain. A
million kids with empty bellies.
Land of the free. Black faces
glistening by flames licking a
darkened sky.
Home of the brave. Pregnant
nightsticks crimson with fervent
blood.
And she cries.
Her young, proud men felled
in battle. Her long-haired

They are especially touchy this
year and no one seems to know
why.
Everyone is edgy.
Enthusiastic dorm pranks
have all but disappeared and the
weak attempts to stir up spirit
have quietly died away. The
atmosphere here is almost like
the summer doldrums when
everyone wishes he were
somewhere else anywhere but
Gainesville.
Nothing has been going right.
Ihe university gets into a fight
over gatorade, the chimes

major country in the world: America
France, Britain, Czechoslovakia,
Germany, Italy, Mexico, Japan, and many
others.
Student involvement in the
decision-making process student power, if
you will is what its all about. Not only in
the educational process, which obviously
comes first, but in the socio-political
processes as well.
It is because students, and other ignored
groups, too, have been denied access to the
legitimate channels of power and policy that
their voices of stringent protest have been
heard the world over.
Their voices have been raised in disdain
for the social systems they cannot embrace.
They have demanded and will continue to
do so until the existing power structure gives
them meaningful recognition the voice
they deserve as active and concerned
participants.
It is well they should seek participation,
because the world of tomorrow, if there is to
be one, is theirs.
If the Action Conference denies students
here their opportunity to join, the travesty
may never be undone. v
The Action Conference should suggest
today that students also be granted a
legitimate and meaningful voice in the UFs
new legislative body.

By Harold Aldrich

children kicked in the streets.
Her black off-spring rotting in a
godless ghetto.
Her cities raped. Her
countryside charred.
Her leaders prey to an
assasins bullet.
Her people armed, only an
eyelash between them and instant
annihilation.
Her values scorned.
Her hopes stumbling,
flickering, gasping, dying, no
more.
And she cries. Her despair,
her sorrow, her anguish.
Hush, my child, and sleep.
Tomorrow is always a better
day.

By Jeff Alford

havent been working, and bricks
are even beginning to fall from
century tower.
Love bugs attacked
Gainesville and as soon as they
left the mouths took over.
Nothing has been right.
Whats the problem? Whats
the reason? Whats the cause?
There are too many tired
students and it is too early in the
year to be tired. Perhaps
Homecoming will change it all
and light fires in a moping
university.
Its time for the campus to
come alive.



Reflections

A Time When All Will Be Daisies

Your hair had the scent of
perfume that night; yet that is
not why I could find no peace.
Your back was as delicate as I
had imagined; but that was no
reason for unrest. It is simply
the heart of you that Id always
adored; and of that you seem to
have been deaf.
Your world of pageants and
parties leaves no place, save
memory, for personal intimacies.
Your poems and desires, long
my privilege, have become but
mere banalities. Your acting and
loving have all been my insight;

OPEN FORUM:
Adoiaml ViA&Mt
There is no hope for the complacent man.
r

Please Tell Us The Facts

MR. EDITOR:
Although the powers that
be dont usually hear the
students they claim theyre
protecting, there is an issue I feel
compelled to comment on the
Union Bo a r d-S tud e nt
Government controversy. I have
served on several Union
committees and the Student
Senate, so Im not unaware of
their goals and operations.
My position is the absurdity
of the recent general election of
the Union Board officers.
Granted there is a degree of
favoritism employed in the
present system, but in order to
hold a position or an office on
the Board, one must have a good
bit of (necessary) experience
behind him. As the new process
is now, anyone can run for an
office, without prior cognizance
of the mechanics involved in the
set-up and functioning of the
committees.
And, can you tell me that
electing the officers this way will
eliminate political favoritism?
Few committees have met yet,
as the chairmen doubt their
continuation of their position if
they were on the wrong party
and unfortunately, theyre
probably right.
Besides, just how are all these
funds being spent, if not on the
students? Politicos keep
shouting about students being

U.S. Law Has Room For Dissent

MR. EDITOR:
In an editorial of October 28,
Alternatives to Disenfranchise Disenfranchisement,
ment, Disenfranchisement, Bruce Greer says he will
not concur with the point that
we must first destroy in order to
rebuild, but he vindicates this
method by attempting to
destroy the arguments of the
dissenters.

yet something is blinding me and
surely nothing is there.
You say your love is lost and
may never be foigotten. But you
know thats not where its at,
because your ideals are just
shielding you from
imperfections reality.
You say therU come a time
when all will be daisies and little
not forgotten; but what is gained
when what is forfeited is today?
To wish your life away, I say, is
perhaps the greatest sin; to
further rationalize but to deceive
yourself.

deprived of the benefit of their
money; but Ive seen no facts or
figures. If you walk through the
building, youll find all the
meeting rooms filled constantly
with students!

Letters About Campus Thing
Indicate Readers Naivete

MR. EDITOR:
I read with interest and enjoyment your
supplement, The Campus Thing. I also read, with
sadness, the letters in your Monday, October 28,
issue of the Alligator. The two students who
commented demonstrated within their own letters
the irrevelances of their thought trains. Anyone who
considers the attitude of deception represented by
attempts at presenting editorial comments in the
guise of literary expression repulsive shows himself
pitifully naive. Any composite of articles in any
paper respresents an editorialization to a degree.
Anyone who would dismiss as an irrevelant girlie
magazine one of the most dynamic forces in
intellectualism and humanitarian law reform of our
day again also merely demonstrates a low caliber of
logic and understanding of the times.
It is however the third letter which distresses me.
Whereas the first two letters were from students, the
latter was from an assistant professor of an
educational instutition. He deplores the ideas and
concepts presented as aberrant and deviant
saying that they would degrade that which is
sacred and degrade personal virtue. The word
sacred means set apart. If there is one place where
the word sacred should have no context, it should
be an institution of education. Please allow me to
make a corollary. Late in the sixteenth century an

To the question of what is to
be done by persons feeling that
they no longer can abide strictly
by the edicts of mans law alone,
he proposes that when dissent
becomes so intense that it spurs
a man to act, he should be aware
of the significance of his act.
This is exactly what Thoreau,
Martin Luther King, and many
other sincere dissenters are

Because I have loved you now
for such an infinite time another
lifetime seems of little
consequence. But oh what
melancholy is this meandering,
and do tell of the tragedy that
befalls the dreamer.
So now sometimes, late at
night, 1 wonder whether it was
you that I was really chasing. It
seems so eternal, my adoration,
that perhaps I have lost sight of
the goal, being mesmerized by
illusion.
But back when I did see,
when everything was so young,

Student Government why
dont you justify your allegedly
noble purpose, and tell us the
facts!
LINDA TARLER, 4AS

aware of: the significance of
their acts and the obligation to
accept the consequences, in the
hope that they will improve the
system in the long run.
The individual conscience is
the bulwark of a democratic
society against authoritarianism.
Nowhere is this better illustrated
than in the courtroom, where
the role of juror is indeed

Italian astronomer expressed the hypothesis that the
stars were actually suns like our sun with planets
around them like our own planet. This idea was
declared heresy. Giordano Bruno was thrown into
prison, excommunicated and finally burned at the
stake on Feb. 17,1600. All because he questioned a
sacred concept. The same thing has happened time
and time again during the history of man. We owe
our science of medicine to outlaws who practiced at
the risk of their lives and souls. And yet, with all the
sacrifice that has been made, have we not yet
learned that a good concept will prove true no
matter how thorough an examination it is given?
Mr. Johnson, you criticize people who are trying to
find the truth whereas an educated man would
instead criticize a defective idea by proposing a
better one. Mr. Johnson you call us deviant and
forget that humanity owes much to the deviants.
A deviant discovered the medical knowledge that
perhaps has saved your or your familys life at one
time or another. A deviant founded the country
in which you live. A deviant died on the cross for
you. Mr. Johnson, is it immaturity to seek
knowledge and to recognize the lack of it? If so
then I hope we never grow up.
J. MARC DANIELSEN, 3AS

WwinMday, October 30, 1968. The Florida Alligator,

every girl had to be the right
one; each had to be the ideal.
And it was back then that I
believed in once upon a time
stories and happily ever afters.
Today is not that memory,
nor shall tomorrow speak of a
vision. So as I look upon you
now, I recall the image of the
girl I yesterday worshipped. For
now it seems so clear that the

Showing Nasties
On That Paper

MR. EDITOR:
I certainly read the letters
written by those dear, sweet,
good, kind and pure people,
taking such good and noble
offense at the cover of your
Campus Thing, in Mondays
Alligator. I read them, oh my
goodness, yes! Those dear,
sweet, good, kind and pure
people have the right idea,
indeed yes, but are a wee bit shy
of saying what they really feel
what I feel what we all feel
so I will say it, oh gracious me,
you bet I will, you journalistic
rascals, you!
Oh you nasty, nasty, nasty,
nasty things. It makes me so
mad! What you put on that

ordained upon each individual in
the jury.
Our imperfect system of law
and justice has room for dissent
as a catalyst for necessary
change. Even extra-legal acts,
followed by acceptance of the
consequences, have legal
significance.
ROGER UMSTEAD, 3AS

By Bruce Greer

attainment of perfection is by
definition self-defeating; and
pity the man who perceives that
he has found it.
But, alas, swinging at a
windmill is not solely for
Quixote; nor searching for
Camelot a mere kingly domain.
Well strain for a star, though
surely not the same one; and
each take a step or perhaps, into
Eden, simply peer.

paper! Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! Ooh!
How could you? (See; I can be
as logical as those other good
and moral people who wrote in
Monday against your Campus
Thing, upholding decency.)
You evil, boorish and naughty
people, showing God forgive
me for even thinking of such
things showing those THINGS
on that girl! Have you no
morals? Thats a no-no!
Youre almost as bad as those
horrible, perverted Grecian
maniacs. Imagine. They
displayed nudies in sculpture
even in front of children. Art!
Art, they called it, those wicked,
wicked Grecians. THERE IS NO
BEAUTY IN THE HUMAN
BODY ONLY NASTINESS
THATS WHY WE KNOW
ENOUGH TO KEEP IT
COVERED UP TODAY!
At times, 1 grant, it is
necessary to admit those
hush-hush areas do exist, but to
display them goodness me, as
if they were a natural part of the
body, like an arm or leg
dreadful. Land 0 Goshen do
you want the children to find
out that those things are there?
Heavens to Betsy, if people
want to look at dirty, filthy,
crude and vulgar things like the
two dirty, filthy, crude and
vulgar things on that
cover-girl-slut, let them read
Playboy.
So listen here, you perverted
journalists, from now on you
stick to showing just arms,
ankles, earlobes and pretty
things like that. Sakes alive, we
dont want to see any more of
those evil, ugly parts of the
body. My word, if you want to
show a slut like the one on the
cover of the Campus Thing,
next time you can at least black
out those Naughty-naughty
places. Then we can pretend
they dont exist.
Gracious! You awful things.
Next thing I know youll be
showing a womans navel! Oh, if
my mother knew what kind of
school I am attending, where
they allow such things! I get so
mad just thinking about it. Ooh!
Ooh! Ooh! Ooh!
DOUG OLANDER, 2UC
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300-words
in length. The editor reserves
the right to edn all letters
in the interest of space.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

w%
& ftll
r* Wm

4tHtTiS
nnuroAMFo No matter ow the temperatures |HJi|} 111 Ilf fj' |liji!UlU|T|l
DONIGAN S reach you'll stay 98.6 wearing this JXliiljllj.il til 111
University Avenue multi-colored box plaid poncho, jrl i l'limltfll
complete with hood and swingy tiiiiiilif wj fnliiliU4iffl|
You won't mind the winter winds in black fringe for that extra touch. 1111 111 rtf Mat | 1> M 111 U tTI
this bum orange flap culotte with sl9. Chocolate brown bell pants by lIHtIMI I Xlm&lffiM
orange and gold striped marine wool Elli. Modeled by Ellen. U|M M
knit sweater. Add the matching
Cardigan sweater for extra warmth. T V | ^^p^B
Accessories include opaque tights and : ''. H ,'i
All by Vidagar. jlplLa 1
Stanton Jr. brings you a great vested *'' |l||lp|§l
3 piece suit in gray double knit wool. f|||s|||f
A sparkle of chains and a sassy
foulard tie on crepe blouse will make
a hit at any football game. From the & |HBr J^^H|
Junior Terrace shop. B^liJipQl'
STAG *N DRAG
Stop for a second look ot this podia mM I
slasweles dross in dacron and wool. |
Gold and uMte cord trim at neak and MVfl
hamline.. Side belt tab accented with HBf
gold button. Sixes 5-11. Modeled by Bjute.
Carol.



U 'pXalc
g*
.a*
.. Ay
blue, Evening romance in Green and white .. jHw /
by Know Clothe*. Green velveteen i 'Bftrj 'l^Bml
vest matches cord flip skirt. Cotton
P i long sleeve blouse with lace at cuffs
BWMBMllly HMHtfHIHBMHHIim antl collar. Modeled by Jane. 2SJJ|
colony shop
\ r J|l W Gainesville Mall
'W Climb every mountain (If you can
~ -\
slacks In black and white
||p§p|l houndstooth, a belted hip hugger of
fiiipH wool and acrylic. Sizes 3-11. sl6.
Gold crepe Mouse with polkadot tie
by Four Comers. Sizes 28-34. sl2.
J|gf|sp| Modeled by Karen.
*
NJ
The Lone Ranger wevedgood-bye to
Tonto, when ho sow Linda in bar
"*"2? maiden outm. lnyottad PflOfOS fcjf 6VS MUffe/lVf
wade ball pants and seat wHh leather #
ties. Modeled by Linda. n

Wednesday, October 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 11



GATOR CLASSTFIEDS

FOR SALE
ivXvXOWI'VvWAVA^vvW'^^JvX-Vv:-.''
196/ Honda C 8450 43HP 4 speed
transmission. Good condition, runs
very fast. $475. Call Jon 372-9370.
(A-st-23-p)
Roberts 770 X stereo tape recorder
with mikes. Custom-made. Cover
slightly used. $325.00. 376-3543
evenings. (A-st-25-p)
1964 Honda Super Hawk, very good
condition, helmet and tools, $335 or
best offer. Must sell, call 378-3120.
(A-st-25-p)
1968 305 cc Honda Scrambler. Just
like new S6OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-2742. Philco port, tv 19 in. S4O.
With stand. 2 new VW Goodyear tires
S4O. Hoover vacuum cleaner $35.
(A-7t-25-p)
RCA Portable solid state stereo with
solid state reverb only $65.00 Call
Paul at 372-9438 after 8 Stereo Hi Fidelity component
equipment. Sell as a unit or
individual parts. Cost $950 selling for
$425 need money desperately
378-0157 (A-3t-26-p)
1965 Allstate Crusair motorscooter.
125 cc Runs good. SBO. Silvertone Hi
Fi phonograph with mahogany
cabinet S2O. Phone 376-3591.
(A-3t-27-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
> M * n
ll l| l| | £
|*| 2 9 i I 5
= a 2 n
___ z
" |~ ~| [ Ut u W N> M
&a a a a r 75
cv ai a> ai o
<<<< 3
tti 5 1
>''' 3 * 2
t\> a M M £ U
or o t
iP < c? c£ (D __
a a a- J
82 2 Z
3 3 3
Baalai *"* *+ #4
_ 1 Q > 3 Z
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2 m S
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BMIMB
HHHB

FOR SALE
THE amazing Blue Lustre will leave
your upholstery beautifully soft and
clean. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-28-lt-c)
Yamaha 1967 60cc. One owner,
excellent condition. Helmet & tools
included. Low mileage. SIBO. Call
Karl at 378-7661. (A-st-28-p)
Binoculars 7x50 mm, wide angle,
fully coated lens, leather case, hardly
used, cost $49, will sell for $23. Call
after 5 p.m. 376-8560. (A-lt-28-p)
Rest your feet, Vespa 125 cc, best
buy for money, starts easy, 55 to 60
mph. Excellent running shape, call
Russ at 378-9710 after 3:00 p.m.
SIOO. (A-st-28-p)
Honda 50. Like new, top economy
and dependability, new parts, electric
start. 1965, only $l6O. Call
372-3188 anytime. (A-3t-28-p)
TWO HOMECOMING TICKETS.
Buy at 405 NE sth Ave. Apt. 3, after
6:00 p.m. (A-lt-28-p)
Fender Pro reverb amp, $250. New
Gibson EB-2 bass guitar, burgundy,
S3OO. Owner drafted, must sell.
John, Ph. 372-9415. (A-3t-28-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

Page 12

;-x*X*X*>X FOR SALE
:y.*x-x*x*x*Xv>XvX-x*x-x-X X*x--'--'-"-v.^
FOR SALE: Honda 90 C2OO, 1964,
2 seater, with helmet, in good
condition $150; Call Jack Campbell
at 2081 or 378-4401 (home); may be
seen at Reitz Union, Room B-32.
(A-3t-28-p)
Are you a woman who wants to
increase your bustline or firm up and
support your heavy bosom?
SY M BRAETTE custom fitted
lingerie is now being introduced to
Gainesville. Call 378-7811, 376-7387.
(A-st-28-p)
Ex-Yamaha mechanic must sell own
1968 Yamaha 350. Kept in perfect
condition. Only 4300 miles. Call
372-0009 after 5:30. (A-st-28-p)
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL
TICKETS Best offer takes four
non-student tickets. Call 376-7430
between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.
(A-2t-28-p)
'V.SVMW.YXW>>/X*/V'ViV.V/; KvXv'MV"ij
FOR RENT
T .y.%%%ww..y.w.w..v. .*.:;xx*xx;M; CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval .England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Apartment for rent. Colonial Manor.
Call 372-7111. (B-st-23-c)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS
1700 SW 16th Ct. model apartment
now for rent includes: spreads,
pillows, bath accessories, bric-a-brac
etc. Call 376-9668 (B-st-26-c)
Excellent horse boarding facilities.
Hunters preferred. 12x12 box stall,
ring. Jumps, tack room. 10 minutes
from UF. 378-8016 mornings.
(B-st-23-p)
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
tb wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-c)
"irTs WRITTEN THU 4SO TIMES YOU CAN SIN ANO IE FON6IVEN.
THIS MOTION PICTURE IS AIOUT THE 4*l".
JANUS FILMS ....
POWERFUL! (k|AJ
There ire least two jflll IH
sequences which deal with
The audience H
>s brought yen close to the /
ect, very powerfully so There I BB I
could be ne question of the I
sincerity and art intention of B
this picture...lt should probably 'LJ
be limited to a mature,
serious minded audience /M I
Aren*/ Wmitn, N 1 (
SHOCKING! 4IUI
A violent and admittedly f
shocking film; we |0 beyond 1 IHI I B
homoseiuelity into perversion i lap I
end sadism tbt dominant / )
effect' fulfills the purpese es 11/
the film The intent is a serious
and artistic one
- Judith Cruf, Htrald Tribune \ 1!
ADULT! 4IMI
A worthwhile film for free, |
adult minds!" ) M
- Umooiin, W
3 57 9
*** ***" < Ny Vitt lyMen
in* aiM|
* CMll.en Ith
A.pe-ce- W^,
uoomunotniiTtMsor
Gl Will It AOMITTtO

&IJ£4l]*7*TM box OFFICE OPENS 6:30
gJtfjHffuiMJWlil SHOW STARTS 7:00
SHO o W AT7:OS
f| Jjjirnfsa RING-A-DING
Mi WSNEV JHIUBAs
)fT TRAP! J
* **-"* - CO .SC -IM
ALS
AT COLOR BT Dtimt

FOR RENT
e %
Will rent completely furnished
apartment to RESPONSIBLE persons
homecoming wknd. Accommodates 6
people. Ext. 5394. 378-5296 after 6.
SIOO. (B-3t-27-p)
Homecoming room for couple in
spacious mobile home. S6O. Includes
kitchen. Contact Randy, Andrews &
Connell Trailer Pk no. 11, evenings!
(B-st-27-p)
Homecoming only room for two or
three. Central air, comfortable. SSO
for November 1 and 2. Ask for Bob.
372-9370. (B-3t-28-p)
v.;.;.:-x > Xv < x-vG'X X'XX*x*x*x*X"V-v.%yx*x v
WANTED
v ,<
< x*x*x*x-v-'. .*xvx-x*x-x*xxNNv;*x*;*y*X'X
Need two west stand tickets for
homecoming game. Will bargain.
378-5740. (C-st-23-p)
**
Two general admission homecoming
tickets. Call 378-9842. (C-3t-27-p)
Wanted ride to Atlanta Ga. Thurs 31
or Fri 1. Will Pay. Call Ethel
378-1078 after 10 p.m. (C-2t-27-p)
Roommate Male 1 block from
campus. AC, TV only 33.75 per mo.
Ca 11376-6101 or come to 1316 N.W.
Ist Ave. (C-3t-27-p)
Y
TWO TICKETS TO HOMECOMING
GAME. Call after 1 p.m., 378-8769.
(C-2t-28-p)
Housewife will iron in your home or
mine, free repairs, Call before ten
p.m. 372-5269. (C-28-lt-p)
Need tickets to Homecoming Call
Dan Mason. 376-6461 or 378-7760.
(C-3t-28-p)
v-t.^v.vxv.vX/X'X-x-'-v.vx-Xs/x^X'X'V-X/^
HELP WANTED
: X*X XXM*S*i*J !*I'X*;*X J X*XXMWX HIGHLY QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
pay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)
Listeners wanted Wifi pay $1.50
for 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049. (E-25-10t-c)
Need 20 students for on campus
work during Christmas Break. Inquire
about qualifications in Rm 23 Tigert
Hall, Student Employment.
(E-25-6t-c)
Is there a bright Hausfrau with a
good general education who would
like to grade exam papers in a field
which she may not be familiar?
Prefer a relatively permanent resident
maybe a professors wife. Two to six
hous a week. Reasonably good
hourly rate. Write a note to box
14321 University Station. (E-st-26-c)
Part time student help Male over
21. Neat appearance required. Apply
Woody's 3458 W. Univ. Ave.
Between 3 and 5 p.m. (E-3t-26-p)
Students for stage crew. Knowledge
of lighting or technical procedures
desired. Call ext. 3484. (E-st-25-c)
ma LE have several part time
cashier, grill and carhop openings.
Help needed during noon hour. Apply
Kings Food Host 1430 SW 13th
P.M. Only. (E-3t-23-c)
AUTOS
&X*X*X*XNVX ; X*X*X' >iX !NV; X*X X*X-X*v::
59 MGA classic condition, engine
recently overhauled, newly carpeted
interior, red leather seats. $600.00
101V2 NE 7th St. after 6 p.m.
(G-3t-26-p)

Use our Randy
mall in order
form.

AUTOS j.
1964 Porshe 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2500.00.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-26-st-p)
CHEVROLET 1961 Stawag
automatic heater radio power
steering power brakes air conditioned
$550. 3789037. (G-3t-26-p)
1967 MG Midget, radio, heater, wire
wheels, luggage rack. Excellent cond.
$1650 or best offer. 378-1219 after 6
p.m. (G-st-28-p)
1965 Corvair Monza. Metallic gray,
automatic, radio, heater, only
$685.00. Phone 372-4505.
(G-lt-28-p)
pp
stofe
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OF THE
BELF-CONFESSE )
BOSTON
STRANGLER IS
IBASEDONRACT.
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I STRANGLER
limy Curtis
Henry Fonda
I George Kennedy
| MikeKelhn Murray Hamilton
ff f Wi C a^iecraaae
| Robert Ryer Kchanf FlMchar ABk.
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Bsnwwoo CotorbyOaluM



GATOR
CLASSIFIED

AUTOS |
XKE 1967, excellent condition. All
accessories, except air. Best offer
OV er $4450. Terms available. Call
378-6654 weekdays after 6 p.m.; Sat.
and Sun. after 12. (G-st-28-p)
1963 GRAND PRIX Pontiac. Bucket
seats, all power. Come see a GOOD
BUY at 207 B Flavet Village 3.
(G-3t-23-p)
Plymouth Wagon 1959. Power brakes
and steering, inspected. S3OO. Phone
372-9860 after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)
62 Olds F-85. Engine in top shape,
new paint, tires, brakes a good
running reliable car, but must sell. To
see or offer call Art 376-5432.
(G-3t-28-pr
1969*Saab 850 GT Monte Carlo.
Winning performance, Luxury of air
cond., Am/Fm. Rugged
dependability. Excellent local service.
sl6oo.Call evenings,
weekends. (G-4t-27-p)
1966 Datsun Sports Car with new
white leather grain vinyl top. 1600 cc
with disks up front, an excellent car
for highway and town. 378-0451.
(G-st-27-p)
PERSONAL
*5 5*
Wwwwxwwwwwwjwwsswww:
Need an ant eater? Baby ocelot?
Penguin? How about snakes, owls, or
a Ceratophrys calcarata? Call the
Underground Zoo, 378-8810.
(J-st-28-p)
Broward SE, the Great Pumpkin is
alive and well in Fletcher L. He will
come and delight Thurs. night. Get
your goodies ready. (J-lt-28-p)
Dear Rachel Baby, I am sorry I
missed you last night but you know
how busy Anthonys is. Please,
another chance and at lunch. Love
Marvin. (J-st-28-p)
Sweet Lovable Bob, please forgive
me. You should have told me that
those cute little escargots they serve
at Anthony's were snails. Liz.
(J-st-28-p)
ATTENTION: One washed-up Bull
Gator should be looking for a new
job far from G-ville. Please take him
off our hands! (J-lt-28-p)

jf-
If you havent picked
up your 1968
Seminole, Do So
.
NOW. Rm. 330
Reitz Student Union

| PERSONAL |
To our favorite brothers Jke and Jim
glad you survived to rally around
the swings from the two
J l ?* *" ea s and the wow hub's!
LOST A FOUND i
FSU class ring lost around Fla. Gym
area. Shape of football, initials ES.
Reward. Contact Elisabeth, 135
Tigert Hall. (L-2t-28-p)
Lost: lighter in Union snack bar
inscribed Seminole florist.
Sentimental Value. Reward. Call
Sandi, 378-1502, rm. 1208A.
'L-3t-27-p)
SERVICES
... :>
Homecoming special color 8 x 10
prints of date or parties $2.50 black
white Bxlo SI.OO I will come to you,
at your convenience. Call Ron Koru
376-6042 fast service (M-st-26-p)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE Fast professional results.
Computer Management Corporation
Administrative Services Division,
1105 W. University. Phone 378-8077.
(M-24-st-p)
CASH LOW? Ask about co-op living,
great food, a concerned community
at GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL 1002
W. Uni. Ave. 376-2476. Apply now
for next quarter. (M-st-23-c)
Hey! I can fix that motor knock or
increase your mileage; make your
trans work well again. Reasonable
too! Ask for Jack, 372-3322.
(M-lt-28-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
Buy, Sell, or trade used articles.
Confidential loans our specialty. A to
Z Pawn Shop 378-5575. 1326 E.
University Ave. (M-st-28-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
' SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(A< c)

GREEKS
and
GRADS
PICTURES for the Seminole will be taken November 4-22 in room 346 of the
Student Union. Appointments must be made in advance, between the hours of 12
and 5, and must correspond to the weekly schedule below. Beginning October 28,
phone the Union, extension 2832 for an appointment.
4-8
Alpha Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Gamma Rho
Alpha Omicron Pi
""""""""'"""I Alpha Tau Omega
AN proepectlve graduates, last g etg y^ eta pj All prospective graduates, last
names beginning Qy Omega names beginning
cwphi A
- MuChi

NOVEMBER 11-15
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Gamma
Delta Phi Epsilon
Delta Sigma Phi
Delta Tau Delta
All prospective graduates, last Delta Upsilon All prospective graduates, last
names beginning Kappa Alpha names beginning
Kappa Alpha Theta
HM Kappa Delta M |L|
INI Kappa Sigma M" M
NOVEMBER 18-22
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Epsilon Pi
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Tau
PhiMu
" Phi Sigma Sigma
All pro***., gnduatw. las. Pi Kappa Alpha AB <***" to
banning Pi Kappa Phi "*" m b glnninl
0 Pi Lambda Phi mam
Sigma Alpha Epsilon W M
Sigma Chi JLm
Sigma Kappa
Sigma Nu
Sigma Hii Epsilon
Tau Epsilon Phi
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Theta Chi
Zeta Tau Alpha

Wednesday. October 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator.

Page 13



Page 14

, Tlm Florida AHifMor, WldrMday. Ortpbar 30. IMO

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Homecoming
Is Coming
Things are moving for the Gators. Construction,
instruction, ail in preparation for UF's destruction
of the Auburn Tigers.
f
Cheerleaders are cheering a little harder now.
Signs and banners are being drawn, painted,
scrawled, some openly, some in secret. Fraternities
and other campus groups are building formidable
floats, decorating. Gator Growl is in final stages of
rehearsal. The drama is about to begin.
Homecoming is more than two days of frantic
activity. It's all-nighters in the cold to complete the
float and display. It's racking your brain for a skit
line that will survive the censors". It's wondering if
the whole thing is worth the effort.
&
Don't worry. It is.
t- .
Photos By Tom Kennedy
And Randy Bassett

** ~ jt f? *k \ j|JL §
Hb *i\ j

V"A
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Columns of this type
: generally start with four to six
$: nostalgic paragraphs about the
:£ change of season. For those
interested, the following is a
Readers Digest Condensation j
designed to establish the same
effect with less space:
Ah! The leave of brown, red,
and gold fall to the ground while
that ol nip is in the air and its
nice to see the all the girls with
their pretty multi-colored
sweaters and blue knees and
snuggle up together by the ol
fire and get a little high and
philosophize about how autumn
represents death in natures
cycle.
It is also the time of the year
when the local natives take part
in a singular and colorful ritual
called homecoming.
People talk about it for weeks
in advance. Plans are carefully
formulated and amended. The
most physically perfect female
specimans on campus bring their
best sorority-nish smiles out of
the deep freeze and begin
practicing being beautiful and
sweet for the Homecoming
Queen Contest. Float committees
are formed and your fratty-club
prez tries to convince you that it
really is important that your
crepe paper gator display in the
front yard has movable jaws and
a fully, operative digestive
system.
If your current cuddly isnt as
presentable as youd like, you
import a face from Agnes Scott
or Manatee JC and make it well
known among the guys that

BhH The Talent Seeker
He cant seek you out,
but SAMSON can.
Give your time and talents...
Your talents are his training.
Dont just pity apply.
I" : ProjeJsAMSON j
Interest Information Application 2
I ADDRESS New oppfieont I. return to
P PHONE Returning applicant Student Gov t
|l 1 office.
I| Student and/or local resident: 1 :
|| Major Age ' \
With the support of Gov. Claude R. Kirk. Jr. DhrWon of Economic Opportunity Jonea A. Bex. Dir.

L ~~| f n | j
|P -jpliAd r r r|
SS i i i 111 i c*Kh
! I |lj I;
nM ij -j
i lj. , > 1 i j
j J|-;:|! by joint porirer

Kathys flying in for
homecoming.
You suddenly become an
expert on the ol teams
chances and you know the
condition of all the players and
make statements like,
Hell,were THREE DEEP at
flanker and theyll never stop
Sigafoos on the ol zig-out.
You stand on your toes, or
maybe your dates toes to watch
the floats go by and listen to the
red next to you saying, Look,
Martha, here comes another
dirty one. Hot damn, them
college kids is real cards.
You look at all the kids
running around with chocolate

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ice cream rings around their
mouths and runny noses and
wonder if theyre bored silly like
you. But you smile, and when
Suzy-with-the -big-ones waves at
you from inside some portable
crepe paper Taj Mahaj, you wave
back and grin like an idiot and
say, Wow, isnt she pretty?
(Boy, Id like t 0...)
You go to the skits the night
before and your date pretends
not too understand the really
bad ones, but you say heh,heh,
heh, and elbow her in the ribs
till she finally has to cover her
mouth and giggle
uncontrollably.

Wednesday, October 30. 1968, The Florida Alligator.

You come back to the party
and get a little high and gyrate a
little to the live music of Ralph
Sleeze and the Canadian Mucks.
You go to sleep uneasily
wondering if maybe you came
on a little too strong or maybe if
she was impressed that you held
your booze so well.
The next day you wear your
best blazer and your six dollar
tie and scream your head off at
the game. Again your fantastic
knowledge of the finer points of
the game comes to the surface as
you point out to your date such
things as, that damn guard
didnt pull like he was supposed

I.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.
to or that play would have been $
good for five at least. §
V
You come away from the
stadium deliriously happy or §
blind with anger and swaying
just a little bit. You are*
muttering either I knew we could
do it, 1 KNEW IT or We
shoulda punted, dammit, we
ioulda punted.
You come back and gyrate
some more, this time with the
Lebanese Lung Rackers and you
really blow it out with a fifth
and a half of Old Slewfoot 150
proof and wonder for weeks
whether you had a good time or
not.
But whether you did or not,
for days you tell everyone that it
was a great weekend. Probably
as good as last years, anyway.
And you are right. It
probably was.

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, October 30, 1968

Children! Subject
For Poems, Jazz

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Feature Writer
There were no fanfares, no
formalities, no stale and stilted
voices droning endlessly in cold
and sleepy auditoriums. It was a
poetry reading**, so most would
expect all these ingredients to
show themselves. They didnt.
This time it was different, and
for at least an hour poetry not
just words reached an
audience with the warmth and
impact its authors intended.
It was Robert Sokols
Poetry Concert, presented last
Friday and Saturday evenings in
the MSB auditorium, and those
few responsive souls who
managed to attend the
performance seemed well
satisfied with the experience.
(This review is based upon
Fridays performance.)
Sokol began the program
with a brief preface of
explanation. My poems are
written about children .
abnormal children . but
not for children, he
told the audience. Theyre for
adults, to help them understand
what it is for these children.
With this in mind Sokol read
of children, and war, and
beyond, his voice and message
dramatically reinforced and
complimented by the mild
jazz** of two extremely able
musicians professional pianist
Dex Williams and
clarinetist/flutist Bruce Ergood,
a UF graduate student. His terse
lines laughed with water
children, dogs, birch trees, and
circuses in a few spots, but for
the most part his mood was
much different:
... its happening in 1964
not 1984...
where is humanity
when your son burns
and you kill mine?
the children were forgotten
until they had to be
j prayed for
and were given guns
to play f0r...
we wage war 364 days
and save only the
25th of December
for peace and 10ve...
... as no-shoe woman
fertilizes a gutter.
These are only pieces which
happened to particularly strike
this reviewer, pieces which say
little about the strange children
Sokol promised (though theyre
very much in presence between
the stanzas and in other portions
of the poetry) and as such
probably arent very
representative. And yet, it seems
Frame Dorms
There were 52 wood-frame
on-campus student residential
buildings at UF in the fall of
1967.

they demonstrate quite
vigorously the fervor Sokol
expresses in his poems.
A further indication of his
strong feelings resides in the fact
that he has devoted his graduate
studies at the UF to caring for
the unfortunate youngsters he
writes about, and produced this
concert as a public relations
gesture for the Medical Centers
Childrens Mental Health Unit.
However, perhaps the deepest
insight into the matter can be
gained from Sokols answer to a
question from an audience
member who showed concern
over the angry feel of Sokols
poems:
Yes, Im angry. Im angry
that these children have to be
the way they are. And it angers
me that so many parents cant
see the light that would help
them. That light, of course, is
love.
At any rate, Sokols poetry
and delivery stand well in any
light, with or without additional
considerations. Its easy to see
why the Bitter End case in New
York City was eager to have him
perfonn his work there and why
The College Anthology of
Poetry gladly published some
of it in 1965.
Also included in Fridays
performance were poems aptly
interpreted by the rich and
comfortable voice of Bernie
Webb, a professional poetry
reader and the head of the UFs
Psychology Department. Very
appropriately, Webb mused at
one point, There are so many
lovelies, so many lovelies, as he
moved from one selection into
the next, accurately describing
the extremely readable poetry
he presented by Marianne
Moore, e.e. cummings, Tom
Gunn, R.S. Stevens, and others.
Webbs contribution was strong,
with enough change in mood to
contrast Sokol and round out
the program and end it as
forcefully as it had been
sustained.

Remember Her
on
HOMECOMING
With J2
Flowers
From
f CREVASSES FLORIST
PROMPT DELIVERY
FLOWERS WIRED idjKk
ANYWHERE fll
2 LOCATIONS \lM|/
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VERSITY AVE. J Lmisrp P r>ArJ

A Touch Os Greenwich
Village In Quiet Gville

By LEE HILLIKER
Alligator Feature Writer
You walk down the dimly-lit
hall. The whine of a sitar
envelops your head as you move
toward the light. There at the
end on the wall is a large
painting and below it tables and
chairs. Turn the corner and in
front of you is a small well-lit
tage. More of a platform really.
T o the left are still other
i and chairs and upon them
soon-to-be-lit candles. Eyes not
yet adjusted to the light perceive
a few shapes near the back of
the room. Not many people but
its still a while till nine oclock
opening time.
In the back wall is a gaping
hole of light the dispenser of
free coffee and various other
concoctions. You have arrived at
the only coffee house within
200 miles. The Bent Card
welcomes you.
Considering the Tops were in
town, quite a few people
welcomed opening night at the
Bent Card. Entertainment was
varied, to say the least. From
blues and country-western to
poetry reading and all good, too.
Not a dull moment. And for
more than four hours. Nick
Tatro was there to read some of
his stuff. Nick is a former
Alligator News Editor and is
now a published poet. I meant
to catch some of his lines for
this article but became so
engrossed in his reading that I
forgot to write anything down.
Youll appreciate him more if
you catch him in person
anyway.
If you played your cards right
Strvict Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
80* E. Putt. At,. 372-4373

THE BENT CARD

Friday night you could win a
free kazoo and thereby be
eligible to play in the
kazoo-along. The beauty of it
was that it requires no talent at
all to play this somewhat
dubious instrument. If youre
more musically inclined you can
bring along your own instrument
or whatever and do your own
thing.. Anybody can
participate. All it takes is to

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release your inhibitions for a
while.
So everybody had fun and
played their kazoos and listened
to poetry and didnt get uptight
and left feeling happy. In case
youre interested, the Bent Card
is open every Friday and
Saturday night from nine until.
Theres life in Gainesville. You
should try it sometime.



-----
jl/jjwK Don t Let Them Down
** By MARC DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor

There is a rumor going
around campus that this student
body doesnt know how to
support its football team.
The cheerleaders and band
members think they would be
the only ones in attendance at a
pep rally.
An Alligator editorial called
for a pep rally to show the team
that the students do support
them.
Coach Ray Graves has said on
numerous occasions that UF
student support at games was
inspiring to his players.
It is great that Coach Graves
has this opinion, but I wonder
where he got it. My experience
with UF fans is that they love
the team when it looks great,
but they turn their backs when
the team looks bad.
For some reason every time a
Gator fumbles, misses a pass,
throws and incomplete pass,
misses a blocking assignment or
makes some other mistake the
fans immediately yell for his
head. Football players are

yax^-.. y- ~ -- - IT- -g
kj| jl v
s|
GATOR CHEERLEADERS
. . leading team out on the field,
will be leading a pep rally tomorrow.

Georgia Game
Student Tickets
All Gone
Student tickets were issued
Monday and Tuesday at Gate 13
for the UF-Georgia football
game. They were all gone by
4:45 pjn.
The allotment for the game is
Jacksonville was 1200 more this
year. Also there were not any
bloc seating groups for this
game.
The tickets were issued for
six hours on Monday and for
about five hours Tuesday.
The arrangement for this year
also disallowed any date tickets,
so anyone who picked up tickets
had to be a student.
A portion of every students
activity fee goes to the Athletic
Department, supposedly to
assure each student a seat at the
football games.
Tickets will be given out at
Gate 13 for the UF-Miami game
on Nov. 21 and Nov. 22.
He Hopped Along
COLUMBUS. Ohio
The most points scored in a
four-year career by one player
in Ohio State University foot football
ball football history was 222 by Howard
''Hopalong) Cassady from 1952
through 1955.

human beings and make errors,
but never on purpose or because
of lack of desire.
Some students on this
campus are loyal and dont mind
showing it, but not enough of
them can be found.
Jeff Weil, one such student, is
the Spirit Committee Chairman
and has organized one hell of a
pep rally for Thursday. Coach
Graves is all for it and the team
members have been convinced
that this pep rally is going to be
a success.
Weil has arranged for the pep
rally to begin at 4:15 tomorrow
afternoon on the upper drill
field. The band and cheerleaders
will lead the students out on the
lower drill field where the team
will be practicing.
Thats when the cheering will
begin.
President Stephen C.
OConnell may come out to lead
some cheers.
Its about time the student
body got off their rumps and
showed some spirit, too. Dont

f Keeping Up Appearances
HOMECOMING 1968
Your weekend social calendar is jammed. Seems
like all the fiats and sororities are having week
£oo' k/\ en< P art es or vis *ti n 8 Alumni. Youll
\ 'xi need a jacket thats styled for comfort
W an d good looks. Simple! Just take a
Ms \ A y JM j, ft break, come in and check over our
J' ft #l£p4 / selection of the newest colors, pat pat'
' pat' m j&fflOEm' terns and styles in sports coats. The
J side vents and slanted flap pockets
Jm v are very fashionable. Add a pair
jmSF'x of color coordinated slacks and
U youll get a second look from

let the cheerleaders and band
members be right.
The season isnt over yet, in
tact there is still an outside
chance that we could win the
Southeastern Conference title.
If we, the students give up,
then how could we expect the
team to go out there and try to
win.
Auburn dreads coming down
here to play because we always
raise such hell.
Lets not let them down.

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*Du Pont's registered trade name tor its man-maae poromeric upper

Wednesday. October 30. 1968, The Florida Alligator,

FSU On Probation

ST. LOUIS (UPI) The
National Collegiate Athletic
Associations 18 member
council Tuesday placed Lasalie
College of Philadelphia, St.
Bonaventure University of New
York and Florida State
University on probation for
basketball violations.
As a result, FSU was declared
ineligible for post season
basketball tournaments during
the 1 year probation period.
The copncii reported that late
last winter and early this spring,
Florida State University
basketball coaches organized and
conducted drills and practice
sessions for prospective athletic
scholarship winners.
The council also said that two
recruits visiting the Florida State

campus were provided a
cosi-free sight-seeing trip to
Panama City, Fla.
Another violation attributed
to Florida State, was the
organization by basketball
coaches of mandatory practice
sessions during the off-season,
with the coaches in attendance.

SPORTS CAR
SPECIALTIES
If You Want It
Fixed NOW Not
Next Weak See
- RICK
2017 NE 27th Ave
Ph, 372-3406

Page 17



Page 18

t. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 30, 1968

UF Athletic Fraternity
OutstandingU.S.Chapter

UFs national athletic
fraternity has been named the
outstanding chapter in the
United States for the past year.
Sigma Delta Psi is sponsored
by the College of Physical
Education and Health. Track
Coach Jimmy Carnes serves as
the faculty advisor.
The Gator chapter inducted

Sports Trivia
By MIKE SEGAL
: Answers to yesterdays quiz are:
: 1) Dan Sikes, Bob Murphy, Doug Sanders, Dan Beard,
: Tommy Aaron, Dave Ragan, Laurie Hammer (if there
: are any more, please let me know).
f 2) Frank Selvy of Furman University
j 3) Herb Adderley Michigan State
j Lenny Dawson Purdue
: Jack Concannon Boston College
*: Merlin Olsen Utah State
\ Ken Williard North Carolina
4) Oklahoma, 47, Notre Dame
: 5) Jack Dreese (also accepted will be Don Dunphy)
: I have had some complaints that my quiz is not hard enough,
so today I challenge anyone to score 100 per cent. If you do,
[please drop by the Alligator office and leave your name. Im
[curious as to the type of student that wastes his' time learning
such insignificant rabble (students like myself).
[: 1) Who was the alst race horse to win the triple crown? What
[year?
[ 2) Who was the first player in the National Basketball
to score over 2000 points in a single season?
: 3) When Don Larsen pitched his perfect game in the 1956
series, who was the opposing pitcher? What was the score?
:[ 4) Dr. Roger Bannister was the first man to run the mile in
under four minutes. Who was the second?
[ 5) Who was the University of Florida basketball coach
before Norm Sloan?
. Take it away, David Miller!

Four Teams Watched
By OB Committee

MIAMI (UPI) The Orange
Bowl Committee revealed
Monday following the halfway
point of the unpredictable
college football season that the
top four teams under
consideration for the Jan. 1
annual bowl game here are
Kansas, Penn State, Tennessee
and Georgia.
Theyre the top four but
that doesnt rule out about a
dozen others, said selection
committee chairman C. Jackson
Baldwin.
This season has been so
unpredictable were keeping a
close check on once-beaten and
even twice-beaten teams.

open DOUBLE
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25 new members, a national
record, and won the overall team
championship scored on an
individual participant and team
basis with 7493.9 points. UF
was followed by Northern
Illinois, Florida State (Jniversity,
Long Beach City College, The
Citadel and the University of
Arizona.

Committee Executive Vice
President Ernie Seiler said the
main games to be scouted this
coming weekend are
Kansas-Colorado,
Tennessee -UC L A and
Houston-Georgia.
The way upsets have been
popping up, Kansas, Tennessee
and Georgia could stub their
toes this week and confuse the
picture even more, said Seiler.
Jackson said the committee
also will be represented at the
Auburn-Florida game in
Gainesville because Auburn is
definitely under consideration.
Auburn could win the
Southeastern Conference.

In order to be eligible for the
fraternity, one must pass 15
athletic events in a required time
Qr distance. Last year, Gator
athletes nailed seven records and
former basketball and track star,
Harry Winkler, won the
best-all-around athlete title.
UFs chapter was organized in
1936 and under the direction of
Dean D.K. Stanley it has become
the number one club in the
country.
Trackmen John Morton and
Ronnie Jourdan hold national
records in the organization.
Morton holds the shot put
record with a heave of 57-6
and Jourdan has the high jump
mark with a leap of 7-%.
Ray Soehner, a physical
education major, set a national
record in bowling with a 219
average.
Its a great honor to win the
national title, Carnes said. It is
an outstanding achievement for
a boy to pass the test and when
one school qualifies 25 for
membership, this has to be a
compliment to their physical
education and athletic
programs.
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Dolphins Sign Hines

MIAMI (UPI) The Miami
Dolphins of the American
Football League announced
Monday the signing of Olympic
sprint gold medalist Jimmy
Hines, the successor to Dallas
Cowboy Bobby Hayes as the
worlds fastest human.
Dolphin officials said that the
22-year-old Hines, just back
from the Mexico City Olympics,
might get his first chance to play
before the season ends. Hines
said he was real happy with the
deal.
A figure of $75,000 has been

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mentioned but never confirmed.
The Dolphins drafted Hines in
the sixth round of the 1968 pro
draft but with an agreement to
let him run in the Olympics
before deciding on a try at pro
football.
Hines attended Texas
Southern College on a track
scholarship and is the holder of
three world records the
60-yard indoor record of 5.9
seconds, the outdoor 100-yard
record of 9.1 and the 100-meter
record of 9.9.



Gator Offense Answers

By 808 PAOECKY
UFs offense, much maligned
by arm-chair quaterbacks, has
Finally had it with its critics.
Last Sunday in a regular team
meeting, the UF offenders
decided on a policy not so
routine.
For the first time this year,
we are going to think like a team
and not let outside interests bug
us, said Paul Maliska, one of
the Gators top four receivers.
The Gators, in the past, have
denied that adverse publicity has
affected their play. But after the
Vanderbilt tie, enough was
enough.
In the past few weeks
people have been pressuring us,
said a player. But we shouldnt
have let it affect our game. But
it has. Fans I dont know go
right up to you and ask you
whats wrong. Even some of
your friends do it. The pressure
keeps building up. We want to
take it off.
One player added, the only
true friends that we have are our
fellow teammates. Everybody
else is your fair weather friends.
Everybody loved us before the
season. Now things arent going
so good and they hate us.
The players emphasized most
people, especially UF students,
have supported the team, win or
lose. But they mentioned a
consistent minority who takes
great pains to gig the Gators.

m&m Gator Ray
What was the trouble in the second half stopping Valput?
Vanderbilt came out with a new wrinkle on offense, using an
unbalanced line for the first time with an L-set backfield to the short
side of the line. Our defense moved over with their unbalanced line
but our linebackers did not compensate for their backfield strength to
the short side. In short, they had more blockers in that area than we
had defensive men. It didnt really matter who ran the ball with the
blocking available. Once we were able to compensate we stopped this
and they wound up with only 81 yards rushing.
Was our offensive line not giving Rentz protection, if not, what was
the reason for him eating the ball so often?
Offensive line protection was good, in fact, above average. There
were 39 called pass plays and Rentz had to eat the ball seven times,
three of which came on long yardage situations in which the receivers
simply couldnt get open* and Larry didnt want to put the ball up for
grabs. After coming back into the game on a sore knee Rentz was
thrown twice for losses. Twice Vanderbilt fired and got to the passer,
which is about a normal percentage for 39 pass attempts.
Why havent we used Jim Yarbrough for punting?
We had been working Jim and intended to use him several games
ago. However, he got a bruised right knee and is having a great deal of
difficulty raising his leg. This prohibits him from punting.
Why must the Gators prove they can pass when they have such a
good running game?
If you cant generate a passing threat against a decent defensive
team they will have little difficulty in making adjustments and also
shutting off your running game. The opposite is true, also, you must
establish a ground game to support a passing game or a good defensive
team will shut off your passing. Ask Florida State about that.
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By disassociating itself from
the outside world this week,
Floridas offense is going to live
in virtual seclusion, untouched
by comments of an inconsistent
offense.
Some people think we have
the bad attitude right now, said
Gene Peek, another receiver.
Well, we arent going to say
anything about our attitude,
good or bad, until after the
Auburn game.
As for myself, I wont say
anything about the offense
period, continued Peek. Weve
said so much about our offense
in the past thats its time we
shut up and start playing ball
like a team, and not worry about
what other people say.
You may get some others to
talk about the offense, said
Peek, but the majority wont.
The big thing to note here is
the pressure the Gator offense
feels from not moving the ball
consistently.
People build us up like we
are Grecian gods, said Maliska.
Id wish they realize we are
men just like everybody else.
Weve tried harder in the last
two games than we have most of
the year. And yet we didnt win.
And we dont know why. But
people wont accept that. They
want something else.
I guess the best way to
characterize the offenses feeling
towards all this criticism is to

recall a play last week against
Vanderbilt, said Maliska.
Rentz (Larry) was throwing a
pass to Smith (Larry).
Smith looked like he had a
sure touchdown. But he tripped
and fell and missed the ball.
People ask why? Larry says
because of a sprained arch. That
should be enough to satisfy most
people. But it doesnt. People
are looking for some deep,
hidden motive.
If we can get our offense
together this team will move the
ball on anybody, said Maliska.
But it wont if we cant be left
alone. And since it doesnt seem
anybody is going to make the
effort, we have to take the initial
step. Weve got to.
The offensive players
interviewed stated criticism from
the outside is not THE reason
why the Gators fail to move the
ball. But its a contributing
factor.
1 know well play much
better now against Auburn for
finally having decided to say to
hell what everybody else says,
People should realize
athletes are emotional and
sensitive people, said another
player. And if some guy comes
out and makes a stupid
statement about something he
doesnt know anything about, it
makes us angry. Not for being
criticized, we all will take good
criticism. But not criticism for
people who dont know what
they are talking about. And
there seems to be some of that
around.
Criticism has also come from
the dont give a damn critics.
Do you think we like to
lose? Do you think we dont try,
asked a player. In the Vandy
game, Kim Helton caught a
helmet in the back that made
him practically immobile for the
next three days. Guy Dennis
played again with his bad knee.
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Wednesday, October 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Critics
But they both stayed in because
they wanted to win.
The Gator defense has also
felt some of the burden.
When we lose, we lose
together, said Jim Hadley, UFs
top defensive tackle. But we
have had an easier time of it on
defense.

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Page 19

j >



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, October 30, 1968

The Year That Never Was
By MIKE SEGAL

Well the initial shock has settled, and I wake
up each morning and know its true The Year of
the Gator has become the Year That Never Was.
With successive losses to North Carolina and
Vanderbilt (a tie is like kissing your sister), and
with Auburn and Georgia coming, things look bleak
indeed! Any Gator fan loyal, fair or fair weather
- simply has to be disappointed.
Os no Gator team in history has so much been
I expected, and so little received.
The Greatest Gators ever have played (except
against FSU) in a manner reminiscent of the
Amazing Mets of baseball fame.
Naturally, the question has arisen: Why?
I feel the talent is here. Why doesnt it produce?
People cite injuries, lack of a steady quarterback, no
Richard Trapp (but then we knew that in January,
didnt we?), a disappointing offensive line, not
enough depth, (Reverend Wright probably feels
their skins are too pale!).
No doubt all these factors have a ring of truth to
them, and each are plausible, but I, for one, feel the
true answer goes deeper than this.
Lets face facts! Not enough players not
enough students want to win bad enough in this
school!

TEP, Sigma Nu Win Semi-Finals

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Corrospondent
Monday night in the Orange
League Sigma Nu squeaked by
Sigma Chi 15-4,1-15,17-15, and
TEP defeated a stong BETA
team 15-12, 15-9. The winners
will meet in the finals.
The first game in the
semi-finals was all Sigma Nu as
Jim Strickland spiked from
everywhere on the floor. In the
second game, Sigma Chi finally
started setting up 6 7 Frank
Saier and tere was no contest,
15-1.
The rubber match proved
to be just that as the lead

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changed hands throughout the
game. With Sigma Chi leading
14-13 and Saier on the front line
it looked like it might be all over
but Strickland, scoring from the
front line, back line and out of
bounds, brought the Nus in for
a close win.
In the second semi final
match, little 5 8 Gary Hames,
spiking all over the court took
the Betas to a fast 6-1 lead in the
first game. TEP setters
consistently fed the ball to Rick
Perillo and Craig Savage as the
TEPs came from behind to win
the first game.
The second game was all TEP.

The University of Florida is the only school in
the Southeastern Conference that has never won a
football championship! I do not believe we want it
bad enough! As tough as the competition is today,
its not enough to want to win on the day of the
game.
To win today, youve got to put out all the time
youve got to think about the good of the team,
day and night, seven days a week, 24 hours a day!
Now 1 dont mean to point an accusing finger at
each member of the team, for Im certain that the
vast majority are not at fault. But one would be
particularly naive not to notice some of the
incidents that go on during the season breaking
training, smoking, not caring, getting drunk.
Ive been on this campus for six years, and Ive
seen too much of this behavior to ignore it.
Its not too late its not too late. But in order
to get it, theres going to have to be a quick
turnabout, for Auburn and Georgia are just around
the corner.
Tulane and Mississippi State are past its time
to wake up.
We loyal fans (yes, I consider myself a loyal
fan) wont desert you, but cmon Gators lets play
football!

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