Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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SPIRIT DAVE DOUCETTE
Pam Spencer, 2UC lounges amidst mountains of Gator spirit
shakers. Due to lack of funds she remains incompletely covered
despite radical changes in temperature. For the spirit-shaking,
temperature changing story, see page 2.

FOR HOMECOMING

Tickets Available

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
More than 900 tickets for
Saturdays Homecoming game
will be available to students
Thursday afternoon, according
to Student Body President Clyde
Taylor.
Tickets will be distributed on
a first-come basis at Gate 13,
East Stands of Florida Field.
Open at 4 p.m., the windows
will stay open until the supply
of 921 tickets are exhausted.
Student tickets ran out
Friday and distributers were
forced to turn away a reported
2,000 students. Taylor said the
firure was closer to 350-500.
Taylor said the committee
checked the entire east side of
the field to come up with the
900 tickets. Unclaimed tickets

Proposed Constitution: Revision, Not Reform

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a three-part analysis
of Florida's proposed
constitution which voters will
vote on Nov. 5. The author, a
UF law student, was a legislative
aide to the Senate Constitutional
Revision Committee and an aide
to Rep. Sandy DAlemberte
(D-Dade) during the special
revision session last summer.)
By BILL SADOWSKI
Alligator Special Writer
In June of this year the
Florida Legislature voted
(131-Yea, 25-Nay) to place a
proposed revised constitution on
the November ballot. This final
action cullninated years of hard
work by hundreds of people.
Thus, Florida voters will have an
opportunity to approve a new
basic document of government
for their state.

from Auburn and UF alumni and
student returns made some of
the tickets available, he said.
Taylor urged students who
have purchased date tickets and
are attending the game with a
UF student to turn in the date
ticket.
Taylor blasted students who
deliberatley purchased date
tickets to scalp other students
later at the gate.
This type of activity could
jeopardize the date ticket system
we now enjoy, he said. And
its the students themselves that
are abusing the system.
The additional tickets bring
this years distribution total to
20,866, a record for UF and
the Southeastern Conference.
Tickets for the UF-Georgia
game on Nov. 9 will be on sale at
Gate 13 today from 1-5 p.m.

Alligator

This article is designed to
provide some insight into the
proposed constitution. It
explains some of the reasons
why some parties urge that a
change from the 1885
Constitution (Floridas present
constitution) is needed. It also
analyzes and compares the
principal differences between
the proposed constitution and
the current constitution.
The present Florida
Constitution was adopted in
1885. Significantly, the first
amendment to this document
was offered in 1886, and
amendments have been placed

. . /
Florida Alligator
/~ r
America's Number 1 College Daily r

Vol. 61, No. 29 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday October 4G; 1968

IN GATQBADI CONTROVERSY

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
A report on investigations
into the residual rights for
Gatorade will be given Friday
when the State Board of Regents
meets on campus.
The report will delve into the
past history of the beverage and
what rights the UF and the U.S.
government would hold on its
production and marketing.
Gatorades inventor, Dr.
Robert Cade, in the meantime, is
claiming neither the university
nor the government holds any
rights.
Phil Ashler, vice chancellor of
the State University System, has
been named to prepare a report
for the Regents. His report will
include an opinion from the
office of the state attorney
general and an enlarged report
from the office of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Chancellor Robert Mautz
disqualified himself from the
probe due to what he termed a
conflict of. interests. His wife
owns stock in Stokely-Van
Camp Corp., the company that
bought the rights to Gatorade
from Cade and his associates.
The inquiry was sparked
when an investigation showed
Gatorade, the rapid
thirst-quencher developed by
Cade and tested by UF football
squads since 1965, was a
possible bonanza.
The UF was left out of any
possible revenue from Gatorade
because officials decided that
the university would not seek
any patent rights.
However, the U.S.
government claims that it holds
the rights that Stokely-Van
Camp says it bought from Cade.
A grant from the National
Institute of Health, a division of

ANALYSIS

on the ballot by every regular
session of the Legislature since
that time.
During its history, this
document has been subjected to
severe criticism. Charges leveled
at the present constitution are
often directed at provisions
which relate to the historical
origins of the Constitution.
Critics also point to the many
provisions which are
unconstitutional, out-moded or
which, they assert, should
properly be relegated to statute.
For example: The method of
apportionment provided for in
the old document has been

Cade: No Residuals
For UF, Government

the Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare (HEW),
paid for the research that led to
the development of Gatorade.
Cade said this weekend,
however, that he doesnt feel
that either the university or the
federal government holds any
rights to Gatorade.
I think the UF has no rights
now and is unlikely to have any
in the future, Cade said. The
university, had it applied, could

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declared unconstitutional by the
U.S. Supreme Court and is
therefore without effect.
According to Floridas
Constitution, separate but equal
schools still exist and
intermarriage between blacks
and whites is prohibited. Under
Article 111 the Florida
Legislature still elects Floridas
United States Senators.
Then there are provisions
which critics contend should be
statutory law and not a part of
the Constitution. For example,
one section prohibits railroads
from giving free passes to
legislators (in a day when most
of them travel by air). Other
sections award tax holidays to
motion picture studios and
industrial plants (both of the last
sections remain in the
Constitution although by their
awn terms they became

have received the patent. I tried
to get the university interested. I
couldn't. The time to apply for
rights was then, before they
were sold to Stokely-Van
Camp.
Also, as I understand it,
Cade continued, the federal
government has no direct rights
to Gatorade. They can deny the
patent, but they cannot take one
out to manufacture it.
(SEE 'UF-U.S/ Page 2)

inoperative in the 19405).
Presumably a constitution,
since it is the most basic state
document, should be easily
comprehensible to the average
citizen. The 1885 Constitution
has been criticized for being
difficult to understand, even by
lawyers.
In arguing that the existing
document is disorganized and
lacking in literary quality, these
critics point to the fact that it
contains over 50,000 words
organized into some 20 Articles
with no clear, simple division by
subject-matter. Sen. John
Matthews (chairman of the
Senate Constitutional Revision
Committee) illustrates this by
observing that in order to get the
answer to some tax problems (or
for that matter, to amend
certain tax provisions), it is
(SEE 'ls' PAGE 3)



Page 2

2, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 29, 1968

Justice Warren Expected
At Law School Opening

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Chief Justice Earl Warren will
be the keynote speaker Feb. 1 at
the dedication of the new UF
Law Center Building.
Warren was selected by the
Faculty Dedication Committee
to give the dedication, according
to Leonard S. Powers, chairman
of the committee and associate
dean of the College of Law.
We are really happy that the
head of America's judicial
system will be able to be with us
for the opening of our building,"
Powers said.
The dedication of the $3
million Law Center will
culminate a two-day ceremony.
Preceding Warrens address
will be a lecture and panel
discussion .on a legal subject of

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TAU EPSILON PHI DAVE DOUCETTE
...SIOO for spirit

SG Requests Financial Support
For Orange And Blue Shakers

UFS Student Government
Spirit Committee is asking
campus organizations for
financial support in obtaining
orange and blue shakers for the
homecoming game Saturday.
Chairman Jeff Weil said the
committee needs S6OO by
Thursday to purchase 6,000
shakers.
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity
donated SIOO and Student Body
President Clyde Taylor bettered
that with a slOl contribution
from SG.
When the Gators are on the
field, they cant help but notice
the bright orange and blue colors
of the spirit shakers waving in
the air, Weil said. Theyll
certainly help boost the teams
morale.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U tin official btatont newspaper of the University of Florida
and is published dee times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 3X601. The Alligator Is entered
as xeosnd class matter at thn United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 3X601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or 13.50 per quarter.
The Florida AUffiater wasrp. Uw right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or Mg* away tnpy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida AlltoatoS Ot Ist consider adjustments at payment tor any aMeritsomeut
Involving typographical emMh er erroneous Insertion unless codes Is gtvira to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Flortfe Alligator will
not be responsible tor more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

current interest, to be named at
a later date.
Powers said other guest
speakers have not yet been
selected.
Warren, recipient of
numerous honorary degrees, was
appointed chief justice in
September, 1953. He also served
as special ambassador of the
United States to the coronation
of Queen Elizabeth II that year.
The chief justice entered the
judiciary arena in 1914 when he
was admitted to the California
bar. From 1939-43 he served as
attorney general of California
and from 1943-53 as governor of
the state. During 194041 he was
president of the National
Association of Attorney
Generals.

The committees purpose is
to promote student spirit. This
week, the committee will be
using various promotional aids
throughout the campus urging
students to get behind the
Gators.
The spirit shakers are given
out prior to each home game.
Their effect was successful at the
Senate Meets
Newly elected senators are
required to attend tonights
orientation Student Senate
meeting at 7 p.m.
After the orientation meeting
a regular Senate meeting will be
conducted with main discussion
concerning the Student Body
Budget revisions and committee
appointments to special Senate
committees.

Warren was a Republican
candidate for vice president of
the United States in 1948.
The opening of the Law
Center, delayed five months by
construction disputes and last
springs workmen strike, will
also serve as the site of the 1969
Law Reunion.
Student will begin classes in
the building in January.
The Law Center, located
north of fraternity row in Beta
Woods, will house facilities for
the faculty and a courtroom as
well as classrooms and a library.
Three housing buildings are to
be added at a later date, making
efficiency-type apartments
available to married and single
law students.

Mississippi State and the FSU
games, Weil said.
Donations to the committee
will be received at the SG
treasurers office, third floor,
Reitz Union.
lf not enough money is
donated to the spirit committee,
the only thing waved through
the air will be the usual cups and
ice, Ronnie Bloom, assistant
spirit committee chairman,
said.
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UF-U5 Gatorade
Rights Questioned

PACE ON!
The federal government can
issue a patent or not issue a
patent, thats where its authority
ends.
Cade and several associates,
under the name of Gatorade
Trust, Inc., sold rights to the
name and the ingredients of
Gatorade more than a year ago
to Stokely, which intends to
apply for a patent.
Cade is satisfied that the
transaction was in accord with
law and regents policy.
My lawyer tells me that
everything I have done is
completely legal, he said.
OConnell will be sending a
report to the regents this week
based on information sent him
by UF Director of Sponsored
Research George Croker and
other investigation.
We as yet do not have all the
facts in this case, OConnell
said. And until all the facts are
determined we dont know if the
university, the state, or HEW has
lost anything.

We also dont know if
anyone has abridged legal
procedure or the legal rights of
other parties involved.
We are, however, not going
to engage in recriminations; we
are not going to make judgments
until all the facts are in; and I
for one am not going to get into
speculation over what is going to
happen, OConnell said.
Among the questions to be
discussed by the regents is
whether the UF ignored a

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DOKT MISS
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November 6-7-8 yII 3 )
A of thy* t \U J
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and Dool^tore(|V/jf/
located in the mm U / (l\

written policy of the research
board. This policy requires
researchers to agree in advance,
in writing, what trademark and
patent rights would exist as a
result of the research being
performed.
The policy also requires
writter agreement on division of
possible profits.
Dr. Emanuel Suter, dean of
the UF College of Medicine and
Cades superior (Cade is an
associate professor of medicine
and director of the department
of renal medicine), said no such
agreement was reached in the
development of Gatorade.
According to earlier press
reports, these written reports
were to be filed with a research
council.
Cade, however, said he had
no communication with a
research council and had no idea
that one existed.
I went to the dean of the
medical school to find out what
I was supposed to do and if
there were any reports I was to
file while working under the
grant from HEW, Cade said.
He (Suter) sent me to Tigert
Hall. They never sent me to any
research council.
I dont know anything
about it yet. I have had no
communication with it.
In fact, the first I heard
about it was when I read about
it in the Gainesville Sun last
Thursday.
Action Conference
Action Conference will meet
Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 in
room 101 Little Hall.



1885 Constitution Archaic. Unclear

£ FMH H6t OIK
necessary to go to six or seven
different sections of the
Constitution.
v
That a need for change exists
can probably best be illustrated
by the large number of
amendments, 212, which have
been proposed to the 1885
Constitution, of which some 149
have been adopted. A majority
of these amendments have been
adopted since World War 11.
Significantly, efforts at revision
began as early as 1947 and have
continued to the present.
An analysis of the proposed
constitution can be approached
in a variety of ways. It may be
viewed in light of an ideal
constitution the approach
adopted by members of the
University of Florida Political
Science Department in their
recent analysis.
But perhaps a more
informative approach is to
compare and contrast the
proposed constitution with the
Constitution of 1885.
Proponents of the new
document stress that on a
section-by-section comparison
the proposed constitution is
better than the old
constitution. The goal, in any
case, is to provide a practical
vehicle for helping people to
formulate an intelligent estimate
of the relative merits and
demerits, of the proposed
constitution.
The ballot will present voters
with three separate votes relating
to the proposed new document.
One vote will be on Article VI
(Suffrage and Elections), the
second will be on Article VIII
(Local Government) and the
third will be on the rest of the
Constitution excluding Article V
(Judiciary).
The reason for requiring
separate votes on Articles VI and
Mil was the belief by legislators
that the controversial nature of
each article night cause people
to vote against the entire
document solely because of their
opposition to either or both
of .these parts.
At the time the decision was
made to have the Suffrage and
Elections article subject to a
separate vote, it provided for an
18-year old voting age. Later
(probably as a result of the
Columbia riots) the old
provision (providing for a
21-year old voting age) was
reinstated. Thus, the original
reason for separating Article M
no longer exists.
By the time it was deleted,
however, it was too late to
reincorporate Article M into the
basic document. So this article is
still being voted on separately.
Legislators feared that the
expanded home rule provisions
contained in the local
Government Article would be
controversial, so it too is subject
to a separate vote.
The third vote will be on the
basic document, covering all
articles except VI, Mil and \.
The present Article V
(Judiciary) will be retained if the
proposed constitution is
adopted.
There were never enough
votes to get a revised judicial
article out of the Legislature.
Thus, there will be three parts of
the proposed constitution to be

voted on: Article VI, Article
VIII and the basic document
covering all articles except M,
Mil, and V.
The proposed constitution, as
its authors explain it, is a
document of revision, not of
reform. They say that it was
intended to clean up and organize
the existing document. Any
reforms included in it were those
that are generally conceded to
be essential and, consequently,
of a non- controversial nature.
(This in reaction to recent

Where does Nixon
stand on education?
. i
In the back of the bus
with Thurmond.
Where does Hubert Humphrey stand
As he said when he accepted the
nomination of hm party; "There can he
W no compromise with the right of every
bHgljr iBH American who is willing and anxious
to learn to have a good education"
Humphrey wants to insure a quality
ilBBHBBI': L education for every American from
age four right on thru college.
rfflbu / m Because Humphrey is for all the
t&f IB people. And not for the extremists.
BBBmmMBBmBKL JB
Humphrey has the answer.
Now give him the authority.
BBHHBrmonPim
4 re*
X

Alligator

defeats of proposed
constitutions in Maryland and
New York.)
However, the authors do
contend that the proposed
constitution is a vehicle for
reform. They base this position
on the liberalized amending
procedures. They also point to

ANALYSIS

provisions which set the
maximum number of state
agencies at 25 (presently about
145), which provide for annual
sessions of the Legislature, a
reduced number of legislative
seats, a fail-safe apportionment
procedure and the expanded
home rule.

Tuesday, October 29,1968, Tke Florida Alligator,

Generally, other advantages
to the proposed constitution
include the following: It is much
easier for the layman to
understand. It is considerably
shorter than the present
constitution (15,000-16,000
words compared to 50,000
words; 12 articles compared to
20). Within its 12 articles the
contents are much more
logically and simply organized.
And the improved style of the
proposed constitution makes it
read better.

Page 3



Page 4

L Tha Florida AMpMor, Tunday, October 29.1968

W HATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writar
IN ITS ROLE HAS
BECOME GREATLY
EXPANDED, NOW THAT
SOME HAVE FINALLY
REALIZED THAT ITS NOT A
COMMUNIST FRONT: Dr.
Oscar Svarlien, a political science
professor, will speak on the
Role of the United Nations
Today at tonights meeting of
the United Nations Association
in room 105 B of the
Architecture and Fine Arts
Building at 8 p jn.
IN FOUSE OF THE FLUTE:
She (Sarah Baird Fouse) will
toot on the flute, while Earl
Groth blows on the oboe, Willis
Bodine pleases the keyses (of the
harpsichord), and Marie
Henderson has a fling on the
strings (of a cello) tonight at
8:15 when the Florida Baroque
Ensemble assembles in the
University Auditorium for a
concert.
IN GARY AND THE
PLAYBOYS: The Student
Senate meets tonight in room
349 of the Reitz Union at 6:30.
IN THE FRENCH HAVE A
WORD FOR IT: And the word
is coffee, which the Y ench Club
will imbibe at its Coffee Hour in
room 150 B of the Union today
at 2 pjn.
AND SPEAKING OF
FRENCH WORDS: Buffet is
another one, and the Supper
Club will have one of those in
the University Inn at 7:30
tonight.
DID I MENTION ROLES
SOMEWHERE?: Orin M.
Bullack has something to say
about them, and he will say it at
the meeting of the Florida
Historic Societies in the Union
Auditorium tonight at 8. Bullack
will speak on The New Role of
the Preservationist.
IN THOSE WHO ARE SURE
TO PLAY BY THE RULES (AT
LEAST, WE HOPE THEY DO):
The Law Dames play bridge in
room 150 C of the Union
tonight at 7:30.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Alpha Delta
Sigma meets in room 362 of the
Union tonight at 7; Delta Sigma
Pi meets in rooms 361 and 357
of the Union at 7 tonight.

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Desk Carving: Peabody Pastime?

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Staff Writer
The topic of conversation
around Peabody Hall could very
well be Read any good desks
lately?
Step into the large lecture
hall in 205 and you will
understand. There reading for
enjoyment* takes new
dimensions. Carved into the old
wooden desks lined up in long
rows are the pithy thoughts of
students who have spent many a
long hour steeped in the
rhetorical brillance of their
professors.
Their self-expression has
taken many forms ranging from
art work to acute observations
on politics, religion, and
contemporary culture. These
stand out from the usual
campus graffiti the greek
letters and the unprintable.
The predominance of
political commentary may be
explained by the fact that
Peabody houses the political
science department. Various
Americana'6B;
Showing Here
American a6B, a show
sponsored by Interhall Council, 4
will be presented Saturday night
of Homecoming weekend. (
Tickets will be sold this week i
at the Constans Theatre Box 4
Office beginning at 12:30 p.m.
They will cost $.50 per person, t
Mike McNermey, president of
Interhall, said.
Shows will be at 8 and 10 4
p.m.
Americana 6B features a'
rock band, six chorus girls, one 4
male singer and Mickey Vamo, a
female singer.
Good Servico Starts
at
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pundits have left such
ruminations behind as Nixon is
a nurd, Vote for Chester
Ferguson for God, George
Wallace owns slaves, Ed
Gurney is a fascist, and Calvin
Coolidge for prisident
Even religion has its share of
pointed remarks. From one
potential theologian: The Lord
giveth and the Lord taketh
away. The Lord is an Indian
giver. Large, bold black letters
proclaim Christ was a wino!
And right below it is the in inquiry
quiry inquiry Did God have a wife?
On a desk near the front: Pope
Paul is a TEP.
Then there is the inscrutable
A crab by any other name
would not forget the sea
Wagner.
On other desks there is the
Nosebowl score for 1967,
Bonnie Parker was here, and
merely Enlightenment.
Near the front is a very
detailed sketch of what seems to
be a Renaissance cathedral. It is

ft PRE-OPENING PARTY YALL COME!"
|f m. ***************
| Every Item Selling At s th* Lot**
1/ TL *4 1-1 EL.: ; PSYCHODEUC
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5 Hundreds of beautiful fall \ "BLACKUGHT
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ft "Free Gifts, Coffee, Refreshments, Latest Miracle
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I THE BRANDS YOU KNOW AND RESPECT
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£ REG. 39.00 19.50
ft REG. 45.00 22.50
| REG. 60.00 30.00
£ REG. 70.00 35.00
| FAMOUS NAME SIACKS No
REG. 13.00 4.50
ft REG. 19.95 9.98
| REG. 25.00 12.50
£ COCKTAIL DRESSES
| REG. $35.00 Now $12.50
| REG. 70.00 19.95
| REG. 45.00 19.95
| REG. 29.95 14.98
| LADIES UNIFORMS REG. TO $12.95 $3.99
j* HUNDREDS FAMOUS NAME DRESSES SIB.OO, $23.00 $26.00
| FALL DRESSES . SPECIAL LOT. . SB.OO YOUR CHOICE
ft
6 I I lilAr Nites till 9:00 p.m.
g 1236 N.W. 3rd Ave. Around The Corner From McDonalds

done in ball-point pen and takes
up most of the desk.
These message with the most
pathos was written by some
unknown student perhaps while

1968
HOMECOMING SWEETHEARTS
Coronation s£all
FRIDAY, NOV. 1,1968
FLORIDA UNION BALLROOM
ADMISSION... $2.50
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE OFFICEMON.-FRI.
MON.-FRI. OFFICEMON.-FRI. OCT. 21-31
12 noon-4:30 pm
SPONSORED BY
FLA. BLUE KEY- STUDENT GOVT, UNION BOARC
DRESS: COAT & TIE
WpiOTiiPPMMiH

desperately trying to keep awake
through a monotone lecture or
while struggling with his final.
He wrote simply Suffering
bears wisdom.



Humphrey, Nixon Stump
As Campaign Nears End

AKRON. Ohio (UPI)
Hubert Humphrey barnstormed
through vote-rich Ohio on the
start of his last nationwide
campaign swing Monday,
charging Richard M. Nixon was
playing politics with the
national security.
Under cloudy skies and with
temperatures dipping into the
30s, Humphrey led his
presidential motto over the
states superhighways in a
gruelling daylong bid for the
states 26 electoral votes.
At every stop, Humphrey
assailed Nixon on a spectrum of
issues-law and order, Vietnam,
the economy-but hit hardest at
the GOP candidates charge that
the Kennedy-Johnson years
produced a security gap.
On the steps of the Akron
courthouse, before about 3,000
persons who waited for him,
Humphrey said there is no
security gap, and there will be
no survival gap unless we follow
Mr. Nixons advice.
Meanwhile, Nixon
campaigned in New York and
Pennsylvania Monday in an
effort to head off burgeoning
support for Democrat Hubert H.
Humphrey. He confidently
predicted his showing in the
Nov. 5 election would be from 3
to 5 per cent better that the
polls indicate.
Maddox Mad
Over Threats
On 'Dixie
ATLANTA (UPI) Gov.
Lester Maddox, threatening to
have a band play both Dixie
and the Star-Spangled Banner
daily from the Capitol dome,
said Monday Were not going to
stop singing Dixie in Georgia
.. not while Im governor.
Maddox angrily denounced
charges by the Lowndes County
branch of the NAACP that
Dixie is a symbol of white
superiority and white
supremacy.
Maddox said Dixie is a
song about a great region and all
its people, black and white.
He further said the song was
written by a Yankee prior to
the Civil War.
If people continue to
complain about the singing of
Dixie, Maddox said, I might
hold a Dixie Day in Georgia. I
might order them to play both
Dixie and the Star-Spangled
Banner from the Capitol dome
every day at noon.
2 Milom Spool
$2,713,265 were spent by the
UF for the Agricultural
Extension Service in the school
year 64-65.

FU Games Area is forming
MIXED BOWLING c&gjMA
Tue., 9:00 pm OR Fri., 11:00 pm
Call Games Area (Ext. 2089)
or
Come in and fill out application
i mm | MM |

UPI
REPORT
The Republican presidential
candidate, appearing rested after
a weekend in his New York
apartment, appealed to voters in
a rally on the state capitol steps
to give him a firm mandate to
lead the country during the next
four years.

Paris Conference
NowComplicated

"By United Press International
Soviet Premier Alexei N.
Kosygin was quoted Monday as
saying the talks between the
United States and North
Vietnam were in a very
complicated stage. He was
reported to have urged Japan to
persuade the United States to
halt its air raids on the North.
Kosygins position emerged in
Moscow after a meeting in the
Soviet capital between the
Russian leader and the Japanese
Transport Minister Yahiro
Nakasone.
The Vietnam talks have
reached a very complicated stage
and I suggest the Japanese
government do all it can to
persuade the United States to
give up bombing North Vietnam
unconditionally, Japanese
sources quoted Kosygin.
I shall relay your suggestion
to our premier, Nakasone was
quoted. 1 am sure Japan will do
all it can for the cause of peace.
Kosygins characterization of
the Paris talks as complicated
took on added significance
with two more meetings in
Saigon Monday between U.S.
Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker
and South Vietnamese President
Nguyen Van Thieu.
SPORTS CAR
SPECIALTIES
If You Want It
fixed NOW Not
Next Week See
- RICK
2017 NE 27th Ave
Ph. 372-3406

The will of the American
people must be expressed
overwhelmingly in Novermber,
Nixon told a crowd of about
8,000. It must not come in
confused or timid or halting or
tri-partite voices.
Reaffirming his support for
his former vice president,
Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote
Richard M. Nixon Monday he
hoped Nixon wins a strong,
clear mandate on election day.
Meantime, Mrs. Mamie
Eisenhower mailed absentee
ballots to their Gettysburg, Pa.
precinct for herself and her
husband, who has been
hospitalized here since April 29,
recovering from two heart
attacks.

Another possibly significant
development occurred in Paris
where the North Vietnamese
delegation for the talks with
American diplomats called off
its regular morning briefing for
the second consecutive week.
No explanation for the move
was given but it appeared that
North Vietnam wanted to tone
down its propaganda attacks on
the United States because of the
delicacy of the negotiations.
Saigon dispatches said Bunker
and Thieu apparently were
trying to reach agreement on
new American proposals for
breaking the deadlock in the
Paris talks, including a bombing
halt tied to North Vietnamese
moves toward scaling down the
war and seating South
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
representatives at the conference
table.

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*
Micr-Easf Tenses

By United Press International
Tensions remained high on
the West Bank of the Jordan
River Monday as Israel clamped
strict curfews on three occupied
Arab towns.
Jordanian reports in Amman
said Arab demonstrations in
Jericho were dispersed Monday
by shots fired into the air by
Israeli security forces.
An Israeli communique said
security forces captured eight
guerrillas in an encounter a few
Abernathy
Picks HHH
BALTIMORE (UPI) The
Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, head
of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference (SCLC),
Monday endorsed Hubert H.
Humphrey as his personal choice
for president.
Abernathy said his statement
here was ape rsonal
endorsement. A spokesman for
SCLC said the organization is
not officially endorsing anyone.
It marked the first time
Abernathy had spoken in favor
of a presidential candidate.
Abernathy is successor to the
late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
as leader of SCLC.

i|j jB-lect
ENNEKING
paid political advertisement
11 1 .n 1 1.
SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 3

Tuesday, October 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

miles north of Jericho Monday
morning.
Two of the guerrillas were
wounded. No Israeli casualties
were reported, officials said. The
communique added that
bazookas, hand grenades and
other sabotage material were
captured in the encounter.
Jericho, Yaabed and Antaba
all in the Israeli-occupied
Jordan were all put under
curfew to curb demonstrations,
but Israel eased restrictions in
Nablus and Ramaliah, sources in
Amman said.
Curfews in Nablus and Rallah
were lifted between 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. following meetings between
civic leaders and the Israeli
military governor, sources in
Jordan said.

WANT
APS

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 29, 1968

] News I
ALPHA DELTA PI
Off to a good start in
Homecoming activities this year,
Donna Betts was chosen one of
the three finalists for
Homecoming Sweetheart, and
the ADPi skit was the only
sorority selected to perform in
Gator Growl.
New members of Angel Flight
are Lynn Boland and Lome
Martin,
PHI KAPPA TAU
The Phi Taus have purchased
the lot on the corner of SW Ist
Ave. and 13th St. across from
the law school. Construction will
soon begin there on the new
chapter house.
After a fine showing in
swimming intramurals, Phi Taus
stand undefeated in volleyball
competition.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
Tau Kappa Epsilon returned
to the University of Florida this
year at a new location with a
new idea. The TEKES, now
located at 1236 S.W. Ist Ave.,
have converted an apartment
complex, with the addition of a
new Social/Dining wing, into
their fraternity house.
In athletics, the TEKES
resoundingly defeated Phi Psi in
volleyball with scores of 15-8
and 16-14.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Lambda Chis are very proud
of their faculty advisor, Prof.
William T. Tiffin for being
inducted into the Order of
Merit, the highest honor a
Lambda Chi can receive in his
life.
Other Lambda Chis receiving
honors are Brother Hagan
Kohler who was appointed
Traffic Court Justice and
Brother Doug Crow was elected
to the Student Senate. Little
Sister Janis Mohrbacher was
elected Vice-President of the
Union Board.
Alpha Chi Omegas pledge
Carol Gilmore was chosen Pledge
class sweetheart.

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
The Students Friend
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimtrtes on Any Repairs
Ju t Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager I
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DROPOUTS

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|a, /l ll / / '/Oil Ifer 11

Four Tops: Recipe For Success

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Feature Writer
The Four Tops have become
one of the top male vocal groups
in the world. Their style is
singularly unique and other
groups run a poor second in
musical variation.
Their performances capture
teenage and adult audiences and
standing ovations. What then is
their formula for success?
Abdul Fakir said that the
group has been singing together
for the last 15 years. The group
grew up in Detroit and was on
the same basketball and stickball
teams. When we graduated from
high school we began singing
under the name of The Four
Aims. The name was switched in
1956.
We also sang together in the
Army, but it wasnt until 1962
that Motown Records (Diana
Ross and the Supremes, Martha
Reeves and the Vandellas)
became aware of our existence.
In 1965 the groups I Cant
Help Myself zoomed the charts
to success, and became a million
seller. Following in 1966 the
group scored again with Reach
Out, Ill Be There.
Much of the groups success is
through the genius of Holland,
Dozier and Holland, a trio of
songwriters that brings success to
the groups from Motown.
Duke, as Abdul is
affectionately called, said the
group experiences very little, if
none at all, problems when
traveling. In regard to other
groups that were big in the early
sos Duke said, They never
made the transition. They were
big for a while and have settled
into playing colleges.
Lawrence Payton said his kids
love the groups success. I
sometimes take them on tour
during the summer and mv

favorite cities are New York, and
of course, Detroit. The group
gets together to rehearse
whenever we can and we all live
near each other.
Obie, (sometimes spelled
0.8.) better known as
Renal do Benson cites the
Beatles, Miracles, Temptations
and Supremes as his favorite
groups. My taste in music
depends on the type and time. I
like all types of music.
When asked if their ages (they
are all over 30) were ever held
against them, Obie replied, Age
is no problem. We love college
audiences its like being in my
livingroom. Their response to
our music is quite different than
what we receive at nightclubs.
Levi Stubbs, Jr. is the groups
lead singer. His versatile voice
can belt out a ballad with the
softness of a feather or set the
audience rocking with a firm
voice suited for rock music.
Levi said that the record
Reach Out sold over three
million copies. We have five
gold records and seven albums to
our credit.
The reason why I sing lead
with the group is that I have a
more commercial voice. He also
stated that on records the lead is
often sung by a different
member of the group.
The men, just from passing
conversation, all favor jazz.
Their favorite musicians range

BY HOWARD POST

from Miles Davis, Ramsey Lewis,
Cannonball Adderly to Count
Basie to Leonard Bernstein.
They are totally unconcerned
with any other problems except
their own. Payton stated, My
kids know that I am doing this

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work for their benefit. Its for
their future.
As far as U.S. racial issues,
Duke merely said, Things are
confused.
They are friendly, prolific
and they are The Four Tops.



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices Campus Calendar

PRE-MEDICAL & PRE-DENTAL
STUDENTS: Dr. George T. Lewis
from the University of Miami School
of Medicine will be on the UF
campus to interview applicants and
interested students beginning
Tuesday, Nov. 12, through Friday,
Nov. 15. Students should make an
appointment with the
Pre-Professional Office in Room 3
Anderson Hall to talk with Dr. Lewis.
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
Requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
and the elementary block which
is (EDE 300, 301, and 302.)
English and speech majors do
not take the test, as SCH 201 is
a required course in all of their
programs. Appointments are
now being made in Room 124
Norman Hall.
WORK-STUDY JOBS: UF
students qualified for the
College Work-Study Program
(parents income must be in the
low-income range 57,000 or
less) who are interested in
part-time work, please contact
Student Employment, Room 23,
Tigert Hall, for further
information.
ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB: Carol
D. Taylor, applied anthropologist,
will speak to the club Wednesday,
Oct. 30, in Room 125 of the Arts
and Sciences Building. Her topic will
be "Small Tribes in Urban America
The Conveyor Belt Society." Coffee
will be served at 7 p.m.; topic and
discussion at 7:30 p.m. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
PROGRESS TESTS: All students
in the respective courses are required
to take the following tests. Students
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and
wifi be required to use their Social
Security Number.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct. 31, 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1, 2. 4,5, 7, 10. or 11; (C>
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121, or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102, 112, or 114; 201, 202, 205. or 206; (l-J) to

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Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance >-
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
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Flint 110 or 112; to Walker 202,
211. or 213; (L) to Little 213. 215,
217, or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223,
225. 227. 233, 235. 237, or 239;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 112, or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101 or
109; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Students
whose last name begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2, 3. 4,5, 6,7. 8,
9,10,11,12,13, 14. or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102,105, 108, 112,113.
114.115, 116, 117, 118. or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday. Oct. 30,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4, 5,6, 7,8,
9, 10, 11. 12, 13.14, or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108 112, 113,
114.115, 116,117, 118, or 119.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Student
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1, 2. 4,5, 7, 10. or 11; (C)
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121. or 125; (F) to Little 201. 203,
205, or 207 (G) to Peabody 101,
102, 112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to Flint
110 or 112; (K) to Walker 202, 211,
or 213, (L) to Little 213, 215, 217,
or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235. 237. or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Nov. 6,7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,10, or
11; (C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little
113. 121, or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; (G) to Peabody
101, 102, 112, or 114; (H) to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J)
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 211, or 213; (L) to Little 213,
215, 217. or 219; (M) to Little 221,
223, 225, 227. 233. 235, 237, or
239; (N-O) to Anderson 104,112, or
115; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R)
to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101 or
109; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Matherly 2,3,
4. 5,6, 7, 8. 9.10, 11,12,13,14. or
16; (M-Z) to Matherly 102,105,108,
112, 113. 114, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday. Nov. 5, at 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)

BLUB BULLETIN

report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1.2, 4. 5,7, 10, or 11; (C)
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121. or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102. 112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to Flint
110 or 112, (K) to Walker 202, 211,
or 213; (L) to Little 213, 215, 217,
or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, 237, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,
9. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.
MS 204 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
MS 301 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-F)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,
9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. or 16; (G-L)
report to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
112, 113, 114, 115. 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (M-R) to Little 101, 109,
113, 121, or 125; (S-Z) to Little 201,
203. 205, 213, 215, 217, or 219.

Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 29: ARTHUR ANDERSEN,
CPA Acctg. OLIN Cham, ChE,
IE, ME, MetE. GENERAL
ELECTRIC CO. PhD recruiting,
sciences 8i engr. science.
HUNT-WESSON FOODS Acctg,
Bus. Ad, IE, Industrial Mgmt, ChE,
Math, Statistics. KURT SALMON
ASSOCIATES, INC. IE. CITIZENS
8t SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANK
normally interviews business,
finance & liberal arts. U.S. ARMY
MATERIEL COMMAND All engr.
math, physics, chem. LEHIGH
PORTLAND CEMENT CO. Lib.
Arts, all business.
OCT. 29 & 30: THE BOEING CO.
AE, CE, IE, ME, Engr. Sci., Engr.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Placement Interviews

Symphony Orchestra, University
Aud.. 10:00 a.m.
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 B, 12:00 noon
Unitarian Student Forum Lunch 150
T uesday, October 29
Le Cercle Francais Informal Coffee
Hour, 150 B Union, 2:00 p.m.
Program Office, Children's Ballet,
Tap & Modern Dance Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet Meeting,
123 Union, 4:30 p.m.
Chinese Language Society, 150 C
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons, 150
C Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Beginning Oil, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Supper Club Meeting, Buffet supper.
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Arnold Air Society, Pledge Review
Board, Military Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
United Nations Assoc. Meeting &
Lecture, Dr. Oscar Svarlien, "Role
of United Nations Today". 105 B
Architecture 8i Fine Arts Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
Program Office, Charm Classes, 363
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept., Faculty Concert,
Florida Baroque Ensemble,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, October 30
Music Dept., Children's Concert with

Meehan, Math, Physics, Chem. Engr.
THE TRANE CO. All Engr.
OCT. 29, 30 & 31: UNION
CARBIDE CORP. ChE, Chem. ME,
CE, EE.
OCT. 30: ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION CE, ME. EE.
Math, Physics. CITIES SERVICE
OIL CO. Acctg, ChE, CE, IE, ME.
HONEYWELL, INC. EE, ME.
OCT. 30 & 31: GENERAL
ELECTRIC CO. EE, ME, AE, Met.
E, Chem. E, IE, NE, Chem, Bus. Ad.
AMERICAN CYANAMID CO.
Chem, ChE. UNION CARBIDE
CORP. PhD candidates and
post-doctorates in Chem, ChE,
Physics. GENERAL DYNAMICS
CORP. AE, ME, EE, Math.
OCT. 31: B.F. GOODRICH CO.
ChE, ME, Chem, BC, EE, Engr.
Mech, Math, Physics. NEW YORK
STATE DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION CE. W.O.
DALEY 8i CO. normally interviews
Acctg.

Tuesday, October 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

C Union, 11:30 a.m.
Children's Ballet, Tap 8t Modern
Dance, C-4 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Gator Growl, Technical Rehearsal,
Stadium Gate 17, 6:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Motion Picture
Techniques, C-4 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Alpha Chi Rush, 356 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Veteran's Club Meeting, 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Mensa Lecture, AFA 105 B, 8:00
p.m.
Pharmacy Dames, Fall Welcoming
Coffee, J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, Pharmacy Wing P 111,
8:00 p.m.
Stereophiles Meeting, The Fidelity
Shop, 604 N.W. 13th Street, 8:00
p.m.
Young Republicans, 150 C & D, 8:00
p.m.
Thursday, October 31
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 F & G, 12:00
noon
Gator Growl, Fall Dress Rehearsal,
Stadium Gate 17, 6:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting 8i
Elections, 363 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Football Films, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Friday, November 1
Program Office, Football Films, 150
C 8i D, 12:00 noon
Mensa Lunch Meeting, 150 F & G
Union, 12:00 noon
Homecoming Blue Key Banquet,
Toastmaster: Senator John
Mathews, Florida Gym, 4:30 p.m.
Homecoming Mortar Board Banquet,
Union Ballroom, 5:00 p.m.
Union Movies, "To Kill a
Mockingbird", Union Aud., 5:00,
7:00 8i 9:15 p.m.
Chess Club, Union 118,6:30 p.m.
Chess Tournament, 118,6:30 p.m.
Gator Growl, Florida Field, 7:00
p.m.
Blue Key, Homecoming Dance 8i
Coronation Ball, Union Ballroom,
Lee Castle & the Jimmy Dorsey
Orchestra, 10:00 p.m.
NOTICE: Camp Wauburg will be
closed all day on the day of a
Home Football Game.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Coronation Ball, $2.50 per person,
the Florida Cinema Society, $1.50
per person. Interhall "Americana
'6B*', $.50, and Mantovani at
$2.50, $1.50 and SI.OO. Tickets
are also on sale for the SFJC
Presentation, "Marriage Wheel",
students $.50, all others SI.OO.

Page 7



Page 8

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 29, 1968

_The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
rCffadtlfy Managing Editor
Mi Raul Ramirez James Cook
vAIWi/UCCUt Executive Editor News Editor
Autumn in New York

Staff Writings

My forefathers, my brethern, and I have
submitted to the yoke of despotism and
discrimination all the years of our lives. We will
endure no more. We may be a minority, but we will
stand and be heard. We will vent our grievances
through our new brotherhood, and we will take
pride in our new identity. We are the
Long-Enduring, Forgotten-Totally, Indignant
Establishment of Students (LEFTIES).
Our only crime is that we happened to be bom
left-handed. How could we help that? The decision
was completely out of our hands. And yet, for the
crime of being different, we have been forced to
live as virtual second-class citizens. We have been
spat upon through discrimination, segregation, and
outright hatred. Righty has ruled us with an iron
fist (right hand, of course). But secretly he trembles
he knows what power we wield. Our time has
come.
No more will we submissively sit in desks

the Alligator inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Hello. I bring you questions now for the twenty-seventh time. Please enjoy them:
1. What was the Manhattan project and who was its head?
2. The University of Tampa beat their second major college team last Saturday, which should retain or:*
improve their No. 5 ranking among the nations small colleges. Can you name the team they beat, Tampas:-
Coach, and what college this coach is from? :
3. And while Im on football, who was the coach of the University of Florida football team before Ray :|
Graves? :
4. Who was the editor of the CHARLATAN magazine? :
5. (A toughie) Salinger is not the only writer to have fallen win love with a large family. Can you match:*.
;the names in Column One with the authors in Column Two who have written sagas about them? $
a. Whiteoaks 1- Hugh Walpole 5
b. 2. John Galsworthy
c. Herries 3. Louisa May Alcott |
d. Sangers 4. Margaret Kennedy §
e. Marches -5. Mazo de la Roche §
6. What is the cure for cancer?
Mondays answers: §
1. John Ritch 2. A type of piano 3. Scorpius 4. T. S. Elliot The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock 5.^
Tim Conway, Rango. $
Lose a pound today. J?

Riahtv Rules With An Iron Fist

EDITORIALS

The Gator Will Growl

The year of the Gator went down the
tube.
The Gators fumbled 12 times to North
Carolina and lost. The Gators were
decimated by injuries against Vanderbilt and
tied.
And the Gator growl was a timid meow.
Well, were here to say the Gator will roar
again louder and meaner than ever.
The Gators can and will bounce back.
They are still a great football team.
But the road ahead, the remaining four
season games, are enough to give a loyal
Gator fan nightmares.
Tick them off: Auburn, Georgia,
Kentucky, Miami. All are capable of beating
the Gators.
And all will beat the Gators, unless...
Unless the team AND the student body
picks itself up off its duff and wounded
pride.
Unless the team AND the student body
go to Florida Field Saturday willing to
accept only a victory.
Unless the team AND the student body
commit themselves to 60 minutes of pure
hell for Auburn.
We believe the team AND the student
body can do all this and more. And we
believe they will.
So were asking the cheerleaders and
Student Government to organize the biggest

designed for righty. No more will we resignedly
open doors whose handles are on the right side. No
more will we patiently shuffle down staircases
whose bannisters are on the right side. No more will
we use rightys scissors and can-openers.
I can hear you now, Righty. You are telling us to
remember the days of forced assimilation, when
righty grade school teachers made Lefties conform
to the majority.
But I ask you, Righty, to try tp imagine, if you
can, the feelings of despair and inferiority you
would have if whenever you went to a gas station,
the attendant put a pen in your right hand to sign
the bill.
You see, Righty, the whole world conspires
against the Lefties. The militarys flagrant prejudice
is obvious look at how they salute. American
social customs are no better handshakes are for
the benefit of righty. Even religion discriminates
against us. Look at the Apostles Creed; some

prejudiced translator has duped us into thinking
that Jesus is supposed to sit at the right hand of
God.
We, the Lefties, have a duty to stand up for our
rights. We want action; and we want it fast. Well
bum down this country, if need be. But we hope to
get what we want without violence. Our plan is very
simple. After purging the military, religion, and
social graces of their discriminatory practices, well
make the government create a Department for
Architectural Reform (DAR), headed by a Leftie, of
course, to change desks, doorknobs, staircases, and
anything else that might annoy us.
Then, well put one Leftie on the Supreme
Court, one in the Presidents Cabinet, one as mayor
of a major city, and a proportionate number in
Congress. We dont care about their qualifications,
as long as theyre Lefties. Were going to get what
we want. We may be a minority, but well win,
hands down.

Thoughts

What would the university
have done with the $2-3 million
it lost to the Stokely-Van Camp
company for the rights to
Gatorade. Nearly every
university president in the

The Florida Alligator
Publiihad hy rtudantgqf the University of Florida under the
auqiittsof the Board of Student Publications.
Editor**. Busfcwm. Adventt* offices in Room 33, Reitz Union. Phene
ext. 2832
Opinion* expressed in the Florida Alligator are thorn of the editor* or of
the writer of the article nd not thoae of the Univertty of Florida."

pep rally ever for Friday afternoon, after the
parade and before the team leaves
Gainesville.
And were asking UF students who want
the Gators to win to go to the pep rally and
show the team how they feel.
Then go to the game Saturday and yell
like hell. Every time Auburn gets the ball,
lets make enough noise to shake the turf
beneath their feet.
And then listen, as the Gator growls
again.
Spirit Shakers
The Student Body Spirit Committee
needs S6OO by Thursday to pay for several
thousand orange and blue shakers for the
Homecoming game Saturday.
The TEPs donated SIOO, Student
Government gave slOl, but thats not
enough. To put the shakers in action at the
Auburn and Georgia games the needed funds
must be raised.
If several fraternities and sororities would
spend a little less money on Homecoming
decorations, favors, activities, etc. and
instead give something to the Spirit
Committee for shakers, there would be more
than enough money to pay the bill.
OK Greeks, go with the Gators!

By Janie Gould

nation is crying for money
including Stephen OConnell.
Would the money from
Gatorade have been enough to
push the UF into the greatness
that the president has called for?



Martin, Alper Clash Over 'Censorship

Didnt Measure Up

It appears that through some
journalistic alchemy, the Alligator has
transformed a rather mundane Student
Senate meeting into the most awesome
drama in political history. As it was so
elegantly phrased in the editorial, the
entire student body was screwed
again. Madmen with mud for brains
conspired and threw up a terrible
blockade. A man was mercilessly
persecuted by a Kangaroo Court.
Angry Student Senators staged a mass
walk-out. But most exciting of all, the
Senate pulled one of the Alligators
all-time favorites, a Witch Hunt.
What really happened? Its hard to
believe, but all this excitement grew out
of a rather routine matter, the Senates
refusal to appoint a candidate to the
Board of Student Publications. Harvey
Alper, a man who now thinks of himself
as the victim of an insidious conspiracy,
was considered and rejected by a
majority of the Student Senate after
calm debate for and against his
appointment. The Senate simply found
that Mr. Alper didnt measure up. He
was not there to defend himself because
he didnt measure up. He was not there
to defend himself because he didnt
choose to be there. No armed guards
blocked the door to the Senate, and no
one held Mr. Alper captive during
deliberations on the appointment. He
was just a little too busy or disinterested
to bother about showing up.
And what about the walk-out? Yes,
some people waited until after the vote
on Mr. Alper to leave for the rest room,
the water fountain, or the F. Lee Bailey
speech. Some came back after finishing
their other business, and some didnt.
Two hours after the vote was taken, the
meeting adjourned with the usual small
number of Senators remaining. The
Alligator sought to give the impression
that the 16 Senators present at the end
of the meeting were the only Senators
present immediately after the Alper
vote, but it was not until two hours
later the number of Senators finally
dwindled down to 16.
In defense of those who voted
against Mr. Alper, I would like to agree
with the Alligator Mystery Man, Mark

Dark Side Os Human Emotions

MR. EDITOR:
I am deeply disturbed by
David Millers letter which
described the Theatre of the
Absurd, exemplified by the
works of Albee, Beckett and
lonesco, as meaningless dada
scribblings.
The Absurd Theatre has been
a vital expression of the
dispirited, lonely condition of
modem man. I challenge Mr.
Miller to ignore the sharply
bitter social criticism of Albees
American Dream. The Zoo
Story is hardly trivial nonsense,

Thompson Was Clear On
Problems Os Math Majors

MR. EDITOR:
I express, on behalf of the
Department and its Advisory
Panel, the most grateful thanks
for Richard Thompsons dear
and explicit treatment of the

Charge

By Larry Martin

but a shocking and effective
exploration of the darker side of
human emotions.
lonescos work is deeply
relevant to our conformist
society. Our futile searches for
identity and purpose are well
expressed in Rhinoceros and
The Chairs. lonesco has
received world recognition and
we are indebted to his ability to
express the crucial* existential
dilemma of absurdity.
I admire Samuel Beckett, not
only as a great playwright, but as
a compassionate human being.

difficulties which accrue to
students majoring in this
Department.
ALEXANDER D* WALLACE
CHAIRMAN
DEPT, of MATHEMATICS

Time. A majority of the Senate didnt
like the fact that Mr. Alper abandoned
former Alligator Editor Steve Hull last
spring when Hulls controversial
editorial on the Marshall Jones hearings
was temporarily censored. To some it
appeared as if Mr. Alpers stand on the
Hull editorial was an act of cowardice.
A majority seemed to think Mr. Alper
reflected either a lack of personal
responsibility or an unwillingness to
support freedom of the press when he
left the Alligator during the censorship
controversy. It mattered little to a
number of Senators that Mr. Alper
claimed he acted responsibly and in
support of a free press by quitting on
Steve Hull at the precise moment when
Hull needed backing to fight the
censorship of an Alligator editorial.
Worse yet, the Senate, in Mark
Times opinion, conducted a Witch
Hunt by rejecting Mr. Alpers bid for
the Board of Student Publications.
Perhaps Mark Time will also consider it
an abridgement of freedom of speech
and a Witch Hunt if a majority of the
American public refuses to support
George Wallace for the Presidency
because of what Mr. Wallace has said
and stood for. Certainly Mr. Wallace,
like Mr. Alper, can say and stand for
whatever he believes in without fear of
censorship. It doesnt follow, however,
that either man should expect to get the
vote of those whom he alienates by
what he says and does.
In conclusion, it appears that Mr.
Alper would improve his case by
refraining from remarks which confirm
the Senates belief that he stands for
repression of the student press. For
example, his remark to the Alligator
theat the University Report is part of a
dastardly conspiracy which is hell-bent
on destruction seems to reflect an
unhealthy attitude toward free, open,
and rebust debate by the press jon
campus. It doesnt seem likely that a
man who strongly advocates freedom of
the press would feel so threatened by
the simple expression of ideas in a
student newspaper.

The humor of Waiting for
Codot reveals his generous gift
of laughter, even in the face of
the unbearable purposelessness
of existence.
I strongly urge Mr. Miller to
re-evaluate his opinion of the
Absurd Theatre. These plays are
hardly foolish innovations, but
efforts to free all of us from fear
of freedom and meaning, in
order to find the courage to
be.
ANNE LAMPERT, 2UC

LETTERS
In order to appear in die
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in die interest of
space.

Not Man Os Power

Hot Damn. Im supposed to be evil.
After listening to and reading the
invective pouring forth about my
allegedly dastardly actions, I have a few
things to say.
First, to set the record straight, 1 am
not the man of power and influence
which Mr. Mike Hittleman would have
this campus believe. I am not a man of
power and influence, Mr. Hittleman,
because I do not make deals. Were I the
evil individual you would have this
campus believe the party in power most
certainly could have preserved my
nomination to the Board of Student
Publications.
But the truth is, Mr. Hittleman, that
because I discharged my duties
objectively and without dealism last
year as Alligator managing editor I
havent got people in political debt to
me.
Second, I resent Mr. Clyde Ellis
repeated assertions that because I stood
up for my convictions I stood up for
censorship.
Hes wrong.
I too have a responsibility to be true
to myself and that responsibility
demanded that I resign as Alligator
managing editor last Spring. I felt that
as a professional I could not stand by
Mr. Steve Hulls unprofessional
editorial. For reasons of ethics and
moral conviction I, along with four
other Alligator editors, simply could not
honestly support an editorial which we
viewed as prejudicial to a quasi-judicial
hearing.
I could not be a party to something I
viewed as morally and ethically wrong.
Beyond that, however, I must
emphasize that I never received, nor did
any other editor who left the Alligator
with me receive, any word of
encouragement or advice from anyone
in the administration or associated with
it. The assumption prevalent on campus
that I acted as an administration puppet
is simply unfounded.
Most important to me is the general
absurdity of the charge that I am a
supporter of censorship.

Tuesday, October 29,1968. Tha Florida Alligator, I

Reply

By Harvey Alper

45Jr
The Newer Nixon

Unlike my friends Messers. Ellis and
Mingledorff I have worked
professionally in the daily press and 1
have dedicated a large portion of my life
to the right of the people to know the
truth though their newspapers.
Now, because 1 have put myself on
the line journalistically, I am the object
of unreasoned and unjustified attack.
Messers. Ellis and Mingledorff have
yet to come to the realization that
persons may agree with them on some
points and honestly disagree with them
on others. They seek to polarize opinion
and hence hamper democracy. They
seek uniformity of belief instead of
sincere reasoned diversity.
I cannot attack men for what they
believe in so long as they seek to exert
their beliefs through a democratic
process. But I cannot stand by while
those same men seek to warp that
process through bitter invective and
character assassination.
Messers. Ellis and Mingledorff had*
better not rest on their laurels though.
Im not out of the game just yet. If
anything, these men have proven to me
that each of us at this University must
stand up for his beliefs and fight for his
ideals. Otherwise a noisy few will drag
us down the road to nowhere.
Ill survive Mr. Ellis because Im not
so caught up in this game of Get The
Power that I cant have ideals. Power is
worthless without reason. I have mine.
As James Allen said in a little book
called As A Man Thinketh:
Tempest-tossed souls, wherever ye
may be, under whatsoever conditions ye
may live, know this in the ocean of
life the isles of Blessedness are smiling,
and the sunny shore of your ideals waits
your coming. Keep your hand firmly
upon the helm of thought. In the
barque of your soul reclines the
commanding Master; He does but sleep;*
wake Him. Self control is strength;
Right Thought is mastery; Calmness is
power. Say unto your heart, Peace be
stUl!
Peace, gentlemen, Peace.

Page 9



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

VWW'V'V.v/dWMXW'V'V.V/MOX-V'V,
I FOR SALE |
Triumph 1966 Bonneville, 650 CC
one owner, excellent condition.
Mechanically perfect, 5,644 miles.
$875.00. After 5, call 376-5190.
(A*23-st-p)_.
1967 Honda C 8450 43HP 4 speed
transmission. Good condition, runs
very fast. $475. Call Jon 372-9370.
(A-st-23-p)
Roberts 770 X stereo tape recorder
with mikes. Custom-made. Cover
slightly used. $325.00. 376-3543
evenings. (A-st-25-p)
1964 Honda Super Hawk, very good
condition, helmet and tools, $335 or
best offer. Must sell, call 378-3120.
(A-st-25-p)
Borg-Warner 3800 car stereo tape
player with 4 B-W speakers $l4O
value for sllO. Call Sam weekdays
after 5 p.m. at 376-64 7. (A-3t-25-p)
Deberman pup AKC reg. red
female all shots and ears, cropped.
Sire Ch felix the Warlock. Very
flashy pup. Call after 5 p.m.
481-2362. (A-3t-25-p)
1968 305 cc Honda Scrambler. Just
like new S6OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-2742. Philco port, tv 19 in. S4O.
With stand. 2 new VW Goodyear tires
S4O. Hoover vacuum cleaner $35.
(A-7t-25-p)
RCA Portable solid state stereo wun
solid state reverb only $65.00 Cali
Paul at 372-9438 after 8 (A-st-26-p)
Studio Sale Grad studentXew Harris
large paintings $30.00 contact Jeff
Ounn 378-8595 8:00 10:00 A.M.
(A-2t-26-p)
Stereo Hi Fidelity component
equipment. Sell as a unit or
individual parts. Cost $950 selling for
$425 need money desparately
378-0157 (A-3t-26-p)
Two twin beds mattresses and box
springs sls each set. Ladies golf
shoes, size 7m, like new, $5. Call
378-3176 any time. (A-2t^26-p)
IT'S terrific the way we're selling
Blue Lustre for cleaning rugs and
upholstery. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-27-p)
1965 Allstate Crusair motorscooter.
125 cc Runs good. SBO. Silvertone Hi
Fi phonograph with mahogany
cabinet S2O. Phone 376-3591.
(A-3t-27-p)
i " '. ~r <--i
if Ufc ***,
T otcwcepoon
m J WB'-tocmkte
* %
vw w
'% under 16
admitted
without
* parents
*
josttraou \
§MQ)(n)dl\^or d]i
w m inePSut NtWSAN production ol
\rachel. /
\ raohei
sueeisrto mtHahm aucewctsi
IT. HMwrdtv 4r^|
WED.OCT.3O
A era e shape intrude!
A blood-red thing that /
writhes from out The
scenic solitude 1
with mortal pangs-
TCoitQue9Jt
Utcngn color
VINCENT PRICE I

FOR RENT
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval England. One and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
378-0296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)
Apartment for rent. Colonial Manor.
Call 372-7111. (B-st-23-c)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS
1700 SW 16th Ct. model apartment
now for rent includes: spreads,
pillows, bath accessories, bric-a-brac
etc. Call 376-9668 (B-st-26-c)
Excellent horse boarding facilities.
Hunters preferred. 12x12 box stall,
ring, jumps, tack room. 10 minutes
from UF. 378-8016 mornings.
(B-stm ~P )
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-c)
Will rent completely furnished
apartment to RESPONSIBLE persons
homecoming wknd. Accommodates 6
people. Ext. 5394. 378-5296 after 6.
SIOO. (B 3t-27-p)
Homecoming room for couple in
spacious mobile home. S6O. Includes
kitchen. Contact Randy, Andrews &
Connell Trailer Pk no. 11, evenings!
(B-st-27-p)
WANTED
v e s
Need two west stand tickets for
homecoming game. Will bargain.
378-5740. (C-st-23-p)
Two general admission homecoming
tickets. Call 378-9842. (C-3t-27-p)
Wanted ride to Atlanta Ga. Thurs 31
or Fri 1. Will Pay. Call Ethel
378-1078 after 10 p.m. (C-2t-27-p)
Roommate Male 1 block from
campus. AC, TV only 33.75 per mo.
Ca 11376-6101 or comb to 1316 N.W.
Ist Ave. (C-3t-27-p)
HELP WANTED
HIGHLY QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secietaiial skills
essential. Permanent job excellent
pay. Du not apply.' less well
qualified. Phone 376 9 days or
378-2000 evenings j; ; -c)
Listeneis wanted Wu pay $1.50
for i hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Hamel Wukerson,
Umv. Ext. 2049. (E-25-lGt c)
Need 20 students foi on campus
work duimg Christmas Bieak. Inquire
about qualifications in Rm 23 Tigert
Hall, Student Employment.
(E-25-6t-c)
Is there- a bright Haustrau with a
good general education who would
like to grade exam papeis m a field
which she may not be familiar?
Prefer a relatively permanent resident
maybe a professors wife. Two to six
hous- a week. Reasonably good
hourly rate. Write a note to box
14321 University Station. (E-st-26-c)
Part time student help Male over
21. Neat appearance required. Apply
Woody's 3458 W. Univ. Ave.
Between 3 and 5 p.m. (E-3t-26-p)
Students foi stage Crew. Knowledge
of lighting or technical procedures
desued. Call ext. 3484. (E-st-25-c)
AUTOS
Want to ore a ci 1 F .-mowing
125.00 up 1940 Ford M j; aC i. 40
LaSalle 41 Cry. 40 2y. 3t> Butck 40
Chev. 31 Model A Cali 378-7951.
fD-lOt- 18-p',
1966 Opel. Air-conditipned, radio,
$1295, must sell, need money for
scnool. If interested. call
378 4539. (G-st-23-p)
1960 Karman Ghia Turquoise
$250.00 Call 378 3827 after 6:30.
Good shape, passed inspection.
(G-3t-25-p)
IRDSII
JGER L
tIGHTb I
MnBs Mmi B
B

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 29, 1968

Page 10

AUTOS
59 MGA classic condition, engine
recently overhaluled, newly carpeted
interior, red leather seats. $600.00
lOl'kiNE 7th St. after 6 p.m.
(G-3t-26-p)
1964 Porshe 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2500.00.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-26-st-p)
CHEVROLET 1961 Stawag
automatic heater radio power
steering power brakes air conditioned
$550. 3789037. (G-3t-26-p)
67 Mustang winyl top V 8 factory air
power steering radio white walls
$2300 call after five 378-7587.
(G-2t-26-p)
196 7 Saab 850 Gi Monte Carlo.
Winning performance, Luxury of an
cond., A m/F m Rugged
dependability. Excellent local service.
SlOOO.Call 3 7 2-2 64 7 evenings,
win. i--:inis. | G -4t 2 7-1-1
1966 Datsun 5p w new
while leather giam vTnD '.op! i ijUUce
with disks, up hunt, an oxceih-nt cai
foi highway and town. 378-0451.
(G-st-2 7-p)
PERSONAL
For Gioovy wedding invitations,
announcements, napkins, e'c., call
Orange Blossom representative after
5 p.m. at 378-5986. (J-3t-25-p)
Ritita, friendship bigger than words.
Best unsaid. Happy day from your
jungle friend. Me. (J-lt-27-p)
Tommy: Happy second' Always &
never. Apples grow m May. Bubba.
(J-lt-27-p)
I LOST & FOUND |
Yellow charger with black vinyl roof,
where are you? (L-lt-27-p)
Lost: lighter in Union snack bar
inscribed Seminole florist.
Sentimental value. Reward. Call
Sandi, 378-1502, rm. 1208A.
'L-3t-27-p)
THE STORY
OF THE
SELF-CONFESSE )
BOSTON
STRANGLER IS
BASED ON FACT.
BOSTON
STRANGLER
Tony Curtis
Henry Fonda
George Kennedy
MikeKellin Murray Hamilton
eovetor o*MCtso*
Robert Fryer Richard Fleischer /fvv
K>tlO k *s MUD - I'll
Edward Anhalt Gerold Frank
I JUneFonoa
i-,45, 3:45, 5:45,7:45, 9:45*

SERVICES
V '*
vx.y.A.v,xsev.y.w.*.v'; 'y
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS*
- STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-tf-h'
CAbH LOW? Ask about co-op living,
great food, a concerned community
at GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL 1002
W. Uni. Ave. 376-2476. Apply now
for next quarter. (M-st-23-c)
Child Care for 2 To 5 year olds
home in N.E. Section, fenced yard,
playroom, lunch aRd snacks.
$ 1 0/weekly. Call 376-8523.
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SHOWING AT 7:3OONLY CIGARETTE ROLLER
Kit includes: Roller, sample
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, ;;.v^..,.,,, : : ..... papers. Complete for $1.50.
HW( WULIAMS jp SHEUEV fABAff S f D BEGIEV satisfaction
ALSO AT 9:30- I***-*"** GUARANTEED
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I 80115
MT THE
plntberstiy jzStyaji
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
win Saturday, Nov. 2 Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will*be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
O AIRFORCE vs. Q N. CAROLINA
FLORIDA VS. p AUBURN
D FLA'STATE vs Q VA. TECH.
D GEORGIA vs. HOUSTON
Q LSU VS- D MISSISSIPPI
OHIO ST' vs. MICH. STATE
STANFORD vs. Q OREGON ST.
O TENNESSEE VS. O U.C.L.A.
TEXAS vs. S.M.U.
VANDERBILT vs. TULANE
by FLORIDA [ |
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.
a mono *1" *** * tie Pr ZeS WiU ** divided ec uail V
among winners. 7
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
shp Intueratiu &hott
s^ A^;E UmVerS,,y Aw * UNIVERSITY n
ADDRESS ~
=ity_TZZl statc
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

SERVICES
Homecoming special color 8 x 10
prints of date or parties $2.50 black
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Administrative Services Division,
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(M-24-st-p)



Tuesday, October 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

* rr%*
| Sports Trivia
!v C*
- v
ft: OK, Gator boosters-here are the answers to yesterdays quiz. : : :
|§
ft; 1) Curtis Martin ft
$: 2) Bobby Joe Green, Don Chandler, and Don Ringgold §
| 3) Cliff Luyk |
g 4) Baylor; 13-12; Florida (My apologies-this game was §
played in late December, 1960) §
$; 5) Dale Van Sickle &
a ft
Todays Quiz $
i-i 1) Name five ex-University of Florida golfers now on the pro
>: tour. |
x
| 2) Pistol Pete Maravich of LSU set a new NCAA major |
college record last year for most points per game average. Whose §
S record did he break?
§ I
g 3) Match the following pro football players with the colleges $
they attended:
ft ift
ft a) Herb Adderly North Carolina
b) Lenny Dawson Utah State |:j:
c) Jack Concannon Michigan State a
jft d) Merlin Olsen Boston College
| e) Ken Willard Purdue ft|
ift V ft
ft 4) What team holds the NCAA major college football record
ft for consecutive games won (Its not the Gators!)? How many? $
ft Who stopped this winning streak? ft
ft $
ft 5) Who was the announcer on the Wednesday and Friday j:j
ft night fights? $
ft) .VAV.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.'.V.V.WVAV.'.V/.V.V.'.V.V.V.VAV.V.VASV.W.V.VAW..S^:

Dorm Football Closes,
Playoffs This Week

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
Gaddum section struck terror
into the hearts of every Hume
resident as they tore apart
Yeaton for the area
championship 43-12 in dorm
football.
Dormitory and Law League
football are rapidly coming to a
close as is Independent
basketball.
In Graham Area Henderson
and Hadley areas will meet for
their championship. East
Campus semifinals find Reid IV,
(5-0), meeting Jennings 1, (4-1),
and in a rouser, Reid 11, 6-0),
will face Reid I, (6-0). It is being
rumored that some of the girls
who used to live in Reid are
secretly leading their teams to
victory.
In the modern dorm area,
Murphree, Fletcher N has won
Bracket I, Sledd G Bracket 11,
Fletchers S & J must face each
other for the bracket 111 title
and Murphrees G & E will
compete in Bracket IV.
Tolbert 111 has won their
bracket in Tolbert Area and
Independent
Football Date
Drawing Near
Football is the next sport on
tap for the independents and the
last day for signing up your team
is Wednesday at 5 p.m.
All those interested in
forming some sort of
conglomeration for a team must
contact the intramural office
room 229 Fla. Gym or call
376-326 1 EXT. 2912 by
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Speddized Bodies
There are 3 professional
fraternities on UF campus. They
are specialized. bodies that
confine membership to a specific
field of professional or
vocational education in colleges
and universities.

Page 11

South 11, (3-1 ), Tolbert 11, (4-0),
and North 111, (3-1), still must
play in the other bracket.
In Law League action,
Browns Bandits easily won their
bracket as expected and now
must face the winner of Mag 7
vs. Team 1.
In Independent basketball,
The English Dept, went
undefeated in winning their
bracket. Diamond Village, the
Spudnuts. and the Flavet I igers
did likewise in winning their
brackets. The B.F. Bombers,
Chem Catalysts and Tally
Whackers are in a tie tor their
bracket as are the Traders and
the 13th street Gang for theirs.
five till nine
dining room only
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1505 N.W. 13th Street 378-2481

Smith Out For Auburn

Doctors reports came back
to Ray Graves yesterday, and
the unhappy rumor became
truth Larry Smith is out for
Auburn.
Gone with him is defensive
tackle Skip Hadley, who
tenorized Vanderbilt quarterback
John Miller for two quarters
before a shoulder separation
took him out of the game.
Other possibly sidelined
players include Jack Bums, who
has a sprained ankle and Robbie
Rebol, with a knee injury.
Injured, but available for duty
are quarterback Larry Rentz,
tight end Jim Yarbrough, and
tailback Tom Christian.
Rentz is expected to see duty
against Auburn, and will

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probably be in for punting
duties as well, but Jackie
Eckdahl will start the Gators
moving this weekend.
The lightweight senior has a
sprained arch, which has slowed
him down considerably. If Rentz
appears unable to carry out his
punting duties, Graves is
working Guy McTheny and Paul
Maliska at that post.
Graves yesterday said that
Eckdahl has made a full recovery
from his toe injury, and can play
an entire game if necessary.
Rentz is considered as backup
quarterback, with Harold
Peacock deemed third.
Yarbrough came out of the
game with severe bruises on his
leg, but besides soreness, is ready

for the Gator Homecoming.
Tailback Christian, who did
not wear his nose mask for the
first time since his injury four
games ago, is back in his cage"
again, and expected to play. The
still mending nose yielded to
buffeting during the Vanderbilt
game.
Expected changes in the
Gator lineup include Jerry
Vinesett at halfback, and Alan
Cole at defensive tackle. Backing
up that pair will be Gary
Bimson, playing in his first game
of the year, and Chip Hinton.
Speaking on when Smith will
be back for Florida, Graves said
he could possibly be back for
Georgia.



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 29, 1968

So Then, What Is
College Football For?
* What is the purpose of college football?
I think the answer to that question, or rather a lot of people's
conceptions of the answer, lies at the base of several problems
encountered over the past tew weeks.
To the UF Alumni Association, its prestige. A winning season is a
must, because youre proud of your university, and you like to say
that you graduated from Florida.
To the Athletic office, its bread and butter. A football team is a
profit-making venture, and football must heavily subsidize other
programs.
To a football player, its away of expressing yourself. Its letting
off energy, being known, and being able to get a college education.
When the football team loses, different reactions set in. The alumni
meet and discuss whats wrong with their team. If they have the
influence, they start talking about changes in the athletic structure
(i.e. canning Ray Graves).
If you work in the athletic department, you start worrying about
filling the stands.
If youre a football player, you get dejected for a day or so, then
youve determined to play harder, and you try to forget the past.
mm As a student, I have my own
m a ideas as to what college football
I O I ITi C| s f r 1 m selfish, so I say
it is primarily for the enjoyment
of the student body. The
bv Neal Sanders students 8 out to the B ame and
Ftjj S3 bV release some emotions, yell, look
Alligator at women and know you're
|gjp| Sports Editor part of the university.
fUsKmr* As a student, I want to go to
1 the games. If the team loses, 1
j C feel dejected, as though it was a
personal loss. I feel mad if the
team doesnt seem to play the
way they should, but the feeling passes, and 1 start looking forward to
the next game.
The University of Florida fields a team of student athletes for the
enjoyment of the students, or at least I think so. If there are extra
seats (and with a 55,000 seat stadium, there should be plenty) then let
in the alumni and loyal followers. If a television network wants to
televise the game, that's also great. I'm proud of the team.
You would think, then, that all factions would be in harmony for
this weekends homecoming game. The philosophy I proposed would
seem to work for everyone.
No way. The students will get the royal shaft this weekend,
because of a difference of opinion over what college football is for.
The ticket office, under the Athletic Department, allots a certain
number of student tickets for the game. This was a big year for tickets
to UF athletics. Somewhere, an allotment for student space
was made for this weekend, and it was less than anyone expected.
But when the discrepancy was discovered, it was too late. The
alumni had their tickets, and the six-dollar ticket buyers had put
down their hard cash.
The tickets ran out, and there wasn't anything that could be done,
although a few hundred extra tickets, previously unclaimed, were
routed in for students, and chairs will be set to seat a few more.
Other than that, students will still sit home because there wasn't
space enough for them. The athletic office makes a gallant effort, but
its too late.
The bad thing about the situation is, that it raises a barrier between
the athletic department and the students. Students snicker when they
read in the paper that misprinted tickets turn up at games. People
start talking about under the table ticket sales, and fat wallets for
football players.
It's ugly talk, and the Homecoming ticket situation doesn't help to
squelch it.
That seems like a big controversy over such a little thing like a
philosophy of the purpose of collegiate football.
And it is.
Football Tickets
Students planning to attend the Georgia-Florida football game it
Jacksonville next week must pick up their tickets today at Gate 13 ol
the stadium.
Tickets will be issued at this time, but a two dollar deposit is
required to hold your seat. A receipt will be issued, and students mac
get back their two dollars at the Gator Bowl on Saturday of the game.
There will be no non-student date tickets. All students wishing to
bring a non-student date to the game will have to purchase a six dollar
ticket, as Georgia will not agree to a price reduction.
There will be no bloc seating for this game.

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