Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Managers-SG:
Whose Union?
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the conclusion of a two-part
series explaining the four main points of disagreement between
Student Government and the Reitz Union Board of Managers
which have caused recent controversy.)
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Editor
The four central issues in the controversy between Student
Government and the Reitz Union Board of Managers involve
primarily questions of authority and philosophy.
In a nutshell, SG is criticising the philosophy of the union as
a community center for the university. SG argues that the
union should be for students, if not exclusively at least in major
orientation.
The board of managers on the other hand, rather than
answering SG's objections about the operation of the union,
disputes the methods SG is using to try to change the
operations. Specifically, the board is attacking SGs authority to
make changes without the boards consent.
Changes the Student Senate made last week in a proposed
charter revision for the board of managers drew bitter objection
from the board and resulted in its decision Tuesday to withdraw
the charter from SG consideration.
SG countered that the charter will not be withdrawn because
once the machinery for its adoption is started by SG, the
charter cannot be withdrawn.
SG is willing, however, to delay further action on the charter
until SG and board representatives can discuss the changes and
agree on a compromise.
Ultimately, though, the question of the extent of SGs
authority to change charters of organizations receiving student
funds will have to be resolved. It is apparent then that the
dispute over the union charter may emerge as a test case of SG
authority.
Related to the two main issues are two other areas of
contention which are also involved in the controversy. Both are
questions about SGs authority.
One is whether SG has control over student funds which the
union receives.
Money is actually basic to the entire controversy because it is
from SGs claim that it controls all non-academic student funds
that its subsequent authority over organizations using student
funds derives.
Union Director Bill Rion told Alligator editors recently that
he believes SG has no control over the student funds the union
receives.
He cited a 1962 student law which gave the union financial
autonomy. Rions interpretation of the law was that SG
delegated its authority over student funds to the budget and
finance department so that the union would receive $8.50 per
student per quarter.
Rion also noted that a 1968 orientation pamphlet for
incoming students listed the ways non-academic fees were
divided among the infirmary, the Athletic Association, the
union and SG.
Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich pointed out that
union autonomy was taken back by SG in 1967.
The Senate, then called the Legislative Council, passed a law
to recodify all existing student laws so that records could be
more easily kept.
The 1967 law stipulated that all laws not recodified would be
(SEE 'WHOSE' PAGE 2)

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RANDY BASSETT

TICKET
RUSH

1,200 date tickets were sold within 45 minutes after the
ticket window opened Thursday afternoon, endangering
students with a seating shortage.
Students who are holding date tickets for the Auburn Florida
game Nov. 2, and do not plan to use them are urged to turn
them in for a $3 refund.
The Student Senate, the athletic department and the
president of the student body in a joint resolution Thursday
night urged those students who were not planning to use their
tickeU to.tupri Jhe/t) in at,1 1 a,ip 4 today, ?tud?r)t? rrjay/

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 25

US Government May
Seek Gatorade Rights

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writar
Gatorade, the well-known
thirst quencher and replenisher
of body salts used by UF
football teams since 1965, now
has a new ingredient to add to
its mixture of glucose, sodium
orthophosphate, patassium,
sodium bicarbonate, and
potassium chloride.
The new ingredient is
controversy -a controversy over
who should actually hold the
right to produce and market it.
Dr. Robert Cade, associate
professor of medicine and
director of the department of
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
developed Gatorade in research
financed by the Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare
(HEW).
Last year, Cade sold the right
to GatoradetoStokely-Van Camp
Corp., now producing it for
consumption by other football
teams and for the general public.
But the university apparently
is to get nothing from the sale,
because UF officials did not
(SEE 'GATORADE' PAGE 4)
Absentee Ballot
Mail-In: Pg. 9
On page 9 today is an
application for an absentee
ballot for the general election on
Nov. 5.
As a public service the
Alligator, in conjunction with
the Youth for Collins group on
campus, is giving you this
opportunity to exercise your
right to vote.
Fill out the application today
or Monday and put it in the box
attached to the Alligator stand.
The Youth for Collins group will
pick up the forms and mail them
to your home-county supervisor
of elections.

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

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_ BRIAN QOOOHEIM
EERIE UF
An early morning mist played tricks with the UF skyline Thursday.
One might almost have expected Tigert's front door to squeak open
with Transylvanian voice proclaiming, "Helloo myyy nammme ess
Count O'Connell."
BY OWN REQUEST
Tripper Arrested
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
An 18-year-old freshman was found Wednesday morning
apparently under the influence of some form of hallucinogenic drug.
University Police are presently investigating the case.
We are still unable at this time to determine the origin or type of
narcotic with which the student came into contact," said Investigator
J.K. Morrison. Every indication is that it was a hallucinogen like LSD
( SEE 'TRIPPER' PAGE 2 )

use them.
Students who purchased date tickets but who have since
gotten a date with another UF student may turn in the date
ticket with their date's ID and receive the refund. The same
seating arrangement will be kept and the date ticket will be
altered for another location.
In the resolution students who borrowed friend's IDs to get
non-student couples into the game were urged to turn in the
tickets and were guaranteed the chance to buy regular admission
Vp&fa'V.W *Y,V*V.V. .. . .Y Y*Y*Y. ** *Y*V*

Friday, October 25, 1968

y



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

State Press Bares Story,
Or 'Whats Nude At UF?

See Editorial Page 8 ;
By GAYLE MCELROY I
Alligator Staff Writer
A bare-breasted blonde on
the cover of Tuesdays Alligator
magazine supplement, The
Campus Thing, has caught the
fancy of newspaper headlines

Whose Union?
PA6E ONE
void. The union automony law was not recodified by the
Senate.
Then last summer, the Senate approved a law stipulating that
because of the earlier action, the union budget was subject to
line-item control by SG.
Rion said he did not think SG could grant autonomy and
then take it away. But Goodrich said SG is clearly empowered
to repeal any law it passes.
To further substantiate SGs claim of control over student
funds, Goodrich pointed to recent revisions in policies of the
Board of Regents. The policy on non-academic student monies,
called student activity fees, is that the must be dispursed and
spent under the supervision of a student government or similar
group.
Goodrich contends, then, that because the union uses
student funds over which SG has control, SG should have a
voice in how appropriated money is spent.
And, he says, SG wants the money spent on students rather
than on the entire university community.
The other authority-related dispute involves SGs power to
call for the election of officers to the Union Board of Student
Activities, which is under the supervision of the board of
managers.
Rion, current Union Board President Roger Brown and
members of the board of managers all argue that election of
officers to the union board should be a decision of the board of
managers rather than SG.
But Goodrich counters that SG is constitutionally enpoweied
to determine if student posts are elective or appointive in
organizations which use student funds. The fact that the union
board gets money through the board of managers is, Goodrich
says, unimportant.
Negotiations between SG, the board of managers and
administration officials to seek ways to improve the unions
student service have been going on for about seven months.

H loans Up To S6OO
rfget Am
I
Morion Rnanco Co.
376-5133
222 W. University Are,

BREAKFAST
SPECIAL
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2 SLICES BACON M W% A
TOAST & GRITS (w on^ os fciJC
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1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVI. K BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

.THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la fMrtrtli*~il Ova times weekly except ferine Jana, July and August whan It Is ptollshed
ami -aatlr. aad ferine stadaat holiday* and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
rfiwitmm at their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alllfator, Rails
Untoe Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator la entered
aa_. second class Matter at the United Stotaa Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 12601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
He Florida All Hr*" r reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone at all adver-
UiiMeeta aad to revise or ture away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will ant consider adjustments at payment for any advertisement
Involving l)rt *r >> '** > errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advwr-
Mnamger within (1) one fey attar advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
of he iwepoasMe for more than one Incorrect Insertion at an advertisement scheduled
to rmi severe! times. Mottoes tor correction must he given before nest insertion.

across the state.
Headlines such as UF Paper
Goes Topless, Supplement
Busts Forth and UF Cover
Has Nude have played up the
new magazines return of nudity
to the campus, a subject barely
debated since the Pamme Brewer
scandel A year ago last winter.
Miss Brewer left the student

body after her second nude
appearance in the Charlaton, a
magazine published in
Gainesville.
Dave Doucette, managing
editor of the Alligator, said the
girl was a professional model and
not a student as in the case of
the Pamme Brewer scandal.
The administration still
hasnt said anything, Doucette
said, and I personally doubt
they will.
In reference to the blowup
by the news media, I think it is
absurd, asinine and childish to
exaggerate something that isnt
really this big, said Allen
Pierleoni, editor of the
supplement.
By their exaggeration, the
state news, Associated Press in
particular, have shown
journalistic irresponsibility,
Pierleoni said Thursday.
He said the AP misquoted
him saying: This is The Campus
Thing and thats why it was
done.
I never even talked to an AP
reporter, Pierleoni said.
He said the primary reason
for using the photo was because
it was an artistic photo with
form.
We also wanted to capture
attention, Pierleoni said. Any
magazine has attention getting
devices on the front page.
The photo in question,
heavily shadowed, showed the
girl waist deep in water facing
the camera. Another photo of
the same girl is reproduced full
page on the back cover of the
supplement, but is engraved as a
line cut.

Hi
i

BY OWN REQUEST-
Tripper Arrested
RON MS OK *5
or similar material.
According to campus police records, Sgt. E.E. Smith and
Patrolman E.C. Crews were patrolling near the stadium on
North-South Drive at 2:30 ajn. Wednesday when they were attracted
to blinking headlights.
Upon investigation, the officers found a young male student on top
of a car pounding the roof with his fists.
The driver of the vehicle, a local physican, was enroute to J. Hillis
Miller Health Center on an emergency call.
He said the youth ran into the path of his car waving his hands and
pleading for a ride to a fraternity house. When the motorist refused,
the boy climbed onto the roof of the car and began shouting
incoherently and pounding his fists.
Police said the student was crying steadily and displayed poor
physical coordination. He stated that he wanted to be arrested despite
anything that would happen to him.
Police officers took him to the UF infirmary where the doctor on
duty was unable to form an opinion about his condition.
While at the infirmary, the student could not conduct any
meaningful conversation and the doctor speculated the student might
be under the influence of an hallucinogenic. His suspicion was based
on the students intermittent flights from reality.
He was transferred to a local hospital where his condition remains
unchanged. Thursday he was still displaying symptoms of incoherency
and seemed unable to maintain continuity of thought, according to
reports received by Morrison.
Morrison conferred with the students roommate and housing
officials on Wednesday morning and learned the individual had been
emotionally disturbed for several days. Rumors were circulating
among students in the students dorm area that he had access to
narcotics.
The students were concerned about his condition but elected not
to discuss the problem or seek counseling, Morrison said.
A search of the students room with permission of the roommate
revealed no evidence of drugs or similar material.
Personally, I am greatly disturbed by this incident, Morrison
said. Here we have a student who recently came to the UF campus
and because there exists an attitude of permissiveness toward drug use
on campus, this emotionally disturbed person appears to have been
given an hallucinogen from which he may never completely recover.
We all know there is much drug traffic on this campus, yet the
average campus citizen avoids committing himself publicly against this
problem.
Each person who knows of narcotic violations and does not act to
remedy the danger must share the moral guilt for the incidences,
Morrison said.



. J|H
Wm ,'^KS^V
M
RANDY BASSETT
FREEMANS BACK
SDS-SSOC "radical" Ed
Freeman lends his back to a
membership drive to strengthen
the organization's ranks and
possibly to increase chances of
gaining a UF charter.
Freeman stressed that while it
costs nothing to join the local
group, the national SOS
requires a $5.00 fee.
The campus activist
organization has been seeking
for a number of years, chartered
recognition from the UF. Each
time it has been denied.
I I
Pi* ma*§
.US iiK' a.'
n fc m 1 ~ h
Work in Europe
American Student Information
Service has arranged jobs,
tours & studying in Europe for
over a decade. Choose from
thousands of good paying jobs
in 15 countries, study at a fa famous
mous famous university, take a Gra.id
Tour, transatlantic transporta transportation,
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gram. program. On the spot help from
ASIS offices while in Europe.
For educational fun-filled &
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time lifetime send $ 2 for handbook
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listing jobs, tours, study &
crammed with other valuable
info, to: Dept. M, ASIS, 22 ave.
de la Liberte, Luxembourg
City, Grand Duchy of Lux.

4 Hit School Board
In Civil Rights Suit

Four high school students
challenged the Alachua County
School Boards desegregation
plan Tuesday, and filed suit in
U.S. District Court.
Lavon Wright, son of the Rev.
T.A. Wright, president of the
Gainesville chapter of the
NAACP, and three friends claim
the present desegregation plan
for Alachua County schools fails
to provide a unitary system of
education that disregards race

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Bl

Everyone wishes for peace.
But just wishing wont bring it one
step closer.
Dedication and hard work will.
Dedicated.
Hard-working.
Thats Hubert Humphrey.
In 1955, Hubert Humphrey saw world
peace threatened by rising stockpiles of
weapons. And the testing of those
veapvns in the atmosphere. He sought to
arouse both Congress and the public on
the need for a nuclear test ban.

Hubert Humphrey.

under the present freedom of
choice school assignment plan.
The suit asks for a writ
ordering the Alachua County
School Board to assign students
to county schools on non-racial,
geographic patterns instead of
the present freedom of choice
system which the students
pointed out was declared
unconstitutional by a May 27
decision of the U.S. Supreme
Court.

People laughed.
How could we get belligerent Russia
ever to agree on such a treaty? they said.
But Humphrey was dedicated to this
idea. And determined to see it happen.
He went to work to gain acceptance
for it. For a long time, he was the only
influential member of Congress making
any effort in behalf of such a ban.
Finally, in 1968, the Limited Test Ban
Treaty became a reality. And as President
John F. Kennedy signed the bill, he turned
to Humphrey and gave testimony to
his efforts.

BURGER CHEF
FISH SANDWICH SPECIAL
Fri., Sat, &Sun.
Od 25, 26, 27
ALL DAY
"LET'S ALL GO TO BURGER CHEF"

Friday, October 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Hubert, this is your treaty.
It took eight years from the time
Humphrey introduced the idea for the ban
to come about.
Eight years during which Humphreys
dedication never once wavered.
Eight years during which Humphrey
never lost sight of the aim of his efforts.
A ban on the bomb.
And peace in the world.
There is a candidate who will work
harder for peace.
His name Is Hubert Humphrey.

Page 3



Page 4

, Th* Florida Alligator. Friday, October 25,1968

Gatorade In Controversy

F* FBOH PA6E ONE
apply for the rights. Cade had
urged university officials to seek
the rights ot Gatorade but
officials at the time thought
Gatorade would not amount to
anything.
Meanwhile, the U.S.
government claims it owns the
rights to Gatorade virtue of its
financial support of the research
that led to Gatorades
development.
What is more, the government
plans to take legal steps to win
control.
N either the federal
government nor the UF nor
Florida taxpayers are now
receiving any money from the
sale. In fact, the UF football
team now buys its Gatorade from
Stokely-Van Camp distributors
in Jacksonville.
According to Dr. Emmanuel
Suter, dean of the College of
Medicine, Cade urged the UFs
division of sponsored research to
ask the U.S. government to
waive rights in favor of the UF.
Under exceptional
circumstances the UF could have
applied for rights, Suter said in
a statement Thursday, but the
UF failed to do so because of
the unlikely event that it would
receive such approval and
because the university, after all,
was not in the business of
marketing products for the
general public.
Suter had earlier been quoted
by the Associated Press as saying
that the university decided to let
it go because normally nothing
marketable comes out of
research, Gatorade proving to be
the exception.
No one could know of the
tremendous demand for
Gatorade, Suter said.
According to UF Head
Football Coach Ray Graves, the
Department of Intercollegiate
Athletics, which does not receive
any money from the sale of
Gatorade, would remain
essentially unaffected by any
decision as to who would have
rights over the production and
marketing of Gatorade.
We were just provided lab
experiments and went into it

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without any expectation of
reimbursement for scholarship
funds or for personal gains,
Garves said Thursday.
I would think that the
question of who controls the
rights of producing and
marketing Gatorade would be
decided at the administrative
level the university and the
Board of Regents.
However, the Associated
Press reported in a story released
Thursday that Graves is not
happy about the fact that the
athletic department is on the
outside financially.
It was a team effort; the
doctors and us cooperating with
them and the players to make
Gatorade possible, the AP
reported Graves as saying. Even
if they left me out, I thought the
staff and the players should have
been considered, perhaps by
setting up an athletic scholarship
with part of the money.
An inquiry has been
subsequently ordered by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
- an inquiry which would delve
into the development of
Gatorade, its sale to a private
company, the rights of the
university and of the U.S.
government, and lapses in state
policy.
Mel Sharpe, OConnells
administrative assistant, said that
the administration was not in
position to comment right
now, but that comments would
come after OConnell receives
the report this morning.
Gatorade hao its beginning
when Cade was granted funds
from the National Institute of
Health, a division of HEW, of
study the hormone Aldosterone
in rats.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
10 I N.MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. 5 mins.

Aldosterone is involved in the
bodys salt metabolism and
therefore is related to
perspiration processes. Gatorade.
developed as a result of Cade s
studies, replaces the sugars and
salts lost in perspiration, getting
into the bloodstream 12 times
faster than water.
Gatorade became a boon to
football players, who lose as much
as 2.5 gallons of fluids during
a two-hour workout, a loss of
this nature would force the body
to strain to replace the fluids in
the blood stream.
Relieving the burden of
having to replace body fluids,
sugars, and salts makes the
player stronger for the later
parts of a game or practice.
UF football players have
served as guinea pigs for the
Gatorade research program since
1965.
It is now reported that all
professional football teams but
two now use Gatorade, as do
300 college teams and 1,000
high schools.
Alfred J. Stokely, president
of Stokely-Van Camp, said that
when the company first heard of
the product, there was no
market for it and certainly no
demand, for it was known to
relatively few people.
While investigating its
commercial possibilities we
satisfied ourselves that this new
product was devised and owned
by Gatorade Trust, Inc. (Cade
and several associates), from
whom we subsequently bought
the commercial rights, Stokely
said.
Keep In Step
I Read the Alligator I

| Save your seat j
! at your first sit-in.!
The trouble with a sit-in is what you sit on. And
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JOr 9 I weve had no remedy forother parts of the body I
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... What distinguishes The Sit-On from an ordinary
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GOT A SICK CAR "T
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
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Youll drive safer wltn our brake ana
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Were the student's friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIAUST
1031 So. Muia Phone 376-7771
What's NEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
THE TRUTH ABOUT GOLF & OTHER LIES Buddy Hackett
SAVAGE SLEEP Brand
WE BOMBED IN NEW HAVEN Heller
ACROSS THE RED WORLD BUiiney
STARTING FROM SCRATCH Barnes
BRIEF AGAINST DEATH Smith
TRAVELLER EXTRAORDINARY Reid
THE MIRAGES OF MARRIAGE Lederer
WEST OF THE DATELINE Duffus
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1943,1944, 1945,1950 & 1956.
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00A.M. 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore



WEEKENDOINGS
R DAVID CHAPIN
Alligator Staff Writer
SPECIAL EVENTS
IFC FALL FROLICS: The Four Tops, today, Florida Gym, 8 p.m.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Concert, Edward
Troupin, conductor,Sunday, University Auditorium, 4 p.m.
UNIVERSITY GALLERY: Drawings and Graphics for
Collectors, today through Wednesday, Oct. 30, University Gallery, 9
a.m.-l 2 p.m., 1:30 p.m.-5 p.m.
DEPT. OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY: Special Joint
Colloquium, today, Bless Auditorium, 4 p.m.
POETRY READING: Faculty and students reading poetry, today,
Medical Science Building Auditorium, 5 p.m.
CHRISTIAN YOUTH DINNER: Free dinner, Sunday, First
Christian Church, 804 SW 2nd Ave., 5:45 p.m. Call 372-7744 for
reservations.
CLUB MEETINGS
MUSLIM STUDENTS: Today, Reitz Union room 122, 12:30 p.m.
CHESS CLUB: Tournaments, Tonight, Union room 118, 6:30 p.m.
INDIA CLUB: See India Through Flims program, Sunday,
Union Auditorium, 2 p.m.
FLORIDA CINEMA SOCIETY: Sunday, Union room 347, 7 p.m.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, Union
room 361,4:30 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST: Sunday, Sigma Chi fraternity
house, 9:15.
SG To Restart
l lntercourse

By CUNT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Mick Callahan, secretary ot
economic affairs for Student
Government, plans to re-start
the Intercourse program he
initiated during April of this
year.
Intercourse is a program
which invites speakers from the
faculty and administration of
UF to appear in the Plaza of the
Americas and answer questions
students might have.
Nothing has happened to
the program, Callahan said, I
simply have not done any work
on it so far this year. Up until
this week, I have been involved
with the student body elections,
but now that they are over, I
will begin work on Intercourse.
Last years program included
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and Dr. Sidney M.
Jourard, professor of
psychology, as speakers.
After the seeming success of
last years program, I made a list
of about 30 members of the
faculty and administration who I
would like to have speak at
Intercourse, he said.
Included in the program last

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spring was a request from
Callahan that classes at the UF
be held outside on the day of
Intercourse meetings.
This request for open-air
classes will probably be
continued again this year, said
Callahan. I feel it adds more of
a relaxed nature to a class
situation.
Personally, I would like to
see this program become a
monthly occurence, Callahan
said.
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Friday, October 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25,1968

UF Awarded
Top In WUS
Contributions
- UF was awarded the 1968
state award for the states
highest contribution to World
University Service (WUS).
The contribution of
$1,444.59 was also the highest
from any of the Southern
schools involved in the program.
Seventy colleges and schools
in the south made contributions
to WUS during the 1967-68
fiscal year. The total from the
South was $19,526.39, which
includes S2O given by
individuals.
Rollins College was second
highest contributor in Florida
with $1,000; Florida A&M
University gave SIOO, Florida
Presbyterian College, $92.70;
Florida State, $ 10.
The second highest
contribution in the South came
from Texas Christian University
with $1,162.47, and third was
Randolph-Macon Womens
College, Virginia, with
$1,149.20.
The WUS is an international
organization concerned with
student welfare. The basic
budget is dependent upon
contributions from students.
The program provides
material aid ( 10 per cent to 50
per cent in most projects) while
trying to further international
cooperation and understanding.
It has initiated projects since
1920 for college and university
student health, lodging,
emergency aid and other
facilities.
Onassis Buys
Jackie Rubies
PARIS (UPI) Aristotle
Onassis brought his new bride,
the former Jacqueline Kennedy,
$1.2 million worth of
heart-shaped rubies and
diamonds as a wedding present,
according to reports in Paris

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Should the Apollo 8 space
shot go off in December as
scheduled, theUF will be playing
ap important part.
A station at UF will be one of
many tracking the space ship as
it floats through space.
The station is being built in
the old Engineering Building,
Richard S. Flagg, research
associate in astronomy and
physics, said.
In addition to tracking
Apollo 8, a moon orbital flight,
but other UF programs were
it is hoped the station will be
powerful enough to pick up
signals from the first lunar
landing.

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Department of Electrical
Engineering. The building is 75
per cent completed, Flagg said.
Original plans were for
completion in time for the
Apollo 7 flight just completed,
given priority.
Equipment for the station
was given to UF by the Telstar
Ground Station at Cape
Kennedy, and by Elgin Air
Force Base near Fort Walton
Beaph.
The program was begun by
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Friday, October 25.1968, Tht Florida Alligator, F

Page 7



Page 8

l Tfca Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25,1968

EDITORIAL
Thanks For 'Nothing

The Alligator would like to commend its
university.
Those who remember the embarrassing
over-reaction to the now defunct Charlatans
nude feature of nearly two years ago may
well have waited with apprehension for the
administrations reaction to our own nude
studies in the recent Campus Thing
supplement.
The reaction was not forthcoming.
Those who, as part of the campus
community, had to answer for the news
media carnival surrounding the Pamme
Brewer Incident may well have sought
cover in the face of expected storm clouds
brewing over Tigert.
The skies over Tigert are blue.
It was time that those who held the reins
on a sophisticated seat of learning realized
that nudity as an art form was not

CrM SPIRO AON m \

Rational Observer
Even Thoughts Os Inny-inny
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN

I had an interview with a Miss Polly (last name
withheld, but IH give you a hint it sounds like
virgin*) who came storming into the Alligator office
Tuesday protesting the two nudes exposed
grossly on the front and rear of the literary
supplement.
1 found Polly in an angered nervous state ( this
was obvious because the cross hanging from her
nose was shaking), sipping a glass of buttermilk. Her
skirt, four inches below her knees, she was proud to
say, was made out of her mother's wedding dress.
And her top button (unbuttoned) let it be known
that she had on two tee shirts and a university
sweatshirt under her blouse. In her left hand she
carried a Bible, and in her right, the scales of justice.
In short, she showed symptoms of succumbing to
some of the laws of our society. And she was
furious.
POLLY: AAGH GAACHH!
ALLIGATOR: Pardon?
POLLY: The-th-that picture!: How could you
put it in? How? How??
ALLIGATOR: Are you upset, Polly?
POLLY: Women's uppers! WOMEN'S UPPERS!!
In PUBLIC!! SMUT!!!
ALLIGATOR: What exactly are you saying,
Polly?
POLLY: (calmer, resting her hands on her lap for
fear peering men may be crawling on the floor)
(Now, indignant) Simply, this. Any paper that
would do what you have done is contributing to the
delinquency of its readers. One knows, that at the
right of a bare women's upper-upper (there's two of
them) a male is turned into a beast with lascivious

reprehensible simply because the art form
was a creation of and available to its
students.
That time has come.
We hoped, when we settled on the
project, that the administration would feel
that a great university must not restrict free
expression beyond the point that it would
normally be restricted in the world outside.
Apparently we were right.
We congratulate and are sincerely grateful
to the university administration for living up
to our own, and we think others,
expectations.
We thank them for calmly refusing to
feed the appetites of crackpots and cranks
who seem to work day and night dredging
evil out of good, obscenity out of beauty.
We thank them for doing exactly what
the situation called for.
Nothing.

thoughts which should remain in the gutter.
ALLIGATOR: And by lascivious thoughts you
mean...
POLLY: You know tootin' well what I mean.
Thoughts about TOUCHING her, and EVEN
thoughts of (oh horrors) INNY-INNY!!
ALLIGATOR: Inny-inny?
POLLY: Well, don't want me to SAY it, do you?
ALLIGATOR: And these thoughts are bad?
POLLY: BAD?? (Has a fainting spell. Someone
mentions artificial respiration. She immediately
wakes up.) (Eyes upward) Oh Lord in heaven, he
asked me if these thoughts were bad!
ALLIGATOR: So if a husband were to see his
wifes upper-upper'' and think these thoughts, this
would be wrong.
POLLY: Oh, no! A husband is ALLOWED to do
this. At least after a couple of years of marriage.
ALLIGATOR: So then these same exact
thoughts are sometimes good and sometimes bad.
That's like saying a red ball is sometimes red and
sometimes green.
POLLY: Don't try to confuse the issue with
balls, (looks suddenly embarrased, kisses the
hanging cross on her nose.) With extraneous matter.
I don't want to talk about this any more. You put
in this terrible picture (steam begins to rise from
her sweatshirt), and I mean to see that you never do
it again! (becomes stuffy, realizes her hands are
TOO far down on her lap, lightens them.)
ALLIGATOR: Polly, would it have been bad to
run a picture of a pretty tree?
POLLY: Os course not!
ALLIGATOR: is the thought of a pretty tree
f-

Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
I dedicate todays column to Mrs. Aristotle Socrates Onassis for her
wisdom in choice of mate. May all her future days be to her as good
looking as her husband is.
Todays questions:
1. Place these men in order of birth: Socrates, Plato, .Aristotle.
2. What was the name of the horse who won the Kentucky Derby
this year and was then disqualified when certain drugs were found in
his system?
3. What was the name of the man who was convicted in the late
forties of selling atomic bomb secrets to the Russians, a story which
made headlines for weeks?
4. What is the capital of South Carolina?
5. The sinking of what ship by a German submarine brought us
into World War I?
6. Is it true that a new musical group called Parsley, Sage, and
Rosemary has been formed and their first big hit will be called
Thyme is on my side?
Start your weekend right and forget what youve just read.
1 Arabesque, Breakfast at Tiffany's Safari, Charade, Pink Panther
2. Royal Crown, Robert 3. William Frawley and Vivian Vance 4.
France, Spain, (Argentina, Chile, Colombia Cuba, Mexico, Uraguay,
Dominican Republic), (Turkey, Egypt, Syria, Libya, Cyprus) S.
Averill Harriman
Look for Rhino Fungus today.

The Florida Alligator"!
pf\ *- 'The price of freedom
j s the exercise of responsibility."
Pm#wJw 9,ng
MA^-' ja s c co k
jG-Vi/ie Justice
uuuHHeanriPrinnnf 0y Bill Dunn

Mr. Champion, Andy Ford,
and Alfred Daniels.
Three men from Gainesville.
Negroes. They stole pigs, talked
with white girls and were even
acquitted of crimes. The date
is in the 1890s.
Manny Price. Robert Scruggs.

with clothes on ridiculous?
POLLY: Os course it is!
ALLIGATOR: And cant yon see that a pretty
girl is just as natural and beautiful as a pretty tree?
POLLY: Ridiculous! How many men get turned
on (flush of red) uh, uppy-uppy (another look of
embarrassment) uh, lascivious over a tree?
ALLIGATOR: But if it were that all girls walked
around nude so that they were as common, yet, as
beautiful as a pretty tree...
POLLY: But it isnt like that
ALLIGATOR: (And then I realized what she
said, and how true it was, and I felt sorrowfully sick
inside.)
POLLY: Oooooh that slut! Would I like to get
my hands on that slut! What kind of girl would DO
that!
ALLIGATOR: One who isnt ashamed of her
body, Polly.
POLLY: (Silence, then) To me, any girl who
does that is telling me dies a slut! (durtksg her
nursing shoes) A down and out slut!
ALLIGATOR: Yes, to you and those of your era
and thought, but theres a new breed of people,
P011y...
POLLY: Ah, you and your new breed! (rising) I
dont want to listen to your kind! Im happy the
way I think and I ignore any other way. All that slut
wanted was attention. DAMMIT -1 WISH I COULD
GET ATTENTION LIKE SHE DOES!!! (silence,
then suddenly she huffs, puffs, checks her hemline,
walks out singing something that sounds like praise
virginity, damn inny-innity ..)
End of interview.

John Haskins. James Dennis.
Andrew McHenry.
Some mote Macks. All from
that humble metropolis just west
of here Newberry. One
insulted a white merchant. One
bumped into a white girl. One
was, found hiding in a swamp
after a store had been robbed.
One was a horse thief
The date was sometime
between 1900 and 1916. It was
Newberrys hayday.
Harry Jordan. Henry Henson.
Stella Young. Mary Dennis.
They were from familial
surroundings. Newberry. Waldo.
Alachua. All were Negro and
highly suspect when anything
was rotted in the state of such
redneck cities.
The dates were as late as
1932.
All of them were lynched my
majority mob rule. Newberry
alone had ten lynchmgi
Gainesville seven. As a state,
Florida had nearly 140. A state
of madness.
You can still find a not-so-old
timer who can point out the big
oak that sedately rests as an
eternal reminder of Alachua in
the good ol* days.
But that's all past, says an
overalled landlord wiping sweat
from his brow, grinning broadly
in the sun.



Whereas Alachua Hog Markets Decline...

MR. EDITOR:
WHEREAS, the Alachua hog market has suffered
a recent serious decline;and
WHEREAS, northern New England is presently
in the grips of a paralyzing telephone strike; and
WHEREAS, one Cathy Eicher has been
summarily and illegally removed from the varsity
cheerleading squad; and

OWN FOtUM:
jAdtn ciml ViA&wt
"Thor* is no hop* for the complacent man."
* Spooking
It Took Great Courage
Mike Hittleman J

It seems, judging from
Thursdays Alligator editorial
and a Friday column, that the
Alligator, through its one-half
walk-out editorial board, has
again criticized students working
for the further attainment of
rights and freedoms which we
have so long been denied. I am
referring to the deletion of
Harvey Alper's name for one of
the student positions on the
Board of Student Publications.
It took a great deal of
courage and intelligence for men
like Clyde Ellis and Ken
Mingledorff to stand up to the
power and influence of a man
like Mr. Alper, and, working in
the students best interests, help
convince the Student Senate to

AreTheThomas DMen
Really Smart Fellows?

MR. EDITOR:
As a resident of Thomas D
during the last academic year, I
am positive of the fact that that
dormitory section could not
possibly have had an aggregate
grade point average of. 3.58, or
even the more humble of the
two figures claimed in the letter
in Mondays Alligator, 3.42.
I do know, however, that one
resident of the first floor had a
near 3.8 average and, by virtue
of said feat, was voted Section
I LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The edftor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

refuse his appointment. They
should be enthusiastically
commended, instead of
condemned in a very
questionable name-calling
manner as they were in the
Alligator editorial and by Mr.
Alper himself.
Mr. Alper walked out of our
beloved student paper at a very
crucial time, when the paper was
under tremendous pressure from
Tigert and its friends because of
its attempt at criticizing the
administration for its handling
of the Marshall Jones political
witch hunt affair. Even though
he might not have agreed with
an editorial, did he serve the
students best by walking out at
that time? I very strongly believe

Cerebrum for the period ending
in June of this year.
On the other hand, there
were numerous instances of
averages below 2.0, the high
incidence of such occurrances
precluding a dorm average of
anything over 3.0, much less the
ridiculous 3.58 that was claimed
on Monday. To wit, there were
at least 17 instances of averages
in the 1.5 1.7 range during the
last two quarters alone, not to
mention the unfortunate jock
who aced out the first quarter
with a sizzling .98 average and
was not even present the third
quarter.
I think it high time that the
Honor Court, or some other
equally august body, undertakes
a complete investigation of what
can only be an egotistical
attempt to place the fools of
Thomas D on the Deans List.
ALLEN R. FRYE, 2UC
FRANK N. DORMAN, 2UC

WHEREAS, the city of Two Guns, Arizona has
experienced an appalling rise in its botfly
population; and
WHEREAS, it is rumored that golf courses will
be closed in Tierra Del Fuego during the rush
December tourist season; and
WHEREAS, certain militant factions in Otter
Creek are reposted to be aiming themselves with the
intent of open rebellion against the flagrantly

he didnt, that a man like that
shouldn't be in a post that we
students want to represent us,
not Tigert Hall or political
pressure on our paper.
If we had more men like Mr.
Ellis and Mr. Mingledorff, the
students would not be so
apathetic toward their student
government. Instead, they would
actively support and work for an
SG that would represent them,
and not knuckle under, or
indirectly benefit Tigert Hall in
its continued attempts to keep
student rights and power at a
minimum.

Absurd Plays Mean Nothing

MR. EDITOR:
As much as I hate to admit it,
I wish to thank (Edgar) Allen
Pierleoni for including my play
Minstrel Show in Tuesdays
Alligator Magazine Supplement.
The Campus Thing didnt turn
me on as much as did Eilene
Mandel, but it came (no pun
intended) close. I greatly
appreciated this literary effort.
However, I wish to dispute, as it
were, one point.
Mr. Pierleoni referred to me
as the self-styled Egotistic
Eugene lonesco of Hog Town.
My adoring fans are perfectly
willing to prove that the Jewish
James Joyce is just as modest
as the next man, especially if the
next man is Howard Cosell. But,
more important, I do not like
being compared to lonesco or
any other absurd dramatist.
I have read four plays by
lonesco, including The Bald
Soprano, and I believe that his
plays are meaningless dada
scribblings unworthy of the label
literature. I have written a
farcical play, Theatre of the
Absurd, in which I satirize
lonesco, Edward Albee, and
Samuel Beckett. These men
have, for the most part, failed to
assert anything in their drama,
lest it be the message that thev

Student Poems
Vietnam War
MR. EDITOR:
I am corresponding with a former Florida student who is now in
Viet Nam and received the following from him. It expresses all the
anguish and tragedy he, and probably many others, feel during these
times.
Dusk has vanished to past twilight
When the roar of cannon shatters the night
*Mid fluorescent flare and star-bright shell
Death stalks through a screaming hell.
Tracers stream and plow the ground
While your buddies are hit from all around
The fire-fight rages until dawn
When you Anally decide that your foe has gone.
In the morning youre out to count the dead
Retching at friends without a head
Beneath the sun, break down and cry
Why Lord, why, did they have to die?
Sent here by those who dont understand
The people, the customs, the way of the land
Visitors come and leave, thinking they see
But the real truth is known by you and by me.
Youve come here to fight, but told to wait
While out there, Charlie, decides your fate
Its his land and he knows all the tricks
Booby traps, mined with deadly pungi sticks.
My God, you think, this is a crazy war
Youre right to ask what were fighting for
But, my friend, as you walk away
Pray tomorrow's not like yesterday.
SP/4 ALEX A. KULAS
327 SIG. CO.
APO SF 96384

cannot write good drama.
Absurd drama, which I do not
write, is a childish non-statement
written by non-writers. I, unlike
the truly Absurd dramatists,
attempt to communicate, to

I 1
\ Absentee Ballot i
After you fill out this form, tear it out of the paper and drop
. it in the box attached to the Alligator drop boxes. It will be
I mailed to the Supervisor of Elections in your home county and
| you will be sent the application and absentee ballot.
TO:
Supervisor of Elections |
| .County Court House
I -- Florida
| Dear Sir:
Please forward an application for an absentee ballot for the i
general election, Tuesday, November 5, 1968. 1
| Send to: |
. Name
| Address
| City Zip I
. Thank you, a
! 9 I
I Signature
Dafp _

Friday, Octuoar 25, Yttt, Tha Florida Alligator,

unconstitutional establishment of the Tennessee
Valley Authority;
THEREFORE, be it resolved that the Florida
Alligator give less space to the questionable
controversy surrounding Dixie, and greater
consideration to the aforementioned pressing issues
of our time.
RICHARD F. REYNOLDS, 2UC
FRANK R. HERVATINE, 4AS

reach the reader through my
writings. Eugene McCarthy, Si;
Eugene lonesco, No!
As Chiquita Banana says, put
that in your pipe and smoke it.
DAVID MILLER

Page 9



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FROLICS TICKETS forth FOJR
TOPS. 20 tickets at $4.50 each. Call
now 376*9271. (A-3t-23-p)
1967 Honda 90 Scrambler, with only
4200 actual miles. Excellent
condition! only $220 helmet and
lock included. Call Ted Erck at
372-9427. (A*3t*23-p)
1P62 Valiant Niw battery, tires.
Transmission like new. Call 378-6535
after 6. (A-4t-21-p)
Triumph TT Special 1967 650 cc 2
hp Full (frag, cam scrambles bars,
?ip*s, tires. Extra street tire plus
many other goodies. Call 376-3740.
(A-4t-21-p)
Honda Super Hawk 305 cc. 1967,
mint condition. Many extras. Helmet
included, $475, best offer. Call
378-3156 before 11 a.m. or after
5:30 pjrn. (A-4t-21-p)
Triumph 1966 Bonnevflt*, 650 CC
one owner, excellent condition.
Mechanically perfect, 5,644 miles.
$875.00. After 5, call 376-5190.
(A-23*5t-p)
Honda 1965 S9O. Helmet & tools
incl. Excellent condition. Test ride
and you'll buy it. $195. Call
378-3095 anytime. (A-St-21-p)
Diamond wedding ring set 1/3 carat.
Never worn. Silver and gold band.
Original price S2OO. Now $125. Rich
1403 SW 22nd Place. (A-St-21-p)
4 track stereo tap* recorder 3 spd.
stereo record playback, 7 In. reels, 2
4 in. oval speakers, only 15 lbs., 2
mikes. Tapes included. Asking sllO.
376-7439. (A-3t-23-p)
1959 Plymouth runs wonderful car
for a mobile billboard. Slant-six
engine a mere 9200 miles. First $125
takes it. John 8-1483 apt. 6.
(A-3t-23-p)
1967 Honda C 8450 43HP 4 speed
transmission. Good condition, runs
very fast. $475. Call Jon 372-9370.
(A-st-23-p)
12 in. GE portable television with
stand. Excellent condition, need
money $40.00 or best offer. Tom
Salisbury 427 Jennings Hall.
(A-3t-23-p)
Engagement broken. Vt carat
diamond ring, 5 small diamonds
wedding band. Original price $275.
Best offer. Bob 378-6016. After 6,
378-6387. (A-2t-23-p)
MAIN FEATURE TONITE
AT 7:30 AND 11:05
HE STARTS A SINGIN'
OVER
1 §\ NASHVILLEI
itWR-MEy*
DBEGtEY METROCOIDR
ALSO AT 9:30
"HILLBILLIES IN A
HAUNTED HOUSE"

I NOTICE |
Student Publications
Business Office
HOURS
Bam 4pm
Mon. Fri.

| FOR SALE |
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY 466 3340. (A-lt-tf-p)
IT'S inexpensive to clean rugs and
upholstery w th Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampoocr. SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-25-lt-c)
Lafayette KTSOO mono-stereo tuner,
GE portable stereo phono, 3 pieces
Danish Modem Furn. All good. Will
deal on firm offers. 372-6532.
(A-2t-25-p)
1964 Honda Super Hawk, very good
condition, helmet and tools, $335 or
best offer. Must sell, call 378-3120.
(A-st-25-p)
Borg-Warner 3800 car stereo tap*
player with 4 B-W speakers $l4O
value for sllO. Call Sam weekdays
after 5 p.m. at 3766437. (A-3t-25-p)
305 Honda Dream look like a blue
$325. Hog runs like a scalded dog.
Also Bonanza mini bike $l5O. Call
Bob 372-9280 or 376-9433. Room
114 Tolbert. (A-lt-25-p)
Doberman pup AKC reg. red
female all shots and ears cropped.
Sir* Ch fellx the Warlock. Very
flashy pup. Call after 5 p.m.
481-2362. (A-3t-25-p)
Roberts 770 X stereo tape recorder
with mikes.' Custom-made. Cover
slightly used. $325.00. 376-3543
evenings. (A-st-25-p)
Garage sale: most of a household,
furniture, swing set, stove, vacation
trailer, etc. 2610 NW 12th Ave. (16th
Ave. to 25th Terr to 12th Ave.)Sat
and Sun. 10 to 6. (A-lt-25-p)
Real garage salel Large couch, good
condition $25, bed SB, coffee table
$lO, lamps $2 and other items. Call
378-1104. (A-lt-25-p)
1968 305 cc Honda Scrambler. Just
like new S6OO. Call after 6 p.m.
378-2742. Philco port, tv 19 in. S4O.
With stand. 2 new VW Goodyear tires
S4O. Hoover vacuum cleaner $35.
(A-7t-25-p)
v-T.v.vX'X'X'X'X-x-X'X-x-x.x.v.v.v;*.;.
FOR RENT
l-v.v-v-'-vx-ra-x-x-Ji-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-'-vX
must Sublet leaving town
Move in today. October rent paid
on a desirable 2 bedroom apartment
in a convenient location close to
campus. Very flexible arrangements.
Call 376-9688 between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m. for further information.
(B-20-ts-c)
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-cl
Large room, private bath, entrance,
Fla. room, off street parking. Call
376-3211, ext. 5765, Ann Sheridan.
Homecoming weekend only, guest
room with private bath. Also garage
space. Phone 3726163 mornings
only. (B-3t-23-p)
Apartment for rent. Colonial Manor.
Call 372-7111. (B6t-23-c)
Air-Conditioned one bedroom apt.
with pool sub-let. More than the
comforts of home. Call 378-3969
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-21-p)
Excellent horse boarding facilities.
Hunters preferred. 12x12 box stall,
ring, jumps, tack room. 10 minutes
from UF. 3786016 mornings.
(B-st-23-p)
Apt. to sub-let. Suitable for 1 or 2.
Call 378-2221. (B-256t-p)
CAMELOT APARTMENTS: FOR
THE PEOPLE WHO WANT AN
APARTMENT THEY CAN CALL
HOME. Camelot combines the
comfort of Modern day living, with
the quiet, unhurried tempo of
Medieval England. On* and two
bedroom furnished or unfurnished.
From $132 per month. Located at
(WESTGATE) 3425 SW 2nd Avenue.
Resident Manager, Mr. Pooley,
3786296. Professionally managed
by: ERNEST TEW REALTY, INC.
(B-25-20t-p)

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25,1968

Page 10

v > w.x->w>rp;-xx-x<-:-xfrX-x-:-x-v.*xv.v.^
| WANTED
Need two west stand tickets for
homecoming game. Will bargain.
378-5740. (C-st-23-p)
Female roommate wanted 3 blocks
from campus. Private room A/C free
washer 6 dryer. 378-3291, 376-3582.
(C-st-21-p)
Coed to share lg. 1 todmaDta* WW
carpet. Poolside. Call 3786338*4 til
6. Move in by Nov. 1. (C-st-20-p)
Must sub-let. No rent till Dec.! Big 1
bedroom apt. Furnished, has washing
mach. Only 4 blocks to campus. Call
Bob, 378-9826. (B-st-25-p)
Student wife with one or more
children to keep IV: yr. old in her
home M-F. 11:30 4:30. SIO.OO
wk. Call 372-3043 after 5.
(C-lt-25-p)
5^*XC-XOOCC*X->X*MXWX 4*X-X X*X WX-X*XJ
1 HELP WANTED §
S>e-x-:-:-x!-J>v.v*swXX*x*x-x*x-x*!WrX
HIGHLY QUALIFIED SECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job, excellent
Ipay. Do not apply unless well
qualified. Phone 376-9950 days or
378-2000 evenings. (E-24-ts-c)

Ik ijRHjSEL 1 s IBs JaMB/,-
I A v Bl I 8 Pkl 1
V a 8 HI m mmm HI
1 Ttcmsiw
Shortat; 1:15 3:20 5:25 7:30 9:35
L " *' Feature: 1:513:566:018:0610:11
This film contains
I shown...from the
I actual moment of ,f I
I conception to the MjjgijV I
I birth of the baby. I
I For the first time- I
I intimate story of I
I
I no one under 16 admitted unless accompanied by a parent. I

HELP WANTED j;
Listeners wanted wl * ***
for 1 hour session, must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
Univ. Ext. 2049, (E-25-10t-c)
Need 20 students for on campus
work during Christinas Break. Inquire
about qualifications in Rm 23 Tigert
Hall, Student Employment.
(E-256t-c)
MALE Have several part time
cashier, grill and carhop openings.
Arranged to your schedule. Apply
King's Food Host 1430 SW 13th. PM
only. (E-3t-23-c)

florida cinema society asks the musical question
What was Roger Vadim doing before
he directed BARBARELLA?
&
see Jeanne Moreau in
"LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSSES"
Sunday Reitz Union Aud. 7:15 & 9 p.m.
(Sorry, W. S. Hart fans, 'Tumbleweeds" was lost in the mails.
We will reschedule it next quarterJ

CTiiMivyi 111
1 j 1



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| HELP WANTED***!
Male student for movie box office
Fri. Sat. nights 4:30 to 10:30 p m
' 10:00 om omfOT
fOT omfOT Sta 9e cr ew Knowledge
of lighting or technical procedures
desired. Call Ext. 3484. (E-st-25-c)

41119191. i. I
W ff\ 9 I
I I- *v. s -... -^:. -
I MWamSI-mt
** CTf it ROBERT WISE and JEROME ROBBINS l
111 ASSOCIATE P4OOUCI* SAUL CHAPLIN
IF choreography *v jerome robbins
BASCO UPON THE STAGE PLAY
9999998 /fK PROOuCtO By ROBERT f GRIFFITH AND HAROLDS PRINCE
I Bf/ PLAY CONCEIVED
W 1811 11/ itVVW OmfCT *ANO CHORE OCR APHEOiY JEROME ROBBINS
S Mil W A f JM IN panav.sk>n technicolor*
VuiV PRESENTED BY MIRiSCM PECTURt*. INC
IN ASSOCIATION WITH SEVEN AMTS PRODUCTIONS. iNC
AT AT; 320 ESQ 6:50 9:20 I
_ 9 9
pnJMUtjSHWf I I
LTrieAwwjTMjlTlMj L-AIJ
f i q John Phillip Law I
I n March Marceau I
|m >I uiM "UgO .1
I =
I SENIORS GREEKS
[Pictures will be shot I
starting Nov. 4th I
Watch the Alligator for further I
information I

Frkley, October 25.1968, The Florida Alligator.

| AUTOS |
Jsvvss r^ r rsra
Cbev. 31 Model A. Call 378-7951
fG-10t-18-p) 01
1963 Falrlane 500 Blacx ar whiie w.
T *?. nt **H very good cond. Must
f''^^ 0 00 Cheap. Call Ruben
378*6874. (G*6t*2o*p)

| AUTOS I
3 6 Karman Ghia. Turquoise
$250.00. Call 378*3827 after 5:30
PK ~* ,nI P* c l n n-1963
-1963 n-1963 GRAND PR IX Pontiac. Bucket
seats, all power. Come see a GOOD
foSUaV Fl,v v, "*- 3
i?f! oprt A| F*condltioned, radio.
22J* * t ,l "<* money for
S£2!t* f # 2!^r?* t <, p,M> 04(1
378-4539. (G-st-23-p)

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS PROM 90c
w E ? V l^. AM 10 :o PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 878-8820
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

u,V *&:?-- B
I I I
BpM^. f J
'.V ' ; 3ft %a§s:: JV a a m
1 $|3L J 9 Jj|fl I
j j|
9ral&& : 9 9
9 Kfe MHpnrX-. -.v.
K
; mKKm I

Jst/,mm Ifca: jNHf
1 9p JB
I Cheer up with Morrisons Coffee I
I ...and a delicious Morrisons meal! I
H
1 ] f y?u enjoy the deep-down satis- You can relax and be served all
I faction of a really good cup of cos- the coffee you want for the price I
1 Iu e w r after ,unch or dinner of a single cup! Enjoy a delicious
1 then Morrison sis for you! We lunch or dinner with a built-in cos-
I serve our own brand an ex- fee break at Morrison's soon
elusive blend of the world's most and BE HAPPY!
expensive coffees roasted to per*
section in our own roasting plant HIiORRIS ON'S
I and brewed for full, rich flavor. JJJSgKSJIfcg I
I And heres an extra happy note! CAFETERIAS I
SERVING HOURS
1 Lunch 11 B,m. to 2 p.m. 1
I Dinner 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. |
I GAINESVILLE MALL I

Page 11

yKiwwwaaawaMiEw ih^nwc^
[ AUTOS I
mg to 1950 classic 3/4 restored
rebuilt engine 1000 ml ago. Radio!
*'* r cow- New steering wheel,
brakes top etc. $1275. 414 SE Bth
St. Apt. E. (G*3t*23*p)
60 MKIX Jag Biggest luxury Jag
built. SIOOO spent on complete eng.
overhaul 3 wks. ago. Radio heat air
excellent in a out. Offers over
SISOO. 376*0201. (G-Bt-18-p)

*>
Based on fact. I
l
laomcyufrfai % 1
I STRANGLER I
|4enryFOTida I
I George Kennedy
I Mika KaNin Murray Hamilton 1
BlEgKyar RtehardFlaiachar jfm
I Bair"" fTTm
I Edward Anhalt Cfarctiftar* lijljV I
Cpfarby OaUwa J



Page 12

T b Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
!£.;.vx*x x-x-x-k-v-vx-x*x*X"X-;-v.'X X'X-x<;*;
Announcing another hairy tea tour.
See the farewell performance of the
Cream in Miami Oct. 26 sl7 round
trip includes ticket. Call 372-2728.
(J-3t-23-p)
Playful Kittens part Siamese, part
Persian, all beautiful, healthy and
long-haired. 6 wks. old $2.00
$6.00. 3205 NW 14 St. or call
378-2077. (J-21-st-p)
CHEVALIERS Dinner Nov. 8. Call
Bill Slippy after 6, 376-2603 for
information and reservations.
(J-3t-23-p)
Happy Birthday Miss Nirsch. May we
forever be neurotic together.
Psychiatrically yours, Marsha, Eileen,
and Rhonda. (J-lt-25-p)
Albert the Alligator says Beat Vandy
Prediction: Gators will win by two
TDs. Meantime, there are good
things at the cage Sat. (J-lt-25-p)

The Famous Kennedy Dual Charms
President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy,
irrevocably committed to a dream of brotherhood and
peace among men, died before the fulfillment of that
dream. Remember the Kennedy brothers with a shiny
alunimum key chain or antique silver medallion engraved
with the image of John Kennedy on one side and Robert
Kennedy on the other. Let it serve as a reminder of the
need for each of us to commit ourselves to the fulfillment
of their dream.
The aluminum key chain is yours for just $1.29, or in an antique
tique antique silver for $1.98, and the medallion on a chain for
only $2.50, or if you wish, a gold medallion for only $3.50.
Send a check or money order along with your name and
address to GENERAL MARKETING CO., Box 393, Forest
Grove, Oregon 97116 or look for the charms at your
favorite store. Your money back if not totally delighted.
ANY ORGANIZATION
INTERESTED IN BEING
REPRESENTEDINTHE
PLEASE CONTACT
THE SEMINOLE OFFICE
KOOM 337 REITZ UNION I

REITZ UNION THEATRE
UNIVERSAL presents
MaRIOn SOPHta A MOMENT'S SURREHDER ..A NISHTMARE OF TERROR!
BRAnpO IPR6N iw JEANSEBERG i
*jR COUNIeSS HONOR BLACKMAN A
stem HONGKPnaT SEAN GARRISON Jj
Her move/ W^/kmefh
~T|V j
TECHNICOLOR,
/ W Scretnpliy by JOHN UE MAHIN and ALEC COWL
Wo ?' S *YSm?£ W* Oifctd by MCRVYN LEROY m^a
WWcS'Ho r / A UNIVERSAL PICTURE KKI
I >l *' *o Una / /
WRITTEN, DIRECTED and MUSIC by
CHamssCHaptiN
s nmniom ibhl. mawu. ,iws! buhbm <
TECHNICOLOR*
FRIDAY OCT 25 5,7, 9:15 P.M. SATURDAY OCT. 26 5,7, 9:15 P.M.
NOTICE: The UNION BOARD FILM'S COMMITTEE new "thing"
a new 5:00 P.M.showing at all our Friday and Saturday night movies.

I PERSONAL
y.
V.V.VX-X'X-X-X-V-'X'X-X'XC'-!
Angelica, my eternal lover. Hope you
gopher me. Happiness is within you.
Now, Im only to a Degree, Well
dream later. Happy 20th. I itch no
horns. Dont worry. After 5, hope
the Zi means bliss forever. . All only
what is ER Nest. (J-25-lt-p)
For Groovy wedding invitations,
announcements, napkins, etc., call
Orange Blossom representative after
5 p.m. at 378-5986. (J-3t-25-p) *jL
Dayle: Happy 22nd birthday. Hold
onto that teddy bear & don't forget
Dotty on the potty in red flannels
with a flap. You'll survive. Jan.
fJ-lt-25-p)
X-V.V.V.*.V. .v. X*X-X X-X X X*X*:-!-V. XvX*.vJ
I LOST & FOUND \
Lost: Movado ladies watch. BlacK
velvet band. Between Krystal and
Math. Fri. noon. If found please call
378-4459. Sentimental value, reward.
(L-3t-23-p)

SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-tf-c*
Papers typed, 50c page, prompt,
accurate. 20 lb. quality, Bond paper
supplied. Call 378-2937. (M-st-21-p)
CASH LOW? Ask about co-op living,
great food, a concerned community
at GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL 1002
W. Uni. Ave. 376-2476. Apply now
for next quarter. (M-st-23-c)
Child Care for 2 to 5 year olds
home in N.E. Section, fenced yard,
playroom, lunch and snacks.
$lO/weekly. Call 376-8523.
(M-3t-25-p)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE Fast professional results.
Computer Management Corporation
Administrative Services Division,
1105 W. University. Phone 378-8077.
(M-24-st-p)
JWft
At Least Thru Sunday
ti^^^miechansinbl
I want to be just like I am,
1' but everybody wants me to
be just like them."
Newport ~ Bob Dy "" I
I FESTIVAL!
with JOAN BAEZ
|l BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAl|
JOHNNY CASH f
| JUDY COLLINS |
DONOVAN |
1 808 DYLAN
Haimi and dick farina!
SON HOUSE
ODETTA
SPIDER JOHN KOERNER I
VESKIN AND THE JUG
OSBORNE BROS
I PETER, PAUL AND MARTW
I BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE
GATOR
ADS SELL

y ss& I life 5 'vA" f 3// ?
. ylpfe'
lS? sJk'/' v ~
,'" *%W £&s&""'' " x --;: :V
;i;4lli j ~
" -A-. 3
AHw \ * /j(r J%. .jANjli^v., x j%w% *33t rt *tx*f% &
CMON GATORS. .LETS GO!
Cheerleader Helen Powell shows her enthusiasm for the Gator
football team.

TO GATOR BOWL
Bowl Bus Planned

Going to the UF-Georgia
game Nov. 9?
Need transportation?
Tickets go on sale today for
rides aboard a chartered bus to
Available
To Students
A directory of helpful
services is now available to UF
students.
The Os f ice of the
Vice-President for Student
Affairs began distribution today
of some 3,000 copies.
Copies will be placed in
residence halls, fraternity and
sorority rooms and at various
distribution points on campus.
The directories contain the
telephone numbers and campus
addresses of the offices and
personnel that are immediately
available to students needing
individual assistance.
These include: academic and
personal counseling, medical and
mental health services, financial
and placement assistance,
ministerial counseling,
ambudsman services and reading,
speech and hearing clinics.
The directories were prepared
by the office of the
Vice-President for Student
Affairs in conjunction with the
department heads of the various
helping services in response to a
recommendation by the UF
Action Conference.
Phi). Degrees
%
The number of Ph.D. degrees
awarded has almost tripled since
1957. The number rose steadily,
except in 1962, when it droDDed
from 100 to 72. One-hundred One-hundredfifty-five
fifty-five One-hundredfifty-five degrees were awarded
in 1967.

the Gator-Bulldog game in
Jacksonvilles Gator Bowl.
Providing room for 36
students on a first come-first
served basis, the bus is being
chartered by the Special Projects
Committee of the Union Board
for Student Activities.
Tickets for the round-trip
ride are on sale in the Union
Board office, room 310 of the
Reitz Union, for $4.75. Fried
chicken box lunches will be sold
for $1.25 and may be paid for at
the same time bus tickets are
purchased
The bus will leave from the
front of Florida Gym at 11 a.m.
the day of the game and is
scheduled to arrive at the Gator
Bowl at 1 p.m. It will leave
Jacksonville one half hour after
the game.
FBK Taking
Applications
Florida Blue Key applications
for the fall quarter are available
at the FBK office, third floor of
the Reitz Union, the union
information desk and through
the deans of UF colleges until
Friday, Nov. 8,
Undergraduate and graduate
Florida men are eligible for
membership if they have a 2.0
overall on 84 hours of college
work as accepted by the registrar
and are enrolled as full-time
students. They must have
completed seven quarters of
college work, four of which were
done here.
Students must have
distinguished themselves in
leadership and service in
extra-curricular activities in at
least one major area. Significant
participation in extracurricular
activities at any other college or
university is acceptable tor
transfer students.



Friday. October 25.1968, The Florida Alligator,

No Basic Breakthrough
In Vietnam: Johnson

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Johnson said Thursday
there still was no basic change,
no breakthrough in the
Vietnam situation, and refused
to accept suggestions that low
U.S. war casualties are the result
of an intentional Communist lull
in the fighting.
We are working hard and
diligently and earnestly to
achieve peace in Vietnam, he
told a White House news
conference. But at another point
he said The last thing I would
want to do is lull anyone into a
false sense of security.
Johnson thus made clear he
was not willing to interpret the
casualty figures from Saigon as
part of the sort of peace gesture
from Hanoi that he requires for
halting the bombing of North
Vietnam.
His message, in effect, was an
appeal for patience and respect
for the importance of quiet,
private diplomacy now that the
United States and North
Vietnam are meeting
face-to-face.
Despite intensive diplomatic
activity in Paris, Washington and
Saigon, the President had no
more progress to report than on
Oct. 16, when the White House
issued a statement saying there
was no basic change in the
situation no breakthrough.
Johnson said that statement
was as accurate now as then.

McDonalds
Before or after the
. for a tasty
your date
pleasure to
Hamburgers made
on Our
Shakes are the
*Bf golden
brown
never
Come today
town
FR] SAT NOW ITS HERE!!
OCT. 25-OCT. 26
.. Theres a new M McDonalcfs is your
McDonald sin town. B . ,
B kind of place.
Quality food. Sensible prices. Fast r
& cheerful service. /^^ S= /£T\
Piping-hot 100% pure-beef hamburgers. HG^S^SOgL
Golden brown French Fries made from
only fresh potatoes. N W 13th
strawberry shakes. - - 11 1 "-

Page 13

Looking tired and grim, he said
we .do not want to make news
until there is news. We realize
that many times diplomacy can
be more effective in private than
to have all your discussions,
recommendations and
prophecies carried in the press.
The news conference was
announced on Monday, well in
advance, and it was believed it
would be broadcast live. The
White House denied it was called
in the expectation that Johnson
would make a statement on
Vietnam.
He made no announcements
Wednesday. Newsmen were
given only a few minutes to
gather in the small cabinet room
near Johnsons office for the
half-hour session, which was
jssj&A- /=
'|if^^BTfiTTil
';f,i^
til

taped for later broadcast.
The Presidents only firm
disclosures were that he would
make his first nationwide
television endorsement of the
Democratic ticket at 8:30 p.m.
EDT Nov. 3 -two days before
the Presidential election over
the NBC network. He noted he
would make a similar appearance
on CBS radio this Sunday at
7:3S pjn. local time, except for
6:35 pjn. in the Mountain time
zone.

[UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
l 515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581

>;;
Cohn-Bendit and
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Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

OVERSEAS STUDY CENTER:
Nov. 1 is the deadline to apply for
the next session of the Florida State
University Overseas Study Center in
Florence, Italy. Any student of
sophomore level or above attending
one of the state universities may
enroll. Applications are available in
the office of Dr. Wayne Minniek, 212
Williams Bldg., Florida State
University, Tallahassee. About 100
students can be accepted for the
session which will extend form
January to June, 1969.
GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION: The GRE is to be
given Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968, 8:30
a.m. in Walker Auditorium.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: Exam is scheduled
for Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968, 9:45
a.m. n 207 Leigh Hall for French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
FLORIDA COED: Applications
are now being accepted for
Editor-in-Chief of the 1969 Florida
Coed, women student's handbook.
Managing Editor, Division Editors,
typists and proofreaders are also
needed. Applications are available
from all association of Women
Students representatives, the
Activities Desk (3rd floor, Reitz
Union) or the Dean of Women's
Office (123 Tigert Hall). Forms must
be returned no later than Oct. 25 to
the Dean of Women's Office.
Applicants for Editor will be
contacted for interviews.
GATOR BAND OUTING: All
members are reminded of the outing
for Sunday, Oct. 27, 2 p.m., at
Fleming Field. Kappa Kappa Psi and
Tau Beta Sigma volleyball contest
will be held.
PROGRESS TESTS: All students
in the respective courses are required
to take the following tests. Students
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and
will be required to use their Social
Security Number.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct. 31, 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1.2, 4. 5. 7, 10, or 11; (C)
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121, or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102, 112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker 202,
211, or 213; (L) to Little 213, 215,
217, or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223,
225, 227, 233, 235, 237, or 239;
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 112, or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101 or
109; (W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Students
whose last name begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,
9. 10,11,12,13. 14, or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102,105,108, 112,113,
114,115,116,117,118. or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 30.7 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with: (A-L)

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
report to Matherly 2,3, 4, 5,6, 7,8,
9, 10, 11, 12,13,14, or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108 112, 113,
114. 115,116.117,118, or 119.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Student
whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10, or 11; (C)
to Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,
121, or 125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, or 207 (G) to Peabody 101.
102, 112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 206. or 208; (l-J) to Flint
110 or 112; (K) to Walker 202,211,
or 213, (L) to Little 213, 215, 217,
or 219; (M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, 237, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 25: E. I. DU PONT DE
NEMOURS & CO., INC. ~ Cham,
Engr, ME, IE, Cham. PPG
INDUSTRIES, INC. EE. ME. IE,
ChE, Cham, Math, Bus. Ad. ALLIED
CHEMICAL CORP. IE, Cham,
ChE, ME, CE, EE, Finance. AETNA
LIFE 8i CASUALTY no specific
major. ASSOCIATED COCA-COCA
BOTTLING CO.. INC. Acctg. ITT
RAYONIER, INC. ~ CE, ME. EE.
ChE, Forestry, Cham. TORNWALL,
LANG 8i LEE Acctg. juniors for
summer employment. UNIVERSAL
OIL PRODUCTS CO. Cham. Engr.
THE CECO CORP. ~ CE, Bldg.
Constr., ME, Bus. Ad. FMC CORP.
normally interviews engineering
disciplines. AMERICAN ELECTRIC
POWER SERVICE CORP. EE, ME,
CE, NE. SCHLUMBERGER WELL
SERVICES - normally interviews
engineering disciplines.
OCT. 28: U.S. ARMY
ENGINEER TOPOGRAPHIC
LABORATORIES Chem. Engr. CE,
EE, Math, Physics, Geol, Space Sci.
YORK DIVISION-BORG-WARNER
CORP. IE, ME, EE, Chem.E.
TEXACO, INC. Chem. CE. EE.
ME, Geol, Law. Juniors for summer
employment and graduate only in
Geology, and ChE. MERCULES.
INC. -- normally interviews Chem,
Engrs, Acctg. disciplines. ARTHUR
ANDERSEN, CPA. Acctg. OLIN
Chem, ChE, IE, ME, MetE.
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. PhD
recruiting, sciences & engineering
science. BOEING CO. AE, CE, IE.
ME, Engr. Sci, Engr, Mechanics,
Math, Physics, Chem, Engr.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMS: Oct. 25 is the deadline
for receipt in the office of
foreign languages of applications
for all foreign language
functional examinations to be
given on Saturday, Nov. 2.

BLUB BULLETIN

PRE-MEDICAL &
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Students MUST register with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 3, Anderson Hall.
Registration has been extended
until Oct. 25. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
REGISTRAR'S DEADLINES:
Oct. 25 is the deadline for
applying for Graduate School.
Dec. 1 is the deadline for
applying for the College of Law
for the 1969 Spring Quarter.
Applications may be obtained
and returned to room 33 Tigert
Hall.
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
Requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
and the elementary block which
is (EDE 300, 301, and 302.)
English and speech majors do
not take the test, as SCH 201 is
a required course in all of their
programs. Appointments are
now being made in Room 124
Norman Hall.
WORK-STUDY JOBS: UF
students qualified for the
College Work-Study Program
(parents income must be in the
low-income range 57,000 or
less) who are interested in
part-time work, please contact
Student Employment, Room 23,
Tigert Hall, for further
information.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Those
who have not completed the
annual census card of the
Institute of International
Education are requested to do so
as soon as possible at
International Center.
Friday, October 25
Football Films, 150 C & D
Union, 12:00 noon
Student Committee for
re-election of Congressman
Dante Fascell, handout
political material. Ground
Floor Lobby East, 1:00 p.m.
Dept, of Physics & Astronomy,
Special Joint Colloquim, Dr.
John Strong, Bless Aud., 4:00
p.m.
Poetry Reading, Faculty and
Students reading poems by
Robert Sokol, MSB Aud.,
5:00 p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Union Movie, "Countess from
Hong Kong," Union Aud.,
5:00, 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Chess Tournament, 361 Union,
6:30 fern.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 6:30
p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Florida Gym,
7:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movies, Ist
show, "Operation Petticoat,"
7:30, 2nd show, "Around
the World, Under the Sea,"
9:30 p.m., 3rd show, "Tales
of Terror", 12:00 midnight,
S. Hall Rec. Room.
I.F.C. Fall Frolics, "THE FOUR
TOPS", Florida Gym, 8:15
p.m.
Freshman Football, Florida vs.
Miami, Miami, 8:15 p.m.
Saturday, October 26
Football, University of Florida
vs. Vanderbilt at Nashville
Poetry Reading, Faculty and
Students reading poems by
Robert Sokol, MSB Aud.,
5:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Moment to
Moment", Union Aud., 5:00
Union Aud., 7:06 & 9:15
p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movies, Ist
show, "Operation Petticoat,"
7:30, 2nd show, "Around the
World, Under the sea", 9:30,
3rd show, "Tales of Terror",
12:00 midnight, S. Hall Rec.
Room.
Sunday, October 27
Program Office, Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.
India Club Movie, "See India
Through Films", Union Aud.,
2:00 p.m.
University Symphony Orchestra,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.
I nter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship Meeting, 361
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Christian Youth Fellowship Free
Dinner, First Christian
Church, 804 S.W. 2nd Ave.,
5:45 p.m. Call 372-7744 for
reservation.
Florida Cinema Society Meeting,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Movie.
"Les Liaisons Dangerouses,"
Union Aud., 7:15 / 9:00 p.m.
Monday, October 28
Program Office, Children's
Ballet, Tap, and Modern
Dance Lessons, C-4 Union,
4:00 p.m.

Florida Players Business
Meeting, Constans Theatre,
5:30 p.m.
Program Office, Dancing
Lessons, 245 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym. 7:00
p.m.
Tau Chapter of Alpha Phi
Omega Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Dairy Science, Club Meeting,
Room 201 Dairy Science
Bldg., Dr. E. L. Foust,
"Gator-Go and related
Products", 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, Painting
Classes, C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Self Defense Lessons, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Block & Bridle Club, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 29,1968
Le Circle Francois (French Club)
Meeting, 150 B Union, 2:00
p.m.
Program Office, Children's
Ballet, Tap & Modem Dance
Lessons, C-4 Union, 4:00
p.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet
Meeting, 123 Union, 4:30
p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons,
150 C Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Charm Classes,
363 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept., Faculty Concert:
Florida Baroque Ensemble,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Supper Club Meeting, Buffet
supper. University Inn, 7:30
p.m.
Program Office, Beginning Oil,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
United Nations Assoc. Meeting
& Lecture, Dr. Oscar Svarlien,
"Role of United Nations
Today", 105 B Architecture
& Fine Arts Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
Notice: Camp Wauburg will be
closed all day on the day of a
Home Football Game.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Fall Frolics, "THE FOUR
TOPS", $5.00 a couple, for
The Coronation Ball, $2.50
per person, and for Florida
Cinema Society, $1.50.
Tickets are also on sale for
the SFJC Presentation,
"Marriage Wheel," Students
$.50, all other SI.OO.



F riday. October 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Wallace Hits Nixon
For No TV Debate

DURHAM, N.C.(UPI)
George Wallace, having
offered to step aside so Richard
Nixon and Hubert Humphrey
could meet in a televised debate,
twitted Nixon Thursday for not
taking him up on the offer.
Really, Mr. Nixon didnt
mean what he said, which is so
often the case, Wallace
declared.
He accused the GOP
candidate of creating a
credibility gap with his
statements regarding debates.
Youre not going to get Mr.
Nixon to debate, Wallace said.
Wallace made his debate offer
in Roanoke, Va., Wednesday
night, and then moved on
Thursday to North Carolina,
where he feels he is running neck
and neck with Nixon. Later
Thursday night he will address a
rally in New York Citys
Madison Square Garden.
An enthusiastic crowd of
about 10,000 turned out to hear
Wallace at Durham. They
cheered him wildly when he
spoke out against some schools
banning the playing of Dixie
by their school bands, and
added: We appeal to the soul of
the South- help save our
country.
There was some brief
scuffling when the
demonstrators and Wallace
supporters started throwing
placard sticks at each other, but
police quickly put down the
disturbance.
Nixon has said he would not
debate Humphrey because equal
time provisions of federal law
would necessitate that it be a

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Page 15

three way debate, with Wallace
as the third man. The former
Alabama Governor said,
however, he would be willing to
waive his equal time rights in
return for 30 minutes rebuttal
time the night after such a
confrontation.
I would like it to be a
three-way debate, but Im
willing to forego this in order to
get Mr. Nixon before the
American people, Wallace said.
Im going to make 1 this
proposition to Mr. Nixon and
the networks; if youll invite Mr.
Humphrey and Mr. Nixon to
debate themselves and give them
and hour on prime time, and

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give me 30 minutes the next
night to answer, I think I can fix
both of them up.
One of the three major
networks, CBS, immediately
sent telegrams to the three
candidates offering to carry
through on Wallaces proposal,
but Nixon forces rejected the
offer.
Were not going to do a
thing that would give George
Wallace free time, said Nixon
aide Ronald Ziegler. Ziegler said
Congress closed the door on
televised debates acceptable to
Nixon by rejecting a bill
allowing free debate time for the
two major candidates.

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Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

Kennedy Pleads: Not Wallace

NEW BEDFORD, Mass. (UPI)
- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
appealed to Americans Thursday
in the names of his assassinated
brothers not to vote for George
C. Wallace for president on Nov.
5. He said Wallace is in league
with extremists.
The last of the Kennedy
brothers said a heavy Wallace
vote in the coming election
could create a permanent party
of division and hate on the
American political scene.
Observing that polls indicate
as many as 15 million
Americans may be considering

Georgia Ne wspaper
Endorses Nixon

MACON, Ga. (UPI) Richard
M. Nixon was endorsed
Thursday for president of the
United States by the Macon
News.
Nixon is the first Republican
nominee supported for the
presidency by the newspaper in
40 years, the News said.
The Macon afternoon daily
saw the issues as the Vietnam
war, law and order, and fiscal
responsibility. It argued Nixons
position is soundest and
strongest on all issues.
The paper dismissed
Democratic nominee Hubert H.
Humphrey as too far to the left,
wishy-washy on Vietnam, a
candidate who would attempt
to spend Negroes into keeping
quiet and obeying the law, and
too responsive to political
pressures to make any real dent
in Uncle Sams expenditures.

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The HORNE'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE -a quiet
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and travelers alike. HORNE'S BUFFET is a Horne of
plenty, featuring a tempting variety of gourment
specialties.
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voting for the third party
candidate, Kennedy said: To
those who lean towards Wallace,
and especially to those among
them who voted for President
Kennedy and who supported
Robert Kennedy, I want to say
that nothing could be further
from the principles of these
men.
Contrasting Wallace to his
late brothers, the Massachusetts
senator commented: President
Kennedy upheld the
Constitution and the laws of the
United States. George Wallace
defied them. President Kennedy

George C. Wallace was
criticized politically for his lack
' of experience and his record as
governor of Alabama, and was
flatly termed a racist by the
newspaper.
The News sister publication,
the Macon Telegraph, published
by the same corporation,
endorsed Humphrey for
president Wednesday.
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defended America against the
extremists. George Wallace is in
league with them.
Robert Kennedy stood for
reconciliation among the races.
George Wallace stands for
division and suppression.
So it is not enough that
Wallaces movement be defeated.
It must be repudiated for the
health of our country and our

yj
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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
425 W. UNIV. AVENUE
INVITES STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO
SERVICES OF WORSHIP
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Early Worship 8:30 a.m. Chorale (College choir) 5:00 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Vesper Service 6:00 p.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Snack Supper (free) 7:00 p.m.
Seminars and Training Union 7:30 p.m.
-FREE BUS TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION

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IF YOU CAN'T BE IN NASHVILLE TO
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future as a nation.
Kennedy said that in
selecting retired Air Force Gen.
Curtis E. LeMay as his running
mate, Wallace proposes to put in
the vice presidency a man who
has shown himself to be
completely insensitive to the
grave risks involved in the use of
nuclear weapons.

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Our recruiter will be here on Thurs.,
Oct 31, 1968 Visit your Placement
Office NOW for brochures and SIGN
UP to hear the full story.
Or writs to:
Director of Manpower
Staff Development and
Training Bureau
State Campus Building 5
Albany, New Yorlc 12226
Tel.: 518/457-4404



Friday, October 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Murphreeite Wins
Titus Oates Citation

This weeks Titus Oates
Memorial Citation goes to
George Mcean 111, lUC, for
outstanding courageousness in
the wee hours of the morning.
Mcean was a resident of that
living complex sometimes
laughingly referred to as
Murphree Area.
In years past, it has been the
custom of all residents in good
standing of Thomas Hall to
make rather loud accusations
across the street to the residents
of Murphree Hall between the
hours of two and three in the
morning. These statements of
ill-will usually made reference to
some alleged bizarre sexual
habits of the latter residents.
No good Murphreeite could
take this abrasive affront sitting
down, and their retorts were
generally just as vigorous as their
neighbors.
With the proper conditions,
these exchanges could last until
dawn.
Mcean was a somewhat
studious young man, a judo
enthusiast, and not given to
participating in these bawdy
late-night sessions. He was said
to become extremely irritable
when the exchanges began,
usually burying his head under
his pillow, quivering, and
muttering softly such oaths as

Jazz-Poetry
Show Tonight

Tonight and tomorrow night
offers poetry buffs and others a
chance to enjoy a Poetry
Concert and donate to local
charity.
The performance, presented
from 5:00 until 7:00 pjn., will
feature readings of the works of
T.S. Eliot and Lawrence
Ferlinghetti and those of UF
graduate student Bob Sokol.
The poems of Messrs. Eliot
and Ferlinghetti will be read by
UF Professors Frank Taylor and
Bernie Webb, both professional
poetry readers. Sokol,
production head for the entire
presentation, will read his own
poetry to the accompaniment of
jazz improvisations by
professional pianist Dex Williams
and the clarinet and flute of UF
graduate student Bruce Ergood.
The concert will be
presented in the auditorium
above the J. Hillis Miller
Teaching Hospital library to
raise funds for this centers
Childrens Mental Health Unit.
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Page 17

.Ms
MCBEAN
... now a statue
Gosh dam those guys anyway.
One night he was on the verge
of cracking. He had not slept for
several days due to the
intra-dorm altercations and he
had just failed a Physical Science
prog, in itself a rather
remarkable feat.
He was in bed nearly asleep
when it began. It was an
innocent enough statement,
nothing unusual.
Mcean sat straight up in
bed, poised, listening for a
response. If no one answered, all
might not be lost. But, alas,
there it was.

Although no admission will be
charged, Sokol has stressed that
donations will be appreciated.
A recent contributor to the
poetry section of the
ALLIGATORS magazine
supplement, The Campus
Thing, Sokol has also had work
published in The College
Anthology of Poetry, a
nation-wide publication, and has
performed his poetry at The
Bitter End case in New York
City.

UMCN SPECIAL
CLAM DINNER
SERVED WITH
COLESLAW I
FRENCH FRIES I M
HOT ROLLS A BUTTER 1
ft
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVI.
'A BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Oh, yeah? someone called
out.
Soon the air between the
dorms was filled with random
insults.
Mcean got a sly gleam in his
eye, crept stealthily out of bed
and disappeared in the darkness.
Several minutes later he
appeared in the beam of a
streetlight between the two
dorms, dressed in his neatly
pressed judo gi, white belt
fastened securely about his
waist.
All right you clowns! The
air was still for the first time in
several minutes. Four hundred
dorm residents peered curiously
through their windows at this
innovation to their nightly
foray.
Mcean was beside himself.
Come on, you clowns. All of
ya*. 11l take all of ya at once.
Come on ya bunch of clowns.
He was swirling around
making oriental noises and
obliterating imaginary foes with
very credible throws for a white
belt.
Mcean was soon buried
under a barrage of old gym
shoes, handball gloves, dirty
socks and an athletic supporter
or two.
Doctors agree that the
catatonic state was induced not
by the being struck by these
various missiles but more from
the potent and singular odors
emitting therefrom.
Mcean was dressed more
appropriately and now stands
behind Peabody disguised by the
wily Murphreeites as a statue.
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
Mmm
SALES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave. 372-4373

FU Gomes Area is forming
MIXED BOWLING
Toe., 9:00 pm OR Fri., 11:00 pm
Call Gamas Area (Ext. 2089)
i 'j
or
Coma in and fill out appfication
Welcome Class Os 1969
Creative Hair Styling Complete Beauty Cara
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2 \ecire 5
HAIR STYLING STUDIO
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INTRODUCING
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SALLY- -GEORGIA
All PHASES OF BEAUTY CARE
ELtcTic/ j
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Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

Student Spies
At Work In
Himalayas?
WASHINGTON (UP!) A
research program in the
Himalayan Mountains has
rekindled fears in Asia that spies
may be hidden among American
scholars working abroad.
The University of California
at Berkeley sponsors a research
project called the Himalayan
Border Countries. It sounds
innocent. But an uproar was
touched off in the Indian
Parliament when it was disclosed
that the U.S. Defense
Department is contributing
$282,000 to the Himalayan
study.
Indian Prime Minister Mrs.
Indira Gandhi told Parliament
her government would very
carefully look into the
Berkeley project in the
Himalayan Mountains, a
sensitive geographic area because
the lofty mountain range
separates China and India.
But Mrs. Gandhis assurances
did little to erase memories of
other scholarly programs
financed by front organizations
of the U.S. Central Intelligence
Agency.
Michigan State University
became involved in international
controversy when it was learned
that CIA agents were involved in
a police training program
sponsored by Michigan in South
Vietnam.
Earlier this year the Indian
government ordered the Asia
Foundation to close its offices in
India because the organization
admitted it had received money
from what was learned to be a
front organization for the
Central Intelligence Agency.
The Asia Foundation gave
India assurances it had severed
all connections with the CIA
front organization and that it
had not known of its nature at
the time the financial
contribution was accepted.
But the Indian government
still had doubts and remained
firm on closing the foundation
offices.
Scholars and cultural
organizations in Washington
believe that the latest incident
may cause the Indian
government to forbid visas to
any scholars sponsored by
organizations financed by U.S.
military or intelligence funds.
This development comes at a
time when there are some
indications that India might
soften its stance against
Communist China, a mood
partially influenced by the
Soviet Unions interest in
supplying military weapons to
Pakistan.
American officials said that
the Defense Department
contract does not hamper
scholars in any way. It permits
them to choose their own
projects and guarantees that
none of their findings shall be
classified.
But such explanations are not
satisfactory to opposition
members of Parliament.
Conservative Hindus and
Communists alike have
denounced the project.

r CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS =|
\ {xf
O |v i ** I* v>% JIM
V(§ 'i
Capt. Ridley wont be here today, men. He sprayed his underarms with Mace
this morning and. .
m m Ullv
: &c*: Wmm Hf mm
Dont stare. Four years without a date and youd grow em too.

Just Go Ask Alice...

By LANIE FULLER
Alligator Feature Writer
It was a fishbowl. And Alice
looked out at the world from
her very own groove in the
rocks. She knew it was hers
because she stayed there so
much. It felt like home safe,
warm and secure. Her own little
niche, and she had carved every
crevice in it herself. She existed
there, she was Alice.
She thought, therefore she
was. What was she? Well, it
really didnt matter. No one ever
looked in her niche. No one
knew who she was or what she
did.
So she played games. In the
beginning, they were the same
ones everyone else in the
fishbowl played. She knew them
well, and there was no effort
involved. But one day Alice
awoke with a different feeling,
She was afraid she couldn't

The
Florida
Alligator
identify with the new game. She
had never thought about doing
and it persisted all day. It urged
her to play a different game, to
try out a new niche,
things that way. Or if she had. it
was with a negative view. But
today was different. There was
this funny feeling.

Do I live? Or just exist?
Where arc my emotions? Am I
straight? she wondered.
Feeling adventurous, she took
one or two steps outside her
groove. What an emotion surged
through her! This was
unbelievable! She ventured a few
more steps and felt a new
freedom and completeness of
being. This was where she
belonged.
She planned to return to her
old niche at night and venture
out during the day. Her new life
was succinct and wonderful to
her. Everything was idyllic.
But Alice forgot one
important thing: she still lived in
a fishbowl. They watched, and
they condemned and scored her.
She was different now. She
didn't fit their mold. She wasn't
playing their game. She wasnt
playing at all . just go ask
Alice, when she's ten feet tall.

Raiders
Rolling
Figh tv-five freshman and
sophomore candidates for the
Gator Raiders saw their first
field problem rained out
recently, but their enthusiasm
for the counter-guerrilla outfit
has remained unchecked, said
Raider Advisor Maj. George
Finley.
Maj. Finley reported that the
new candidates, along with 24
returning sophomores and five
juniors in command positions
had turned this years Raiders
into one of the most spirited
outfits in the company's history.
Despite the fact that voluntary
ROTG was established for the
first time, this year's total
number of Raider candidates
represents a 15/7 increase over
the number of volunteers last
year.
Strong interest in the
programs is also evidenced by
the fact that some Air Force
ROTC men transferred to the
Army program in order to be
able to participate with the
Raiders. If the new men measure
up to the traditional Raider
qualifications and maintain at
least a 2.0 grade average they
will become full Hedged Gator
Raiders sometime next quarter.
The outfit has a full slate of
activities planned for the
remainder of the year. More
field problems are planned,
including an all-day exercise on
Nov. 23 and an overnight
problem to be held jointly with
a reserve unit of the Armys
Special Forces.
Also slated are a series of
lectures by Maj. Ramsey on
Revolutionary Warfare, a course
in survival swimming, and a
possible activity held with
Marine officer candidates.
Leading the Raiders this year
is t hird-y ear man Bud
Dougherty, a junior majoring in
electrical engineering.
Major Finley said that it was
still possible to try out for the
Raiders, but only those
exceptionally well qualified
could be accepted at this la-tc
date.
'Players
Acting Up
The Florida Players
(disguised as mild-mannered
students of this great suburban
university) will be out stalking
for potential converts to the
theatre cause Sunday, Oct. 28,
at 3 p.m. in the Constans
Theatre (overlooking the
Duckpondj.Thc occasion will be
their annual open house, when
anyone who's interested can be
initiated into the infamous
secret rites of this highly
exclusive UF organization (only
students can join).
The Florida Players arc the
largest and most active UF
organization devoted solely to
art torm. namely, the theatre
(comic, tragic, historical historicalpastoral.
pastoral. historicalpastoral. pastoral-comical, and
always a gas).
Sunday's open house will
tour you through the new
theatre, introduce you to the
Players, tell you about
productions past, present and
future, and most important of
all. feed \ hi.

year.



Friday. October 25.1968. The Florida Alligator,

w-. Bd
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FOUR TOPS HERE TONIGHT

The Interfratemity Council is bringing the Four
Tops to campus tonight. Tickets may be purchased

Designers
Look Ahead
LONDON (UPI) In the
world of movie stars, one
woman in particular knows the
realities beneath the glamorous
image that the public sees on
screen.
Julie Harris not to be
confused with the actress of the
same name has designed
clothes for more than 100
movies.
She has dressed some of the
top names in the business, won
an Oscar for her costumes in
Darling and flown to film
locations all over the world to
give fittings and advice.
Miss Harris, an attractive
blonde woman with a lovely
London apartment, a
housekeeper and a pekinese dog
earned by her work, said her
great problem with modem dress
movies is that they are not
released until roughly a year
after she started sketching the
designs. The fashions of the day
could have changed completely
by then.
You have to be able to look
ahead and see what will survive
and what is pure fad, she said.
I think that today, when
anything goes, there is not so
much prediction but what fancy
dress will catch the eye.
Hm
~ uni
QSRDON'B
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri

Page 19

at
the
flicks

UNION BOARD FILMS
COMMITTEE: Fri., A Countess
from Hong Kong with Marlon
Brando & Sophia Loren at 5,7
& 9:15. Sat., Moment to
Moment with Jean Seberg &
Honor Blackman at 5,7 & 9:15.
FLORIDA CINEMA
SOCIETY: Sun., Les Liasons
Dangereuses at 7 & 9.
INDIA CLUB. Sun., See
India Through the Films at 2.
GAINESVILLE DRIVE-IN:
Fri., Sat. & Sun., Anzio with
Robert Mitchum at 7 &
Redline 7000 at 9:29.
SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN: Fri.,
Sat. & Sun., A Time To Sing
with Hank Williams, Jr. &
Shelley Fabares at 7:30 &
Hillbillie In A Haunted House
with Ferlin Husky at 9:30.
PLAZA I: Fri., Sat. & Sun.,
West Side Story at 1:50,4:20,
6:50 & 9:20.
PLAZA II: Fri., Sat. & Sun.,
Barbarella with Jane Fonda at
1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45 & 9:45.

New Menu Out
at
Alans Cubana!!!
Mister Sandwich of Gator Country
Free Delivery |
Featuring
The most complete Sandwich
and Pizza menu in town.
Special
"Gator Vicki Just 50<
Phones 376-1252 or 378-1230

at the Reitz Union Box Office for $5 per couple.
The performance is to begin at 8 p.m.

STATE: Fri. & Sat.,
Newport Festival with Joan
Baez at 3, 5,7,& 9.
FLORIDA: Fri., Sat. & Sun.,
The High Commissioner with
Rod Taylor & Christopher
Plummer at 1:30, 3:30, 5:30,
7:30, & 9:30.
CENTER I: Fri., Sat. & Sun.,
Rachel, Rachel with Joanne
Woodward at 1:00, 2:43, 4:26,
6:09, 7:57 & 9:45.
CENTER II: Fri., Sat. &
Sun., Helga with Ruth
Gassman at 1:05, 2:35, 4:05,
5:35, 7:05,8:35 & 10:05.
SPORTS CAR
SPECIALTIES
If You Want If
Rxd NOW Not
Noxt Week See
-RICK
2017 NE 27th Ave
Ph. 372-3406

'Barefoot In
Last Weekend
Neil Simon's comedy, Barefoot In the Park" will be presented at
8:30 p.m. this Friday and Saturday at the Gainesville Little Theatre.
4039 N.W. 16th Blvd.
This is the third and last weekend for GLT's first show of the
1968-69 Season which has played to capacity crowds in the freshly
renovated playhouse. Reservations should be made by calling GLT's
answering service, even if one already has a patron, season, or Junior
Womens Club benefit ticket.
Directed by Tom Godey, Barefoot" features GLT regulars Rob
Sharkey. Jay Lauer. Jay Gebhardt and Herb Schweyer, and
newcomers Sally Kline and Yvonne Dell. Proceeds will benefit the
Alachua County Juvenile Shelter.
Cm tom Component Jbtdxno
See the Sony
8 frock cartridge "RECORDER
GAINESVILLE'S COMPLETE STEREO COMPONENT SHOP"
SALES & SERVICE
378-8045
604 N.W. 13th Street

PRIME RIB SPECIAL
Maas Prime Rib of Beef
Top choice, roatted to perfection
Rare Medium Well Done
Crisp Toned Salad
Baked Idaho Potato
Basket of Assorted Fancy Rolls
Coffee or Tea
2.95
MAAS
SUNCOAST RESTAURANT
/flood Bjtotim J



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25, 1968

'Bounce Back Big Theme For Gators

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QB DUO NICK ARROYO
... a new combination of Larry Rentz (10) and Harold
Peacock (14) will be calling signals this week.
Attitude Improves ;
Peacock No. 2 QB
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Harold Peacock moved up to the number two quarterback position
yesterday, and Larry Smith became 1 the next victim of a minor
influenza outbreak among the football team.
Peacocks move came with the announcement that Jackie Eckdahl,
who has been limping with a sprained toe, may not play at all in
Saturday's game against Vanderbilt.
The injury is more serious than we previously thought, said
Graves. Right now, the chances that Eckdahl will play at all this
weekend are very slim.
Larry Rentz had moved into the number one spot earlier this week
when it was learned that Eckdahl would be sidelined at least three
days of practice this week.
Peacock, a senior, has not quarterbacked the team this year.
Also, Larry Smith found himself the most recent victim of tin*
Alligator flu Wednesday night. Smith recorded a temperature of
102 degrees when lie reported to the infirmary, but since then, he has
recovered rapidly.
Larry is still a little weak. said Graves, but he won't be
impaired for the game.
The other players who reported are all now recovering very well,
and I'm just waiting for the cases to die down.
Two of the previous flu victims. Skip Albury and Bill Dorsey, will
start in Saturday's game.
Florida's flu list may increase, but the injury list is at a new low.
David Mann, right linebacker, will be starting, and Wayne Griffith will
be on tap if needed.
As for Mann. commented Graves, he definitely will start, but I
don't expect that he will be playing a full game. He's got to work his
knee back into condition, and that takes time."
Griffith will make the trip, but I'm starting Jim kiley. In a pinch,
however, he can move into the tackle position.
Graves said he has noticed a definite shift in the team attitude this
week, and that he is pleased by it.
This group is taking a more serious attitude toward the game than
before. said Graves. This Vanderbilt game will take a good deal of
team effort, and I think that the team has developed it during the
week.
ASK GATOR RAY
Ask Galoi Ray questions will be taken again this weekend.
For those really ambitious a new phone line has been installed,
('alls may be placed during the game. The number is 072-I'JStvo 7 2-I'JStv Only
during the .game.'
Srmda\ questions will be taken at .'""0-320I. ext. 2852-
, \pswcis will appeal I uestluy

Vandys Passing Combo
Tests Secondary Defense

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The second best passing
combination in the Southeastern
Conference tests the best pass
defense in the conference at
Nashville Saturday.
The Gators have yielded 94.8
yards per game passing, that
includes a game against the
strongest SEC passing team,
Mississippi State.
Vanderbilts Commodores
plan to fly past the Gators and
upset them for the second week
in a row.
The Commodores will rely on
the arm of John Miller and the
hands of Curt Chesley. Miller has
thrown for 808 yards and 2
touchdowns, Chesley has caught
32 passes for 411 yards.
Vandy passes about 50 per
cent of the time and has passed
as much as 67 per cent against

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GHESQUIRE
. . moved from defensive left end to left linebacker

LIGHT PRINT

McTHENY

... "Gator Grip" will be put to work by receivers Saturday in Nashville.

Alabama. The receivers are
especially good at catching the
ball in a crowd.
Gators are leading the SEC
rushing and Larry Smith is at the
top of the list with 512 yards.
Vandys rushing defense is
eighth, but All-SEC linebacker
Chip Healy and guard Bill
McDonald will be after Smith.
Vandy can run the ball too.
Allan Spear, running back, has
done well from the I formation
on the off tackle plays and the
draw plays. Vandys rushing
game is last in the SEC, but they
have run as much as 70 per cent
against North Carolina.
The Gator defense has

Statement Os The Week
Florida inventors are working on a combination of peanut butter
and musilage, to be applied to the hands, and to be named Gator
Grip for use Saturday afternoon in Nashville.

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changed considerably this week.
David Ghcsquirc has been moved
to right linebacker, Tom
Abdelnour is at middle
linebacker and David Mann is at
left linebacker. Mike Healy is at
left end and Bill Dorsey has been
moved from middle guard to left
tackle.
The major changes on offense
have Guy McTheny at split end
and Ted Hager at flanker back.
Larry Rentz is back calling the
signals with hopes to bring alive
the passing game.
Although UF is third in total
offense and Vandy is eighth, the
Gators must prove their offense
this week.

YARBROUGH NICK ARROYO

Albert
Predicts
By ALBERT THE ALLIGATOR
This is ol Albert, with a
special forecast on flic most
important game being played in
football tomorrow.
The staff of the Alligator,
that wonderful newspaper that
publishes only the best sports
forecasts, will meet the evil
Executive Committee of the
Intel fraternity Council.
The Alligator staff will win.
With the pass receiving ability of
such greats as Caron Balkany
and Kathie Kcim, and the
head-on tackling of Dave
Doucette, there's no wav the
IIT can heat this spirited group.
Add to those already mentioned,
the signal calling tactics of
Harold Aldrich, and the bench
warming oi Raul Ramirez, and
there will be action all
afternoon.
Game time is noon Saturday
at the field across from the Sig
I p house. Gators will win by 40
points



Friday. October 25; 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Seminoles Not Taken
By Injury Reports

By KENNETH POMAR
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida State Coach Bill
Peterson said today he is not
letting his Seminoles be taken in
by South Carolina Coach Paul
Deitzels complaints that injuries
to Gamecock runners will put
them at a definite disadvantage
Saturday night.
I know Paul wouldnt lie,
said Peterson of his former boss,
but on the other hand, lets just
say he h as an awfully lot of
halfbacks.
The Seminole coach, who was
an assistant to Deitzel at
Karate Meet
Largest Ever
Saturday at Jacksonville
Beach one of the largest and
most important karate
tournaments in this country will
take place.
The Trias International
Karate Championships will
feature championship matches in
Kumite (sparring) and Kata
(form), plus exhibitions of
karate, judo and aikido.
The tournament is being
sponsored by Dirk Mosigs
Universal Karate Dojo, a karate
club with membership composed
mostly of UF students and staff.
More than 500 contestants
will attend from every state in
the union, plus Canada, Japan,
Korea, Okinawa, Argentina,
Chile, Venezuela, Puerto Rico,
Germany, and several other
countries.
Contestants will be divided
into the following divisions:
black belt, brown belt, white
belt, green belt, junior division
and women division. Each
division will be sub-divided into
light and heavy weight
categories.
Tickets for the event can be
purchased at the Jacksonville
Beach Auditorium. Ringside is
S 5 and general admission $2.
Tennis Tryouts
The Gator tennis tryouts will
be held Monday, Oct. 28 and
Tuesday. Oct. 29 at 4 p.m.
Coach Bill Potter has invited
all interested students to come
to the varsity tennis courts.
The team is the current SEC
champs and ranked fourth in the
NCAA.

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Page 21

Louisiana State during the
Tigers heyday in the late
19505, said he was well aware of
the South Carolina coachs
ability to get a team
psychologically ready to play a
football game. And, he added,
this is homecoming for the
Gamecocks.
The Seminoles will be after
their fourth win against a single
defeat, while South Caroline is
l-4 this season. Peterson
promised to have some new
wrinkles to the Seminole
offense.
One of those new twists, he

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said, will be the use of former
starting quarterback Gary Pajcic
at the halfback post, giving
Florida State a double-barreled
passing attack.
Pajcic will give us a better
running pass threat, he said,
nothing that Bill Cappleman will
still be firing most ot the aerials
to a host of fine receivers led by
flanker Ron Sellers.
Florida States pass defense,
second best in the nation, may
face one of its toughest tests of
the year against the Gamecocks,
he said. South Carolina threw
the ball 42 times last week.

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Page 22

!' Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 26,1968

Csonka Returns,
Dolphins Ready

MIAMI (UPI) The Miami
Dolphins, with two wins and one
tie in their last three outings,
will have Larry Csonka back in
action Sunday for their game
against Denver.
The 240 pounder from
Syrcuse, and Miamis No. 1 draft
choice, sat out last Sundays
victory over Cincinnati because
of concussion.
Csonka is fine now, said
Coach George Wilson, but Im
not sure whether or not hell
start.
Coach Wilson did say that
Jim Kiick will be at halfback.
Tampa Fourth
NEW YORK (UPI) The
United Press International top
20 small college football teams
with first place votes and won
lost records in parentheses.
Fifth week.
Team Points
1. San Diego St. 22 5-0 324
2. No. Dak. St. 5 289
3. N.M. Highlands 4 60 199
4. Chattanooga 5-0 169
5. Tampa 4-1 161
6. Western Ky. 2 5-0141
7. Weber St. 1 125
8. Morgan St. 40 80
9. Northern Mich. 5-1 77
10. Texas A& I 4-1 69
Second 10 ll. Arkansas
Staff 62; 12. Troy State 30; 13.
Eastern Kentucky 29; 14. East
Texae State 18; 15. Willamette
13; 16. Arkansas Tech 12; 17.
Tie, Appalachian 1 and Adams
State 10; 19. St. Norberts 9; 20.
Tie, Texas-Arlington and
Gustavus Adolphus 8.

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Stan Mitchell played the
entire game against Cincinnati,
but will probably be sharing
duties with Csonka this week.
The Dolphins will be going
into the game in their best
physical shape in a number of
weeks. There was no one injured
in the Cincinnati game, and
everyone is expected to be ready
Sunday.
Sports Car Rally
The Gainesville Sports Car
Club will present its first night
fun rally of the season Saturday
night.
Registration will begin at
6:00 PM with the first car
leaving Gainesville High Schools
parking lot at 7:00 PM.
The Halloween theme rally
complete with costumed
checkpoints will be divided into
3 section: a scavenger hunt, a
game-gimmick section and a
follow- the-instructions part.
Registration fee is $2.50 per
car.
WHOS
ON
FIRST?
If you're trying to put first
things first maybe we can
help. Try HOLY TRINITY
EPISCOPAL CHURCH at
Northeast First St. and First
Ave. SUNDAYS at 8, 9:30
and 11:00. AN kinds of
people are welcome.

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j
j | , a Alligator

25 On Campus
V (Bu the author of Rally Round the Flag, Boys!,
V' / Dobie GiUis etc.)
THE WINDS OF CHANGE
ARE GIVING ME A STIFF NECK
Today if I get a little misty, I hope I may be forgiven.
This is an anniversary; it is exactly fifteen years since
I started writing this column in your campus paper.
Fifteen years! What a pageant of memories marches
through my mind as I sit this day on my verandah, my
faithful wife crouched at my feet, my hot line to Medicare
within easy reach! What changes I have seen in American
college life! What strange new thingsthe teaching
machine, the disposable dean, the rise of Eugene... the
Moby Grape, the naked ape, the hairy nape, the Carnaby
drape, the generation gape... the Grateful Dead, the acid
head, the tiger tread...the electric sitar, the menthol
cigar, the come-as-you-are. And, of course, the Electro-
Coated Blade.
The Electro-Coated Blade, which is to say the new
Personna Super Stainless Steel Blade, is mentioned here
because the makers of the new Personna Super Stainless
Steel Blade are the sponsors of this column, and they are
inclined to stop payment on my check if I omit to mention
their product.
Not, mark you, that it is any chore for me to sing
the praises of Personna, for it is a seemly blade that
shaves you cleanly, a gleaming blade that leaves you
beaming, a trouble-free blade that leaves you stubble-free.
If you seek facial felicity, if you yearn for jovd joy, try
Personna today. It is available both in double-edge style
and in Injector style, both styles Electro-Coated with a
new process invented by Personnas resident mad sci scientist,
entist, scientist, Steinmetz Ampere, who also invented the oppos opposing
ing opposing thumb, without which millions of castanet players
would be destitute today.
But I digress. We were discussing the changes in col college
lege college life during the last fifteen years. Lets take up one
change in particular: the emergence of a new breed of
admissions dean.
The old breed of admissions dean (and they are still
a majority) admit freshmen on the basis of standard,
cut-and-dried criteria: IQ score, SAT score, high school
standing. But the new breed of admissions dean occa occasionally
sionally occasionally will take a chance on an applicant with a low
IQ, a low SAT score, low high school standing. He looks
not so much at a mans test scores as at the man. If the
deans intuition tells him that within the man are hidden
qualities, something rare and special that would enrich
the college, the man gets in, test scores notwithstanding.
Take, for example, the case of Champert Sigafoos.
Champerts credentials for college were not what you
would call promising. He graduated 419th in a high
school class of 419. His IQ was 14; his SAT score was
12. Also he was bald on one side.
Nevertheless Champert trudged from campus to cam campus,
pus, campus, showing his dossier to admissions deans. Everywhere
the result was the same: projectile vomiting.
Then one day Champert came to a campus where the
admissions dean, E. Pluribus Ewbank, was one of the
new breed. Champert, said Dean Ewbank, my intui intuition
tion intuition tells me that within you are hidden qualities, some something
thing something rare and special that would enrich the college.
X OU JS uut of vou r bird, said Champert.
No, Champert, said Dean Ewbank, I know whereof
I speak, for I am not only the dean of admissions here,
but I am also the basketball coach. And the hidden quali qualities
ties qualities I see within you are that you are seven feet three
inches tall.
So Champert was admitted. It did not, alas, work out
as well as it might have, for Champert shortly developed
acromegaly (a morbid fear of hoops) and was dropped,
loday, a broken man, he earns a meagre living as a
mooring mast in Akron.
Dean Ewbank is no longer with the college either; he
has gone into the three-minute auto wash game.
* * 1968. Max Shuiman
ake S S f P ersonna Super Stainless Steel Blades
, e e r Injector style) and Burma-Shave (regu (reguv
v' (reguv 0 :^" 1 00 are f l ?"* ed (or apprehensive) to bring
Hiibited Wax* uncensored and unin



Tech To Revenge Upset

ATLANTA (UPI) The
homecoming war cry at Georgia
Tech this week has been
remember New Orleans.
A year ago, at New Orleans,
Georgia Techs hopes of escaping

f Sports Trivia
Bv MIKE SEGAL
: So that the editorial page wont have entire control of the
: trivia, we have decided to institute a Sports Trivia Quiz. It will
: be published as often as I can get around to making one up.
Now take out your Encyclopedia of Sports and get to work.
Answers will appear tomorrow.
: 1. Match the professional basketball players with the college
they attended:
: A) Terry Dischinger Providence
B) Guy Rodgers NYU
: C) Lenny Wilkins Temple
D) Tom Sanders Bowling Green
E) Nate Thurmond Purdue
2. Who was TCLPs 6 ft. 7 in. All-American quarterback in
\ 1962?
3. What was the final score of the 1963 Rose Bowl game
: between Southern California and Wisconsin? Who won?
4. Name the three Alou Brothers in baseball.
5. Who was the basketball player for small Rio Grande
: College who averaged over fifty points a game?
BONUS QUESTION:
Who ran the wrong way in the 1929 Rose Bowl game? (It
wasnt Corrigan.)

Sailing Races
The Gator Sailing Club races
Saturday in the Intercollegiate
Keelboat Championship Regatta
at Ft. Walton. Other members of
the Club race in the Flying
Junior Regionals at Brandenton
Saturday and Sunday.
Bruce Blais, John Tack, Tom
Marchner and Roger Umstead
will said the Fishboats in the
Keelboat Championships, hosted
by the University of West
Florida.

THE
BENT CARD
COFFEE HOUSE PROUDLY ANNOUNCES ITS REOPENING
THIS YRY VEEKEND
DON'T MISS DARING*
HIGH WIRE ACTS
PERFORMED OKI AND tANJO 5Y
JARREIT RBISHAW*QAILG,|LESPIE
EIEPHAHTS
JBE SHIFAL6 ZUBER
A CLOWNS N
) AND OTHER ASSORTED MEN OF THE WORLD
j^PeETRY-^-
NKX TAJR t LASID WILEY
M lf Alt l
SEE THE FOLKIES
' AT THE
BENT ARt>
ACROSS UHWERSJTY AYE
j FKBECPFFEE JIADMISSiOfO
EBPAY+ 68VS&X

its first losing season in 17 years
went down the drain in a 23-12
upset at the hands of Tulane.
Saturday, Georgia Tech will
be host to Tulane in its
homecoming game and the

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oddsmakers predict the Yellow
Jackets will win by two
touchdowns.
There are two big reasons for
this about face: 1. Georgia Tech,
which had to use a defensive
specialist at quarterback last
year because of wholesale
injuries, has Larry Good, the
Souths leading yardage gainer;
and 2. Tulane doesnt have
Bobby Duhon.
More than 50,0CX) persons are
expected to be on hand for the 2
p.m. EDT contest as ticket sales
were spurred by Techs 21-20
upset win over Auburn and
Tulanes 28-14 victory over
previously unbeaten Boston
College.
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Friday, October 25,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 25,1968

SOONER OR LATER
YOUR CHOICE IN
A COMPACT CAR

o <=a\

96
"FRIEND OF THE
EXCBIENT SERVO
Godding & Clark
Motors
"CLOSEST DEALER TO
THE UNIVERSITY"
1012 SOUTH MAIN
OPEN
TIL 9 P.M. Ph. 378-2311
Tfc§ Collego Life
Football Forecast
THE GAMES
Fla. vs. Vanderbilt
Auburn vs. Miami
Calif. vs. Syracuse
Houston vs. Mississippi
Memphis St. vs. Sou. Miss.
Michigan vs. Minnesota
Wake Forest vs. N. Carolina
F.S.U. vs. South Carolina
Miss. St. vs. Tampa
U.C.L.A. vs. Stanford

Guest Prognosti Gators

CLICA
Florida
Miami
Calif.
Mis.
S. Mis.
Minn.
N. Carolina
F.S.U.
Mis. St.
Stanford

PHI DELTA
THETA
Fla.
Miami
Syracuse
Mis.
S. Mis.
Minn.
Wake Forest
F.S.U.
Mis. St.
Stanford

DELTA
UPSILON
Fla.
Miami
Syracuse
Houston
S. Mis.
Mich.
Wake Forest
F.S.U.
Mis. St.
Stanford

The Harmon Football Forecast

TOP 20 TEAMS

1 KANSAS
2 OHIO STATE
3 SOUTHERN CAL
4 PURDUE
5 NOTRE DAME

Saturday, Oct. 2&MAJOR COLLEGES

Air Force 21
Alabama 17
Arkansas 28
Army 21
Brigham Young 28
Buffalo 17
Chattanooga 18
Colgate 20
Colorado State 20
Davidson 27
Florida 23
Florida State 26
Georgia 23
Georgia Tech 27
Harvard 14
Houston 24
Indiana 28
Kansas 37
L.S.U. 17
Louisville 23
Miami, Fla. 21
Miami (Ohio) 20
Michigan 17
Mississippi State 21
Missouri 27
Nebraska 21
New Mexico State 31
North Carolina State 30
Northwestern 27
Notre Dame 31
Ohio State 38
Ohio U. 22
Oklahoma 21
Oregon 21
Oregon State 10
Penn State 30
Princeton 13
Purdue 31
Richmond 21
Rutgers 20
San Oiego State 33
S.M.U. 23
Southern Mississippi 17
Stanford 25
Syracuse 22
Texas 38
Texas A A M 2*
Toledo 28
Tulsa 20
Utah State 2i
Villanova 20
Virginia 24
V.P.I. 21
Wake Forest 17
Washington 20
Western Michigan 27
William A Mary 15
Wyoming 47
Yale 28

Other GamesSOUTH and SWEST

Appalachian 21
Arkansas State Col. 20
Arkansas State U. 28
Arlington 24
OePauw 18
East Texas 16
Eastern New Mexico 20
Eton 27
Emory A Henry 22
Fairmont 48
Franklin 14
Henderson 18
Jacksonville 35
Lenoir-Rhyne 21
Martin 20
Middle Tennessee 25
Murray 23
NE Louisiana 28
Ouachita 24
Presbyterian 21
S. F. Austin 27
Samford 28
Sewanee 19
SW Louisiana 30
SW Texas 25
Tennessee Tech 16
Texas A A I 27
Texas Lutheran 33
Trenton 25
Troy 17
Waynesburg 35
Western Kentucky 23

Your CLICA Representatives in Gainesville:

J3l

The
College Life
Insurance
Company of America
Vic McKenzie & Associates
4115 N. W. 13th St.
New Phono number is 37&247S ,*%

(Forecasting Average: 744 Right, 228 Wrong, 28 Ties 765)

6 TENNESSEE
7 GEORGIA
8 PENN STATE
9 MIAMI, FLA.
10 SYRACUSE

Pittsburgh 0
Clemson 8
North Texas 12
Duke 8
Texas (El Paso) 15
Holy Cross 14
The Citadel 14
Brown o
Pacific 16
Furman 13
Vanderbilt 14
South Carolina 8
Kentucky 7
Tulane io
Dartmouth 10
Mississippi 21
Arizona 27
lowa State 7
T. 7
Wichita 6
Auburn 17
Bowling Green 15
Minnesota 14
Tampa 20
Kansas State 10
Oklahoma State 8
Northern Illinois 7
Maryland 13
Wisconsin 7
Michigan State 14
Illinois o
Dayton 10
Colorado 10
Utah 18
Washington State o
Boston College 10
Pennsylvania 8
lowa 13
East Carolina 7
Columbia 8
San Jose State 15
Texas Tech 21
Memphis 15
U. 20
California 21
Rice 14
Baylor 8
Kent State 8
Cincinnati 17
West Texas 20
Xavier 10
Navy 8
West Virginia 18
North Carolina 8
Idaho 8
Marshall 13
V. 13
New Mexico 0
Cornell 14

Carson-Newman s
Southern State 7
Abilene Christian 12
Trinity 14
Centre 7
Sul Ross 8
Angelo State 13
Catawba 20
Wofford 20
Concord o
Maryville 13
Arkansas A A M 15
Newberry 6
Western Carolina 15
Delta 17
Austin Peay 20
East Tennessee 21
SE Louisiana 20
Harding 0
Guilford 12
Howard Payne 24
Mississippi College 1*
Southwestern, Tenn. 7
Lamar Tech 14
Sam Houston 12
Morehead 14
McMurry 7
St. Mary 7
Shepherd 8
Florence 0
West Va. Wesleyan 0
Eastern Kentucky 13

Hugh Brooker
Sam Darby
Breece Me Cray
Bob Peterson___
Don Wiggins

i < T fvi A Ks 3 jjfjlj I
jlpljl |j||p|mii! r ** K

11 CALIFORNIA
12 TEXAS
13 HOUSTON
14 MISSISSIPPI
15 ALABAMA

There may still be another month left of
the college football season after this
Saturday, but the possibility of bowl-bids
and conference titles is already putting the
pressure on many top teams. Ten games in
particular this week have direct bearing on
the leaders in six conference
race Surprisingly, there are just three
undefeated teams left in Big Ten Conference
play, 2nd-ranked Ohio State, 18th-rated
Michigan, and Minnesota. The Buckeyes are
heavy favorites to remain undefeated,
whipping Illinois by 38 points. The
Wolverines, however might run into trouble
in their annual Little Brown Jug struggle
with Minnesota. This one will be close:
Michigan by three.
In the Southeast Conference, Georgia, no.
7, and Florida are the only leaders meeting
conference opposition. The Bulldogs, having
just a tie with Tennessee on their record,
meet Kentucky, and Florida plays
Vanderbilt. Neither top dog has a
push-over ... Georgia is favored by sixteen,
Florida by 9.
Undefeated Kansas, ranked Number One
in the nation this week, takes on lowa State
in the Big 8 Conference. 17th-ranked
Missouri meets Kansas State, and Oklahoma
tangles with Colorado. The high-scoring
Jayhawks will ride over the Cyclones from
Ames by 30 points, and the Mizzou Tigers
should top K-State by 17. The Sooners, with
a tougher assignment, are favored over
Colorado by eleven points.
The Atlantic Coast Conference has just
one team leading the league race: North
Carolina State. And the Wolfpack will breeze
over Maryland by 17 points. The feature
attraction in the Southwest Confernce
matches the two teams tied for the lead,
19th-ranked S.M.U. and Texas Tech. The
air-minded Mustangs will barely fly by the
Red Raiders: Southern Methodist by two.
And in the Pacific Coast Conference,
Oregon State meets Washington State. The
Beavers are favored to remain tied with
Southern Cal and California for the league
lead ... Oregon State by 10 points.
Here are three other real flea-wallopers!
The sth-ranked Irish of Notre Dame will clip
the Spartans of Michigan State by 17
points ... Syracuse, no. 10, will just slip by
11th-rated California ... and Houston and
Mississippi, 13th and 14th respectively, are
just three points apart. The favorite,
Houston.

I m
.mm Isl
I JS 4 '-
. Jrfm

ARTS FIRST LETTERS FLORIDA'S IDEAS AIRS FIRST LETTERS

16 ARKANSAS
17 MISSOURI
18 MICHIGAN
19 S.M.U.
20 OHIO U.

Colored*Framed Stripes on
Tone-Deep Backgrounds
A new Gant button-down that has
elan in a gentlemanly manner.
Gentlemanly, too, is the luxuriant
cotton broad-cloth. Tailored with
infinite care from collar to cuffs
patently Gant. Trim Hugger body.
Elegantly elongated, flared collar.
Exuberant colors and stripings.
jj DONIGANS|
mi W. Uii*. Am.
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
330 Reitz Union
Campus
I WANT TO
SUBSCRIBE
Send Me the
October Issue
1 copy $1.25
1 year (3 issues) 3.00
3 years(9 issues) 8.00
Heres my check

|| ARTS FLORIDA S LETTERS |