Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Camp US Thing

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 22

'NO MOTIVE APPARENT

UF Prof Held In Murder

K|;;
Iniil' jfc v
V f.
JOHN KIKER
.. .charged with murder
SG Forum
Stresses '6B
Campaigns
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor has appointed
Howard Rosenblatt, 4ED, to
organize and coordinate a series
of current events forums.
The series, to be held in the
Plaza of the Americas, begins
Oct. 29, with students
representing the views of various
U.S. senatorial and presidential
candidates.
\ u>
Rosenblatt said the reason
the first topic was chosen was
because of the upcoming
November elections.
Through this program, we in
Student Government are trying
to bring residents of this campus
in contact with the activities of
the larger world we live in,
Rosenblatt said.
He stressed the role of UF to
see that students are educated in
the men who will be shaping
their government.

Eicher Dismissal: Procedure Was Not Legal

See Editorial Page 6
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the conclusion of a two-part
series explaining the background
of Cathy Eichers removal from
the varsity cheerleading squad,
an action the Student Senate
now contends is illegal.)
By DAVE DOUCETTE
Alligator Managing Editor
After the Cheerleading Board
of Directors removed Cathy
Eicher, 4AS, from the squad in
May, she thought she had no

The
Florida Alligator

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF professor was arrested
and charged with homicide early
Monday morning after police
were summoned to his home and
found his wife shot to death on
the bathroom floor.
Johm Kiker Jr., 62, chairman
of UFs bioenvironmental
engineering department, has
been charged with the murder of
Mary Kiker, 58.
We can find no motive for
shooting right now, said Police
Detective Lt. Roy Thames, and
we are having a hard time getting
any testimony.
We havent really had a
chance to talk to any of the
neighbors yet, said Thames,
and we havent been able to
locate the ones that we want to
talk to.
Kiker was jailed without
bond and did not make any
statement to police on the advise
of his lawyer, local attorney L.
William Graham, Thames said.
Thames said that an
ambulance company and the
police received calls from Kiker
shortly after midnight. When
they arrived on the scene, Kiker
let them in through the back
door.
They found Mrs. Kikers
body, clad in half slip and
underclothing, lying on thebath thebathroom
room thebathroom floor. She had been shot
once with a 357-magnum pistol,
Thames said.
The bullet went in 7 to 8
inches below the left arm pit and
out the other side, Thames
said. Parts of the bullet and the
gun used in the shooting have
been recovered.
He (Kiker) wasnt hysterical
or anything, Thames said. He
let the officers in through the
back door, they asked him
where the gun was and he said,
lll get it for you, and he did.

further recourse to the boards
decision and was off the squad.
At the next practice
following the meeting Maida
Sokal, a member of Delta Phi
Epsilon soroiity and the third
girl alternate, took Miss Eichers
place on the squad.
The two alternates before
Miss Sokal, Donna Wolfman, a
Delta Gamma, and Janice
Biewend, a Tri-Delt, should
have been put on the squad
before she was. Student Body
Vice President Gary Goodrich
said.
A representative of the DG
house came to Goodrich and
told him about the situation.
At almost the same time Miss

University of Florida, Gainesville

Asked if Kiker was
intoxicated Thames said, 1
would say no. 1 didnt get close
to him, but the officers that did
say no -- he was not
intoxicated.
No hearing has been set yet
for Kiker who was named

Tower Chimes
Get Turned On
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The chimes of Century Tower, silent since late this summer, will
soon be striking the quarter hour and playing musical selections
between classes.
At last freshmen will be able to hear what the chimes sound like.
Delta Chi fraternity, in response to an Alligator news story and
editorial Monday, has now contributed SIOO to purchase music rolls
for the chimes.
In addition, the student senate will deal with a requested
appropriation for new rolls for the chimes when the Senate meets
tonight.
Even after repairs to the clock mechanism necessitated by a
stripped gear, the tower remained silent because no money was set
aside for purchasing a new music roll.
A roll, containing eight to 10 selections, costs about SIOO. Willis
Bodine, university organist and carilloneur, said he requested money
from Student Government to purchase a new roll but that his requests
went unanswered. SG officials denied receiving any requests from
Bodine.
Monday, Jim Almand, the president of Delta Chi fraternity
presented a SIOO check to Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich saying that
he (Aldrich) was really the initiator of the entire thing with his
editorial.
The members of the fraternity, Almand said, decided to give
money for music rolls instead of giving homecoming favors this
year.
We read the editorial on the chimes, and we agreed that it was
time action was taken, he said. If we waited for SG to cut through
its red tape, Century Tower would fall down brick by brick first.
Our fraternity is concerned with service, he continued. Wed
been looking for some project to work on and this seemed like a
project that would be appreciated by the entire campus.
The chimes usually are played under two schedules. Westminster
chimes play every 15 minutes, like Londons Big Ben. Rolls with
different musical selections play after the end of each class.

l BACKGROUND REPORT |

Eicher heard that Miss Sokal
took her place so she went to
Goodrich to see if something
could be done to put the first
alternate on the squad.
I was not interested in
getting myself back on the
squad, but that the right girl
took my place, she said.
Goodrich told Miss Eicher
that she was not supposed to be
removed from the squad until
the Cheerleadirtg Board of

-- Alligator
Magazine Supplement

Tuesday, October 22, 1968

Engineer of the Year in 1966
by the American Society of Civil
Engineers for his work in
sanitary engineering.
He came to UF in 1947 from
New York where he had served
with the New York State health
Department.

Directors wrote a letter to the
sti.d.rf senate and the senate
approved the action.
The cheering board met again
to settle the question of who
should take Miss Eicher's place
on the squad. Taylor attended
this meeting instead of Kincaid
and Gore wasnt allowed to
attend the meeting.
They decided that Grubbs
was wrong in placing Miss Sokal
on the squad and told him to

Ameria's
Number I
Collie
Daily

WB
w
UF Action
Conference
Meets Again
UFs Action Conference will
meet Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. in
room 349 of the Reitz Union to
discuss recommendations
concerning the quarter system
and review a report by the Task
Force on Goals.
Members will also discuss the
possibility of course credit for
students and faculty members
participating in the conference
and a resolution to replace any
member who misses over two
general conference task force
meetings without good cause.
The curriculum task force
suggested that a typical student
program under the quarter
system should consist of three
academic courses studied
simultaneously.
The practice of assigning the
same number of fifty minute
periods as course credits should
(SEE 'ACTION' PAGE 2)
Senate Meeting
Student Senate will meet
tonight at 7 p.m. in room
349 Reitz Union.

put Miss Wolfman on the squad.
Putting the wrong girl on
the squad was entirely my
fault, Grubbs said. I thought
any of the alternates could move
up.
In early June Goodrich said
he told Grubbs that Miss Eicher
was not off the squad and that
he would hold up Student
Government funds for the
cheerleaders to attend a two
week summer clinic unless they
took her along.
Grubbs then went to Athletic
Director Ray Graves, got the
money for the clinic and didnt
take Miss Eicher, Goodrich said.
(SEE 'DISMISSAL', PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 22, 1968

UF Honor Code Lacks
Mandatory Enforcement

(EDITORS NOTE: This article
is the second in a series of stories
on the UF Honor System.
Todays installment covers the
Honor Code).
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The Honor Code is simple
and to the point. It includes but
three offenses-cheating, stealing,
and passing bad checks.
Cheating means giving or
taking information on class
work, test papers or anything
that is tallied into a students
final grade, according to the
Honor Code.
Another aspect of cheating,
as stated in the Honor Code, is
the intentional misrepresen misrepresentation
tation misrepresentation of a material fact (lying),
to help your grade.
Examples range from turning
in your roommatess term paper
as your own to skipping a test.
Stealing is described as the
taking of the property of
another without his permission.
Also considered an offense is

UF Debate Squad
2nd At Plainsman

The UF varsity debate squad
finished second over-all at the
Plainsman Debate Tournament
Auburn University last
weekend.
The varsity affirmative team
of Gregg Mathews and Dee
Scarr, and the varsity negative
team of Ralph Glatfelter and
Steve Rosin, were both awarded
trophies for third places in their
respective divisions.
The squad was awarded a
trophy for their combined 9-3
win-loss record.
UFs Coach John Wittig was
also awarded a plaque. After
judging and critiquing a debate,
the coaches were rated by the
debates in the round. Wittig
received the highest ratings of all
the judges, and was awarded the
plaque for outstanding judge.
The varsity affirmative team
defeated Emory University,
Davidson College, Harding
College, and Birmingham
Southern College, and lost to
Wake Forest Universtiy and
University of Alabama. The
varsity negative team defeated
FSU, University of Georgia,
University of Southern Alabama,
Spring Hill College, and Western
Kentucky University, and lost to
David Lipscomb College.

H Loans Up To S6OO
Budget Payday Ante
vlgnOTllrO
Prompt CourtooM
ConfMontM
Marion Finance Co,
376-5333
222 W. University An,
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U tin offictol student nswspspsr at tbs University of Florida
and Is published five tines weekly except during June, July and Atust when It Is published
semi-weekly, end during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Ralls
Union Building, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, SSflOl. The Alligator is entered
as .second clou matter at lbs United States £flpt Office at Gainesville, Florida, M6Ol.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserve# the right to regulate the typographical tone at all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or tun away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will aot consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice to given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Malinger within (1) can day after advertisement appears. The Florida will
sol be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement sdmduled
to ren several times. Notices tor correction meet he given before next Umeitioa.

attempting to steal, even though
it is interrupted or prevented.
Passing a bad check means
negotiating a worthless check
of your own or anothers.
When a merchant tells the
Honor Court about a bad check,
the court usually notifies the
student and gives him 48 hours
to make the check good.
If the student doesnt come
through, the court can charge
him with contempt and give him
up to nine penalty hours.

Action Conference
Studies 'Quarter 1

FROM PAGE ONE

be dropped to obtain greater
flexibility in- scheduling, the
report states. The task force has
also recommended that the
quarter calendar not be arranged
to allow for a long summer
quarter that would influence
only a small fraction of the
student body.
It also suggested unless the
University could fulfill these

UFs junior affirmative team
of David Byron and Bess
Roberts, and the negative team
of Dave Rouse and Gloria
Mikula, equaled the varsitys
combined win-loss record of 9-3.
Mathews won the first place
plaque in extemporaneous
speaking, and Glatfelder was a
finalist in that contest.
Mathews and Rosin were
awarded certificates for
excellence in speaking, varsity
division, and Byron received one
in the junior division.
KISER OFFICE EQUIPMENT
OCTOBER SPECIAL
42 MANUAL TYPEWRITERS
(ALL-MAKES)
RECONDITIONED 81GUARANTEED
FROM $45 to $95
i
20% DOWN
BAL. IN 6 PAYMENTS
NO FINANCE CHARGES
ADDED
604 N. MAIN ST. 372-9607

The Honor Code looks good
on paper. The trouble comes in
getting students to turn in
violators. Unlike the service
academies, it is not mandatory
at the UF to report offenses.
So, if a student sees half a
dozen people trading answers on
a progress test, he can just turn
his head, though the cheating
might cause his grade to be
lower than it should be.
(Next: The Honor Court
itself.)

recommendations the UF should
return to the semester system at
the earliest possible date.
A recommendation that each
college re-examine its total hours
required for graduation will also
be discussed. The Conference
resolution calls for the reduction
of required hours where ever
possible.
The Task Force on Goals will
present a resolution to define
three major goals of the
University. Education of
the student by the use of all
existing knowledge and
development of culture and
individual ability is the first goal.
The second goal is the
introduction of an atmosphere
in which both students and
faculty, may freely interact.
The third goal concerns the
Universitys role in solving
current problems and avoiding
others.
The task force will present
the eight conditions it says are
necessary in accomplishing these
goals. An atmpophere of
excellance, flexibility,
communication, participation,
freedom, Humanization, concern
for relevance, and an obligation
to express the truth are listed as
the conditions.

. I PIZZA HUT SMORGASBORD
I 1723 S.W. 13th ST. 11:30am to l:30p
Gainesville, Florida s:OOpm. to 8:00p
<43 Tel. 378-5761 THURSDAY
EATALL THE
PIZZA YOU WANT
$ 1.35 Per Person In The Piz2a Hut
Smorgasbord Olympics (INCLUDES SOFT DRINK)

You there with the big
appetite. With a craving for
m-m-m marvelous mushroom
pizza; and perfect pepperoni
pizza; and simmering sausage
pizza; and cherishable cheese
pizza; and super-dooper
supreme pizza.

Dismissal llleaal

Flow r Aft Ott
Grubbs has a different story.
He said he doesnt remember
Goodrich saying anything to him
about holding up funds if Miss
Eicher didnt go to the clinic.
But if Gary says he talked to
me, I guess he did, Grubbs said.
Grubbs said he was in
California after classes ended in
June and received a phone call
from the cheerleaders business
manager who said Student
Government was holding up
funds for the clinic.
Grubbs said he told the
business manager to ask Graves
for the money. The cheerleaders
used money from their fall travel
fund to attend the clinic, Graves
said.
Miss Eicher did not go to the
clinic; Miss Wolfman did.
This fall before the first game
against Air Force, Miss Eicher
said Grubbs told her she was still
on the squad and could cheer at
the Air Force game. She said she
declined because she didnt have
the proper uniform, and didnt
know the cheers because she had
missed the clinic.
They learn most of the
cheers at the clinic and I asked
them if they would help me
catch up and learn the cheers,
Miss Eicher said. They
wouldnt help.
The same thing happened
before the Florida State game
the following week, she said.
This fall the Cheering Board
of Directors finally sent a
petition to the Student Senate
requesting the removal of Miss
Eicher from the squad.
The Senate unanimously
decided to overturn the boards
petition for removal at
Tuesdays meeting on the
recommendation of the Senates
Interim Judiciary Committee.
The committee recommended
the denial of the petition for
several reasons:
The time lapse between the
initial action and the Senates

... what are you waiting
for? Enter the Pizza Hut
Smorgasboard Olympics.
Entitles you to eat all or
little as you want including
soft drink. Children up to
13, just $.lO for each year of
age.
(Warning: One taste and

investigation was such that an
objective appraisal of Miss
Eichers competency and
compatability could not be
determined.
0 The legal procedure for
dismissal was not followed. Miss
Eicher was dismissed prior to a
formal hearing; she was advised
of her dismissal by an
unauthorized person; the formal
hearing was not properly
conducted (she was not
permitted a private hearing, she
had no chance for rebuttal as she
was asked to leave the hearing
immediately after her testimony,
and she was not allowed to give
uninterrupted testimony); Miss
Eicher was illegally replaced on
the squad by an alternate.
Article 5, section 6 of the
Charter of the Cheerleaders was
not complied with within a
reasonable length of time.
Article 5, section 6 of the
cheering charter says: With the
approval of the Legislative
Council (Student Senate), the
Cheering Board of Directors may
drop any cheerleader from the
squad for just reasons.
Because of the Senates
action Miss Eicher can return to
her position on the varsity
cheering squad, but she doubts
that she will.
I gave up hope of cheering
after I didnt go to clinic this
summer, she said.
I guess Ill resign.
Code-A-Phone
Out Os Order
Students who called the
Student Governments
code-a-phone service to
report problems to the
ombudsman program last
week, should call again.
Because of technical
problems with the installation
of the Centrex System on
campus the calls were not
recorded.

youll want to eat more than
you want.)
Come try. Win or lose out
Pizza Hut Smorgasbord
Olympics, youll love our
pizza ... and well give you
a badge for being a good
sport. No waiting to begin,
so hurry.



First Patient Celebrates
A Decade Os Progress

Nancy Sue Smith has
witnessed a decade of history
since she made a bit of history
herself one mid-October day in
1958.
As a nine-year-old child from
neighboring Williston, Nancy
Sue was the first patient to be
treated at UFs Teaching
Hospital on Oct. 20, 1958.
In the decade that has passed
since Nancy Sue became
Patient Number One, she has
witnessed events ranging from a
presidential assassination in
Dalllas to a dramatic walk in
space by American astronauts.
At the same time, the
Teaching Hospital has matched
the worlds fast pace.
That first October when
Nancy Sue entered the Teaching
Hospital, only 59 patients
rattled around the new halls of
the Teaching Hospital and
Clinics. Today, the average daily
patient count is 300, plus an

College Editors Vote
Give Nixon The Nod
Richard Nixon will be the next president of the United States,
according to 91 per cent of the nations college newspaper editors.
The opinion survey conducted by the Associated Collegiate Press
was based on a representative mail poll of seven per cent of college
editors selected by the research division of the school of journalism
and mass communications at the University of Minnesota.
Criteria included regional location, circulation and frequency of
publication.
editors classified themselves 46 per cent independent, 30 per cent
Republican and 24 per cent Democrat.
Dave Doucette, managing editor of The Alligator, was among the
editors polled. He classified himself as a Democrat and said he would
vote for Humphrey, but believed Nixon would win.
Only seven per cent expect Humphrey to be elected, and two per
cent were undecided.
Ninety-nine per cent of the Republican editors predicted Nixons
election.
The majority. 80 per cent, of the Democratic editors also predicted
Nixons victory. Sixteen per cent chose Humphrey and four percent
were undecided.
Ninety-six per cent of the Independent group believed Nixon will
be president, and four per cent chose Humphrey.
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THE BOGEY MAN Plimpton
3oyd, Roberts 3t
YOU CAN'T KILL THE DREAM (In paper) Sevareid
i
THE AMERICAN JEWS Yaffe
THE COMPLETE BOOK OF SELF DEFENSE Masters
THE HUNDRED YARD WAR Cartwriyht
HIGH PRIEST Leary
FLOATING ISLAND Kimbrough
MARXISM AND CHRISTIANITY Girardi
NIGHT FLIGHT TO HANOI Berrigan
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

r m
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m

NANCY SUE SMITH
... hospital's first patient
additional 290 patient treated in
outpatient clinics.
Over 1,000 babies are born
each year in the Teaching
Hospital, and the emergency
rooiti provides medical attention
for more than 14,000 persons a
year. Every month, over 380

major operations are performed
in the hospital. These patients
come after referral by private
physicians from every section of
the state.
A year before its 10th birthday,
the growing hospital had greeted
its 100,000th patient since
Nancy Sues admission. On its
10th birthday the hospital will
have greeted its 126,500th
patient.
Already plans for expansion
are on the architects drawing
boards.
The names of two men
former UF President J. Hillis
Miller and former State Sen.
William A. Shands are
hallmarks of the years of belief
by numerous men dedicated to
the idea that a medical and
health complex would be
developed at UF.

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Tuesday, October 22.1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 22, 1968

SDS-SSOC
Hold Apolitical
Convention
SDS-SSOC will hold an
apolitical convention Wednesday
at 8 p.m. in McCarty
auditorium.
The purpose of the
convention is to provide
information regarding write-in
votes and the electoral process
to all those who are dissatisfied
with the presidential candidates
in the Nov. 5 election.
A discussion of plans for a
rally to be held election night
including guerrilla theatre will
also be held.
WHATS
HAPPENING
3y DAVID CHAFiN
Alliqator Staff Writai
IN MUCHO PERSONAL
NOTICIAS: The French Club,
which is meeting somewhere in
the Reitz Union at 2 p.m. today.
And, don't give me anymore
press releases in French. If any
Spanish people show up, its
because I cant speak French.
Try Spanish.
IN ROUGHING IT WITH
SMOKEY THE BEAR'S
FRIENDS: The Forestry Club
reverts back to nature at 7 p.m.
when it has a steak fry in the
Austin Cary Forest.
DO NOT PASS GO. DO NOT
COLLECT S2OO. AND BUY
PARK PLACE Dr. C.A.
Mathews speaks o n
'ln t crnatioual FinanceSome
Inherent Dilemmas'' at the
Porpellor Club's meeting at 7:30
p.m. in room .>47 of the
Union-that's tonight.
IN FOl LO W TH E
LEADERS: Savant-UF meets
tonight at 0:45 p.m. in room
150-D o( the Reitz Union.
IN GREEK ROMPINGS:
Delta Sigma Pi meets in rooms
.'6l and 457 of the Union
tonight at 7 p.m.
IN DEMOCRACY FOR
YOUTH: Youth for Collins will
hold a strategy meeting Tuesday
night at 7:30 in room 356 of the
Union.
'Barbarella
Buttons Given
By Alligator
Want a free pass to
Barbarella?
Stop by the Alligator office
and pick up a See Barbarella
Do Her Thing button. An
unidentified Alligator staff
member is handing out passes to
people wearing these buttons
today and tomorrow.
Barbarella is now playing
at the Plaza Theatre.
Eli
" w

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
f \'ATCH this, alf... \
-I'VE TRAINED TM '' T
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Jjfc\ WHEN I WMISTLfc/ J # f coop \
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/ r! > \ M |, LSf v,
-
OF AMERICANS AROUND THE WORLD

Jackies Marriage Mixes Feelings

SKORPIOS. Greece (UPI)
Mr. and Mrs. Aristotle Socrates
Onassis were alone at last
Monday night on the S 3 million
yacht Christina with their 50
crew members, cooks, chefs,
stewards and other attendants.
They were waiting for a gale to
die down so they could leave on
a honeymoon cruise.
Most American service men
interviewed in a spot check
Monday in Saigon said they
approved of Jacqueline
Kennedys marriage to Aristotle
Onassis.
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Its her life, said Sec. 4
Don Kellogg, 20, of Reno, Nev.
I dont see why she shouldnt
marry. Its five years since
President Kennedy was killed.
In Vatican City, Msgr. Fausto
Vallainc, official Vatican
spokesman, said Mrs. Onassis,
the former Mrs. John F.
Kennedy, knowingly violated a
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Ronun Catholic Church law in
marrying a divorced man and is
now cut off from the church
sacraments. He said this was not
automatic excommunication but
is what is termed in Canon law
as an irregular situation.

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The issue centered on
whether Onassis, a member of
the Greek Orthodox Church,
received a church annulment of
his previous marriage to Athina
Livanos before he married Mrs.
Kennedy, a Roman Catholic.



DAVE DAVIS'ANNUAL
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAYS
DISCOUNT OF 3 A GAL FOR TEXACOFIRECHIEF OR
TEXACO SKYCHIEF GASOLINE
ALL DAY WEDNESDAY DISCOUNTS
WHILE THE STYROFOAM SOUL PERFORM IN PERSON WITH THE
THREE MISS UNIROYAL CONTESTANTS AT NEIGHBORHOOD
SERVICE CENTER
ALL DAY THURSDAY DISCOUNTS
J t
AT NEIGHBORHOOD HURRICANE CAR WASH WHILE LISTENING TO THE
SOUNDS OF THE STYROFOAM SOUL AND LOOKING AT OUR THREE
MISS UNIROYAL CONTESTANTS FOR FALL QUARTER 1968.
DISCOUNTS WHERE THE BAND IS !!!
SUPPORT SUPPORT
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Tuesday, October 22. 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. October 22. 1968

EDITORIAL

A Cheering Machine

Cathy Either probably needs medical
attention.
She made the mistake of turning her back
and a machine ran right over her.
The machine was, unlikely though it
seems, the UF cheerleading squad.
Seems Miss Eicher qualified for the squad
in both ability and personality. But she
never got to cheer for the Gators.
Because she just wasn't one of the
machine's interchangeable parts. She isn't in
a sorority. She's not active in a coed
organization. She doesn't know anybody
important.
But she IS a UF coed who thought she
might have something to contribute to other
sudents.
Sorry, Cathy. Life just aint that way.
If you dont believe it, ask Head
Cheerleader Roddy Grubbs, a Theta Chi.
Ask him how it is that the Theta Chis and
the Pi Kappa Alphas have for quite a few
years held appointments to the cheering
squad in a tightly-clenched fist, doling out
positions to friends.
And while youre asking Mr. Head
Cheerleader Grubbs some questions, Cathy,
you might be interested in his answers to
some other questions:
1) Why werent you informed beforehand
when removal proceedings were started
against you by the Cheerleading Board of
Directors?
2) Why was an unauthorized person
permitted to virtually run the hearing,

Vou KNOW
/ tVHV X ALWAYS 1
I FROWN this /
V WAV/ /!m J

"Views

G-Ville Doesn't Stack Up Very High

In the socially retarded city
of Gainesville, one tends to find
all sorts of inuendos that are
rather disparaging.
Recently, the city passed the
open housing law. Immediately,
one apartment owner stated that
she'd rather close than rent to a
hippie. Sort of reverse
discrimination.
But, discrimination doesn't
end with housing. As a Yankee
and proud of it, I find that the
problems with the UF band
playing Dixie" as kind of
immature and childish.
I attended the University of
~Miami (money. G.T.Os and few

Negroes since 5872 is a lot for
tuition) and at every football
game, it was the kids from the
No r * who yelled for Dixie.
At least we have a school
president who believes that there
isnt anything wrong with the
song. If anyone should be
offended, perhaps its the
Yankees from the North. But,
then we invaded the South to go
to college.
Next Monday, pop recording
artist lames Brown is coming to
Citizen's Field for a rock session
of noise and hate. I sort of
wonder why anyone would
come to a place i? he felt he

frequently interrupting what little testimony
you were permitted to give? (That person
happened to be the previous head
cheerleader, Charlie Gore, who also is a
Theta Chi. I
3) Why did Jim Kincaid, also a Theta Chi,
sit in on the hearing in place of the student
body president, who was unfortunately
unable to attend?
4) Why were you told to leave the hearing
after your brief testimony?
5) Why did the rest of the squad suddenly
decide. without a shred of prior evidence of
animosity, that you were incompatible?
On second thought, Cathy, dont bother
asking. Its not likely you'd get an honest
answer anyway. After all, you threw a bunch
of nuts and bolts into a smoothly-running
machine. You are an outsider.
A word for the machine. Cathy is
innocent of any harm done to you. The
Alligator heard of her accident and
contacted her. She started no trouble, nor
does she want any. She only answered
questions. So leave her alone.
A word for the Student Senate, which
charters the cheerleaders. Clean up that
self-perpetuating clique called the
Cheerleaders Board of Directors. Destroy
the machine and get something in that works
efficiently AND fairly.
And a word to the students. Yell a little
louder at the next football game.
After all, machines are hard of hearing.

wasn't wanted. Money? You
bet. Sort of hackneyed to me to
yell discrimination and then take
money for a few hours suffering.
Not very pretty is it.
Then again, discrimination in
the North is far worse than in
the South. Point in fact is New
Yorks Columbia University. The
board of something that buys up
low-cost housing forces poor
tennants to move. They say that
building a bigger university, and
the hogwash that goes with it, is
for the benefit of the
community. Nine-million is a
pretty big community. And.

| The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook
Amwul |
Jfr&r* iV>! ~i' **
Will you tell them to please shut off the blasted TV camera?"
'\v.\\v/V'VV'V*V"V*Y.v.v.v.y.:.v.;.x.y.v.>;.Xi>y>>;<>x :ww>X''V {Alligator Inquizitorj
| 5
£ By LEWIS ROTHLEIN £
:: Hello. How is everybody out there? You people on meal plan arc:*
Sjyou enjoying it? Do you find yourself eating out more? :
£ And speaking of food, heres todays questions: $
:: I. In the Union Board elections, who won vice president? £
£ 2. One of the most talked about movies of the year is :
:: Rosemarys Baby. Who wrote the now-famous novel with i*
:: that name? x
:: 3. In what sport do you associate the following words or £
:|: phrases, and can you give the meaning of each? j
:: a) A service ace
g b) An impost £
c) A rabbit punch £
& d) A birdie
e) The hot corner £
4. Can you name the President of Cuba who fled the country as £
§ Castros forces took over and claimed victory on New Years
§ Day of 1959? y
5. What is Spiro Agnews middle name? :
$ 6. Is it true that Thomas Edisons first comment upon the £
£ success so his light bulb was Socket to me? 5
x Gads. Some answers: :
| 1. The Fantastiks 2. Pete Rose (.335) 3. Arizona, 1912 £
S 4 Through the fog I feel a pain. 5. Mercury, Venus, Earth,:-:
\ Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto. £
§ Examine a bivalve today. i
I V.V.V.V.W.-.V, y v/iwwww Jull'l in^

how many blacks will go to
Columbia?
But, letr return to
Gainesville. The school has made
big strides in intergration.
Afterall, there are two Negroes
on the track squad. Pretty. Very
pretty, but what about the other
Negroes? And, how do they
feel?
Persecution. Oh joy!
Everyone gets that every so
often. Wouldnt Jews feel kind
of stupid going back to Germany
because of what Hitler did? 1
dont think so. But,
discrimination is felt by those of
us from the big cities, excluding
Miami. There isnt much for us

By Jerry Si I berberg

to do (mentally or socially)
not when youre used to going
out on a date at 11 p.m. Yes,
Gainesville is a pretty bad place
to be.
To the country people, this
is probably a pretty big city.
Well, compared to Micanopy, it
would be.
But, how does Gainesville
(with a major university in its
grasp) stack up? Not high. The
city is totally lacking in anything
except post-Civil War ideals.
Heck. Its no place for a Yankee.
Only seven weeks until
graduation. Yankee Doodle
came to town



. o j\mAV In This Issue!
0F PORTENTIOUS
< AViUw / SOCIOLOGICAL IMPACT
\mfri AISO
WITH
\ % / I
"
I m
I L
S Hi
TOO VAEIED
yfC&f ffi'E 10 ENUMERATE!:
sniln l ouS cartoons!!

SSMCOFWGAL HUMORS
*
nafeeb toomen!!
Supplement to the Florida A/Hnatnr



Bah!

Hi, you-all out there in
Hog Town/Gay-ness-ville!
Welcome to the first edition
of the Alligator's new
literary (??) supplement. I
know the name's not too
hot but keep in mind it
wasn't my idea. However, I
trust the young lady on
pages one and eight makes
up for that. She's 42 (years
old, that is) and she
recently escaped from a
nun's convent where she
was up for election as
Mother Superior, and I
must admit she looks like
she might be a pretty
superior mother.
She was born in the
Virgin Islands and swam
here (breast stroke) at a
tender age, where she was
shanghied by two crazed
Armenian dwarfs. They sold
her to a Colonel Claxton
Fruitcake factory where she
worked and made fruitcake
for several years.
With the help of a
Jamaican mulatto she
managed to escape to India.
She studied under (get the
pun) a wise and venerated
holy man of the mysterious

omalley

O'Malley, a man who
bloated, shrank, sagged and
grayed before 50, pulled
along the street wincing as
he hitched his right
shoulder forward. His day
was only an hour and a half
old. His eyelids were partly
glued with dried mucous.
His throat and palate
wanted a drink.
Officer Sandart was
walking his beat so it was
after 8:30 p.m. Libbi's Bar
wasn't open so it was before
9. He pitched into the alley
and threw up.
O'Malley was dirty but
he didn't feel dirty. He was
ugly but he didn't feel that
either. He was old but he
didn't even feel alive. What
he felt was an unpleasant
sourness in the roof of his
mouth and warm sticky
phlegm in his throat. He
wanted a drink.
His foot hit something
and he lurched forward into
an abandoned matress
spring left for the trash
collectors. A hand stuck in
one of the springs. O'Malley
pulled it out. He bled
without feeling or noticing
it. His torn pants were torn
again at the knee. He
mouthed a curse out of
reflex.
"Hey 'Malley, straighten
up."
Gronsky the Fixer stood
by his shop. He knew
O'Malley and had known

Orient for many years and
finally got sick of the whole
thing and came back to the
U.S. Here she was
kidnapped and held for
ransom for eight months,
finally released, and decided
to become a nun. To repeat,
she escaped from the
convent and came to the
Alligator office and asked if
she could be a Gator Girl. I
told her no, but offered her
a better deal. Judge the
results for yourself.
We have some truly fine
material in this first fiasco.
Our main feature, as much
as I hate to admit it, is a
play by David Miller, the
self-styled Egotistic Eugene
lonesco 6f Hog Town. His
play is entitled "Minstrel
Show." Read it. You
probably won't like it.
Smith Kirkpatrick,
whom I won't comment
upon, granted an interview
for our first issue, and he
says quite a few interesting
and significant things. If
you write, you'll learn
something from it.
Appearing with this
madness is a story by James
Cook, the Micky Dolenz of

him for years. Watched him
age day by day. He knew
O'Malley's habits by heart
and was now standing
outside his shop, partly
because evening business
was slow and partly because
he knew that O'Malley
would be coming by.
He didn't feel
responsible for O'Malley.
He didn't even really feel
sorry for O'Malley. He had
seen too many. What he did
feel was kind of curiousity.
He knew that one day
O'Malley wouldn't come
past his shop and when that
happened he would call the
local precinct and have the
police check the alley
behind the Gwinn Family
Theatre where O'Malley
would be covered with rags
and newspaper and he
would, of course, be dead.
Also he wanted to know
when that day was. He
would mark it down:
O'Malley dead February
17th or some such date, and
it would mean something --
he didn't know just what.
O'Malley stopped and
scratched his knee. He
doubled over with pain.
First pain of the day
stomach, need a drink.
Then O'Malley saw his
mark. <
Marvin Williams was
Libbi's bouncer. He was just
over six feet five inches and
weighed about 320 pounds
His skin was brown-yellow

Hog Town. The story is
interesting and reminds one
of early Stephen Crane. It
might not remind you of
anything, though.
You'll find some humor
and good suggestions from
Bruce Hargreaves, His
sparkling dry wit shines
through his smooth
rhythmic technique and is
quite reminiscent of a Doris
Day flick.
"The Real Thing" (to
steal from Henry James)
and the best thing in this
rag is the poetry. If you
don't dig poetry I really
wish you wouldn't read any
of this rag. Seriously. I wish
you would leave Gainesville.
The credits on the back
page aren't really enough
thanks to all the people
who have put this thing
together. A special thanks
to Bob Berrett for his help
with the page lay-out and
paste-up; to Ed Barber for
his skill and knowledge and
excellent efforts; to the
artists and writers and to
Gerry Soud, whose editorial
wisdom guided me from the
woods of stupidity into the
forest of ignorance.

and except for his wide
nose and lips, he looked like
the Korean that kills people
in the movies with a karate
chop to the neck. He knew
it. He sometimes thought
that was why he became a
bouncer. He kept his head
closely shaved. No kinks.
Marvin saw O'Malley
coming and looked inside to
see if Libbi was watching
the sidewalk tables. Marvin
usually let O'Malley take his
first mark and sometimes
his second before he made
him leave. Libbi didn't like
it at all
Marvin tried to figure
out who O'Malley's first
mark would be. It came
down to the boy with the
moustache and his
wide-eyed date or the fat
salesman. The fat salesman
had hard eyes. Maybe not
the salesman. But there was
more change on the table.
Maybe the salesman
anyway.
Ken Sherman was from
Long Island. He had taken
his date to the Village because
he knew his way around
and because, being a naive
chick from the midwest, it
would impress her. When he
saw the old man coming, he
knew there would be
trouble.
The old man's face was
covered with a white
fungus-like growth. His
mouth was bent down at
the corners and he drooled.
His fly was three-quarters
open. His clothes were
filthy and torn, his right
hand was covered with
dried blood, and, goddamn
it, he was coming over to
the table.
O'Malley noticed the

girl's innocence before
anything else. He steered
himself to the table bent
over the low rail end
reached out his hand. He
caressed her cheek. She
didn't move. She looked up
at him. ,
He saw the boy s hand
slide a dime across the
table. He thought of the
drink. Still he hesitated. His
hand beneath her chin.
Another dime slid across
the table. His hand shook.
Slowly he began to reach
for the money. ..
"Why don t you give him
a dollar?" The girl said it.
O'Malley's hand was
shaking uncontrollably.
"Twenty cents is enough
for him. All he wants to do
is go out and get a bottle of
wine."
O'Malleys head was
spinning. Her lips just.
."Lips that touch liquor
shall never. ." his mother
recited. Dead isn't she?Oh 1
yes but. .the mouth.
.smile "Lips that. ."
mother is dead. "He's
already had enough. Why
should I give him a dollar so
he can go out and get. ."
Tears crowded O'Malley's
eyes.
"If you.. .You're up
there so goddam high if you
ever. .on your way down
you'll see a lot of guys like.
. .see what happens you
goddam rich bastard. Yes
that's what I said. 1..
Milinda's eyes were
filling with tears too. She
looked at the wrinkled face
and all of a sudden it
wasn't there. It bobbed
down the street behind the
big colored man who had
his fist clenched around the
old man's belt.
Marvin dragged O'Malley
down the sidewalk, first by
his belt, and then when the
old man stumbled, by his
arm.
That's what you get
thought Marvin, and that's
what you damn well deserve
when you try to give a guy
a break. Libbi had seen it
and she knew that Marvin
hadn't been doing his job.
That much goddam closer
to unemployment. Marvin
left the old man on the
corner. He looked like a pile
of rags. Beside hi nr. was a
broken shopping cart.
O'Malley was crying.
Gregg Sandart was just
finishing his first round.
He d be on the beat until
6:30 a.m. and he'd already
made his first round. Next
round, he thought, I'll take
it easy. No use in rushing
around like a kid. Sandart
was twenty-three.
He saw the old man
sitting on the comer
sobbing. He knew it was
O'Malley before he even
saw his face. He had heard
O'Malley sob often.
Everyone had.
For just a moment, he
was tempted to bring
O'Malley in. Just once
maybe O'Malley could have
something decent to eat, a
warm place to sleep. The
gesture faded. How many
O'Malleys were there? How.
could the city feed, take
care of all of them? Ifallthe
local winos found out

they'd be dying for Sandart
to arrest them. Th ey re
dying anyway, he thought 9
They don't need me. §8
Martin Wilder stood 1
across the street until the |
cop had turned the corner |
and disappeared. Then he I
called to his friends. Th ey I
approached the old man I
slowly and Martin bent 1
down, reaching f or the I
shopping cart. I
"Excuse me sir, I think I
you broke my shoppi na I
cart." y I
"Whaddysay?" o'Mall ey 1
looked perplexed. 1
Martin repeated himself. 1
"I say I think you broke m y I
shopping cart. You reall y 1
ought to pay me for it in I
full."
O'Malley blinked. "I 1
didn't break no cart." j
"Oh but you did sir, You
broke it when you fell
down. I'm afraid I'll have to
demand full restitution or
it's off to see the judge."
His friends started to
laugh. He warned them with
a frown. "However shall I
deliver my papers in the
morning with my new
shopping cart in such a
state?"
"I ain't never seen this
shoppin' cart afore."
"But sir, you must have.
You just broke it." Martin
almost laughed himself.
Ronald Farnsworth
brought his daughter and
his wife to the Village on
their second night in New
York because he wasn't the
stodgey businessman that
others, including his family,
seemed he was. He wanted
to see, and he wanted his
family to see exactly how
things were on the Village
scene." He was a
broad-minded man, a
tolerant man and a liberal
man. And besides, he
thought to himself, it might
be fun.
"Hello there."
"Hi mister. Can you tell
this man that he's got to
pay for the shopping cart
that he just broke?"
"Broke your shopping
cart, huh? Looks like it's
been run over by a car..."
Then he saw it. They were
kidding. He began to laugh
a warm, good-humored
laugh.
His wife began to laugh.
His daughter started
giggling.
The boys broke into
smiles. Then they started
laughing too..
O'Malley struggled with
thought. It was a...ahh... a
joke. A joke. Only a joke.
The man struck forth his
hand-"Hi I'm Ronald
Farnsworth from
Seattle-real estate..." Just a
joke...shaking the man's
hand... hand on his
shoulder... ..
O'Malley began to smile.
Just a joke. He straightened
up. "Darned if I'll pay for
no cart" He was smiling.
The man was laughing the
woman was laughing the girl
was laughing..the boys were
laughing. And it rose. From
inside.
O'Malley began to laugh.
He laughed until it hurt.
He laughed 'til he cried.
JAMES COOK



1 f e lT I

If you get to know him well
enough you call him Kirk or Smith.
Such familiarity with the man, as
trivial as it may seem, has to make
you feel pretty good, like if you're
friends with a writer, you'll someday
become a good writer too. The
man/writer/professor is Martin Smith
Kirkpatrick, the slim elusive figure
who teaches creative writing here at
the university.
Kirkpatrick holds degrees in
journalism and English from the UF,
which hired him on in 1956.
Kirkpatrick has one of those "ideal
writer's backgrounds," to whit,
running away from home to go to sea.
As a boy in Paris, Arkansas, he
worked at menial jobs to keep himself
in school clothes and supplies: he
picked cotton, mowed lawns, jerked
sodas.
When he finished high school he
ran away from home and shipped out
with the Merchant Marine and worked
as a seaman in the South American
trade. A year passed before they
caught up with him.
He began college in Arkansas, but
this was interrupted by the outbreak
of WW 11. It was back into the
Merchant Marine for a year, then he
joined the Navy and flew torpedo
planes. After the war, Kirkpatrick
returned to college but again left for
the Navy and his beloved sea during
the Korean conflict. He was medically
discharged from the Navy soon after
and, on his doctor's advice, came to
Florida and, more specifically, to the
UF, having first made sure that the
university had "something in the line
of creative writing."
"Before / got to Gainesville I
thought it was a city on the outskirt $
of Miami," Kirkpatrick said. "You can
imagine my surprise."
The creative writing course, which
could almost be considered a separate
college at the UF, was brought to life
in 1948 by Andrew Lytle, now the
editor of the "Suwanee Review.'
During the intervening two decades
the course has produced 20 novels ano

A Modest Proposal'. "Do You or Dont You ?

The current date crisis at the UF is
reaching alarming proportions.
Campus males are losing teeth, fingers
and egos at a steadily increasing rate.
The only solution appears to be an
idea formulated during a moment of
crisis.
Bluntly stated, the solution to all
the woes that plague the campus male
is for UF coeds to reveal their position
on love as one of "I Do" or "I Don't."
The Florida coed would be
required to carry identification at all
times with the words "I Do" or "I
Don't" clearly visible on her person.
Since this solution omits one
important item (i.e., how many "I
Do's" and "I Don't's" there are on
campus) I further suggest proper
identification to begin in high school.

countless short stories published by
students and former students of the
course.
Kirkpatrick has published
numerous short stories, the latest of
which is "Silence," appearing in the
"Southern Review." He also has an
article on Eudora We/ty coming out in
the winter issue of the "Suwanee
Review" and is currently working on a
novel based upon his experiences in
the Merchant Marine and, of course,
the sea. Kirkpatrick was interviewed
in his office, where he leaned back in
his chair, placed his hands behind his
head, talked slowly and deliberated
over each question: his typical
manner.
\
What is the main responsibility of
the writer? That is, is it to satisfy an
inner desire or is it to satisfy his
audience, or both?
Kirkpatrick: Both of these things.
Most of the people I know end up
feeling guilty if they don't go to the
typewriter. They have something they
have to do. There is a need to hold
high communion with another human
being. He wants to release some vision
of what the reality of the world is as
he sees it. He wants to use that
creative part of himself, as we all do.
We all want to use our creative
selves. There is excitement to it. I can
get so high when I'm writing and I'm
making discoveries with the thing I'm
working with I can get so high I can
stay a foot off the ground. When I
make discoveries about myself, the
art, what I'm doing all of these
things happening simultaneously it's
almost like you're sitting there hearing
voices in your head, seeing scenes.
Almost a formal hallucination.
After a prolonged session of
writing you can sometimes walk
outside and see cars riding down the
street and that doesn't seem to be the
real world the real one seems to be
the one you left back in the room. It
takes a while to make the
readjustment. Writing is one of the
few things in which you can use all of
yourself: your past life, everything
you know you bring it all to bear
on the work nothing is wasted.

Each incoming female freshman
would be required to identify herself
on her admission application.
Once all the female applications
and acceptances have been processed
by the registrar, they would be sent to
the computer center to be tabulated.
Once tabulated, the results would be
published in the "Alligator," the
student handbook, the Otter Creek
phone book, the UF Police
Department's instruction manual and
"Playboy."
To check up on his Saturday night
blind date a student would simply
look up his date's name; for example,
Emely Endomorph, and next to
Endormorph would be the initials
"1.D." (I Do) or "1.D.N." (I Don't).
Now if he feels like going with a

What authors should be studied by
aspiring writers for purposes of
learning technique?
Kirkpatrick: Study a good
craftsman as well as the singers. That
is, study Chekov, Faulkner and Welty
for the craft and study Thomas Wolfe
for the song of writing.
Who is your favorite poet?
Kirkpatrick: I like Dylan Thomas
very much. Students think of him as a
singer with no craft. He puts flesh on
the bones so well that students usually
fail to understand that there is a
structure there.
Can you draw any specific
similarities between art and writing;
that is, art in the sense of painting?
Kirkpatrick: They both have to be
interested and involved in the world.
Faulkner wanted first to be a painter
and T'm told a story by a professor
here: the professor went hunting with
Faulkner once and later on he read a
story that mentioned the trip and
Faulkner would make him see the trip
more sharply than he saw it with his
own eyes. The writer paints with
words and the painter with paint. It is
by the senses that all of us know the
body of the world and it is through
the senses that the writer evokes the
body of the world to the reader.
Do you think this generation has
any writers now who are or will be as
great as those writers in the post-war
era, such as Joyce, Pound or
Hemingway?
Kirkpatrick: At a time of social
upheaval, when the conventions,
customs and traditions of a society are
undergoing a great or fast change, it is
the perfect moment to look both
ways: to look back and see what those
things really were and to look forward
and see what is to come. People are
almost forced to investigate their
worlds.
I think this is one reason that the
South in the first half of the century
produced so many artists. The old
ways of the South were at last
changing and the South was moving

prude, he hauls over to Emily
Endomorph's pad for a delightful
evening of reading John Dryden or
hits the Reitz Union by himself for a
spicy movie.
The first few weeks on campus
would be of endless nihilism.
Neurosis, ulcers and lost egos would
become a thing of the past. The
annual Sigma Chi Derby would be
replaced in popularity by the annual
"Do's and Don'ts Derby." The top ten
"I Do's" would surpass the football
polls. For that matter the worst ten "I
Don't's" would be more popular than
the top ten "I Do's" and more
informative, too.
Os course, this solution has its
practical limitations ~ like the D.A.R.,

the Cc.;npus Thing,

into the industrial. Certainly that was
very close to Faulkner's subject. He
was talking of the replacement of the
word "honor with the word
"respectability, and "respectability
is a businessman's word. The present
times should produce artists. We'll
have to wait 15 to 20 years to see
what it did produce. It is the perfect
moment to produce great writers.
Who do you think is the best living
writer around today?
Kirkpatrick: I don't read many
writers who are around now. I'm still
in love with EudoraWelty. I guess I'm
studying her. Faulkner so
overpowered everybody that even
such a brilliant artist such as Flannery
O'Conner called herself "a caboose
hitched to the Dixie Express.
My final question: do you think
the art of writing creatively can be
taught in a university?
Kirkpatrick: You can't create
talent. Talent is only the beginning.
You can't teach someone to be an
artist, but you can save the student
time. Craft is involved in the art of
writing just as it is involved in music,
architecture and painting. Form can
be taught, although it is possible for
the student to learn it on his own, but
that is a long and dangerous journey.
Art, by its nature, is communal,
and for that reason we have a
tradition of a community of artists,
whether it is that group gathering in
the '2o's in Paris and reading for each
other, or whether in New York or
whether it is just Sherwood Anderson
with Faulkner following him around
in New Orleans.
The master/apprentice relationship
has existed in art for as long as I
know. Now that relationship is a little
more formalized in the universities.
Pound was one of the great teachers
of our time. Read Chekov's "Letters;
he was always concerned with young
artists and reading their works and
trying to teach them at the great
disadvantage by letter.
ALLEN PIERLEONI

George Wallace and Dean Cosby. But
I'm sure after a trial basis the solution
would become a Florida institution.
Sororities could hold annual I Do"
contests with funds from SDS. Banner
headlines would read: "Tri-Delts
Do-lt-Again." United Fund decals
would become popular again also.
The final success for this solution
would rest with the Florida male.
Would he be satisfied if the formal
courtship, challenge and excitement
of making a broad were removed? Just
remember what Confucious said in
5,000 8.C.: "Sometimes they do,
sometimes they don't, but only
because you won't."
BRUCE HARGREAVES

Page 3



WMINSTREL SHOTO

Ad One
There are two settings on stage. On
the left rear of the stage is a large
mural of a paddle-boat in a river.
Directly in front of this mural, four
Negroes, the ages of which are
irrelevant, sit and stand on a
green-painted semi-stage. One holds in
his hands a harmonica, another a
banjo; all are dad in overalls and are
barefoot. They are nearly perpetually
smiling, seemingly convinced that
social ignorance is bliss. They are,
therefore, nearly perpetually
displaying four f/assy sets of
pearly-white teeth. They generally
take life easy, though at times they
liltingly sing and dance; in this way
they show themselves to be sometimes
lazy and at other times possessing an
innate sense of rhythm.
The right hand side of the stage is
conspicuously drab; the color of the
mural extends only to the middle of
the stage, as does the green paint
perpendicular to the mural. There are
a few battered items of furniture: a
chair, a table, a radio, perhaps a few
other items that a director might
deem apropos. On the chair sits a
single Negro, a solitary, but not
invisible, man. His mood is
considerably more somber than that
of his four literally left-wing brethren
Though the one and the four occupy
the same stage, they do not
communicate, integrate or assimilate.
Though the appearances of the dual
settings might lead one to believe that
a century separates the two
semi-stages, the author is making no
effort to separate the two
chronologically. It is, instead, for the
audience to decide exactly what
constitutes the truth. The author is
here presenting a rent fable, and it is
the responsibility (if, indeed, modern
man is capable of assuming such a
phantom) of the audience to ascertain
a conclusion, a moral, and a resolve
for the ringing out of the new.
The Negroes on the left are
numbered 1 through 4, beginning with
the figure farthest left and continuing
to the right the numeration in this
instance is not terribly essential, since

1 / |; aM W Wf jUb£ 'W
% .- I I | fl ffl Iff

The Campus Thing,
k / . > f 4

Page 4

the participants, of necessity, look
alike. The soul on the right is
appropriately numbered 5. The
dialogue begins with the four on the
left.
1: Lawd, arnt't it hot? (Flashes
bright, white smile)
2: Sho' 'nuff. Sho' is hot (Flashes
similar smile)
5: (Staring blankly straight ahead)
Heat. damned heat.. The only
prospect for the whole damn summer.
(Disdainfully) "Oppressive"! Is that
what they call it? Hell, the whole
system's oppressive! Always has been.
3: Yassuh, ah 'gree it's awful hot,
but we sho' got lots to be glad 'bout
(Numbers 1,2, and 4 nod their heads
affirmatively). The plantation's been
awful good to us. Slavery's been awful
good to us.
4: (With deep voice) Amen. Amen,
brother.
5: It hasn't ended; they're still
perpetuating and perpetrating the
system. They've kept us in shackles,
justchangingthem from physical chains
to economic ones. They've taken away
our rpanhood, giving us a hollow,
futile "freedom," or whatever they
call what they dish out.
1: We's sho' happy, brothers. Ah
kin think o' nothin' we could want.
We's sho' happy as can be he'pin'
white folks. Lawd knows they's been
good to us.
2: Why, they's given us all we
wants in life. We pick cotton, raise
their chillun, an' sing an' dance.
5: They abolished our bondage, so
they robbed us of our strength.
3: Tha's right. We all like a fam'ly,
us n' the white folks. They treats us
like chillun, an' we treat them like
masters.
5: They took away our souls!
(Glances up at ceiling)
4: There's much we got to be
thankful fo', brothers. Our lives is
filled with joy. Joy, joy we darkies
wants to sit back and' bask in the
wunnerful warmth o' the politics o'
joy.
5: (Raises two clenched fists) GOD
DAMN IT! (Number 1 raises the
harmonica to face level; number 2
does the same with the banjo)

4: Tell ya what, brothers: le's
shovv our satisfaction an' JOY by
exhibitin' some o' our innate rhythm!
1,2, and 3: Amen, brother. Hot
damn!
(Numbers 1 and 2 begin to play
"Camptown Races;" 3 and 4 sing and
dap their hands)
5: (Lowers head, speaks
progressively more slowly) I am a
man. I am... a man. I am a

Act Two

A blonde, blue-eyed young lady,
depicting a Southern Antebellum
Belle, wearing a full-length
appropriate dress and holding a fan in
her right hand, walks slowly across the
stage followed by two barefoot
Negroes in bluejeans.
BELLE: I'm sorry to interrupt
your intermission, but this is a rather
short play, and the author thought
you wouldn't mind. Besides, he
wished me to relate a message to you
(Clears her throat). The author of this
deceptively ambivalent play wishes to
thank the Congress and people of the
U.S. of A. for perpetuating an
atmosphere without which this play
would be unnecessary. Since our
nation-society-community seems
intent upon dividing itself against
itself, the opportunity for this
bicameral drama has presented itself.
The audience ---- you, that is -is or
are not selecting either a burning lady
or a tiger at the gates. You may
choose the plot and the happy or
unhappy ending you prefer. The
playwright has been generous enough
to afford you that privilege. This is
not theatre of the dada, for there is
reality in these lines it merely has
to be perceived. But enough of these
tidings. The flunkeys must be heard
(Turns to one of blue-jeaned
attendants). Rastus, would you please
read and explain the poem you
extracted from the anthology of

"My mother bore me in the southern
wild.
And I am black, but 0! my soul is
white;
White as an angel is the English child
But I am black, as if bereaved of light.
"My mother taught me underneath a
tree.
And sitting down before the heat of
day.
She took me on her lap and kissed me,
And pointing to the east, began to
say:
" 'Look on the rising sun: there God
does live.
And gives his light, and gives his heat

Act Three
The setting is the same as in Act !,
bipartite and pentablack. No.
5 turns on the radio.
VOICE ON RADIO: (Singing) Tell
it like it is .
5: (Turns the radio off) That's
good advice, brother Aaron, but how
many children of the Lord or de Lawd
will take heed? And that, perhaps, it
the hell of it: we're all so damn lost in
our fantasies, trapped by our images,
that we are false to our own selves and
to others. And we lie between
clenched teeth and fists and wonder
why the stage-world produces
unhappy endings when we open our
eyes to take a breath.
(Sighs. Pauses for six seconds, then
grimaces and pounds his right fist into
his left palm. THE BOSS, the
only male Caucasian in tie play, walks
i. i ij 11

away;
And flowers and trees and beast and
men receive
Comfort in morning, joy ; n the
noonday.
" 'And we are put on earth a little
space,
That we may learn to bear the beams
of love;
And these black bodies and this
sunburned face
Is but a cloud, and like a shady grove.
'For when our souls have learned
the heat to bear.
The cloud will vanish; we shall hear
his voice.
Saying "Come out from the grove, my

... man ..
(His voice trails off, and, and the
first act draws to a dose, his lips
move, but the audience is unable to
hear his words. Numbers 1,2, 3, and 4
finish their song and bow to the
audience. The audience applauds. Six
actors, planted in the audience by the
director, give the four a standing
ovation)

Western white literature?
(He steps forward; she steps back)
RASTUS: (Produces poem from his
blue-jeans, addresses audience)
(Throws the paper down upon the
stage, angrily)
William Blake! He creates a lyrical
world of tygers and lambs, then
introduces to it a house nigger! And
that's not an atypical attitude: the
black man waits on whitey hand and
foot, hoping that the fair-haired,
fair-skinned one will be so kind as to
paternally pat him on his kinky head!
Condesenscion! Blake thought, I'm
sure, that he was treating his black
boy as well as he treated Job or Dante
or Tizrah, but he indeed mocked him.
And condesenscion, the most
oft-invoked white weapon, is just the
thing they can't see but we sure as
hell can see it! They want us to weep
for our blackness and pray for
milk-and-honey assimilation. But we
have found a new pride in blackness;
to us it is a pitiable quality. .it's a
badge! We shall NOT trance-like walk
the night, trying to wash the melanin
from our hands; we shall praise, not
curse, our darkness, (pauses). What's
the matter, onlookers? Do you expect
me to whine and grovel and shuffle to
your hard hearts' content? No that
day is gone, thank God. Today.. .but,
then again, you have never seen the
aftermath of (raises a clenched right
fist in a half-defiant, half-triumphant
gesture).. .a dream deferred!
(Each character stays in his place,
motionless)

love and care.
And round my golden tent like lambs
rejoice."
'Thus did my mother say, and kissed
me;
And thus I say to little English boy
When I from black and he from white
cloud free.
And round the tent of God like lambs
we joy,
"I'll shade him from the heat, till he
can bear
To lean in joy upon our father's knee;
And then I'll stand and stroke his
silver hair.
And be like him, and he will then love

me.

onto the stage from the left. THE
BOSS is attired in the garb of an
officer in the Army of the
Confederate States of America; he is
cradling a watermelon in his arms.
Noticing this stapel, numbers 1
through 4 rhythmically spring to their
feet)
1: Hot damn!
3: Glory be, a watuhmel'n!
4: (Claps his hands) Merc'ful
Lawd: Ah DO declare ah'm gwine
Dray to hebben fo' de Boss tonight.
(All four reach out tor the
watermelon, but THE BOSS shakes
his head negatively, an aristocratic
smile upon his face)
THE BOSS: Now, boys and ah
DO mean"boys'' y'all bettuh wait
a spell before indulging yourselves.
Ah'll be back in a little while to give
y'all some knahves course, ah
don't want y'all to CUT yourselves
(Chuckles slightly). Ah'll let y'all
touch this valu'ble fruit, howevuh.
4 * <



(Passes the watermelon around;
each of the four grabs, hugs, and
kisses the fruit, then passes it on with
a sigh. When no. 4 gives it to THE
BOSS, the latter places it upon the
stage near his feet, then resumes his
speech)
Now boys, ah'm gonna let y'all
e-VEN-tu'ly get to eat your favorite
food, the succulent watermelon, but
first ah've gotta give y'all a little
lecture here on the importance of our
relationship, a very fine master-pet
relationship.
4: feaches out, wraps his arms
around THE BOSS' ankles
imploringly) Oh, DO tell, please,
boss! f
THE BOSS: (Pats no. 4 on the
head as no. 4 beamingly releases his
grip and stares in the same manner as
the other three) There, there, no need
to display your emotions so
vividly. (To all four) First, boys, y'all
got to STAY-1 N-YOUR-PLACE! Ah
can't be more emphatic 'bout this:
Stay in your place, and we'll surely
get along peacefully.
4: (Places his hands upon chest,
raises eyes to sky) A-men!
1: (Looks first at no. 4, then at
THE BOSS) But, Boss what IS our
place?
THE BOSS: (Surprised that one of
his pets should question him; not
quite sure how to answer) Hmmm.
That's kind of hard to define.
(Scratches his head with his right
hand) That's a good question.
5: (Rises stridently from his
place) So nice of our society to
provide me with a PLACE with a
PLACE in life! Only.. I'm not to
leave my airtight, stereotyped cubicle
at the botton of the heap!
Takes two steps forward. The lights
focus on him alone; the other half of
the stage is blacked out)
The rest of them (looks about
himself, /?? if to see those about whom
he is speaking)., they don't know I
exist: they're oblivious to my slow
psychological death. But, of course,
this is the star-spangled way, the
habit of a pygmy people
ever-ready to cough up their poison.
And the hell of it is no one wants to
open his eyes to the filthy spectre of
an Afro-American tragedy, the killing
of the dream. You want to pretend
I'm non-existent, don't you? I'm a
phantom in your unseeing eyes, an
invisible spook. Invisible ... Now as
then you accept me only as an
abstraction, whisking me away into
the dank closet of your mind, where I
rattle dem bones in dark oblivion. But
never, damn it, never'will you deign to
look at me when you blithely speak; it
seems that you can't bear to see the
cat with the hoe (pauses, slowly losing
patience with the altogether innocent
audience). LOOK AT ME, DAMN IT,
I'M BLACK! Look at this skin, it's
not gonna rinse white bdfore your
very eyes!
It's black, baby, and the miracle of
melanin has left its ever-lasting mark
on me. It's cemented me in the caste
system that envelops my life-long
environment. I can't do a thing
without being spitefully reminded
that I'm no more than 3/5 of a man
(pauses). You know, years ago I
prayed, prayed night after night that
my blackness might somehow be
cured. Because everything about me
indicated that this unseemly pigment
was a curse. But I found that it
wouldn't work; the tar baby's coat
remained and branded him for the rest
of his unnatural life (pauses). And I
didn't know just what to do (pauses).
And I still don't (pauses). The bitter
cat who burns his buildings draws the
headlines and the infame, but I, like
most, didn't have the energy to react

in that way. My tragedy, like Hedda
Gabler s, is that I and so many others
continue to exist without dramatics. I
whimper through all acts and ages, not
just at the end. And so I have died
inwardly, cast adrift on a slow boat to
Byzantium (his speech becomes
slower, more resigned). Only
occasionally have I raged against my
dying or tried to light my way
through the blight that covers me; for
the most part I've been mastered by
my fate, attempting in vain to assert
my pride. Today. .. today what am I?
I am Manchild Harold on a pilgrimage
to the promised land but destined to
end in despair. The American Dream,
I am sorry to relate, is a Big Lie; the
masses are still wretched, and some of
them not I are tired, tired of their
lot and... but you have seen their
rebuttal to the dream, haven't you?
(pauses) Haven't you?
(After looking imploringly at tne
audience for ten seconds, he bows his
black head sheepishly. This half of the
stage is pitched into darkness; the
other half of the stage is lighted)
THE BOSS: Anyway, boys if y'all
will just be good darkies and stay in
your place and say "yassuh" or
"nossuh" and respect the vast
difference between the aristocracy
which I represent and the
God-ordained slave class of which y'all
are a part, then, boys, we-all will be so
kind as to smile sweetly at y'all, pat
your sweat-laden backs ever so
politely, and give y'all ample
opportunity in the way of intervals
between chores to rejoice in your
beloved singing and dancing, which
your savage race seems so happy at
practicing.
1: Oh, Boss, ah prays that ah may
alius have yo' standin' ovuh me, whip
in han' to guide me 'long the path o'
right'ness.
2: If'n ah kin 'member mah place
in life n' nebber stray f'om it, why,
then ah'll be the mos' happiest, mos'
joyfullest darkey in the whole, wide,
wunnerful world.
3 and 4: (down on one knee, hands
raised) A men!
THE BOSS: Y'know, boys, the
Haitians that's one island where
niggers really abound they have a
story they tell about the creation of
the races, which, as we all know, was
brought about by the Lord God so
that He might create everyone equal,
even though so many races are
inferior. Anyway, it seems that the
Lord asked the white man, "What do
you desire on earth?" And the
superior white man replied, "I wish to
have dominion over all the earth's
creatures." And the Lord asked the
wretched mu-L AT-to the same
question, and he replied, "I wish to
help the white man." And the Lord
asked the question of the lowly black
savage, and he paused and looked at
the other two and shrugged his
shoulders and said, "I just came along
with these two fellows" (pauses).
Well, that's enough philosophy for
now, boys, Tell y' what, ah've got
something here ah thought y'all might
like (reaches into pocket, produces
pair of dice). Look here, boys
gotcha some dice.
(The eyes of numbers 1,2, 3 and 4
pop nearly out of their respective
sockets)
1: Lookit dem bones!
2: Lawdy, lawdy!
3: Merc'ful hebben, lookit dem
bones!
4: Yassuh, dem sho's fine bones!
THE BOSS: (places dice in hand of
no. 1) Here, boys, take these beauties
and roll to your hearts' content. (All
four go on their knees. No. 1 rubs the
dice with his palms). Some people say
ah.should treat y'all like grown-up

men, but ah know differently, boys.
Ah know that THIS is what y'all truly
want. Ain't that right, boys?
1: Oh, Boss, yo's SO good to us!
2, 3 and 4: A-----men!
1: (Still rubbing dice) Come on
hebben, give me a sebben.
2: Eightuh f'om Decatur; show me
dem fo's.
(No. 1 rolls the dice, shouting,
"Go, sebben!" The curtain falls before
the result is ascertained)
Act Four
The setting is the same. No. 5 is
again seated near the radio. On the
other half of the stage THE BOSS is
standing to the immediate left of
numbers 1,2, 3 and 4, who are
squatting in a duster.
THE BOSS: Boys, ah can't tell y'all
how much enjoyment ah've derived
from our mutually beneficial
relationship. Ah sincerely hope that
y'all won't do something rash an'
foolish, like maybe get uppity and
rebel against me and the beneficial
slavery system.
1: Oh, no, Boss, why all ah wants
in life is t' be good t' yo', mah Boss
'cause ah knows that if'n ah do that,
then ah'm sho' gwine go t' hebben.
4: (singing) All God's slave chillun
gwine go. . to hebben!
2 and 3: Halleluiah!
THE BOSS: No, boys, ah'm afraid
that y'all wyi someday follow a drum
beat different from that of your own
precious natural rhythm and be led
astray to seek a life of trouble-making
and demonstrating.
1: (With a great deal of worry in
his voice) No Boss, no; don't ebber set
me free!
2: No, Boss, no! (No. 5 turns radio
on)
VOICE ON RADIO: (singing) Born
free... (No. 5 springs to his feet,
picks up the radio, and throws it
down, smashing it)
5: But I'm still in CHAINS, damn
it! The system has still manacled me,
mauled me and kept me unripe. The
obvious has been progressively
replaced by the sleightly insidious; it
takes more cunning nowadays to put
me down. De Lawd has looked the
other way while de facto multiplied
and became fruitful, (pauses). And do
you consider yourselves blameless,
because you haven't directly
constructed the divided house that 1
now crumbles and burns amidst the
rabble rebels' hosannas? You're
squirming, I take it! Yes, because you 1
know you're guilty all of us are 1
irremediably guilty yes.
I who have been wronged have
wronged others in this regard you
practiced your self-deception without
even self-confession and absolved
yourselves and adorned yourselves and
then turned to one another and asked
why the diseased system had failed!
(pauses; is calmer and quieter upon
resumption of speech) And I could
have -- COULD have but didn't I
could have done something on my
own, I was physically and
theoretically capable of quite a lot.
But.. I was pronounced dead on
denial by my psyche, whose scars
convinced me that I'd failed to survive
the operation to remove the stigma
from my skin. And, because none but
the lonely dark realized the mental
catastrophe that visited me in a lesser
form that most, I sympathized with
myself and benevolently forgot that
my faults somehow existed., (pauses).
And I developed a super-cynicism that
my paternal Great White Fathers

could nu for the life -or death of
them detect (pauses) My father, like
his father, effected a servile demeanor,
and they chuckled at his pearly
delightful smile and proclaimed him
to be a good nigger. But they never
knew how much he hated them 'cause
they didn't know how black souls
operate; all they heard was the steady
Uncle Tom-Tom beat, not the cruel,
hard heart. They never knew how
much the bigoted old man was
stooping in order to survive. Me? I
don't know, I kinda drift between
calm resignation and sporadic bursts
of bitterness, though, it must be said,
I've turned on the destruction
potential.
THE BOSS: Boys, I'm very much
afraid that outside agitators will stir
up vicious, hateful passions in you
5: It's there, it's been simmering
there all along. Rage and bitterness,'
bitterness and rage.
THE BOSS: lncite you to lash
out at the folks who've treated y'all
best all along. These furriners might
take meek servants like y'all and
change then into uppity
revuhlut'aries.
5: You don't know what's
happening, do you? You don't want
to look under my skin to see the
boiling refuse of the melting pot.
1: No, Boss, we jes' humble,
hard-workin' darkies who knows how
good out Boss is to us all.
5: I've been castrated and
dehumanized, kicked and spat upon
by this insane society. I can, if I so
desire, work to finally destroy the
system that denied me my manhood
and my birth rights. But I have
perhaps a sliver of cynic's faith in this
more imperfect union of ours. Perhaps
men of, pardon the expression, good
faith will, after all, construct a new,
more equitable system. I sure as hell
won't carry the torch that ignites this
one though the temptation is
certainly great. Right now I'm too
busy convincing myself that I exist,
which is something you people might
not believe.
2: Oh, Boss, we is truly the mos'
finest rep'sennative of our people; we
is real, GEN-u-ine darkies, an' there
ain't no other kind of us in the world.
5: (smiling) I believe I am
flesh. . and. . blood. .
and... and... (momentarily has
trouble finishing sentence)
3: We \s the true darkies, an' we
ain't nebber gwine give up our
wunnerful chains.
5: (raises clenched right fist, with
determination) lam -a MAN!
4: (raises hands) A- men!
(Darkness. After ten seconds of
darkness, the curtain falls for the last
time.)
DAVID MILLS*
The m
End Wf

The Campus Thing, I

Page 5



So quiet the way she says hello,
whispering gently and sweetly,
you often wonder if she has spoken at all.
A small gold bracelet on her wrist,
a white ribbon in her tumbling black hair
all falling down around her shoulder.
A pink floral dress captures the grace
of her small figure.
Nothing so beautiful than her slight
figure and cold black hair against
the white sheets of her bed,
all pictured in my mind.
Those quiet little sounds of her sleep
and the lovely rustlings and turns.
Eyes look up in silent anticipation,
quick to smile yet fast to fade.
She studies the time with her head
tilted to one side, eager, happy, trusting.
Where did she obtain so much faith
in today and tomorrow?

Carefully putting a strand of hair behind an ear.
All I can see is her sleeping
in quiet sure security.
A beautiful smile and tiny fingers
which turn studies pages and close a finished book,
never to be opened again.
Barry Girouard J',
m
y/A
My window
is just a little window. /A
Five hands high and //yy
three hands wide. ///
That's my window. ////
That's my world.
"Mama, sugar's been spilled in the air. N ~ =
I can tell by the smell.
Smells sweet 'n good.
Like the spice there on the shelf.
Now, who'd you suppose would
spill sugar in the air, Mama?
Maybe it came from one of those roarin' sounds overhead.
Spilled on purpose, I bet,

to sugar and sweeten the ground.
Don't you s'pose, Mama, that's what it's for,
to make everybody sweet 'n nice and fair?"
"Hush your foolishness, Child."
Hm, short green grass 'n
tall green trees
that must be
'cause that's what I hear
a rustlin' in the breeze.
"Trees are restless tonight, Mama.
Hear 'em talkin', wantin' to go.
Why don't they go, Mama?
Why do they stay?
I know.
Breeze is cool and feels good to touch.
Breeze touches 'em and begs 'em to come.
Trees talk it over and decide not to
'cause probably they have mamas to mind also."
What's that I hear?
"Why, it's music and hummin', Mama.
Must be a parade or circus in town.
I say it's a circus 'cause
hear the rollin' of the wheels and
throaty sounds like animals.
Listen to the elephants walkin', Mama.
Hear the horns and drums.
Wait!
I hear motors and splashin'.
Maybe it's boats on the lake
a rollin' along,
high on the waves 'n
cornin' down with a crashin' thud,
crashin' thud, crashin' thud.
Wouldn't it be fun to go on a
crashin' thud boat ridel
I'd be sure to hold on, Mama,
I'd be sure to hold to."
I heard another crashin' thud just then,
Mama's iron against the floor.
"Enough is enough. Child, and
I said enough!"

The yellow walls
don't got no bawls
they never cry, that is.
And if prurient interest
therein were stirred,
what more can I say
and get away with/out your
blushing giggle and lecherous sneer?
Simple.
It can't be done.
Coitus!
John Parker

AjtimMrsEJ** * a
MV Sfl|^^V
mm
xmm
ftWL

"But Mama!
You just come here and smell,
peanuts, popcorn 'n cotton candy.
That's what the circus smells like.
Like that 'n animals
like elephants, lions 'n tigers.
I know that's what it is, Mama,
I just know."
"Shut up and come away from that
damn window!
Ain't you got nothin' better to do
than stand in front of
that window and waste the day away?"
I reached my fingers around the
window's wooden wedges and
hung on tight.
They took away everything else
but ain't no one gonna take away my window!
"Why, Mama!
If my fingers and toes were just a
little longer, I could touch the
tip of the lake.
I bet it's smooth and glassy
just like the table top.
Smooth to touch
whether finger or toe.
And what about the
sky, Mama?
It's big and blue, ain't it?
I bet nobody's ever
seen such a big bunch of blue before.
I wish that...
I felt Mama's fingernails
scrunch into my shoulders.
Mama was perplexed.
I really didn't care
but I really wish she wouldn't get so.
Mama's the only one
I got to talk to
but she won't never listen.

A ~
in the tub
splashing water
mushroom clouds;
soap squirts
through my hand, k
torpedoes my big toe,
glides
over my legs
bumps into my navel,
over the corrugated sides
onto the floor
in linoleum puddles.
Mother yells
for me
to get the hell out
of the tub so
the dog can take a bath.
Bob Sokol
I hear her softly crying
in her room all alone
in a little while she'll stop
then I'll go up and say "I'm home."
Marion DiMaggio
"Now, listen here,
you little Miss Prissy, you.
If you don't stop talkin' this
foolish nonsense
I'm gonna send you to the
state nut house,
and there the windows
got bars on 'em.
You really want to know
what's out that window?
Well, I'll tell you.
Those grass and trees
you talk about
is nothin' but cement and brick of
an alleyway.
And the smell
is nothin' but the
stench of month-old garbage
layin' down there.
And the music you talk so
about is nothin' but street sounds,
people in their machines
whishin' by
not lookin' on either side,
not carin' about nobody.
You neither, for that matter.
The only water down there is the
spit from those foul-mouthed neighbors.
And another thing,
it's nowheres near night time
and it's hot and stinkin' up here.
You always been blind an'
you always will be.
So you got no right makin' up
stories about things
you can't even see!
I want you to stop all
this stupid talk,
you hear?
Oh, hell!
Benjy's awake.
Go get him.
Kids'll be home from school
soon
and your pa'll be here too.
Oh, Lord, it's Hriday.
God have mercy on us when he does come!
I said fetch Benjy!"
0
I felt the back of
Mama's hand against my face.
It stung.
Yeah, it was true.
I'm blind and can't see
but I don't know what
she's so huffy about
'cause neither can she.
Frances E. Sokol



Odd
that I should feel
T oon't know you
anymore
the way you avoid my eyes
and turn your head

when I speak to you
it seems so unfamiliar
not like before.
Strange
that I can no longer know your thouqhts
only guess at them
and speculate
at your secrecy.

I feel so distant from you,
when you sit there like that
so quiet;
not speaking or looking
an embarrassed sort of withdrawal,
alien and frightening me.

I stood beneath the Tower of Arcillon
last night,
and watched the misty streets
with fearful eyes
and quickening breath.
fVioonlight flickered and shifted
between the lattice branches
of ancient foreign trees,
and beneath the Arcillon
the shadows lurked, unseen but felt.
Here an old man approached;
Sir, if you will. .
what time is it. . what year?"
IVoonlit shadows danced
as ghosts on Grecian streets,
and the moon crawled higher
in unlighted skies.

Well, when I was twenty-one I went to Paris
to find out what it's all about
or maybe where it's at.
As I was saying
when I was twenty-one I went to Paris
to learn whatever there was to learn.
When I got there I met Alice;
she was there the same as me
to spend some money she'd worked to earn.
With Paris and Alice and evening and all
first thing my head starts to spin
which left me not knowing what to do,
so we went to a party and then we snuck in
through the back door of a celestial palace
where a god or maybe some gods lived.
They soon spied me along with Alice
and gave us food, that's what they did.
Hey, is this the peace on earth, you know,
the one we hear about?
IVI Ol A i nn! J I

iMaw, said God, it never worked.
I had to close that file out.
So there I was standing in a palace;
somebody touched my leg but it turned out to be just Alice
The music starts picking up, the tempo starts to swell;
Alice, chewing on my ear, speaks the words of hell.
Let me tell you a little about Alice:
she's fragile as a cockle shell
her eyes they burn with hate
and she's not thought to be so pretty
by the people who are straight
with lanky hair and short short dress
and thighs and, ah, but I digress.
Alice and me we slip away
after giving our regards to God,
after thanking him for the floor show
and the buffet of bread and wine.
Let me say a few words about God:
what a sense of humor he has.
Just look at what he's done.
Just look round all about you I
and you'll find that he's had fun.
Used to call him Zeus because he
came down and took our women to bed.
Now, even though he still does that
Well, now we call him dead.

And when I touch your hand
or stroke your hair
or smile,
you look at me with statue eyes
an I think you have never loved before.

Vour laughter seems false
and I can read in your eyes
that your smiles are bored
the signs, the signs.
One only laughs out of politeness
when with a stranger,
and not a friend
yet you are strangely polite
with me now.

Strange you are no longer
familiar to me --
I shall cry some day
for the loss of knowing you.
Gerry Soud

I approached the Nameless Temple
and knelt beneath its door
of wood and steel
and foresaw my life
and knew the past
of a long-dead Arcillon world
knew it by shadows and moonlight
knew it by the soft ticking
of the branch against the door,
knew it by the senseless rules
of darkness and of lore.
Had I but one day left
in this Arcillon world,
let it be at full moon
in the antique country
beneath the Arcillon Tower
which covets the secrets
of the Nameless Temple,
the power of that oak-lined door.
Allen Pierleoni

Finally we got back to the place where Alice was stayinq
So we drank us a bottle of wine.
Then Alice commenced to playing
with my zipper that was stuck.
So I said do you have to do that now, in the middle of my quest
cause I m trying to find out where it's at
and with whom it has been blessed.

She looked at me real strangely,
then she winked her eye,
and took me in another room.
She said she'd tell me why.
I will show you where it's at,
what you are looking for,
but just so you don't try to get away,
first I'm gonna lock that door.

She closed the door and switched the light
and threw away the key,
and said now baby come over here
I'll show you where to be
So I crept up over by her,
climbed up where she lay
and soon I felt nirvana
and heard her start to pray: /
Don't stop, don't stop she cried so loud (ff
as my head began to reel /[ /
as the world fell back into confusion // U
I felt al I there was to feel. fl m
Let me say a little more about Alice: fi/ffll
Alice she is 42 and rne lam twenty-one, if 11
which makes our ages just so right j\
for what Alice thinks is fun. I\\
Alice's mother didn't want her,
her father, he was dead, \\avLj
and so Alice soon found out
that where it's at is bed.
Need I say more?
You mean to say that's all there is,
that's all there is to life?
You mean to say that's where it's at,
that's why man takes a wife?

even the wind has faults
as it gracefully knocks into trees
blowing them and laying them down;
as it awkwardly says I love you.
but then it cracks the trees
into match sticks and yanks the grass roots;
then the ground has no sound to be found.
it doesn't mean it hates you.
then it lets out its delicate moisture
and the trees stand up again
and the grass reaches back for firmer footing.
birches stand strongly again,
it never fell, it merely bent a bit.
but now it has a stiff neck,
a kink left by the wind,
and if the 'tologist is careful he can mend it
but if he isn't the little sapling will get
back its kink and grow
in an unhealthy fashion.
Y
birches bend and
a little boy
swinging in the birch
finds that it sways securely.
little boys don't like to
fall out of trees because
they have fragile bones;
then birches don't like
kinks in their trunks either.
birches become big and strong
and little boys grow up to be men
but men are boys among the birches still.
he didn't swing though;
he climbed to the very top
to find the tender leaves
so that he could sway in the breeze.
Bob Sokol

*mar^
f Li
in %*£
A V

Alice she said, as she hopped out of bed
yes, that's it and where it's at
and I'll tell you something more:
you shouldn't be ready to expect so much
before you love a whore.
And now I'm going back to God
to play with him awhile,
and maybe when I finish with him
Perhaps at least he'll smile.
Mike Hendry

1 The Campus Thing,

Page 8



The Campus Thing,

.
V
* '

Page 8



-=Speaking Out

Dixie Belongs To The Union

In a recent editorial entitled Let's Keep
Dixie, fact vtars so juxtaposed with fiction that I
feel it is time the University be enlightened on the
true tradition behind Dixie, who the author was,
and what the motives were that made him wish he
was in de land ocotton.
The article stated that the song eulogizes the
proud heritage of genteel people. The article also
states that Dixie is a song about stubborness,
defeat and ultimate rising up again of the South.
Defeat, defeat of what? Dixie was written before
the Civil War. But the editorial continues that it is
a song about a culture that died when hundreds of
thousands of men were felled in a war between
brothers. Once again, this is wrong. Lincoln even

Super Patriot
Waving Flags
MR. LDITOR:
Among the least popular
Americans today are those who
defiantly wave Viet Cong Hags.
Why? Because the Viet Cong has
engaged in armed rebellion
(treason, if you like) against
what our government considers
lo be the legitimate government
of South Viet Nam. And
naturally they find themselves
lighting also those countries
(including our own) which
voluntarily came lo the aid ol
lire South Viet Namese
government. In short, these ate
had guys. fighting on the
other side.
-I'll agree with that, but even
the nasty Viet Cong cannot be
accused of treason against our
country. Now. if it is patriotic to
condemn those who wave Viet
Cong flags, shouldn't we attack
even more harshly those who
wave the Hag of a government
which did rise in treasonous
armed rebellion against the
United Stales of America? But
no. The symbol of treason
against our country is the
lavorite -decoration of the
supporters of a would-be savior
of our country.
Would one of you Wallace
stipe i patriots please stop
Standing Up l or America long
enough to explain how you can
wrap \ourselves in Old Gloia
"bile vou are still waving the
C onfederalc stars and bars?
JOHN kAI l MANN
Ole Heritage
MR LDITOR:
Perhaps we could use
Suwannee instead of Dixie"
d we are to sing of "the piotid
heritage of .1 genteel people*
especiallv for those who are
still longing for de ole
plantation or are thev. in
act. equal?
KA l 11l II N B JASPER 4AS

Irreparably Tarnished Image

Last Friday. I was extremely
distressed to discover that the
Alligator carried not only the
usual timely and salient
revelations and adroitly acute
luuiior blit, in addition, a
blistering condemnation of the
University's absentee senators.
I.specially unnerving was the
batflingly unintelligible ordering
ov ils which left mv name to

OPEN FORUM:
Oiml DiMmT
<3 c
There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

Black Men Are Reminded

MR. EDITOR:
After reading Wednesday's
editorial (Oct. 16), I am
reminded that man is quite
capable of easily fooling himself.
We are constantly searching for
gallant reasons for the existence
of traditions simply because we
can not accept the real reasons.

No More Darkies
MR. EDITOR:
Since I have not been included in the numerous polls taken
regarding the validity of playing Dixie at home games, I guess I
must express my opinion via open forum.
! am a Black student on campus. I have pailicipaled as fully as I
have wished in campus activities for the past .> years and I have always
marvelled at the metropolitan atmosphere of this campus. The LFF is
southern onl\ in locale. With the number of out-of-slalc students,
black students, and foreign students increasing every year, the
tradition being lauded bv Dixie is extinct and meaningless lo quite a
lot of students. But oh how dearly we hold on to tradition simply
because it has always been done.
I do find the playing of Dixie insulting' Anyone who desires good
will, a good lile. and brotherhood ot mankind would. It lepiesents
somethin'! that no longer exists il in (act it ever did. The South is
not the land of apple blossoms, genteel living, and happy darkies
anvmore than Ametica is the land of the free and the home of the
brave"
If the South is to stand for more than history has recorded then
Dixie need not be a reminder of past ills.
If not. the Galoi Band should learn and the programs should carry
the words to Lift Even Voice and Sing, the Negro National
Anthem its been put awav for a long time or. belter still. Sav it
Loud. I'm Black and I'm Frond lor starters.
I'm sure that as main n not more, of m\ ancestors are lied up in
the South and always will be. However. I think of myself as an
American if I must be something ;md I'd like to see a little more
enthusiasm foi the Star-Spangled Banner
KITTY OLIVER 4AS

crown the registei oi the
apathetic unfaithful who have
wandered astray lorm that
omnipotent deliberative body,
the student senate.
The repercussions of this
astute disclosure have shattered
the serenity and placidity
heretofore inherent ii\ my being
and irreparably tarnished my
meticulously nurtured image of

ordered a military band to play it at the end of the
war.
We tend to think of Dixie as the epitome of
the South and her tradition, but the author of
Dixie was not a Southern gentleman with tragic
memories of the South he once knew. Nor was the
author an unknown Negro who, having fled North,
wrote the song to express his homesickness for the
Old South he had left behind, as was the opinion of
the band director at the University of Kentucky
(the issue of whether to play or not play Dixie is
not a first here in Florida). The author of Dixie
wasn't even a southerner, instead, he was a
northerner, an Ohian, in fact. He was a famous,
well-known minstrel star of pre-Civil War days. His
name was Daniel Decatur Emmet.

The playing of Dixie may
remind Southerners of their
grand heritage but black men are
only reminded of needless
suffering and pain. Vou may
find Dixie offensive but it
doesn't take away from the fact
that we find it downright
insulting.

public servu A> .1 myriad ol
Florida's finest (1 h e
poli t ically -aware campus
electorate) personally register
their dissatisfaction with the
intolerable disservice done them.
I shali surrender mental
tranquility to mental anguish
and live in fear of being
physically torn asunder by the
outraged masses.

How arc black Americans
supposed to feel when all around
him white men are expelling
animal-like yells and waving
rebellious Hags which a hundred
years ago meant to hell with the
United States. Personally, I
think Dixie is unamcrican!
It may be true that a majority
(X 3%) of UF students are in
favor of Dixie, but the
majority seem lo always have
very little insight. Suppose you
were in a black community,
completely surrounded by
blacks who were chanting
(singing, whistling, or humming)
Get whitey (or any other
ethnic chant)! Majority rule
anyone?
But I suppose blacks and
whiles will never understand
each other they are 100 much
alike.
Go ahead, stand up loi Dixie,
but remember you are openly
supporting or at least lending a
hand lo racism.
RIC K OLIVER SEG
Substitute
MR. EDITOR:
After reading the controversy
surrounding the playing ol
Dixie we feel
could be alleviated by
substituting Old Black Joe.
W MvcinMS
W..1. Rademaker 7AS
K Abate 7AS

Indeed, your limelv expose
of the transgressions of members
of this celebrated legislative
bodv has instilled in me a new
resolve to discharge the
obligations of my exalted station
rather than vindicate the
unspeakable injustice suffered
by the gator acumen at my
hand.
DON GOODMAN

Tuesday. October 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

It is also important to note that Emmet wrote
the song on orders from Jerry Bryant, leader of the
Bryant Minstrels. The reason being. Bryant wanted
a new walk-around something in the git-up-and-git
style, something that will take with the boys, that
they can catch quickly and whistle on the streets.
The editorial ended by saying that Dixie*
symbolizes the heritage of the Souththe whole
South-and should be played pjroudly by the Gator
Band. I agree wholeheartedly, it is a fine song with a
good git-up-and-git style, but the viewpoint is too
myopic. Dixie doesn't belong just to the South
with her tradition, it belongs to the entire country
with our proud tradition. Os this, Linclon said, We
have captured the Confederacy, and now Dixie
belongs to the Union.

By Jim ONeill =

Another Song
To Be Banned
MR. EDITOR:
I believe the playing of the
song that represents the greatest
persecution of people in the
nation's history should be
immediately ceased. It is a thorn
in our heritage and national
pride.
This song represents hatred
which obeessed the country's
founding fathers, blurring their
views of reality and the need for
co-existence. They beset upon us
ravishing us with terrible harm.
The white American beat us into
submission depriving us of what
was rightfully our own. They
dishonored and disgraced us,
forcefully herded us into
encampments where, those of us
who had survived, suffered from
hunger and deprivation. Until
recently we were not granted
equal status with the white
citizenrv and in fact, were
.T
considered to be inferior.
I think the Star-Spangled
Banner should not be played
because it represents the
persecutions and injustices
placed upon the American
Indian
A CONCERNED INDIAN
Abolish
MR. EDITOR:
Let's Abolish:
Let's abolish Dixie country: The
name denotes racial overtones.
Let's abolish the Mason-Dixon
Line: The nation should be more
unified.
Let's abolish Christmas: It could
be insulting to some Jews and
Atheists.
Let's abolish anything that a
minority dislikes: They have
rights.
Let's abolish abolishing.
No . Lets abolish abolishing
being abolished.
No . Lets just abolish. ~<
Don Ashley
3JM

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to th? editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers' names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



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378-7393. IA-st-20-pl
Log Periodic Antennaes: one tv,
one fm, heavy-duty rotor, S2O each;
40 mast $5 or free with pkg.
372-6010 evenings. (A-3t-21-p)
Honda 1965 S9O. Helmet & tools
incl. Excellent condition. Test ride
and you'll buy it. $195. Call
378-3095 anytime. (A-st-21-p)
Forced to seifi 1966 Honda 50
excellent condition tools and helmet
included. New tires, license $125.
Call Frank 5:00 7:30. (A-2t-21-p)
1962 Valiant New battery, tires.
Transmission like new. Call 378-6535
after 6. (A-4t-21-p)
Triumph TT Special 1967 650 cc 52
hp Full drag, cam scrambles bars,
?ipes, tires. Extra street tire plus
many other goodies. Call 376-3740.
(A-4t-21-p)
Honda Super Hawk 305 cc. 1967,
mint condition. Many extras. Helmet
included, $475, best offer. Call
378-3156 before 11 a.m. or after
5:30 p.m. (A-4t-21-p)
Single channel radio control plane
and equipment. Call Rick Bacon
372-9219. (A-3t-21-p)
Fine antiques, good rare books, art,
paintings, oriental rugs, lamps,
clocks, bronzes, mirrors, civil and rev.
war items, jewelry, (superb antique
watches, chains) oredals, large coll,
stamps, gold. Oriental art, fine silver,
china, brass, glass, linens, wood
carvings, hundreds other articles,
priv. est. sale (no sales tax) Ph.
533-2381 Hwy. 16-16A, Kingsley
Lake Road, large sign on property.
10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. daily until
sold. Come prepared to buy.
(A-21-lt-p)
Pile is soft and lofty ... colors retain
brilliance in carpets cleaned with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furn. Co. (A-lt-21-c)
1968 Suzuki 100 Only 500 miles, not
even broken in. $325. Call 372-8946
also selling helmet with bubble
shield. (A-3t-21-p)
CAMPUS CONCESSION Good pan
time money maker. Contact
weekends or eve. except Monday &
Thursday eve. 372-8634. (A-st-18-p)
1
m MHasm adult I
I ALSO
I I2B3EDSEBSQ3SBSBI I
Nrnre

| WED NIGHT I
LADIES DRINKS
19<
DANCE TO THE MUSIC
of RICHARD PARKER and
the SWINGING WITNESSES
WED. thru SAT. 9PM-2AM
LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE
1 N.W. 10 AVE. Phone 378-1636
NO SLACKS AFTER 9PM PLEASE

Diamond wedding ring set 1/3 carat.
Never worn. Silver and gold band.
Original price S2OO. Now $125. Rich
1403 SW 22nd Place. (A-st-21-p)
;vx-x-x*v.v.v.v.v.NN.*.v.'.v;v;vxvX*X\vXv
FOR RENT |
v v
MUST SUBLET LEAVING TOWN
Move in today. October rent paid
on a desirable 2 bedroom apartment
in a convenient location close to
campus. Very flexible arrangements.
Call 376-9688 between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m. for further information.
(B-20-ts-c)
Peter Pan Motel Williston Fla. Just 20
mi. from Gainesville. Reservations
available for Homecoming weekend.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-20-p)
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-C)
Apartment for Rent. Apt. 151
Colonial Manor. Call 372-7111.
(B-st-18-p)
SBfrfouiTWfTOom Fuity FufWMad
'lncluding washing machine* Wtthle
walking distance so Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357* 3>B-os4l.
(B tf!>-<)
Air-Conditioned one bedroom apt.
with pool sub-let. More than the
comforts of home. Call 378-3969
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-21-p)
Large 2 bdr. apt. SBO/mo. Water,
sewer, pest control provided. Call
372-3160. (B-st-21-p)
HOMECOMINGS Room for coupie
in mobile home on quiet lake in city.
$75.00 includes kitchen privileges. If
desired, for 3-day weekend.
372-6010. (B-3t-21-p)
Large room, private bath, entrance,
Fla. room, off street parking. Call
376-3211, ext. 5765, Ann Sheridan.
(B-st-21-p)
WANTED
, f<*x*x > x*x-:srx x*>x*x*xx-x*xssss ; w ix K*'
Need Male Roommate large
comfortable home in NW section of
town, nice quiet atmosphere S4O a
month call 376-9080 ask for John.
C-st-20-p)
Wanted 4 (or) 2 tickets Miami game.
Call 378-6791 after 1 p.m.
(C-3t-21-p)
Coed to share Ig. 1 bdm apt. ac WW
carpet. Poolside. Call 378-8338 4 til
6. Move in by Nov. 1. (C-st-20-p)
Wanted: Coed roommate for 60x12
V/2 bath trailer. Own room S6O
month plus utilities. Call Diana ex.
2543 Mon. thru Fri. for details.
(C-3t-21-p)
Female roommate wanted 3 blocks
from campus. Private room A/C free
washer & dryer. 378-3291, 376-3582.
(C-st-21-p)
S*X*XSSS # >>^>>>X>X!SSSX;*W*>XX*X*XS!W
HELP WANTED
>:
f,s\v.vX*xox.w.vx'X*x*x-x-x*x*x-y*v:r
Subjects males 18-25 yrs. voice
experiment. If accepted S6OO tor
task. Contact R.H. Colton 378-5738
5:00 to 8:00 daily. (E-2t-21-p)
Need two experienced gardeners,
weekends, holidays, mowing,
weeding, also painter, carpenter, gen.
repairs, permanent for reliable
workers. Overnight cottage available
when necessary. Kingsley Lake, Rt.
1, Box 361, Tel. 533-2381, Starke,
Fla. (E-lt-21-p)
I 3,5,7,9 m
| Lmma
!v li Matthau f Jill

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 22, 1968

Page 8

HELP WANTED
X X
>:-x*;.x:*xiS*J Xi*:C'X*:*x-x-x*x<->: Help wanted part-time. Sports Car
Mechanic. 372-4373. Call Joe Smith,
or George Bradley, Crane Imports.
(E-3t-21-p)
jazz Musicians or group interested in
performing locally. No rock. Steady.
376-0908. (E-3t-20-p)
| AUTOS I
J ;ss-x-;x-x*:*x*x*x-:c*x-x^%%Nxx*x*x*xX
60 MKIX Jag Biggest luxury Jag
built. SIOOO spent on complete eng.
overhaul 3 wks. ago. Radio heat air
excellent in & out. Offers over
SISOO. 376-0201. (G-Bt-18-p)
1965 Mustang 289, 4-speed, AC,
radio, new tires, extras. Call Red or
Steve at 372-6776. (G-st-19-p)
Want to restore a car. Following
125.00 up 1940 Ford 41 £ad. 40
LaSalle 41 Cry. 40 Ply. 36 Buick 40
Chev. 31 Model A. Call 378-7951.
(G-10t-18-p)
1963 Fairlane 500 Black & white w.
red int. R & H very good cond. Must
sell now $480.00. Cheap. Call Ruben
378-6874. (G-6t-20-p)
1966 MGB overdrive, wire wheels,
white walls, R & H and extras. Clean,
needs no work, only TLC. Call Dave
at univ. ext 3198 or 372-7024 after
5. (G-st-20-p)
1963 Chevy SS 327 cu. in. 300 np.
air. cond. auto, trans. chrome wheel
stereo tape extra clean one owner
Phone 378-4278 after 5 p.m. $1095.
(G-st-19-p)
1963 Anglia. S3OO. 31 mpg. excellent
tires and mechanical. Good body.
3224 NW 13 St. Trailer 17 or Call
378-5548. (G-5M9-P)
MGB 1964 conv r&h, wire wheels
midnite blue w/white top. Clean all
over & in good shape. Ecstatic driving
$1295, 378-6917, 301-6 Dia. Vill.
(G-19-st-p)
68 Chevelle SS 396 convertible 4 spd
stereo tape radio heat bucket seats
Best looking car on campus $2700
Call 376-8740. (G-st-17-p)
Pontiac LeMans Sprint 1966 3 speed
standard transmission. Stereo tape
$1475. 376-8806. (G-4t-21-p)
Corvette powered comet must sell by
next week, for street or drags. Owner
going into service for full details call
George 378-7889. (G-3t-21-p)
Buick LeSabre 1960 auto-trans.
power steering, inspection passed.
$250 or best offer. Call 376-7322
after 5:30. (G-st-21-p)
Plymouth Wagon 1959 at power
brakes and steering. Inspected. S3OO
phone 372-9860 after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)
I ... r
I production
starring

%IKROSA
JML i STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 90c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

,Xv/X#AwW*-,V%V?#,ivwWvwDj.MVrf'#VAj ,Xv/X#AwW*-,V%V?#,ivwWvwDj.MVrf'#VAji
i ,Xv/X#AwW*-,V%V?#,ivwWvwDj.MVrf'#VAji PERSONAL I
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S*X*X*MrW*:-MCC<-X.X-XiSSQ!Wi*
EXPECTANTLY YOURS
Gainesville's only shop for the
mother-to-be. 706 W University Ave.
372-3850. (J-st-17-p)
Two attractive coeds are now
interviewing for male companions.
Prefer graduate students. One with
moustache. One without. 378-0609.
(J-2t*2o-p)
Wanted four adult Florida Auburn
tickets. Will pay extra. Call Art
Deane 378-9402. (J-st-19-p)
MUFF, I LOVE YOU AND
ALWAYS WILL, Sorry Easter came
so soon this year, but am glad youre
better, LOVE YOU, Wilamena.
(J-lt-21-p)
Playful Kittens part Siamese, part
Persian, all beautiful, healthy and
long-haired. 6 wks. old $2.00
$6.00. 3205 NW 14 St. or call
378-2077. (J-21-st-p)
Happy Birthday Jimbo. Your
Mommy Loves You. Now, and .
etc. (J-lt-21-p)
;v.%vxwx*X X*:*>XXx*.x-;-:x*x*x*:wk*:v
| LOST & FOUND I
Misplaced 1 pr. brown weejuns and
umbrella in gold must. conv. by
mistake. If found, please call
378-6966. (L-3t-20-p)
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CLASSIFIEDS
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MENTI i 530 9:30
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ml 45 9:45

Uso our handy
moll In ordor
form.

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| LOST fr FOUND |
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Found women's belt Oct. 15 on
Radio Road near Graham Area,
ownei call 372-1821. (L-3t-20-nc)
S2O reward for return of miniature
sterling silver ash can lost at DU
house during rush. Sentimental value,
no questions asked. See Big John.
1814 W. Univ., 376-9129. (L-2t-21-p)
SERVICES
A >:
-vX-X-XWXvX-X-X-X-X-WX'X-X-X-X-X-V-V
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-c)
Papers typed, 50c page, prompt,
accurate. 20 lb. quality, Bond paper
supplied. Call 378-2937. (M-st-21-p)
T who cares T
4 about a 4
135 year old I
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of murder... with the 1
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3:30 ImOMOR j
5:30 TdMIAHUM
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1 UUimiMER 1
f THE HIGH I
COMMISSIONER
V IN COLOR I



Orange and

Campus Calendar Administrative Notices

Tuesday, October 22
Interviews for Rathskeller, pick
up application at Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union.
Student Committee for
re-election of Congressman
Dante Fascell, hand out
political material. Ground
Floor Lobby E., 1:30 p.m.
Le Circle Francois (French
Club), 150 B Union, 2:00
p.IYI.
Program Office, Children's
Ballet, Tap and Modem
Dance Lessons, C-4 Union,
4:00 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet
Meeting, 123 Union, 4:30
p.m.
Savant Meeting, 118 Union,
6:45 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting,36l &
357 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Propeller Club Meeting, Speaker,
Dr. C.A. Mathews, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Beginning Oil,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Charm Classes,
363 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, October 23
Interviews for Rathskeller, pick
up application at Student
Activities Desk, Reitz Union.
Unitarian Student Forum,
Lunch, 150 D Union, 11:30
a.m.
Student Committee for
re-election of Congressman
Dante Fascell, hand out
political material. Ground
Floor Lobby E., 1:30 p.m.
Army ROTC, Union Aud., 2:00
p.m.
Action Conference Meeting, 349
Union, 2:30 p.m.
Program Office, Children's
Ballet, Tap and Modern
Dance Lessons, C-4 Union,
4:00 p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Florida Gym,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Motion Picture Techniques, C-4
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Benton Engineering Council,
355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium
Lecture, Colloquium Room,
College Library, 8:00 p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
349 Union, 8:00 p.m.

Low Interest Rates Still Available 1 Sir
loans, and Share loans --
Call ext 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION pf

Thursday, October 24
Student Committee for
re-election of Congressman
Dante Fascell, hand out
political materials. Ground
Floor Lobby E., 1:30 p.m.
Arnold Air Society, Angel vs.
Arnold Air Football, Drill
Field, 4:30 p.m.
Modern Poetry Presentation,
122 Union, 4:40 p.m.
Professor Gordon Bigelow will
speak on Wallace Stevens,
122 Union, 4:40 p.m.
Christian Science Organization,
357 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 150 G
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Contractors and
Builders Association Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Water Color,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Law Dames Tupperware Party,
Perry House, 8:00 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Friday, October 25
Football Films, 150 C & D
Union, 12:00 noon.
Student Committee for
re-election of Congressman
Dante Fascell, hand out
political material. Ground
Floor Lobby E., 1:00 p.m.
Poetry Reading, Faculty and
Students reading poems by
Robert Sokol, MSB Aud.,
5:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Countess from
Hong Kong", Union Aud.,
5:00,7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Chess Tournament, 361 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 6:30
p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Florida Gym,
7:00 p.m.
I.F.C. Fall Frolics, "THE FOUR
TOPS", Florida Gym, 8:15
p.m.
Freshman Football, Florida vs.
Miami, Miami, 8:15 p.m.
NOTICE: Camp Wauburg will be
closed all day on the day of a
Home Football Game.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for Fall
Frolics, "THE FOUR TOPS",
$5.00 a couple, also tickets
are on sale for the Florida
Cinema Society, STOP-

BLUE BULLETIN

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMS: Oct 25 is the deadline
for receipt in the office of
foreign languages of applications
for all foreign language
functional examinations to be
given on Saturday, Nov. 2.
PRE-MEDICAL &
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Students MUST register with the
Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 3, Anderson Hall.
Registration has been extended
until Oct. 25. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
REGISTRAR'S DEADLINES:
Oct. 25 is the deadline for
applying for Graduate School.
Dec. 1 is the deadline for
applying for the College of Law
for the 1969 Spring Quarter.
Applications may be obtained
and returned to room 33 Tigert
Hall.
PRELAW STUDENTS:
Professor Frank Booker of Notre
Dame Law School will be on
campus on Wednesday, Oct. 23,
for the prupose of interviewing
students who may be interested
in attending Notre Dame Law
School. He will have information
regarding available scholarships,
as well as information with
respect to a new program
involving a year of law study at
the University of London,
England, as part of the Notre
Dame law program. Interested
students should sign up for
interviews in the Placement
Office, Room G-22, Reitz
Union.
WORK-STUDY JOBS: UF
students qualified for the
College Work-Study Program
(parents income must be in the
low-income range 57,000 or
less) who are interested in
part-time work, please contact
Student Employment, Room 23,
Tigert Hall, for further
information.
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of College
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
Requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
and the elementary block which
is (EDE 300, 301, and 302.)
English and speech majors do
not take the test, as SCH 201 is
a required course in all of their
programs. Appointments are
now being made in Room 124
Norman Hall.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

FOREIGN STUDENTS: Those
who have not completed the
annual census card of the
Institute of International
Education are requested to do so
as soon as possible at
International Center.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. All
CBS 261 studtnes are expected
to. take this test and each must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
bre required to use his SOCIAL
SECURITY NUMBER. Students
whose last names begin with (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,
10, or 11; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113,121, or 125;
(F) to Little 201, 203, 205, or
207; (G) to Peabody 101.102
112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
(M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 109;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with (A-F) report to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6, 7,8,9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; (G-L) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113,114,115,116,117,118, or
119; (M-R) to Little 101, 109,
113,121, or 125; (S-Z-)report to
Little 201, 203, 205, 207, 213,
215,217, or 219.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6. 7,8, 9, 10,11,12,
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116,117,118 or
119.
CBS 263 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct 22, 7 p.m. in
Little 101.
CY 201 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Walker
Auditorium; (M-Z) report to
Little 101,109,113,121,0 r 125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to Walker
Auditorium; (N-Z) report to
Peabodv 1.2, 4,5, 7,1 or 11.

Tuesday, October 22.1968, The Florida Alligator, I

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 22: ETHYL CORP.
Chem, Chem. Engr, EE, ME, IE.
E.l. DUPONT DE NEMOURS &
CO. INC. Chem, Engr, ME, IE,
Chem. HEWLETT-PACKARD
CO. EE, ME. KOPPERS CO.
INC. & SINCLAIR-KOPPERS
CO. Chem, ChE, CE, EE, ME,
MetE.
OCT. 22-23: HUMBLE OIL
& REFINING CO. ChE, CE,
EE, ME, IE, Chem, AE, Agr.
Engr, Engr. Sci, Met. Engr,
Sanitary Engr, Bus Ad, Lib.
Arts, Acctg. Also juniors for
summer employment.
ARMSTRONG CORK CO.
Acctg, Bus. Ad, ChE.CE, IE,
Lib. Arts, Math, ME. BLOUNT
BROTHERS CORP. Building
Construction, ME, CE. ATOMIC
ENERGY COMMISSION CE,
ChE, EE, IE. Met. E, NE. CE,
ME, Bus. Ad, Acctg, Econ,
Public Ad.
OCT. 23: BABCOCK &
WILCOX CO. ME. ChE, MetE,
NE, CE, MBA, Physics, Acctg.
NAVAL ORDNANCE
STATION normally interviews
Engr, Physics, Math, Chem. E.l.
DU PONT DE NEMOURS &
CO., INC. Chem, Engr, ME,
IE, Chem.
OCT. 24: SINCLAIR OIL
CORP. RESEARCH
DIVISION Chem, ChE.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC
EE, ME, ChE, Prod. & Admin.
Training Program. All
positions in St. Louis. Company
cannot obtain deferments.
CONTROL DATA CORP. EE,
ME, Computer Sci, Physics.
Military requirements must be
fulfilled. BURLINGTON
INDUSTRIES, INC. normally
interviews Chem. & Engr.
disciplines. FORD MOTOR CO.
normally interviews business
students. FEDERAL
COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION EE. PPG
INDUSTRIES, INC. EE, ME,
IE, ChE, Chem, Math, Bus. Ad.
ALLIED CHEMICAL CORP.
IE, Chem, ChE, ME, CE, EE,
Finance. AETNA LIFE &
CASUALTY no specific
major.

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday, October 22. 1968

The UF Quarterback
As A Team Nucleus

Somethings got to happen.
Saturday, Larry Rentz played
a series at quarterback, fumbled
and immediately got back at
flanker. Jackie Eckdahl doesnt
know from one minute to the
next whether hes going to be
quarterback or not. Neither does
the team.
|Viewing
by Neal Sanders
j Sports Editor
| Sports
Thats no way to run a
football team, and its about
time that something was done
about it.
A quarterback is the focus of
a team. Hes the guy who not
only calls signals, but keeps a
team together. You can have
two quarterbacks, but you cant
have both of them be number
one.
Eckdahl is number one? Guess
again. A n umb e r one
quarterback says Coach, send
in the number two man. Im
tired, and my toe is bruised.

Graves Second Half On,
New Season To Win

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Florida Head Coach Ray
Graves yesterday looked over his
wounded charges, and started
talking about how the Gators are
going to beat Vanderbilt.
With the lack of depth weve
got now, said Graves, this
game could be very rough on
us.
Graves lack of depth includes
several minor injuries which will
have much of the first team
hobbling this week.
Foremost is quarterback
Jackie Eckdahl, who has
sprained his left big toe. While
not seeming too serious, the top
signal caller will miss three days
of practice this week.
Those three days, said
Graves, will be critical for the
team. As a result, Eckdahl will
probably be second string
quarterback this Saturday. As of
now, Larry Rentz will probably
start.
Graves, however, talked
enthusiastically about Harold
Peacocks chances for getting
into the game against the
Commodores.
Harold has worked out with
the Jets every day, said Graves.
I see no reason why he cant
play his share of the game.
Additional injuries include
Larry Williamson, who will be
out with a knee injury for three
to four weeks and Tom
Abdelnour, who is expected to
see limited duty despite a hip
injury.
A welcome return will be

Who, then, is number one?
Maybe Harold Peacock. Maybe
me. Coach Graves isnt saying
any more. He just says someone
will start.
So whats my gripe? The same
as everyone elses. If were going
to have a top quarterback, lets
play him. Let the guy call his
own shots.
Yes, call his own shots.
Theres a rut being worn from
your seat to the huddle where
youre telling the team where to
run, kick and send Smith up the
middle. The huddle, by the way,
stays consistently in our own
end zone.
All of your quarterbacks are
intelligent guys. I include
Peacock because he too, deserves
a chance. I say either Rentz or
Eckdahl can call his own plays.
That includes fantastic plays like
sideline passes, throwing to the
tight end and other such
forgotten things that use to go
on at Florida Field.
It all boils down to a decision
now on whats going to happen
with the team. The first step is
getting a quarterback. Give him
a job with some security, and
hell get some confidence.
Thats the beginning. Theres
a lot more than just having
someone in the backfield on a
permanent basis, to be sure, but
getting this done will be more
than has happened so far.

Dave Mann, who has been out of
the Gator defensive backfield
since the beginning of the
season. Wayne Compton, who
underwent a knee operation at
the beginning of the season, is
now running, and may see action
in the near future.
Finally, Donny Williams, who
recently had a finger operation,
is expected to be on tap against
Vanderbilt, but will require
Harriers Place
Freshman and varsity
cross-country runners brought
high places in two different
invitational meets back to
Gainesville Saturday.
The varsity cross-country
team under Coach Don Hale
took fourth at the Callaway
Gardens Invitational.
Jack Nason took 20th place,
with Roy Benjamin, John
Parker, Ken Burnsed and Nick
Caswell following him in the
finish.
Even with runners placing
second, third, and ninth, the UF
frosh were beaten by one point
at the Clover Leaf Invitational
Meet in Bradenton.
Seminole Junior College took
the meet by a score of 54-55
(low score wins). Manatee Junior
College placed third with 61
. points.
Randy Holcombe finished
second for the frosh and Frank
Betts took third.
UFs next test is at the NCAA
regional meet at Georgia Tech
this coming Saturday.

WHO WILL START? ARROYO
.. .Graves will decide

special padding for his duties.
The Florida Coach is
especially thinking about his
teams morale, which he says is
always hard to get up after a
losing effort.
As far as Im concerned,
said Graves, we are getting
ready for the second half of our
season. Weve got four
conference games in front of us,
and thats the important thing.

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THE PASS ARROYO
. .conditions haven't been right, or just turning into a grounded season?

gist w^^Sr3i
CHRISTIAN UP THE MIDDLE ARROYO
.. .not enough diversity in plays?



Nus, Sigma Chi Favored Today

BY STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Orange League volleyball
heads into the last day of
bracket competition with a
number of bracket winners to be
decided by todays results.
Sigma Nu is a big favorite to
ease over Pi Kappa Phi. The Nus
took their second straight win
last Wednesday as they handily
defeated Pju-Deltl
John to set
the pacVfbrThe Nus.
Sigma Chi is another bjg
choice today as they go forjheir
bracket championship against
previously lhe Sigs
will be counting on the strong
spiking arms of] Harry Winkler,
Frank Saier, and Mike Hartman
to carry them over the SAE's.
The Sigs would then find
themselves up against the Sigma
Nu's in the semis W what could
be the big match of the
tournament. Sigma Chibeat SPE
15-11, 16-14 in a thriHer last
Wednesday.
UF Coed
Bowling Set
The big COED Bowling
Tournament is nearing and all
students who wish to enter are
reminded that the deadline for
entry is Thursday. October 24 at
5 P.M.
Any student can enter as long
as lie or she has a partner of the
opposite sex. The tournament
will begin at the Reitz Union
lanes on Oct. 29 and will last for
close to two weeks. All games
rolled by participants will be
free of charge.
Only eleven couples have
entered the tournament so far so
the field is wide open. The field is
headed by Lois Lanes and
Curve Ball who collectively
average close to 87 points a
game.
Registrants can sign up in
room 22d Florida Gymnasium
or call 376-3261 and Ext 2912.
five tilt nine
dining room only
V 99c y
Xhawaiian/
f HAM
J DINNER 1
w Center cut ham \
\ steak broiled |
} with Hawaiian f
/ pineapple, served \
\ with tossed salad, J
1 and french fries w
1 a regular J
value
mssr
2310 S.W. 13th Street 376-2696
1505 N.W. 13th Street 378-2481

orange league volleyball

In bracket three, former all
campus set up man Shelly
Finman returning from a tour of
duty in Viet Nam, teamed up
with another all-campus set up,
Danny Melker, to lead the TEPS
to another bracket win as they
ate up the Lambda Chis 15-9,
15-4. The TEPS must now face
the Delts who were upset by he
Pi Lams and Mingo Teper

HHHB |
I M-lect
ENNEKING
paid political advertisement
SCHOOL'BOARD DISTRICT 3

{failure}
I. ~

15-6, 10-15, 15-13. If the Delts
should win todays game a three
way tie in the bracket will exist.
Beta Theta Pi and ATO will
go for broke as both teams,
undefeated meet head on to
determine the bracket one
winner The Betas sank the KAs
on the strong arm of Gary
Hames 15-7, 15-3. ATO did
what little more needed to be

You'll never get anywhere without it.

Nothing helps a young engineer's
career like being given a challenge.
Which is another way of saying a chance
to fail now and then. To make his own
mistakes.
At Western Electric we give our newly
recruited engineers responsibility almost
immediately. They make their own de decisions.
cisions. decisions. Learn from their own errors.
Don't get us wrong. We keep our

done to emasculate the ALPis
by crushing them 15-6, 15-7,
ATOs Joyner and Sikes
provided the know-how to do
the dirty deed.
In other action last week. Pi
Kappa Phi beat Kapa Sig, 15-2,
1 5-7 and Pi Kappa Alpha
defeated the SAEs 15-2, 15-12.

TUMMY STEAK SPECIAL
S-9MI.
LONDON BROIL STEAK
SERVED WITH
CHOICE Or POTATOES
TOSSED SALAD
hot H
Tr w f
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
/, BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

demands reasonable enough so that our
recruits can make their decisions at their
own pace. But our thinking is, a man
feels awfully good about even a small
decision when it's his.
If you're the type who'd like the chance
to make your own moves, see our recruiter
or write College Relations, 222 Broad Broadway,
way, Broadway, York, N. Y. 10038.
AloFof hard work never hurt anyone, t
Western Electric
MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY UNIT OP THE BELL SYSTEM
'.v-TATi^f.

Tuesday, October 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
iggTWUMPH
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave. 372-4373

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 22, 1968

RFVNkWS
I m mm* W mm W w %mr
By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
Being under the assumption that a Playboy movie review dealt
only with censored scenes, I went down to the Plaza Theatre with a
light heart last weekend. Barbarella was going to do her thing and l
wasnt about to miss it.
Well, Barbarella did her thing all right (did she ever, guys), and in
return had all kinds of things done to her. Frankly, as soon as I can
stop blushing, 1 think Im ready for a nice old Walt Disney movie.
Amazingly enough, aside from Jane Fonda parading around in
various stages of nudity, there really is a plot to this bawdy burlesque.
Barbarella is a top-notch space cadet on a secret mission to find a
missing Earthling who has possession of the deadly POSITRON RAY
(cant you feel your hearts beating faster already?).
Time after time, Barbarella is almost killed by all types of class-E
horror monsters, but of course someone always rushes in to save her
at the most critical moment. Barbarella learns to reward her rescuers
by making love to them I say learns, because on Barbarella's
advanced planet they now use only the pill the exhaltation pill, that
is.
From an artistic standpoint, Barbarella is a complete disaster.
Jane Fondas acting should receive a rating of 0.000 to the ten
thousandth. She must be the most naive, most bumbling heroine of all
time. A typical dumb blonde. She makes Hogans Heroes look
intelligent.
Because Barbarella is a fairy tale, the heroine must naturally live
happily ever after. Passionate as she is (shes even too hot for a
tortuous love machine), Barbarella really stands for love and
innocence and purity. For at the movies end, she is rescued by, you
guess it, a blind angel. Sound comey? Just wait until you see the show.
Barbarella makes no pretense of being a good flick. Jane Fonda
is out to show off her Bod, and thats all she does. Her costumes
(when shes wearing them) are revealing, to say the least. Put them all
together, and you just might have enough material for a
micro-mini-skirt.
The only way to enjoy Barbarella is to enter the theatre in a
liberal state of mind. In this respect, Barbarella is certainly
entertaining, whatever its merits may or may not be. And isnt
entertainment the chief reason most of us usually go to the movies?
THE sjjT
mtarstttr
FOOTBALL CONTEST
tIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
TRA $lO if winner is a girl
lace an "X" in the box of the team you think will
in Saturday, Oct. 26. Estimate total yards to be
lined by Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
ne Team Visiting Team
VNDERBILT VS. Q FLORIDA
LMPA VS. MISS. STATE
CAROLINA VS _,
V 5 FLA.STATE
SSISSIPPI vs. 0 HOUSTON
'BURN VS. Q MIAMI (FLA.)
ABAMA VS. Q CLEMSON
INOIS VS. Q OHIO STATE
VY VS VIRGINIA
RDUE VS, q iowa
:L A VS# O STANFORD
itaHragis Gained by FLORIDA f 1
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in the "U" Shop by Fri.,
)ct. 25. In case of tie, prizes will be divided equally
mong winners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
Imtipratig jWfop
>t University Avenue. ........ UNIVERSITY- Plaza
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ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

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DRESSING OT. 49*
CAMPBELL'S TOMATO
SOUP 10 '/zoz. 6/79<
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POPPING CORN 2/49<
SUNNY FIELD 18oz.
CORN FLAKES 35j

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