Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Cathy Eicher: 'What Did I Do Wrong? 1

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a two-part
series explaining the background of Cathy Ekhers
removal from the varsity cheerieading .squad, an
action the Student Senate now contends was
illegal.)
By DAVE DOUCETTE
Alligator Managing Editor
Cathy Eicher, 4AS, wanted to be a Gator
cheerleader. But because she couldnt get along
with the other cheerleaders, she was kicked off the
squad after winning her position in competition
with other hopefuls.
The Student Senate now says she was illegally
removed from the squad and is still, therefore, a
Gator cheerleader.
The confusing story of a coed who is a
cheerleader but isnt really a cheerleader began in
JMt February when Miss Eicher was one of about 75
UF students who tried out for the squad.
An independent, Miss Eicher went out for the
cheerleading squad because I like to cheer and
wanted to be a cheerleader.
After two weeks of practice and instruction by
the previous cheerleading squad, the best 12 boys

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 21 University of Florida, GcUnesviUe Monday, October 21, 1968

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BRIAN GOODHEIM
DAVID THOMAS
.. .looks down from his perch

Three Illegal Ballots
Prove System Faulty

An Alligator staff member
illegally voted three times in
Thursdays election to prove it
could be done.
Late that night, Alligator
editors gave limited information
about the violations to Secretary
of Interior Ric Katz.
The editors withheld the
staffers name because he could
be fined $25 for the infraction,
if convicted by the Honor Court.
Katz indicated Sunday,
however, that he had filed no

The
Florida Alligator

information with the Honor
Court about any election
violations. He said he was not
formally aware of specific
violations.
According to student body
law, the secretary of interior is
the chief election official and is
required to submit any
information about possible
violations of election laws to the
Honor Court for further action,
if any.
The Alligator staffer

\ll ilt;* t< > r
a. J

BACKGROUND REPORT

and 12 girls according to ability were chosen by the
Cheerleading Selection Committee. Miss Eicher was
one of the 12 girls.
The committee then interviewed them and chose
the 12 regulars (six girls, six boys) and 12 alternates,
primarily on the basis of personality. Miss Eipher
was named to the regular squad.
The other regulars chosen woe Susan Engleman,
a Delta Delta Delta; Janet Martin, also a Tri-Deit;
Debbie Moschell, a Kappa Delta; Helen Powell, an
independent; Sue Salerno, an AOPi; Bob Fierman, a
TEP; Rip Gray, a Theta Chi; Roddy Grubbs, a Theta
Chi; Phil Johnson, a Theta Chi; Mike McGrady, an
independent who later pledged Pi Kappa Alpha; and
Mike Middleton, a Pi Kappa Alpha.
Grubbs was elected head cheerleader by the
other members of the squad. J
Grubbs, Johnson, Miss Martin, Middleton, Miss
Moschell, and Miss Powell were cheerleaders on last
year's squad. (SEEWHAT pAGE2)

Demonstration Held
After Thomas Lockup

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Members of the Students for
a Democratic SocietySouthern
Student Organizing Committee
(SDS-SSOC), marched Sunday
afternoon in protest of the arrest
of Mrs. Carol Thomas and the
disappearance of Black militant
Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins.
The group, ranging from 35
to 40 went first to the
Gainesville Municipal Jail.
Mrs. Thomas, wife of a UF
professor and leader of the civil
rights movement in Gainesville,
was taken into custody by
Alachua County sheriffs
deputies early Thursday and
returned to jail to serve out a
sentence for contempt of court.
Mrs. Thomas and Dawkins
were arrested last December and
charged with contempt of court
after distributing literature
highly critical of the Alachua
County grand jury and the
GainesvUl^pohc^an^fire

explained his violations to
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich
(SEE CURIOUS* PAGE 2)
Bloc Seating
Brown fee cards for the
UF-Auburn Homecoming
game must be turned in to
the Athletic Department no
later than 3:30 today.
Group seating
representatives are asked to
bring them in at their
appointed times.

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CATHY EICHEK BB,AN 000DHe,M
.. .dismissed

departments.
Attempts to appeal her
four-month sentence ended last
week as the U.S. Supreme Court
turned down a request to hear
the case.
Dawkins, who has been
missing for several weeks, failed
to make an appearance almost
two weeks ago in connection
with the contempt case. A

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SAD AND WET TOM KENNEOV
Gator Cheerleaders watch their team lose to North Carolina last
Saturday as the rain came down. The weather matched the mood.

America's
Number I
Colima
Daily

missing persons report has been
filed and a warrant issued for his
arrest.
I just disagree with Mrs.
Thomas sentence, said Myron
Hauben, 3AS, but many
participants had deeper motives.
This was Haubens first march.
We want Jack (Dawkins)
SEE 'SDS' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21,1968

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PIERRE BUVNCHET
SCRAMBLED LEGS
Scrambling cyclist uses his feet to maintain balance Sunday during
the English Trials sponsored by the Gainesville Motorcycle Club.

|SDS Demonstration
I Held After Lockup

f HON H6i OMt
back; if not in body, in spirit,
said Susan Mooney, a student at
Santa Fe Junior College.
Miss Mooney, an English
major, criticized the power
structure of government as
sacrificing individualism.
Human dignity has become
almost absent, she said.
My first demonstration? Oh
no, she added, Ive been in
lots. I even went to Chicago to
participate in the riots. I do love
my country. I just dont like the
injustices.
The general consensus of the
sign bearing, beard bearing, long
haired group was either the
police didnt want to find
Dawkins, they had killed him, or
had him hidden somewhere.
Shouts of Bring Jack back
echoed through the slowly
increasing group, now about 50
in number, as the group decided
to search the jail for Dawkins.
The local police allowed two
representatives of the group and
newsmen to tour the local jail
searching everything from cells
to restrooms to janitorial supply
rooms.

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1831 N. W. 13th Street 378-1391
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the offldsl student newspaper of the University of Florida
and is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Rails
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
u second class matter at the United Slates ftyt Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or S 3 .SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible sos more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Mottoes for correction roust be given before next Insertion.

While Margret Hortenstine,
2UC, and James Dama, lUC,
were looking for the missing
Dawkins, the remaining
participants marched in protest
in front of the jail.
The police, giving the group
complete cooperation, provided
a 15-foot extension ladder to
view a locked room for which
there was no key available.
The protesters were told by
Police Lt. C. E. Dunn that if
Dawkins was locked up, he
woufdnt be in the city jail.
When Miss Hortenstine, Dama
and newmen emerged about 45
minutes later, the 10-15
remaining protestors were
todd no Dawkins.
From there, the
demonstrators drove to the
Alachua County Jail in protest
of Mrs. Thomas arrest.
Make a lot of noise so Carol
can hear us, someone yelled
and shouts of We want Carol
out responded as nearly 50
protestors stood outside the jail.
Ed Freeman, leader of
SDS-SSOC and apparent leader
of the march, said Mrs. Thomas
was in a room by herself. The
police are afraid she would start
organizing prisoners, he said.

What Did I Do Wrong?

FROM PA6t OWE
The cheerleaders practiced for several weeks and
then cheered for the Orange and Blue football game
April 27.
During the week following the Orange and Blue
game the cheerleaders met for a picture taking
session at which Miss Eicher was absent for
personal reasons. At the meeting the subject of
Miss Eichers incompatibility was brought up and
the cheerleaders agreed that she was hard to get
along with and that something should be done,
according to Grubbs.
She had no ability, and no one could work with
her, he said.
Grubbs said he asked Charlie Gore, previous head
cheerleader and a Theta Chi, to talk to her.
Charlie said the squad had troublemakers before
who were hard to get along with and made squad
activity a .problem, so they were taking me off the
squad, Miss Eicher said.
I asked him what I was doing wrong and what I
could have done to correct it, Miss Eicher said.
Charlie said they would give someone else a
chance to keep me from making trouble, she said.
The day after Gore talked to her, Miss Eicher

Curious Student
Votes Illegally

FROM PAGE ONE
soon after the polls closed
Thursday.
He said he first went to the
Reitz Union, polling area for
off-campus students. He
presented his picture ID card
and his fee card to an election
official. His name was checked
off a list of students.
The official instructed him to
sign a white slip of paper which
signified he was eligible to vote.
The staffer then tore off the
slip of paper he had signed and
removed two other blank slips
with it.
After casting a ballot at the
union, the staffer went to
Tolbert area and milled around
until I could slip in line. He
gave the white slip signed with a
fictitious name, to an official
and voted again.
Then he went to Yulee area,
signed a third name to the white
slip and milled around with
students waiting to vote.
He presented the slip to an
official and voted a third time.

UNIVERSITY
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(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS) I
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs I
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Phone 376-7581 J

The staffer is a resident of a
dormitory but did not vote in
his own polling area. He was not
authorized to vote at the union,
but he was never questioned by
election officials.

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CLOSED ON SUNDAYS
.

went to Bill Cross, a member of the Cheerleading
Board of Directors and a Reitz Union assistant
director in charge of student activities, and
requested a meeting of the cheering board to review
her removal.
The board met the next night to review her case.
The board is composed of the head cheerleader,
Grubbs; the president of the Gator Band, Mike
Chesser, an independent; the President of the
Student Body, Clyde Taylor, a Sigma Nu; and a
representative of the Vice President for Student
Affairs office, Cross.
Taylor could not attend the meeting so he sent in
his place Jim Kincaid, a Theta Chi.
Miss Eicher said Gore acted as sort of a
chairman at the meeting. Grubbs said Gore
helped with the procedures.
Miss Eicher testified to the board and was then
asked to leave the building by Gore.
Charlie interrupted my testimony a couple of
times, she said.
After Miss Eicher left the meeting the other 11
cheerleaders testified individually. They all said she
was hard to get along with and hurt squad unity,
Cross said.
The board voted unanimously to remove her
from the squad.
Tomorrow: The Conclusion.

Good Service Starts
of
CRANE IMPORTS
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SAL ES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave 372-4373



Tower Predicts
Nixon Victory

Senator John Tower (R.-Tex.), in Gainesville Friday, predicted
Richard Nixon will win the Nov. 2 presidential election, taking
about 350 electoral votes, 82 over the number needed to win.
Tower, one of only three Republican congressmen from Texas, has
been touring the south speaking in support for the Nixon-Spiro
Agnew ticket. Tower said although ex-Alabama Gov. George C.
Wallace has shown strength in the south, Florida will go for Nixon.
He said Field reports in Florida have shown Nixon holding an edge.
Tower had planned to speak at a public rally Friday but the
weather caused a cancellation.

SAFE TUBING AGAIN

Ichetucknee River Cleaned Up

Hey tubing lovers!
Next time you go floating
and drinking down the
Ichetucknee River, you may be
able to see the river bottom.
Six truck loads of beer cans
and picnic debris were removed
from the river in a recent mass
clean-up effort by Columbia and
Suwanee counties, skin divers
and local boy scouts.
The huge pile of refuse was
dumped beside U.S. Highway 27
and the ichetucknee River in
Branford to awaken the public
to what was happening to the
privately-owned seven-mile
nature site, according to Bill
Thompson, county-commiss county-commissioner-elect
ioner-elect county-commissioner-elect of Suwannee County.
Over S2OO has been raised by
private donations for the
purchasing of trash cans and
Damage Light
On Campus
From Gladys
Although the eye of
Hurricane Gladys passed only 60
miles south of Gainesville,
damage on campus was minimal,
UF police and housing
spokesmen reported.
A tree limb smashed a car
window in a dormitory parking
lot, but the damage was not
reported, a campus police
spokesman said.
A large oak tree fell into a
swimming pool at the Landmark
Apartments, breaking a small
area of the pool surface. The
tree was chopped into small
pieces and removed early
Saturday morning.

I BURGER CHEF
SPECIAL
3 CHEESEBURGERS
FOR 59{
ALL DAY MON. TUES. WED.
OCT. 21, 22,23
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BURGER CHEF
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signs to be put along the river
front.
County funds could not be
used for this purpose because
the river is privately owned, by
the Loncala Phosphate Co.

WHATSHAPPENING

IN SORRY, WE DONT
SING FOR ANYBODY: The
Gator Amateur Radio Club,
which as one of its activities
provides a free radiogram service
to any part of the United States,
will sign (not sing) on in room
525 of the Engineering and
Industrial Arts Building tonight
at 8. (The E and I Building is
across from the Florida Gym.)
IN THOSE WITH LOADS OF
(A)PEEL: The Citrus Club meets
in rooms 355 and 356 of the
Reitz Union tonight at 7:30.
AND STAYING IN THE
CLICHE RUT: The Florida
Cicerones, the Hostesses with

WALLET PHOTO SPECIAL
20 HOTOS FOR
Made from your A
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Bpr v
IBHp Wkmm
SEN. JOHN TOWER
. .makes point

Tubing is a popular sport
among UF students. The
water-lovers launch floats, rafts,
and inner-tubes at the springs
near the Three Rivers Estates
and float down to the picnic
grounds further down the river.

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer

the mostesses, (Do you believe
it?) meet in room 123 of the
Union tonight at 7.
IN MICHAELS MERRY
MEN (AND MASCOTS):
Interhall Council meets in room
150 C of the Union tonight at
6:30.
IN MORE COLLEGE
ALTERNATIVES, YET: The
Navy recruits in the Games Area
lobby on the ground floor of the
Union today from 8 a.m. till 5
p.m.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Alpha Zeta meets
in room 347 of the Union
tonight at 7:30; Alpha Phi
Omega in room 361 tonight at 7.

Winter Trip
Immunizations
Start Now
Students planning to travel to
foreign countries during the
Christmas holidays or the winter
quarter should go to the
infirmary within the next two
weeks to begin immunizations.
Dr. W. J. Coggins, director* of
Studnet Health Services, said.
When multiple immunizations
are required, they should be
spaced over a period of several
weeks for maximum safety and
effectiveness.

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1603 S.W. 13th Street 3444 West University Avenue
1150 N.E. 16th Avenue

Monday, October 21. 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Octobe. 21, 1968

Page 4

Honor System

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
(Editors note: This is the
first of a series of articles on the
Honor System the Honor Code
and Honor Court. Today's
article deals with the history of
the system.)
The Honor System is one of
the least-understood of UFs
institutions though in essence
it is quite simple and it has been
around a long time since 1905.
To violate the Honor Code, a
UF student has to do one of
three things: cheat, steal, or pass
a bad check.
If he gets caught, he will
appear before the Honor Court
for trial and sentencing.
Getting caught means
reporting yourself (a rare
happening) or being reported by
another student.
UF students are bound by
personal honor alone to
report violations.
That, in skeleton form, is
UFs Honor System. Just how
did it come about?
Back in 1905, when the UF
moved from Lake City to its
present location, the Honor
System was born.
A Dr. Farr, former chairman
of the English Department and
one-time vice-president of the
UF, started the Honor System in
his own classes. Gradually, other
professors adopted the system
individually.
Later on, in 1914, the Honor
System was made campus-wide
and an Honor Court was set up.
Total enrollment of the UF was

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Alligator
k

but 650, and a representative
from each of the four classes
made up the court.
The court was enlarged two
years later to include justices
from each college, much like it is
staffed today.
Secrecy became the by-word
for court proceedings in 1931,
when trials were closed to the
public and identity of convicted
students was kept under wraps.
Over the years, changes in
student body constitutions have
often provided for adjustments
in the court. In 1932, court
officers were for the first time to
be elected for two-year terms,
with only half taking office each
year.
But, the 1934 constitution
again called for one-year terms,

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EL I V tIX I from UNIVERSITY CITY BANK ** *

DATES FROM 1905, I A i. II r
: Law Os The Land At UF

DEPTH REPORT

the selection of the Clerk of the
Honor Court. By the 1940
constitution, the clerk was to be
elected by the student body;
28 years later, the 1968 con constitution
stitution constitution ratified bv the
students last spring called for the
clerk to be appointed by the
chancellor.
as has been the case since.
Another about-face was in
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
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AND
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SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. 5 mins

student juries were
introduced into court
proceedings via a constitutional
amendment in 1961. Juries are
used to determine guilt or
innocence in a contested case.
A footnote to the Honor
System's history, as noted, ot all

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places, in an Honor Court
scrapbook: Incidentally, the
Honor System is used quite
successfully at Raiford in the
state penitentiary.
Tomorrow: The Honor
Code-details.



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COME IN AND GET ACQUAINTED WITH THESE
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NEIGHBORHOOD HURRICANE CARWASH OR THE ALLIGATOR OFFICE IN THE UNION.
WED. THURS. FRI. from 4-6 p.m. the STYROFOAM SOUL
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CONTESTANTS AT EITHER OF THESE THREE LOCATIONS.
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HELP US PICK MISS UNIROYAL FOR 1968

Monday, October 21, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21,1968

Page 6

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
r MkkJMM Managing Editor
Ml Raul Ramirez James Cook I
jAmIMM. Executive Editor News Editor
It Was Him Or Me

;Changes

And CD Gets Skewered

As we left off in the last
column,' Chicken Dinner (CD)
had consulted and gotten
absolutely no help from two
math department advisors,
advisors X and Y.
At this point Advisors X and
Y call in 12 more advisors, who
consult each other for 30
minutes. CD sits in a far corner
of the room, awaiting their
finding.
Almost in chorus, all the
advisors begin talking to CD at
once, telling him hes going to
get skewered. Theres nothing we
can do.
CD: No, Im not going to get
SCREWED. Im going to fight
this.
ADV X: Skewered. Really, 1
dont see any need for that kind
of language.
CD: Not if 1 can help it.
ADV X: Thats the only
attitude you can take in this
situation. Theres only one
catch.
CD: Whats that.
ADVX: It won't do you any
good.
At that CD walks out of the
office and goes to the math
chairmans office, telling the
secretary his long story and
asking her if he can see the
chairman.
SEC: Yes. you may see him,
but hes not in right now.
CD: Well, Ill wait for him.
Its critical for my graduation.

SEC: 0, that wont be
possible. You see, hes out today
and wont be back till next
week. Youll have to see advisors
X and Y, theyre the only ones
who can advise on your type of
problem.
CD: (Highly impatient): Ive
seen them, thank you.
SEC: Well, you can see the
chairman but lies not in. You
can see him next week. .
CD: That will be too late for
scheduling.
Just then adviser Z comes in,
overhears CDs plight.
ADV Z: Would you like to
see me. Im bored and need
some business.
CD: OK, if you can help me.
CD and Advisor Z go off to
Advisor Zs office where CD
spends 3Vi hours explaining his
dilemma.
ADV Z: What do you want to
take,then.
CD: Just two courses, the
two I never took but got credit
for.
ADV Z: OK. I'll make a note
in your schedule.
*
CD: That simple! Are you
sure 1 won't get taken in by this
transaction.
ADV Z*: What to do you
mean?

EDITORIALS

Shoddy Election Laws

An Alligator staff member voted three
times in Thursdays election.
He deliberately flaunted a law and got
away with it.
But, then, defiance of student body
election law's is nothing new.
Like last spring, when Bill Mcride had
apparently defeated Clyde laylor for
student body president by eight votes.
The victory, though, was short and sweet.
A protest suit was filed with the Honor
Court, which overturned the election when
confronted with a list of specific violations
that would make an idealist shudder with
despair.
Violations were nothing new then either.
It wasjust the first time anybody seriously did
something about them.
How is it that students can repeatedly
ignore election laws and get away with it?
Simple. Enforcement of the laws is
shoddy.
The glaring lack of clear, well-defined
procedures for election officials to follow is
an open invitation for abuse of the sacred
privilege of voting.
When a student can first vote in an
unauthorized area, when no official
questions his eligibility, when he can later
vote in two other polling locations
when, in short, he can totally ignore
procedures designed to thwart dishonesty,
then its time for a change.
Its time someone who believes in

By Richard Thompson

CD then re-explains his
problem.
ADV Z, after talking on
phone: Well, weve worked out a
deal for you. Well cut out one
of your math courses and lighten
your load one quarter.
Just then the Adviser Z gets a
phoneflash from her secretary.
Yes, tell him to hold she says,
looking at CD. Will there be
anything else, she asks him and
before he can answer adds, Ive
got a very important call here,
Im sure you understand.
CD understood.
Outside, CD is drinking a
coke, trying to calm himself.
Advisors X and Y walk by.
X and Y: Howd you do?
CD: I got SCREWED.
X and Y: SKEW'ERED. Al
least you tried. Thats what
counts.
Inside, advisor Z is oh the
phone: Yes. what paper did you
say you were with. 0 yes. fine
paper. Yes, 1 do think the
Action Conference will help
opeti communications between
students, faculty and the
administration. And whats
more, recent charges that the
administration is authoritarian
are nothing but the absurd and
irresponsible babblings of .

LiGHT PRINT 1
wmmmmm 1 mJLJ L P

Mcu \ Sakes! Another Latin American Government
Taken Over By The Military"
i i
The Florida Alligator
Fl rida
ITVsiT""'*' AdVer,iSi 9 HiC 5 in R " 3 . R Union. Phone
"Opinions expressed in ,ho H.-irida Alligator are ,h ose he editors or of
of ,l.e an.de and no, ihose of the University j | or f d n

honesty steps forward and designs realistic,
enforceable election procedures and then
makes sure they are followed to the letter.
The Alligator proved its point. And so did
a lot of other students who violated
elections laws, probably for other reasons.
The point is and has been that elections
on this campus are a poor excuse of
democracy in action.
For those who care, the time for change
is now.
Any takers?
'Dear SG
For whom do the bells toll?
For the moment, nobody at the UF. The
Century Tower stands tall and silent. The
chimes are no more.
And the quiet is deafening. It seems that
the chime system needed some minor repairs
this summer. Repairs were made.
The chime system also needed new rolls
of music. So far, no new rolls.
Officials say the music rolls will cost
about SIOO. Student Government was told
of the situation but has done nothing.
Therefore, we would like to repeat the
request, for those in SG who may have not
noticed the silence.
Dear Student Government: Would you
please consider scraping together the paltry
sum of SIOO to purchase new music rolls for
the tower chimes. The students would
deeply appreciate your generosity and
concern. Thank you.



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Monday. October 21. 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

* Th Florid> Alliortor, Monday. October 21.1968

-
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THE KREMLIN? IICI FALL FASHIONS I
ARE HERE... if I
i At Libbye's you'll find the latest in c
i smart, new fashions for the cool 1 f
days and nights ahead. See our new 2
selection of famous brandssuits, ' skirts, blouses, sweaters, dresses and :§j / I
slacksfashions for every occasion. I
Come in and browse you're always f
welcome at Libbye's. I
.% USE CENTRAL CHARGE OR LAYAWAY f
FREE PARKING ON Ist FEDERALS LOT S
rB
LIBBYE'S
235 W. UNIVERSITY NEXT TO FLA THEATRE I

Movies Sef Style For Plumage

New York hairstylists are
talking about Plumage coiffures,
water waves, bubbly curls and
long cascades...all of which add
up to a romantic, feminine look
in hair with the flavor of two
forthcoming cinematic
extravaganzas... Star, story of
actress Gertrude Lawrences life
and Romeo and Juliet.
Designer of Plumage, a
collection of soft, rounded,
short hairdos that flare with
feminity, is Michel Kazan. Even
for evening, hair pieces-the
curly bun, curvy cascade wiglet,
wired petit-plaits-rest at the
nape, never lower, leaving the
neck free of hair in swan-like
elegance.
The Plumage line, designed

I S,NC 938 I
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9 B.i # I % s
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am" I M
II SW 0 rti S>.-Villoge Squaw STORE HOURS: I
I 9 30 -* BOO p,ly I

especially for small lieads,
curves the curl close to the head
with feathered wisps curved on
the brow and at the sides. Bangs
are square cut, yet well rounded
and full. The crown features a
new criss-cross line that is
slightly puffed up to achieve the
perfect oval shape.
Kazans Curvy Cut, of course,
provides the foundation-top
layer, curved and elevated, has
the length of the finished
coiffure while the under layer is
cut shorter and squared off to
give lasting body substance thus
eliminating teasing and back
brushing.
Charles of the Ritz stylists
favor four lengths, ranging from
mini to maxi lengths. For the

mini cut, hair is at least three
inches from the crown and
semi-shingled at the nape. Water
waves are coaxed into pl ace
when hair is dripping wet to give
that cheek-hugging look of the
Thirties (when Gertrude
Lawrence was in flower).
For a midi length, hair must
be at least six to eight inches in
length at the crown and at the
sides, shapedin a layer cut at the
back to a mere lYi inches
Setting with small rollers and
ruffling the ends with a brush
create a froth of bubbly curls
(another steal from the Thirties).
The maxi look (usually
achieved with a long hairpiece)
reflects the romance of
Shakespeares Juliet...perfect for
the truly young.



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NICK ARROYO
THE MASCULINE LOOK
One of the most exciting put ons" yet this year is that masculine
look for the girl who's woman enough to wear it.
This cinch belt top above is right in the spirit of the black leather
jacket. Hip hugger pants fit as tight as the Hell's Angels wear them.
Luckily Arlene is walking instead of trying to ride a cycle. The jacket
and pants are available for about S3O at Jody's. Shown with Arlene is
Trish, in one of Jody's newest lines the bird dress. It's made of hand
screened cotton this one with browns and golds.
Maas Brother City Pants presents the costumed men's look for the
women, (below) The bold flared leg trousers are topped by a bush
shirt and a luggage brown sweater vest. Brenda has a paisley scarf tied
at the throat.
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NICK ARROYO

Lindsey
Tartan Terrific
The bonnie plaid coordinates from Bobbie
Brooks are the way to go for fall. Be
smart. .gather the whole clan of separates and
have yourself a fashion fling from Belk Lindsey.
A. Our Tartan talltapers. .for every sporting
lass from Boston to Brigadoon. Slick-fit of 80%
wool / 20% nylon. Sizes 5-15, $14.00.
B. The sweater vest takes over. .and makes the
newest thing in your closet. All wool in marvy
colors. Sizes 34-40, $7.00.
C. Who Scotched the A-skirt? ... turned a
Tartan on its bias, showed up so sassy? Bobbie
Brooks, my Lassie! 80% wool / 20% nylon. Sizes
5 15,. $12.00.
not shown: the catchy clan-plaid jacket. . $20.00.
The tall-turtled sweater. . SIO.OO.
o USE YOUR CHARGE
STORE HOURS: 10a.m.-9p.m.
Gainesville Shopping Center-1302 N.Main Si-Free Parking

Monday. October 21,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Octobar 21,1968

Fashion: Lookina Forward Into Yesterday

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NICK ARROYO
THE PAST
. .returns
Design Shape
Reflects Era
Clothes need not be costly to
be of the moment and remain
interesting and exciting for
several seasons.
Thats what designers of
today are saying.
Theyre designing not for one
specific woman, but rather for a
whole group of contemporary,
vital, and aware women who are
ageless because of their varied
interests.
Designs of today are based on
modern art. Todays shapes, are
geometric and abstract, circles
and curves now replacing the
sharp angles of the past. The
new woven designs, are
romanticized geometric plaids
and checks deliriously exciting
fantasy plaids purely 1969 in
concept.
Color combinations range
from brilliant and clear, with
unusual fabric and pattern
combinations to black and
neutrals which, when worn
properly, have their own sparkle.
Silhouetted shapes are the
center of attention. They are
centered around shapes that are
relaxed and move. Pleats, tucks,
and moderate fullness in skirts
and dresses make the way for
easy living.
The forthcoming movie
Mayerling has inspired many
romantic and soft details
including contrast satin and
velvet collars and cuffs, high
stock-tied collars, wide scarf and
wrapped necklines for day and
after dark.
These soft details are reflected
in the pure romance of velvet,
which will be very popular for
warmth as well as style this
winter.
The use of contrasting
patterns and fabrics for a
newsmaking contemporary
separates effecj is important!
Checks with plaid, plaid with
tweed, pattern with pattern!

By LOIS PARKS
Alligator Fashion Writer
Look around you. Rather
reminiscent of 17th century
England, isnt it? But when you
turn the other way you may
think youre seeing Jean Harlow,
Geronimo, General Custer or
Flash Gordon.
Thats the way fashion works.
While space age designers
have found their niche in one
segment of the fashion
syndrome, another group shows
an appreciable admiration for
the romanticism of days gone
*>y-
The straight angular look of

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HicTOPY REPEATS ITSELF

the early 6os has become passe".
Curly haired girls no longer have
to feel frustrated and spend
countless hours with hair
straightener. Curls are IN.
The battle of the bulge is well
concealed in todays gently
gathered skirts, and bodices.
Puffy sleeves of soft flowing
materials with ruffles galore
accent luxurious velvets.
The dichotomy is, the
twentieth century liberated
woman free and independent to
make her own decisions, has
chosen the garb of the woman of
yesterday, in spite o" its ancient
connotations.

The great thing about it is
each girl can find her own thing
in the fashion world. By the
same token she can change from
day to day if its her inclination.
Lets not forget the fellows.
Theyve caught on to a good
thing. The ivy look is still
popular and generally most
appropriate, but it sure gets to
be boring after a while.
The new Guru and hippy
looks are a kind of reflection of
a new feeling of creativity and
identity.
Guys too have revived history.
Long sidebumed Rhett Butlers
permeate the campus, in search

of their Scarlett OHara, or Civil
War or whatever.
The underlying implications
are exciting. People are getting
away from the here and now and
looking forward into a yesterday
to define themselves. If the old
adage, a man is what he wears
(no doubt a direct quote from
some Madison Avenue
representative of the clothing
industry) still holds true, there
are a lot of interesting people to
meet.
Bring it back to life I say,
youve got quite a heritage to
draw from.



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NICK ARROYO

DOTS FOR FROLICS
Arlene's grey crepe dotted dress is low-sashed and
full-skirted with push-up, high button sleeves.

TOTIHE
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I
By appointment to the local queens of fashion. The Proprietor purveys a
small, but selected array of fripperies and gewgaws. Royally flattering,
they are also of imperial quality. Court is in session, every day.

&tag M rag
Two convenient locations to serve you
Downtown and Gainesville Mall
o

87 :
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NICK ARROYO

DO YOUR OWN THING
Cowboy boots and a velvet mandarin tunic? Well, a
costume ensemble is a do your own thing and Steve
certainly achieves the unique look.

INTERHALL COUNOL
U F
f R epresenting Over 6000 Students
Many positions are open for students interested
in working for the interhall Council in any of
the following committees
Food and Vending
Public Relations
Physical Improvements
Dance

Apply Room 322 of the Reitz Union
Representing All On-Campus Residents
For Better Living
Twig sez...
"let's go to i
Frolics ... I \
in a I M'X,.
Young Edwardian J I
Arpeia" // J/ "A
r\ I \
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Come see the new me . same
OLD warm and cozy ... but
there's Twice as much room to
browze, now that I've grown.
You'll find all your old favorites
plus everything that's fashion for
the ''now'' girl. Remember, we're
sumptuously SITUATE at 1131
W. Univ. . NEAR
CAMPUS . AND IN THE MALL.

Monday, October 21.1968. The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Octobf- 21, 1968

Accessories Make The Total Look

By LOIS PARKS
Alligator Fashion Writer
Fashion trendsetters are
beginning to look at fashion like
psychology looks at individuals.
Today, it is the total look.
No longer is it sufficient for
fashion minded coeds to settle
for a pretty new dress and call it
an outfit. Rather, the look from
head to toe comprises the'
complete image.
Starting at the bottom, on
and off campus, its the
Monster shoe.
Heavy leather squared toed,
thick heeled footwear trimmed
in brass, either buckles, or chains
are in their own ugly way, very
attractive with the right outfit.
The best way to describe
them, is theyre the kind of
shoe your father would call
sensible!

THE GENTLEMAN'S SHIRT
Bristol
I Collegia telyr Correct. ..
1 For Fall 1968: Sero offers a choice of two
1 of Americas most celebrated campus collar
1 models the Purist button-down and the
I new, distinctive Bristol. Deftly tailored
I with trimly tapered body lines in a host
I of handsome solid colourings, stripings and
8 checks, many exclusive with Sero. Both
8 models come in fine-combed 100% cotton or
u durable press.
I 13 West University Ave.
I Gainesville Mall
I Gainesville, Florida
I (TCopyrifM by Sero of New Haven. Inc 1964
#
jzf>ljnp
Carolyn Plaza 1620 West University

Then theres stockings. One
step ahead from last yearsstyles,
this years stockings arc wilder,
brighter and function as a color
accent to the dress.
Plain opaque stockings are the
most practical, but the new
op patterns can lend a new
look to otherwise plain solid
dresses.
Chain belts, a carry-over from
last year, worn just below the
waist can make a sweater and
skirt classic into a special
ensemble.
This new stress at waist and
hip is also reflected in the scarf
thing. Brightly colored scarfs
either in prints or contrasting
solids neatly tied at the waist
give a new dimension to straight
lined outfits.
One scarf can go a long way.
They can be tied at the waist,
folded into an ascot and tucked

into a neckline, or tied in the
hair. It no longer matters
whether your hair is mini or
maxi length. Wear a scarf!
Scarfs are an ideal solution to
the days when the Gainesville
humidity is too much for even
the finest and most carefully set
head to take. The wilder the
better!
Purses go practical, with the
new satchel styles. Geared to
a realistic size that girls can fit a
reasonable amount of
paraphenalia into they really
make the every day scene.

L\ AA /have the lowest
>J// /I /IfnA / PRI CES IN GAINESVILLE
W I i%mecomi^g BEST yfs?T
' / /
100% j Long ] i N ew 100% math
Hair ! | rj I GOODS
Win !1 LLS : : STRETCH Ha IMPORTERS
fee I ; gORRER
any color \ 4 types 100% 1 machine made [ AND UNIV.
i FuUy Hand [ Across from
; ; I S3OO I: Ramada Inn
\ 80 colors 1

And they dont show it nearly
as much when they are starting
to get worn!
Tinted shades in sunglasses are
showing up more and more.
Blue, yellow, green, enclosed in
metallic or plastic frames put an
additional sparkle of color on
your face. Their semi-transpar semi-transparency
ency semi-transparency also draws attention to
otherwise plain eyes and gives
them an air of intrigue.
Antique jewelry is featured
everywhere. The selections are
vast. Rings worn on the first
finger are very popular.
Brooches and lockets at the

collar line can be pinned to a
blouse or scarf and bring eyes
directly to the face.
Love beads, when worn with a
casual outfit have been designed
to bring a touch of the far east,
westward. The Guru look,
however has had its day.
One caution about love beads.
Legend has it that if they are
bought v for yourself they may
bring bad luck. So, sit back and
hope youve got a friend wholl
buy them or make them for you,
or better yet, give you his or her
own in a gesture of love.



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NICK ARROYO
OH YEAH... A MINISKIRT
Pam's wearing a look right out of ancient China. Her green flowered
print pants suit has a high split neck. Convertible to a mini-skirt from
Twig.
j
| Get Your Homecoming Outfit
From

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RUSSIAN WOOL N,CKARROYO AMERICAN IVY

The Russian look is featured in this imitation lambs
wool vest and skirt, with matching grey boots and a
body shirt beneath modeled by Caroline.

jXrr r-=
on the square "" =======a
Q^ H wd
(IPll Lingerie
f Pictured left rib cord in 50% rayon, 50%
cotton. Eyelet embroidery edging gathered
down front, with dainty colored embriodery.
Sleeve edges, too. White, blue in no-iron
fabric. 8-14.
ersary Sale $7.99^0^
Culottes jl|^^\ v
no iron fabric \jf Wuu ri yy
Red green, navy. ||j|| W /
SALE $7.99 tIKM
anop wib ons I j \ \
9.30A.M. -9 P.M. / / \ \
Other Pretty Shifts in Print f / V \
reg. sl3 sl7 I / \ \
Anniversary Sale $6.99 59.99 11 \ \
*disc. styles / / \ \
\k
* Lingerie-Second Floor \J

Monday. October 21,1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Sherry goes American Ivy in one of the traditional
looks of the show...a sweater-skirt combination with
a chain belt. It's the latest!

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21,1968

DENISEWOOL* MESSES I'fTj/ A
LOOK THAT
FROM ALL OTHERS PANTS
VARIETY OF HI
TOP COLORS |A
W TO 5011 your li ik
V NEEDS I |m
'BIRD DRESSES 'LEATHER LOOK
WITH THE slacks x jmm
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NICK ARROYO 0 M kAC CCC
PARTY PLUM I % tU/Vlt Ott 1
An elegantly simple party fjj % i I \
dress in plum is modeled by || V ] /
Pam. The dress has a low little /As
skirt and a sash at the neck, just 100 ft W IIKIX/ awe U
right for any occasion, and great urV MVt
for dancing. Maybe for Frolics? Ph. 376-2585
From the Twig.
III'
p xtbsrive trifeg* jsty#
*>>' 1
- Wttjurtd, "*'u, v



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PEKING TO SHAKESPEARE
It's only a short step from the Kremlin to Peking. Here's Margaret
(above) wearing a burgandy crushed velvet mandarin style pants set.
It's another great costume look.
f 1
Linda's name should be Juliet in this green outfit. She s back in
Shakespeare's time ruffled and pleated and sashed in hot pink.
Perfect for any smart occasion.
mm
5 f Q$
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*4 i t

THE TARTAR LOOK NICK ARROYO MEDITATION LOOK

Mack models the Tartar look in an
embroidery-trimmed tunic. He wears silver sateen
bell bottoms underneath.

Jjp SitwtomZ j|lil^
PLAIDS THE THING IN THIS llsk
princess jumper in blue/ umm-Um tsfm
SAND/APRirnT WOOL. TISSUE Hra TOji
WEIGHT ZEPHYR WOOL turtleneck K|S£[
/A/ blue, sand or apricot. jpffl/iw
iLOVE THAT LONG' LEAN LOOK OF
A SLEEVELESS JACKET AND SLIM
SKIRT IN LUSH GREEN
HERRINGBONE TWEED WITH
ACCENTS OF GREEN SUEDE, topping
a forest green zephyn-weight turtleneck.
THE NEW FASHONS ARE HERE,
full of new details, sparkling with
originality and ready your smiles
of happy approval! COME SEE THEM
S? A
Silve/imaitt-
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING UJoWf/tlui UJoW- 0L TCtAtttCHli
ON THE HUGE LOT AT U
REAR OF STORE 225 W. UNIV. AVE.
MEZZANINE FLOOR

aa- IV tv Vril I *%--/ It %r V i M I 1 Uin I i
Monday, October 21.1968, The Florida AHigrtor,

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WJL IB nApi^B
SMtkmm *up y-'
fi£Bpr raK

The meditation look of the Indian Nehru is big this
fall. Dan wears striped bell bottoms with his brown
vinyl jacket.

Page 15



Page 16

>. The Florida Alligator. Monday, October 21,1968

NICK KNROVO
17th CENTURY ENGLAND
Leg-o-mouton sleeves in the style of the 17Hi Century are highlighted
in this brown velvet empire dress modeled by Linda.
-
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mmmmm a
f) 4 ftnpit %##* NICK ARROYO
FLAPPER DAYS
Glad someone woke Caroline in time for the show! Her outfit is an
embroidered quilted A-line shortie with matching boots.

'&iprfcipiptyjpjf&jp&iprfcjpspjpipjpif&ipipipipipipipipipiplpipipipip

I ,-.. .[*''*
Its almost time for Fall Frolics
and a chance to really dress up.
Nina Cameron is wearing the in
look .. the curl look .. the
feminine look. This is a 100%
human hair toppett. The cost?
$24.95. Come in and take
advantage of our October
Anniversary Sale.
f ' " T
'j \
e^^im/6d
. & - :
r
Dazzle
Tttr.lHitcbefls flfotditll
1127 W. University Ave. n The Mo||



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IBBBBBBBBiIBfiBraIiMfr -
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i Ilf' < ,s
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1 PIN STRIPES GALORE
Penny from Donigan's wears a Lanz dress and
jacket in gray and white pin stripes. Her gray sheer
hose are by Rudi Gernreich and the black patent
leather shoes are from Villager.

*r, -mm \ pj, r u -X, k
wjl |l I B Bi| \Vvl VB^^Hpr^B
i 11 '\
|| Ij lIK B I
ill 111 l I IjM l Il I
~9Pr *| 111 HI X 9 1/8 £ .., "'wafl#^
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, mkmm Hi 111 i I IJBF 1
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Bbl 111 l 111 I Ltm lM : !f| wKM
STO VE PIPE LOOK
Here's Caroline in brown and white striped stove pipe hip huggers.
She wears a black velvet vest and a beige ruffled body shirt.

I *'"' *B
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| I
11 vii^i^n
IS *:
I li m
TRADITIONAL COLLEGIATE
This traditional outfit from Donigan's is
highlighted by a navy blue blazer by Deansgate and
Corbin slacks. A Reis blue club tie against a durable
press tattersal shirt by Gant and Bass saddle oxfords
round out the selection. _____

p^-" niit 'VbXXL
f y J'
P^aZ
Vj| m, C/*i~
Q $ \tXM*4* J&t~0 ~ ~
J t7 r AjlX ) Jt f L Y^///
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7

Monday. October 21.1968. The Florida Alligator,

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9 smmm
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v> nTOm :v v %v
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H W B | w F
FALL F/NERY
This cool weather selection features a turtle neck,
cable knit sweater by Alan Paint, Corbin slacks and
Munk-Strap shoes by Cole Haan from Donigan's.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21,1968

£A,qubt£^
tfSi CLUB &
fU campus
fcji FASHIONS
By CHIP TOLBERT
ESQUIRES FASHION EDITOR
FLOCCIPAUCINIHILIPILIFICATION try that on your Funk &
Wagnalls! Actually, it has nothing whatsoever to do with this col column...
umn... column... I just wanted a classy opener. Now then, about fashion.
I can hardly remember a Fall when theres been such a wide selec selection
tion selection of good looking mens wear. New styles, new colors and fabrics
...theres something for everyone, with plenty of room for indi individuality.
viduality. individuality. First off, let's consider color. Current and choice for Fall
are the new...
HARVEST COLORS warm browns, sunlit greens, livelier blues
and golden wheat. These*are not single, specific colors; rather, a
group of warm autumnal tones each made more vibrant by an
underlying sunlit cast. Greens are clearer, bearing no relation relationship
ship relationship to the olive range; blues are seen in brighter, intermediate
tones; browns range from rich bronze to russet; and golden wheat
livens up the beige/tan shades. Look for these Harvest Colors in
all types of tailored apparel, including...
fTHE COUNTRY SUIT. which comes to campus
with a POW! Bold, colorful plaids and over overplaids
plaids overplaids emphasize the casual aspect of these new
suits, while the smoother finish of the worsted,
cheviot or saxony fabrics allows for more flexi flexibility
bility flexibility in where they can be worn. Available in
either two or three-button models, this suit
makes unmistakable impactparticularly when
worn with matching vest.
THE POWER OF PLAID is also seen in the re return
turn return of authentic clan tartans in sportswear.
Slacks, shirts, ties, jackets all will be bearing
the stamp of MacDonald, Mlinro, Royal Stew Stewart.
art. Stewart. Try the slacks with a solid color blazer. Or
a red tartan jacket...just the thing for your
next fling, Highland or otherwise.
DONEGAL TWEEDS are back, too, and one cant help wondering
why the long hiatus. This classic fabric a sturdy woolen flecked
with multi-colored nubs looks mighty handsome on its own, or
mix it with any patterns you like since it has an over-all solid color
look. Harvest Wheat is particularly suited to this tweed, affording
a warm neutral background for all sorts of color accents.
THE TURTLENECK TAKEOVER continues
t. strong this Fall, as is evidenced by the extraor extraordinary
dinary extraordinary selection available. One idea we like
the bulky knit pullover with an extra-high cuff
at the neck... enough to be adjustable, depend dependon
on dependon de the turn-over. Intricate
cables and stylized variations of fisher fishermens
mens fishermens knits add textured, dimensional interest
to many of these sweaters. Theres plenty of
opportunity for individuality, so forget the
I over-worked white turtleneck with navy blue
| blazer. Youre college men...not U-boat com-
I manders.
MATCHED SHIRTS AND TIES make fi hion news in bold woven
patterns of checks and plaids. The fabri .. range from medium mediumweight
weight mediumweight cottons to lightweight woolen blends, and the rugged good
looks of this combination make it equally acceptable with or with without
out without a jacket. However, it does make a perfect partner for the solid
color bl r ror one of those antiqued 1 .ther jackets that are so
popular r ight now.
SHAPE UP is our parting word for this month. With more and
more fitted apparel making the scene, it behooves us all to watch
the waistline. And believe me, its one heck of a lot easier when
youre college age...l know, the hard way!

x g al f JF T\ f / a x \ v
/
[( I\
55 nr f ~ p DI jM
jj | | i :
PRICES ARE "ABOUT.
For little evenings in town or country ... a spirited suit
with the great young look and accomplished tailoring of
John Meyer. In Step Glen wool plaid with a contour back belt
and an easy A-line skirt #46. The compatible pullover is
softly tied and baby-buttoned and comes in fine-gauge lambs
wool #l6. Both, in up-beat colors. At discerning stores.
j! DONICANS y
}'* W 11^
!J^ L -v** v l9 > sb^- 1 "1J
1123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. ~j I>A I



Speaking Out

Alper Gave Aid-Comfort To Censors

(EDITORS NOTE: Clyde Ellis is Chairman of the
Student Rights Committee of the Senate and is one of
the senators who spoke against the nomination of
Harvey Alper to the Board of Student Publications.)
This column is in response to last Thursdays editorial
entitled Screwed Again.
A majority of the Student Senate felt that Mr. Harvey
Alper should not be placed in a position of power over
the content of Student Publications, especially the
Alligator. The main reason was because Mr. Alper
permanently walked off his job when a controversial
editorial was censored by the very body for which he
was being considered last week.
Whether or not Mr. Alper believed that the editorial
should have been censored, the fact remains that his
action gave aid and comfort to those who censored it.
His action at that time clearly permits the inference that
Mr. Alper did not stand up for freedom of the press at
that time and cannot be depended upon to do so in the
future.
As your editorial pointed out, those who resigned at
that time stated that they felt that no student
newspaper should be censored as to matters of opinion.
But their actions belied their words. The issue before the
Board of Publications was the content of the editorial.
Many well-meaning people who think that they
believe in freedom of the press, nonetheless also belifve
that many ideas of a political nature should be filtered
before they reach the students. Those who in fact censor

i? : :
j Alligator Inquizitor j
i By LEWIS ROTHLEIN >!
I :j:
J Happy Monday. Just think, since weve been fortunate to hit a
J twelve week quarter, that leaves us left with eight weeks to go! i;i
'l Todays questions:
x 1. What musical play is the song, Try to Remember from?
$ 2. Who won the National League batting championship this year? :j
:;(And a super-toughie) what was his average?
3. Before Alaska entered the Union and thus became our 49th
instate, what was the last state to have joined? And do you know when
;j*this occurred?
4. In the song Runaway, by Del Shannon, what is the line that
5. What are the nine planets (in their order from the sun.)
£ 6. Is it true that the Levi Company received the Nobel Prize for
the best overall effort?
* 4 K
,j j.;
J That was bad. Here are yesterdays answers: 1. Illinois, Judith Ann ;j
jjFord 2. Dale Garnett 3. Cincinnati iji
S Whistle Dixie today. s

Dixie Aint Even Southern

MR. EDITOR:
I have been most interested in
reading the editorials and
comments otherwise about the
song Dixie in the recent issues
of THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR. May I add a few
pertinent facts to .the campus
discussion? Dixie was wfitten
by a mid-western Yankee, Daniel
Decatur Emmitt. Born in Mount
Vernon, Ohio in 1815, Daniel D.
Emmitt, to my knowledge, never
lived in the South during his
long life. He died in 1904 in the
community in which he was
born. After a stint of seven years
In a circus, he, in 1842,
organized Dan Emmitts
Minstrels which he, in time,
called the Virginia Minstrels.
Appearing first in the Bowery
Amphitheater, Emm its
Ministrels toured Europe after a
successful American debut. By
be 1850s Dan Emmitt was
writing songs which his minstrels
u.g in the most populous cities
the United States. Dixie
was written by this talented
writer of songs early in 1859 and
was a popular number on the
Virginia Minstrels program
tbrought the North and
Mid-West in the spring and earl/
summer of 1859.

Although the Yankees liked
the song immensely, the
Southerners adopted it instantly.
Tourists throughout the South
in the months just preceding the
Civil War reported hearing
Dixie wherever they went.
Southerners hummed it, they
whistled it and they sang it.
Abraham Lincoln, widely read in
the newspapers of the time,
supposedly stated, on the eve of
the presidential election of
1860, that the Southerners
ought to take Dixie as their
song.
Written by a mid-western
Yankee, sung by a Yankee
troupe of entertainers in the
North and in the Mid-West
months before it found its way
into the hearts of Southerners,
the Southern Rebels- the
ancestors of you intelligent
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to tf\e editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300-words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

the press always do so in the name of freedom of the
press. But prior censorship of controversial views lies at
the heart of totalitarian institutions and should in no
way be countenanced by a body representative of the
students at this university.
If Mr. Alper had other reasons for resigning, I suggest
that he should have done so either before or long after
the issue of censorship arose. The editorial in question
concerned the most controversial issue of the school
year.
Whether one agreed with it or not, it exemplified the
type of courageous expression of opinion which won for
the Alligator the rating Americas number one college
daily, which it presently carries on its masthead. I
submit that the first duty of Mr. Alper at that time was
to do everything in his power to insure that the
newspaper was not censored. Only people of
unquestioned dedication to maximum freedom of the
press within the law should hold positions on the Board
of Publications.
The statements by Mr. Alper associating the
University Report with radical students hell-bent on
destruction are extremely irresponsible. They further
demonstrate a prejudice which no responsible member
of the Board of Publications should harbor, since the
Report may have business before that Board in the
future. Let me further state that no one connected with
the Report made any comment to me at any time about
Mr. Alpers nomination.

OPEN FORUM:
AdrtittML ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man
_______

MR. EDITOR:
The mechanistic and
fragmented culture we are a part
of is characterized by revolution,
dissention, and protest.
Subversive activities of this
nature are necessary for a
society to prosper, for
complacency breeds ignorance
and destruction. It is the

young writers in THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR actually
contributed nothing to the
origin of the song but the
famous rebel yells which soon
habitually formed the Grand
Finale of Dixie.
GEORGE OSBORN
PROFESSOR OF HISTORY
AND SOCIAL SCIENCE
Irritated
Historian
MR. EDITOR:
I get extremely irritated by
the letters from the pointy-heads
who would destroy a beloved
tradition by abolishing the
playing of Dixie at football
games. This is, and always will
be, a Southern university with a
noble and proud Southern
heritage.
The South has produced
many great Americans -- George
Washington, Thomas Jefferson,
Robert E. Lee, and. yes, George
Wallace, to name a few. With
such a great and noble heritage,
Hell no, we aint forgettin.
MIKE LEE, 4AG

Crying For Rights Possessed

A few closing remarks are necessitated by your poor
coverage of the Senate meeting. The most important act
of the Senate that night has not even been mentioned in
your paper. It was the unanimous passage of a resolution
calling upon the Administration to have the charges in
local court dropped against the student who taped
posters on university walls. The resolution recognizes
that the proper disciplinary body-if any is needed-is the
Student Conduct Committee. The resolution should be a
particular interest to the Alligator since it has yet to take
an editorial stand on the subject.
Your coverage was factually incorrect about any type
of walkout. Absolutely no walkout occurred over
Mr. Alpers nomination; or over anything else, for that
matter.
Although your coverage was very poor
journalistically, I would in no way support anyone who
might try to censor it. If the present editorial staff ever
wishes to display the same type of courageous
journalism which once made the paper number one, it
would be of immense value to them to be assured that
the Board of Publications members are firmly didicated
to protecting their freedom of expression.
The senate attempted in insure such Board members
by its action last Tuesday night. And if perchance the
next Board of Publications is not so dedicated, the
Alligator will still be able to look for aid to those
eighteen Senators who voted against Mr. Alpers
nomination.

agitator, still clamoring for the
rights which he had previously
pursued and now possesses, who
befuddles me. In the letter
entitled, UF First In Nation?
Only By Open Forum, Mr.
Jacobson is illogically appealing
for those liberties which he
already has at his disposal.
/
Mr. Jacobsons reference to
the lack of freedom,
individuality, and the r ight of
dissent is extremely indefinite
and deserves comment. We have
such numerous freedoms at our

Thomas Men
Take Pride
MR. EDITOR:
After a brief respite from the
pursuits of academia the Men of
Thomas D are happy to report
their formidable record for the
year 1907-68. The final section
average fell to 3.47 from the
3.58 held for the first two
quarters. One former resident,
now living in Reid Hall, made a
2.42, thus causing the plummet.
As a result Thomas D per se just
missed qualifying for the
University College Deans List.
Nevertheless, we are justifiably
proud of our accomplishment.
Unfortunately this select
group has been disbanded, and
this may be the last such letter
from Thomas D. However, only
the grueling passage of another
quarter will tell:
THE MEN OF THOMAS D

Monday, October 21,1968, Th Florida Alligator,

By Clyde Ellis

disposal that it is impossible to
utilize them all. There is not one
privilege that I can contemplate
which is not already afforded to
us by the University. Any more
elimination of restraints on our
behalf would only infringe upon
and abuse the rights of others.
Individuality,on the other hand,
is not a matter of administrative
policies but one ones concept of
self. Attainment of individuality,
kept within rational limits, is a
right only exercisable by the
individual. As far as Mr.
Jacobsons yearning for the
right of dissent, he utilized it
by writing his editorial.
The political action occurring on
campus, the protests against war,
the editorials appearing in the
Alligator, and the criticism of
the administration exemplify the
right of dissent. Rights we
have; it is not rights he seeks,
but license beyond which human
decency dictates.
Concerning his disagreement
with President OConnells
statement, I concure with him
on one point. The UF will never
become number one if the
rational complaints of the
majority are discarded and not
heeded by the administration.
As an example,! point out the
case of Professor Marshall Jones,
which shows the disregard a
minority may posess toward the
rational will of a majority.
LARRY C. LESSARD, lUC

Page 19



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
v
Royal Portable Typewriter and
Leather Carrying Case. Very good
condition. Need to sell fast 549.50.
Call 376-1134. (A-3t-20-p)
Full length human hair wig. Color
light brown. Can be cut. Worn only
twice. S4O. Call 3 78-818 7.
(A-st-20-p)
FOR SALE~I967~Honda Super 65
Only 2,400 mi. Call Steve at
376-9138 or Come see at 2101 NE
Bth St. First offer of $199.00 takes
it. (A-3t-20-p)
M DURABLE SIAMESE KITTENS
Two males and one female. Bumper
pool table and twin bed. Call
372-2452 after 4 pm or 462-2516
after midnite. (A-18-st-p)
SAVE-SAVE-SAVE Desk, chairs,
files tables, Bookcases and typing
tables New Used-Refinished Save up
to 50% or more JR Office Furniture
Equipment Co. 620*/2 S. Main St. Ph
376-1146. (A-17 5t p)
1968 Sport Honda 50 only 1000
actual miles mint condition must sell
only $175 Call Dave 378-6620.
(A-3t-19-p)
LUDWIG DRUMS complete
including Paiste 602 cymbals stool,
white marine pearl. Original cost
$635 Now S4OO. like new. Call
378-6746. (A-7t-16-p)
Akai 355 d Tape Deck (Roberts
400 x) Complete with accessories.
SBOO value. A buy of a lifetime
used less than 10 hours. $425. Call
378-7393. (A-st-20-p)
WELL kept carpets show the results
of regular Blue Lustre spot cleaning.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-21-nc)
1968 Suzuki 100 Only 500 miles, not
even broken in. $325. Call 372-8946
also selling helmet with bubble
shield. (A-3t-21-p)
New Harley Davidson 65cc 200
miles. $225 or best offer. Cost over
$375 includes saddlebags windshield
and helmet. Call Harold or Marty
376-8058. (A-lt-1 8-p)
TAPE RECORDER, Sony 500A,
dual remote speakers complete with
tapes of various selections of music,
also tape slicker kit, microphones,
etc. Purchased in Tokyo. Only S2OO.
TYPEWRITER, Royal deluxe
portable. Fair condition. SIO.OO.
RELAXICIZOR, transistorized.
Practically new, used about 10 times.
Complete with pads and special
moisturizor. Get ycur exercise while
you study! SIOO.OO. Call 378-9003.
(A-19-2t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading supplies.
Custom Reloading. HARRY
BECKWITH GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340. (A-ts-l-p)
Diamond wedding ring set 1/3 carat.
Never worn. Silver arid gold band.
Original price S2OO. Now $125. Rich
1403 SW 22nd Place. (A-st-21-p)
CAMPUS CONCESSION Good part
time money maker. Contact
weekends or eve. except Monday &
Thursday eve. 372-8634. (A-st-18-p)
BSA Lighting 1965 650 cc with
helmet tag good tires. This machipe is
fast and ready to go. Call 376-8972
or 372-3378. (A-st-18-p)
FOR RENT
MUST SUBLLI LEAVING TOWN
Move in today. October rent paid
on a desirable 2 bedroom apartment
in a convenient location close to
campus. Very flexible arrangements.
Call 376-9688 between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m, for further information.
(B-20-ts-c)
Peter Pan Motel Williston Fla. Just 20
mi. from Gainesville. Reservations
available for Homecoming weekend.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-20-p)
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-C)

JML i STEAK HOUSE \
I KATI'RING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 00c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
West *: ato Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville. Florida

FOR RENT
Homecoming room for two or
three large comfortable rooming
house. Central air cond. S6O for Nov.
1 & 2. Bob 372-9370. (B-19-3t-p)
Apartment for Rent. Apt. 151
Colonial Manor. Call 372-7111.
(B-st-18-p)
SpMlous i-bedroom Fully FufriMtod
including washing machine. Within
walking distance so Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357, 378-0641.
(B tf 9 c)
Air-Conditioned one bedroom apt.
with pool sub-let. More than the
comforts of home. Call 378-3969
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-21-p)
Large 2 bdr. apt. SBO/mo. Water,
sewer, pest control provided. Call
372-3160. (B-st-21-p)
WANTED
Need desperately 2 tickets to
Homecoming game. (West stand
desired) please call 372-5452 or
372-9415 and ask for Gage.
(C-2t-20-p)
Need Male Roommate large
comfortable home in NW section of
town, nice quiet atmosphere S4O a
month call 376-9080 ask for John.
C-st-20-p)
Needed: one male roommate to share
lux. 2 br. apt. with 2 others. Security
and Oct. already paid. Only SSO per
month. Contact Ricky or Ron Apt.
202 714 SW 16 Ave. (C-19-3t-p)
Wanted 4 (or) 2 tickets Miami game.
CalL 378-6791 after 1 p.m.
(C-3t-21-p)
Coed to share lg. 1 brim aot. ac WW
carpet. Poolside. Call 378-8338 4 til
6. Move in by Nov. 1. (C-st-20-p)
Wanted: Coed roommate for 60x12
11/?l 1 /? bath trailer. Own room S6O
month plus utilities. Call Diana ex.
2543 Mon. thru Fri. for details.
(C-3t-21-p)
LOVECHAIN Talented,
experienced group desires weekend
engagement. $20,000 worth of
equipment. Call Phil for information:
378-1898. (C-lt-21-p)
HELP WANTED
Jazz Musicians or group interested in
performing locally. No rock. Steady.
376-0908. (E-3t-20-p)
Piano Player wanted for Shakeys
Pizza Parlor. Sing-a-long music 3
nights per week. Apply in person,
evenings. 3510 SW 13th St.
(E-20-ts-c)
Part time male help wanted for
Shakeys Pizza Parlor, 3510 SW 13th
St. Must be 21 or older. Apply in
person after 4 p.m. (E-2t-20-c)
AUTOS |
1963 Chevy SS 327 cu. in. 300 lip.
air. cond. auto, trans. chrome wheel
stereo tape extra clean one owner
Phone 378-4278 after 5 p.m. $1095.
(G-st-19-p)
1963 Anglia. S3OO. 31 mpg. excellent
tires and mechanical. Good body.
3224 NW 13 St. Trailer 17 or Call
378-5548. (G-6t-19-p)
MGB 1964 conv r&h, wire wheels
midnite blue w/white top. Clean all
over & m good shape. Ecstatic driving
$1295, 378-6917, 301-6 D.a, V.ll.
(G-19-bt-p)
68 Chevelle SS 396 convertible 4 spd
stereo tape radio heat bucket seats
Best looking car on campus $2 700
Call 376-8740. (G-st-l 7-p)
~v,.
60 MKIX Jag Biggest luxury Jaq
built. SIOOO spent on complete eng.
overhaul 3 wks. ago. Radio heat air
excellent in & out. Offers over
SISOO. 376-0201. (G-8t 1 8-p)

Page 20

I, 1 he Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21, 1968

AUTOS
1965 Mustang 289, 4-speed. AC,
radio, new tires, extras. Call Red or
Steve at 372-6776. (G-st-19-p)
66 Plymouth Satellite 426 HEMI
every possible extra and factory
experimental option, never raced, call
378-5405 after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-16-p)
Want to restore a car. following
125.00 up 1940 Ford 41 Cad. 40
LaSalle 41 Cry. 40 Ply. 36 Buick 40
Chev. 31 Model A. Call 378-7951.
(G-10t-18-p)
1963 Fairlane 500 Black & white w.
red int. R&H very good cond. Must
sell now $480.00. Cheap. Call Ruben
378-6874. (G-6t-20-p)
1966 MGB overdrive, wire wheels,
white walls, R&H and extras. Clean,
needs no work, only TLC. Call Dave
at univ. ext 3198 or 372-7024 after
5. (G-st-20-p)
Plymouth Wagon 1959 at power
brakes and steering. Inspected. S3OO
phone 372-9860 after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)
Pontiac LeMans Sprint 1966 3 speed
standard transmission. Stereo tape
$1475. 376-8806. (G-4t-21-p)
Corvette powered comet must sell by
next week, for street or drags. Owner
going into service for full details call
George 378-7889. (G-3t-21-p)
PERSONAL
EXPECTANTLY YOURS
Gainesvilles only shop for the
mother-to-be. 706 W University Ave.
372-3850. (J-st-17rp)
Two attractive coeds are now
interviewing for male companions.
Prefer graduate students. One with
moustache. One without. 378-0609.
(J-2t-20-p)
Dearest Albert the A., Any free kisses
for your most ardent admirer? Whos
gonna win, me or Lee? Me! (heh,
heh, heh) XXX J-lt-21-p)
Wanted four adult Florida Auburn
tickets. Will pay extra. Call Art
Deane 378-9402. (J-st-19-p)
LOST & FOUND 1
> v
Misplaced 1 pr. brown weejun's and
umbrella in gold must. ccnv. by
mistake. If found, please call
378-6966. (L-3t-20-p)
Lost black wauet on campus, money
within is your reward for returning to
Herbert Norgorden, phone 378-8056
or mail box 13854 Uni. Sta.
(L-2t-20-p)
I o' 3, 9 jrT~'\
Â¥ Jack W
"Ar si
\ \ Lemmon
l '.* mSSSLi 7*lo Q3O
PIERRE Cl EMENTI 9,30
CATHERINE DENEUVE
'Beniamin
COLOR
isettse)

LOST & FOUND |
Found womens belt Oct. 15 on
Radio Road near Graham Area,
owner call 372-1821. (L-3t-20-nc)
Lost one brown attache case filled
with musical manuscript & scores. If
found please call 378-3958 or return
to band office c/o Henry Wolking
five dollar reward. (L-2t-20-p)
S2O reward for return of miniature
sterling silver ash can lost at DU
house during rush. Sentimental value,
no questions asked. See Big John,
1814 W. Univ., 376-9129. (L-2t-21-p)
NEED ZIPPY
RESULTS?
GATO.
CLASSIFIEDS

Coming in Person
JAMES BROWN
,
and his
1968 Spectacular of 40 Stars
at
Citizens Field
Oct. 28, 8:30 p.m.
Advance Tickets Tickets Available at
Adults 4.00 Record Bar j
Children (-12) ZSO i Discount Records
James Williams Barbershop
Tickets at Gate Russell Henry 3arber Shop
Aduls 4.50 Windy's Barber Shop
.. on University Ave.
Child ten -12 3.00
' Sarah's Place
__ £ ar j Howard Production

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-tf-c*
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible BUT youll be
glad you came. Buy your next eye
glasses at University Opticians, 526
SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound Bus
Station. 378-4480. (M-18-ts-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-16-p)
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FREE ESTIMATES
323 N.W. 6th ST.
376-2558
East Side ACL Depot
7.90 CAUTION: S
' TIS MTHN rtCTUU
AND SHOULD n UTT OOT 0 H
DAVID W 4
couikm- iMin
St'THE SWEET RIDEI
SHOWINGAI^!3^NLY^LjM
I production
storing



t JF
1 Hi
VvVvTTiK JfvJlr
I \& Campus Crier
*d Sponsored by Student Government.
I.| I

[ l)t The Student Government page is
I sponsored by Student Government
and appears each Monday. Any
| campus organization desiring to place
I an announcement in this page must
I turn it in the proceeding Tuesday,
I before the announcement is to
appear. Announcements can be
| turned in to Mrs. McLeod or Jerry
, Abascal in Room 305, Reitz Union.
I UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE
| APPOINTMENTS
All students interested in serving
| on University Committees can apply
1 at the Student Government office,
| Room 305, Rietz Union.
SPIRIT HATS
Spirit hats are on sale at the
Student Activities desk in the Reitz
'Union, 3rd Floor. $4.00.
GOT A PROBLEM?
If you have a problem with
landlords, professors, or the
administration, contact STUDENT
GOVERNMENT'S OMBUDSMAN in
R oom 305, Reitz Union from
2:30-5:00 P.M., Monday thru Friday,
or call 376-4001, THE
OMBUDSMAN, 24 hours a day, 7
days a week. All cases are
confidential.
Coronation Ball
| Tickets for the 2nd annual
| Coronation Ball will be on sale
.October 21 thru October 31
Ifrom 12:00 noon until 4:30
|p.m. at the Florida Union Box
| Office.
This year's ball will feature
i Lee Castle and his famous
[Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, the
icoronation of the queen, and
many door prizes donated by
iGainesville merchants.
I The dance gets underway at
.10:00 p.m. and lasts until 2:00
'a.m.
I Only 1200 tickets will be
[available this yedr and students
iare urged to buy their tickets
early. Dress is semi-formal.

i INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 1
presents
FALL FROLICS
' 'v -.
featuring
yP iBH 9B (I iflr
- ~ mBP
THE FOUR TOPS
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 25 8:00 P. M.
Florida Gym 11 ri _ J Q-uun j-^ns^!ji

ARREDONDO ROOM
4th Floor J. Wayne Reitz Union
Modest prices, Attentive service.
Elegant atmosphere
Monday thru Friday
Luncheon 11:30-2:00
Dinner 5:30-8:00
SPECIAL GALA BUFFET
Before each game
11:00-2:00
RATHSKELLER
Anyone interested in working
with the Rathskeller Project, please
pick up an application at the Student
Activities desk on the third floor of
the Reitz Union. There are currently
three committee chairmanships open:
Entertainment, Special Functions,
and Secretary. Interviews will be held
through Oct 23. Descriptions of
these positions may be obtained with
the applications. Preference will be
given to those people with
enthusiasm and time to devote to the
project.
Agronomy Club
The Agronomy and Soils
Club will meet at 7:15 p.m.
Monday, October 21, in Room
210 McCarty Hall. All past,
present, and perspective
members are urged to attend.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
The Gator Amateur Radio
Club will meet Monday Oct. 21,
at 8:00 p.m. in Room 525 Eand
I Building.
Union Movies
Oct. 25 Friday "A
Countess from Hong Kong"
7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Starring:
Marlon Brando, Sophia Loren. I
Oct. 26 Saturday
"Moment to Moment" 7:00 and
9:15 p.m. Starring: JeanSeberg,
Sean Garrison. ]
Traffic Tickets
Students who are appealing I
traffic tickets please report to
room 121, Law Building, 7:00 9
p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 22. |

A
SAMSON
IT H i UNIVE RS IT Y' S WHAT IS SAMSON? j
1C OMMUNITY HELP SAMSON is OP o*3. v. Aon of University j
jp 1 m m ap a m y students i *:vj *ested ip hthe underpnvi- J
IrLAVtIffCNI AVI Nl T jedyed 1;| Gaine vi!!e ol its grounding I
| communities. SAMSON o based on the be- j
1 lief that there cue many students with the %
1 desire and the abilities tc assist the local %
I anti-poverty agencies. (
I .... ,Aetwim. ,_ HOW WE WORK: I
j Socioeconomic Opportunity Network SAMSON serves as a iiaison between I
j interested students and local anti-poverty ff
HOW TO GET INVOLVED: agencies It informs indents about the pro- C
I w . grams in need of tfmir talents and, in turn, f
1 You can get involved in a 1
1 program of lifelong ,ets !hese Q 9 enci ~ s know whaT ta,ent is I
| significance through SAMSON available. f
I if all the talent you have is a I
I little will goodwill, that 15 WHO SPONSORS US?
I Call Student Government at a J
the University of'Florida and SAMSON is sponsored by the University J
I let us know (376-3261 of Florida Student Government. It was begun E
I Extension 2545) or fill out the in the wmler ot )963 b a QW studen; at f
f to John O'Shea at the Student the Un,vers,, y ot .ON rs your j
I Government Offices, Room effort t 0 y ur world a little different, 1
1 305, Reitz Union. fellow students. I
I WHAT WE DO: J
1 '.'X I
1 Tutor Adult Education f
I iac iiF Grade) # Hobby Groups f
I S;torto Dancing r
I Games Drama f
I A ts end Crafts Music: £
I >; Discussion Groups Health lntn t; v* f
F~ Project SAMSON i
I Interest Information Application
I ADDRESS New applicant r
I. PHONE Returning applicants 1
|| Student and/or local resident I
I I Major _Age Classification J

Monday, October 21, 1968, The Florida Alligator, F

Page 21



Page 22

!, Th* Florid* Alligator, Monday, October 21.1968

Fumble Fumble Fumble Fumble Fumble

gaaMfl
TOM KENNEDY
ECKDAHL EATS THE BALL
...now 'why' is the question
|fl F
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fc GARY BOMAR TOM KENNEDY
...made short work of UF defense

ms :
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'>' .-' >y..* u\-i'S ', .u ; i/-vi -,'' r--> ; \'. ,-' .- ,>.**' ?:;-*r '- >-* -: 5 * '- *; >
VINESETT RETURNS TOM KENNEDY
,
...Smith, blocking, also placed on return squad

'We Lost
Its About Time
The score is 22-7. North Carolina just made a TD and the game
may get worse.
Why is Florida playing this kind of football?
Graves said we would play a wide open ball game, weather
permitting.
Weather didnt permit, we didnt.
" North Carolina has a quarterback that is running, passing and
swallowing the ball.
Florida sends Smith up the middle.
I wonder what Graves will say after this dabacle.
We beat ourselves.
Damn right you did coach.
The weather wasnt right.
I didnt see it raining any harder on us that it did on them.
We never had the right field position.
We had drives that started on the fifty and we fumbled two plays
later.
Our penalties never let us get near the goal line.
They had more penalties than we did.
Those are pat answers, now it is time for suggestions.
You put Rentz in as quarterback in the fourth quarter. You needed
him in the first quarter.
Viewing Sports fW
L w 4f|E#r/
By NEAL SANDERS AUigator Sports Editor j|
If you hit a few players or photographers on the sidelines its no
crime. You avoid the sidelines like the plague. And as long as you do
youll play the same game. A losing one.
Youve got a tight end who can catch, a flanker who can catch.
Even Smith is a good receiver. These guys know what theyre doing,
so why dont you try putting the ball in their hands.
Who calls the plays?
Against Tulane you said you called only a handful of them. If
youre going to call the plays use some imagination. If the quarterback
is going to call them youd better get a quarterback with more than
four plays that all look alike.
That second man through works for five minutes then the other
side starts catching on.
You finally put Smith on the kickoff return team and he carried
once. Thats a start.
Now theres 1:28 left in the game and youre throwing to the
sidelines.
When youre winning and you throw all you care to thats called
wide open ball playing. When youre losing its desperation football.
Weve moved the ball forty yards in four plays.
You should have been playing desperation ball all along.
Now in our losing moments, 24 seconds to go, were starting to
look like a football team.
Seven seconds. The rain is still coming down. A fumble. Two. One.
Cheers. We lost.
Its about time.

w
s> ar StiMrWJ J*jm
l|U|k B~* ;C
SiA IHKL.Jp
Jo W s .v ;
JV * |M9HHHfIK j, ,3,i. : : ; **
Wm m W
sSIPIi v §SP^
JKr JSafe
i 1 lip w? $m §§
I %
p
.._s.. ;;&g
EDMAR CHARGES TOM KENNEDY
...Tannen waits on the tackle

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TOM KENNEDY
GATORS AT THE GOALLINE
...Smith goes up the middle



SEC STANDINGS
W +- T :: pc.
1. Florida 20fl 1000
2 LSU IJ M .1000
3. Georgia 2-0-1 83 ->
4. Tenn. i-u-i 75Q
5. Ole Miss 3-1-0 7 50
6. Auburn 2-1-0 667
7. Alabama 1-2-0 333
8- Vandy 0-3-0 000
9. Kentucky 0-3-0 .000
10. Miss. St. 0-2-0 .000
101 ST b
I V Wyj y py* 1
jL §
'4l Jin IF H&t- w
£ mi- iaanr Bf %
iMfe, §§!
iifci Jftx II A. *
~%A .mm
*r H 7*-'
V
TOM KENNEDY
CHRISTAN CARRIES
.. .soaked field made running impossible.
Homecoming
Game Tickets
Student tickets will be issued
at the Gate 13 ticket window S' \
Thursday Oct. 24 and Friday m
0ct T 25 Hplna
t lie seating assignments g
issued will be for the Nov. 2
homecoming game with Auburn. A LANDMARK
The windows will be opened *y
from 2:30-8 p.m. on Thursday IIM
and from 1-5 p.m. on Friday. INSTRUCTION
Bloc seating lee cards must be I
in today for the Auburn game. \ y
-SERVING
lMi>S I7MIAN FOODS
| FEATURING:
f SHOPPERS SPECIALS
SPECIALTY SANDWICHES
r (Earmittellafl a delicious salads
BP WWHIHMWMW V DOMESTIC & IMPORTED
B (jawfe" nj £otlg p wines and beer
S' SERVING CONTINUOUSLY
11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
/V.iirll.wS CONGENIAL
f % CON T/NEN TA L
atmosphere
IN THE MALL

Surprises Galore
In SEC Action

By DAVID M. MOFFITT
ATLANTA (UPI)
Tennessee beat Alabama 10-9
thanks to two key plays by Jim
Weatherford who was
outstanding all^afternoon.
The Tennessee victory, on the
Tartan Turf at Knoxville and in
view of a regional television
audience, marked the first time
since Bryant returned to
Alabama a decade ago that any
opponent has beaten the Tide
two years in a row. Tennessee
won last year 24-3.
It also is the first time since
1963 that Alabama has suffered
two losses in the same season.
This last Saturday will be
long remembered here in the
southeast. Not only as the
Saturday of the Tennessee-Ala Tennessee-Alabama
bama Tennessee-Alabama classic, but it was the
Saturday that 7th-ranked
Florida, a two-touchdown
favorite was upset 22-7 by North
Carolina and the Saturday that
two touchdown underdog
Georgia Tech upset Auburn
21-20.
It also was the Saturday that
sophomore quarterback Archie
Manning lived up to his billing
and ran for 32 yards while
bringing Ole Miss from behind in
the final nine minutes to a 21 =3
victory over Southern
Mississippi.
And it was the Saturday that
Mississippi State rallied behind
quarterback Tommy Pharr and
tied favored Texas Tech 28-28.
In other action this weekend
9th-ranked Georgia beat
Vanderbilt 32-6. 11-th ranked
Miami edged Virginia Tech 13-8.
Louisiana State beat Kentucky
13-3. Florida State beat
Memphis State 20-10 and Tulane
erased a seven game losing streak
by topping previously unbeaten
five till nine
curb or carry-out
IjssL
flj-BOY|
D BOX
H 69c
X V
J-BOY \
sandwich N
french fries &
coleslaw
a regular SI.OO value
gftZMW
mm
2310 S.W. 13th ST
1505 N.W. 13th ST.

Boston College 28-14.
Florida fumbled 11 times
Saturday and lost eight of them.
Five of those fumbles were by
Larry Smith.
Bill Cappleman of Florida
State passed for 218 yards and
two touchdowns and sophomore
linebacker Ray Hester ofTulane
made two interceptions and
made 8 tackles.

GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
You'll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
We're the student's friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 Sen Main Phone 376-7771
1 i
l STflK*sHAK i
I agnpfn j
| Student Special
| (With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88< Steakburger |
j Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
| $1.03 Value Only 85< plus tax |
I Steak ri Shake I
J6IOS.W. 13th St. Gainesville I
Chemical Engineers
Challenge UOP to Challenge You
UOP is what professional people have made it...a leader in:
petroleum process development
process plant construction
air and water management
specialty organic chemicals
plastic laminates
fragrances, flavors and food products
aircraft seating and galleys
truck and tractor seating
control instrumentation
metals and alloys
fabricated metal products
We have room for you to grow in all these areas.
With UOP, you can apply professional talent in research,
development, engineering, design, manufacturing, market marketing
ing marketing and technical service.
Be sure to talk with a Universal Oil-Products Company
representative at your Placement Office on October 25.
Challenge him to challenge you. v
better ideas from jjjjj

Monday, October 21, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

RAME HAIR STYLIST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549
Yoor CtmnrtQir
| OVERHAULED SokM %
U* so J
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
Ml NW M'Mt. AMHVIQf
HO*-**. 1 AAA.7MR UtTmVfM
m-4n
11 ~ I

Page 23



Pa§* 24. Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21.1968 |
SEE EM AT THE MALL I jkQ&JtsU/ti
THURS, FRI, & SAT OCT 24-26 f rfBHT!,,,
HOME OF THI OH6Ui
4-WHEEL DRIVE VEHICLES | nJLZmm.
4 DOOR wagonsI PLAY ER of the WEEK
4 DOOR SEDANS I TIttSDAY SPKUU.
SPORTS CARS I jfpgjjmt PERCH-A-PLENTY
IXCaifNT SBVKE I FrlndiFri- s^oo
open I TELEPHONE 378 2304
v.%w.%v.%%%v.%%w.VA%v.%%%wrtnv;vvwi*Kw:w.v.*.*;*. iv.v.'.-.w.-A*.v.VA%wA%v.v.vAv.v;v;w:*?:x!>:*
I iiBRiHHHI Announcing
WHEN YOU SUfMNTO JARMANS. .. I LARRY SMITH Colfl~fl(ryOf Cll
and yon naturally feel better, too. with the I mm
confidence that your footwear i. correct and the I This week's Player of the Week award goes to
realization that ins made to fit snugiy and I All-American fullback, Larry Smith, for. his VlfllwlCNpt
comfortably. This beef-roir slip-on features I outstanding play Saturday against North Carolina,
authentic hand-sewn front and easy-10-shiae hwther. I whom the GstOfS bOWed tO, 22-7.
come in and try a pair to wear with yaw I Smith, who had 88 yards rushing in the first half,
favonte sport coat I back for 54 additional yards, ending the game
with 142 yards on 24 carries for a 5.9 average. TlftA flvinlf
I Larry needed approximately 150 yards Saturday to * WB
jump into the first place on the all-time" career mm m
rushing list. Chuck Hunsinger presently holds that flfiWfiTftSf' ROW
envied spot with 2,017 yards. However, Hunsinger
accomplished his feat in four years (1946-47-48-49).
I Smith is in the process of doing it in only three BilO*
The outstanding runner was the only thing the Wtf tlllf CH* DAOBlfit
Gators had going for them Saturday, but evidently he
I wasn't quite enough. Smith's score was the only one
I for the Gators, who fumbled 11 times during the
lit Mil ( Gatorade*, the drink Br
""rVrUfFr M J developed for football players
N[ a \\ who knock eac h other over H
the process, now tastes like cola. 1
Cola-flavored Gatorade W j|j§ Jr
is formulated for all people. Even VgBB
people whose idea of athletics bBBB mm jfIRERfP^
golf, horseshoe pitching, or
carrying home the Sunday paper. tjy
h|h 4 \\ f % Cola-flavored Gatorade works
P | athletes drink. But itTatfes like :
1127 W. University Ave. (Pi A r\z i the cola people drink. Available
yO i wherever soft drinks are sold.
s
4

Page 24

L Tin Florida Alligator, Monday, October 21,1968