Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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BRIAN GOODHEIM
ELECTION OFFICIAL
.. .explains voting machine to voter
I Election Winners 1
I
COMMITMENT 1
UNION BOARD £
I Bob Whits President §
I \ Janis Mohrbacher .Vice Pres.
I Ronna Ellerbeck Secretary
I Bill Levens .Treasurer |
COMMITMENT Micki McCartan Larry Martin
Marshall Constantino John Horton
SENATE Dan Eckert Nick Nicosia
Jeff Bayman Tom McGrady Ralf Nobo
Larry Bercu JoAnne Gliauon Joe Still
Donna Betts Bruce Thomas Patricia Tuck
Bruce Boudreau Linda Dallager Jack Vaughn
Tom Clark Kip Johnson Walter O'Kon
I James Comander Robert Fleischman
: Thomas Cone Sam Hudman
$ John Cosgrove Skip Kedney NEW MOVEMENT £
Â¥ Douglas Crow Jan Dyko
$ Arm Curran Buddy Grisinger SENATE
X BHI Modi in Harriet Halperin Faith Tulino
: Kathy Waldman Michael Hembree Karen Kinnen
§ Joyce Miller Arch Maldonado Steve Bull
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Gladys Heads Inland

By United Press International
At midnight Hurricane Gladys
was located 95 miles off the
coast of Sarasota drifting north
at 8 miles per hour.
The hurricane, packing 75-80
University officials said
late last night that students
should listen for
up-to-the-minute advisories
on Hurricane Gladys* course
in case she becomes a threat
to the Gainesville area.
A n nouncements
concerning UF operations,
including classes, will be
broadcast over local stations.
m.p.h. winds, is not expected to
change its course within the next
f2*2*hours.

Hurricane warnings were
lowered south of Sarasota at
midnight but remained in effect
north of Clearwater.
If the storm continues on its
present course and velocity, it is
expected to come inland at
Cedar Key, 50 miles west of
Gainesville around noon today.
At midnight the eye of the
storm was located at latitude
27.1 north, longitude 84.0 west.
The seasons seventh tropical
storm stalled in the gulf about
150 miles off the West Coast
resort town of Naples for several
hours Thursday, sending in big
rollers that gave surfers a
heyday. It then resumed its
northward course at about 7
miles per hour.
More tl\an five inches of,rain
drenched, the Miami .area -and
~otEeFparf< of souttr~Florida--

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 20

WINS A U FOUR UNION POSTS

Commitment Makes
Near Clean Sweep

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Commitment party claimed
the lions share of the positions
up for grabs in Thursdays
student body election, claiming
all four Union Board positions
and 37 out of 40 Student Senate
seats.
In preferential straw voting,
Nixon was an 800-vote favorite
on the UF campus, while in the
race for the U.S. Senate, Collins
was favored by 700 votes.
Bob White of Commitment
party won the presidency of the
Union Board for Student
Activities over Steve Hull of the
New Movement by a vote of
3110-1748. Janis Mohrbacher,
Commitment, defeated David
Home, New Movement, for the
vice presidential spot by a vote
of 2864-1660, while Ronna
Ellerbeck won over Connie
Knight, New Movement,
2558-1979, for the position of
secretary.
Bill Levens, Commitment,
took the position of treasurer
over New Movements Richard
Braren, 2897-1572.
The four positions are,
however, being protested before
the Honor Court on the grounds
that popular election of board
officers is illegal and
unconstitutional and should
come under the supervision of
the Union Board of Managers.
New Movement was able to
take only three Senate seats-one
from Yulee, one from Flavet 111,
and one of two seats from the
Twin Towers.
Also on the ballot was the
race for Homecoming
Sweetheart, with Suzanne
Rogers, Donna Betts, and Patty
Bohannon all in the running.
The winner of this race will,
however, be kept secret until it

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RANDY BASSETT
/ WAITING FOR GLADYS
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America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

is announced at Gator Growl on
Nov. 1.
In the voting for Association
of Women Students (AWS)
offices, Diane Baron won the
first vice presidential position,

*
Hull Concedes,
Still Optimistic

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
New Movements Steve Hull,
defeated for the Reitz Union
Board presidency by a 2-1
margin, called his 1,700-vote
total a victory for
independent voices on campus.
Im very happy with the
amount of votes we got, Hull
said. We have convinced
students that independents can
have a voice in Student
Government.
We started out two weeks
ago, he said, against the
biggest bloc (Commitment
party) ever seen on this campus.
*

White Wins Bid
For Union Board

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Bob White was the voters
choice for president of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union Board in
Thursdays elections.
White led Commitment
partys slate by defeating Steve
Hull of New Movement Party
3, l 10 to 1,748 votes.
Commitment party came
through by taking the other

Friday, October 18, 1968

Peggy Langstaff was elected
recording secretary, and Caron
Balkany was elected freshman
representative.
Other AWS positions were
filled in the spring election.

We were able to overcome a lot
of odds.
New Movement will be a
powerful force in the spring
elections, Hull predicted, hinting
at the possibility of a student
government-in-exile.
The function of New
Movement will be to act as a
lobby against the powerful
blocs that now run Student
Government, Hull said.
The New Movement
philosophy will not die, he
said. Were going to keep in
contact with individuals who are
interested in breaking the bloc
that controls this campus.
*

three Union Board offices and
37 of 40 Student Senate seats.
In his acceptance speech,
White thanked his supporters.
There was a hell of a lot of
work done in this campaign on
my behalf, he said.
He called for a change in the
personality of the union, saying
there should be a more direct
and vital relationship between
the administration of the union
and the students.



Page 2

S, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

Mingledorff, Ellis Deny AlperConspiracy

By DAVE REDDICK
Assistant Executive Editor
Ken Mingledorff and Clyde
Ellis, objects of an Alligator
editorial Wednesday have denied
charges they conspired to
remove Harvey Alpers name
from the list of recommendat recommendations
ions recommendations for the Board of Student
Publications.
Alpers name was removed by
the Student Senate Tuesday
night with a vote of 18-13.
Mingledorff and Ellis led
floor discussion concerning
Alpers nomination. Mingledorff
said Alper, in quitting the
Alligator, didnt fulfill his
responsibility to the students.
Ellis said that in leaving his job,
Alper had supported the boards


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GATOR GROWL
A sorority contribution adds to the color of Gator Growl Skits.
For the story in pictures, see page 18.
WALLET PHOTO SPECIAL I
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Made from your I
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1232 W. UNIV. AVE.^|fl^
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tbs ctfi*** l student newspaper of ths University of Florida
and is published five times weekly except during June, July end August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as. seopnd class mattar at ths United States P(*t Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
Ths Florida Alligator reserves ths right to regulate ths typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice to given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. Ths Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than on# Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to rtm several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

censorship of a Steve Hull
editorial.
Alper, and four other editors,
quit their jobs when they
disagreed with the editorial
critical of the universitys
handling of the Marshall Jones
case.
I think the main thing here
was that I felt that he (Alper)
was irresponsible, I wasnt
arguing about the censorship
issue, because I know he is a
competent journalist and he is
not in favor of censorship,
Mingledorff said.
My point was that he should
have gone back and worked for
the Alligator, he should have
complied with the Board of
Student Publications wishes
that he come back and 1 dont

Alligator

BACKGROUND REPORT

see how he could have worked on
the board in a responsible
manner, Mingledorff said.
I did not charge that he
(Alper) was against freedom of
expression, Ellis said, I merely
said that his actions in resigning
and refusing to take his job back
caused an inference to be drawn
that if the issue of censorship
came up again where there was
great political pressure from one
side, he might be prone to
censor an editorial.
I didnt say that because he
Champion
Says 'Dixie'
Will Remain
TALLAHASSEE, (UPI)
Florida State University
President John Champion told a
group of black students
Thursday that while FSU has a
basic policy of
non-discrimination, he would
not restrict the playing of
Dixie or the display of the
Confederate flag as requested.
Champion met with the
student members of the
Afro-American Student Union in
his office in response to a
petition demanding an
investigation into a recent
incident between a black and a
white student, calling for the
employment of black campus
policemen and more black
professors and asking
restrictions on the use of the
symbols of the Confederacy.
The meeting was closed to
the press but a university
spokesman later said the meeting
was very harmonious and
productive. The spokesman
said the black students declined
to make an immediate public
statement.

< :
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Blind dates are a chance. But you can always depend on
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That s why th.ngs go better with Coke, after Coke, after Coke. HHIr
BotHed wider jhe authority of The Coca-Cola Company by, GAINESVILLE COCA COLA BOTTLING CO., L£ .FLA. __

walked off he is incapable of
working on the board,
Mingledorff said. Although I do
think this is a bad way to show
someones sentiment -by
walking off of the Alligator staff
and leaving it in a bad situation
- without competent people to
work for it.
We were never in a dire
situation, Hull said. I didn t
want Alper to came back.
Alpers actions belie his
motives, Hull continued. He
doesnt believe in censorship,
but his actions during the
controversy gave that
impression.

I S>>WWWK :WXCi >>M K XMWB ,^, 3 !WiV.VrtV.V.VW
1 Bust The Bloc I
$ By RONNIE BLOOM
** '
New Movement Party Chairman
§ It takes a mighty force to bust the bloc voting system that :
$ has prevailed on this campus for so many years. Obviously, :
fraternity pledges and brothers committed to the Commitment :
> party bloc didnt get fined or miss dinner last night. They got :
out and voted. :
v Its a shame the New Movement didnt have more time to j:
X organize, explain, and prove to the student body that honesty |:
is the best policy, can be abided by- even in campus politics, j
This is New Movements philosophy and morals and principles j:
are our basic watchwords. :
This election marks the beginning of a new type political
v party on this campus. A party that presented the students with j:
£ nominating conventions ... the most democratic way they have j:
:j: ever had to select their candidates. :
£ The New Movement is a strong political organization here to j
stay. We will continue to reach the organizations and students j
x who have never been aware of campus politics or aware of how jjjj
much they are actually effected by the candidates they elect. j
g Congratulations to Bob White and all the other candidates £
elected last night. Thanks to all those New Movement movers ji|
: : : who helped us in the campaign and who will continue to help us |
: : : spread Our philosophy over this campus. 5
H Loans Up To S6OO
Budget Payday Aata
Signature
Prompt Courteous
Confidential
Marion Finance Co.
376-5333
222 W. Univarsity Ava.

One ot the accusations in the
Alligator was that many of the
senators who voted against Alper
left the meeting as soon as the
action was taken.
Right after that (the
removal of Alpers name) 1 went
downstairs to get a soft drink
and came right back.
Mingledorff said, I did notice
that several people did leave and
didnt come back.
There were 31 senators who
voted in the Alper decision, only
16 were present at adjournment.
I have never been to a senate
meeting where anyone has
walked out because they didnt
get their way, Ellis said, thats
not the kind of political games
we play.
I went downstairs for awhile
to hear F. Lee Bailey, Ellis said,,
I came back for the end of the
meeting.



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BABY BEEF LIVER AND BACON 1.80
Baked Ham 85 Hot Pastrami 1.00 BAKED TURKEY, dressing, gravy, cranberry sauce 1.80
DEEP FRIED SHRIMP (6) Tartar sauce or cocktail sauce 2.55
Baked Ham and Cheese 1.00 Hot Roast Beef 1.30 GROUND ROUND STEAK (6 oz.) 1.75
SPECIAL ENTREE Variable Price
Corned Beef 1.00 Grilled Chopped Steak 65 VEGETABLES AND SALADS
Sliced Turkey 1.00 GrillS CtoSf..'i.'i.'.'iiii! if Whipped Potatoes Garden Salad, choice of dressing
VEGETABLES French Fried Potatoes 1000 Island, Blue Cheese, French
Vegetables of the Day 25 French Fried & Whipped Green Peas Congealed Salad
Potatoes 25 Tomatoes Cole Slaw
SALAD BOWLS Corn Vegetable of the Day
-Served with hard rolls or crackers and butter BEVERAGES DESSERTS
CHEF'S SALAD, salad greens with strips of ham, cheese and Coffee 15 | ce Cream or Sherbert 25
turkey, choice of dressing 1.50
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Coffee 15 Ice Cream or Sherbert 25
a a
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c
TUI rinriH MI

Page 3



Page 4

v The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

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THOMAS. DAWKINS ARRESTED LAST YEAR
... demonstration followed
Thomas Returned To Jail,
Missing Dawkins Sought

See Editorial Page 8
By KATHY KEIM
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
?
Carol Thomas has returned to
jail.
Mrs. Thomas, wife of a UF
professor and leader in the civil
rights movement in Gainesville,
was taken into custody by
Alachua County sheriffs
deputies early Thursday
afternoon and returned to jail
to serve out a sentence for
contempt of court.
She had served approximately
a month and a half of
four-month sentence before
being released on bond while
lawyers appealed her case.
Appeal attempts ended last
week, as the U.S. Supreme Court
turned down a request to hear
the case. By refusing to handle
the appeal, the high court ruled
in effect that the contempt
conviction handed down by
Circuit Court Judge J. C. Adkins
was valid.
A spokesman for the sheriffs
office reported that Mrs.
Thomas offered no resistance to
the deputies who came by her
house to take her into custody
to serve the remainder of her
term.
Mrs. Thomas husband, Billy
S. Thomas, is an assistant
professor of physics and
astronomy.
Mrs. Thomas and Irvin

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I BACKGROUND ]
REPORT
Jack Dawkins were arrested
last December and charged with
contempt after distributing
literature highly critical of the
Alachua County grand jury and
the Gainesville police and fire
departments.

TIRED OF FACING LIFE ALONE?
First Baptist Church Welcomes You
425 West University Ave.
Free Bus Transportation
Bus Schedule
Sunday Morning: (Sunday School) (Morning Worship)
The Bus Leaves at at
Mallory Hall 9:10 10:25
Broward Hall 9:12 10:27
Jennings Hall 9:15 10:30
Hume Hall 9:20 10:35
Frat Row 9:23 10:38
Tolbert Hall 9:25 10:40
Cafeteria (west) 9:30 10:45
Murphree Area 9:32 10:47
BSU Center 9:35 10:50
Arrives t church 9:45 11:00
Return to Campus.. .12:15
Church Activities
Sunday Morning Sunday Evening
Early Worship.. ..8:30 A.M. Snack Supper 5:30 P.M.
Sunday School 9:45 A.M. (35?)
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. Training Union. .6:15 P.M.
Evening Worship..7:3o I'.M

Mrs. Thomas was given a
sentence of four months while
Dawkins was given six months.
Both appealed on the grounds
that the sentences were excessive
penalties for contempt.
Adkins had refused to set
bond after their arrest, saying
the pair had no respect for the
law. This decision was later
upheld by Harold Carswell,
federal district court judge in
Tallahassee, before being
overruled by the U.S. District
Court of Appeals in New
Orleans, which set bond.
At the present time, Dawkins
is listed as missing, having not
been seen in more than a week.
He supposed to have appeared
last week in connection with the
contempt case but did not
appear.
A warrant has been issued for
his arrest.

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ft
Marketing at IBM
Working with
company presidents
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Im pretty much the IBM Corporation in
the eyes of my customers, says Andy Moran.
That kind of responsibilitys not bad for an
engineer just two years out of school.
Andy earned his B.S:E.E. in 1966. Today,
hes a Marketing Representative with IBM,
involved in the planning, selling and installa installation
tion installation of data processing systems.
Plenty of business experience
Engineering was my first love, Andy says,
but I still wanted good business experience.
So far, hes worked with customers involved
in many different computer applications,
from engineering to business. His contacts
go from data processing managers all the
way up to the president of his largest account.
At first I was a little nervous about working
at that level/ says Andy. But then you realize
youre trained to know what hes trying to
' / -

learn. That gives you confidence. Youre
helping him solve his problem.
With his working partner, the data proc processing
essing processing Systems Engineer, Andy has helped
many customers solve their information
handling problems. I get a broad overview
of business because I run into every kind of
problem going. Sometimes I know the solu solutions
tions solutions from experience. Other times I need
help from my manager.
"Thats one of the best things. My manager
is more of a backup than a boss. Hes there
when I need him. Usually, I pretty much call
my own shots.
Andys experience isnt unusual at IBM.
There are many Marketing and Sales Repre Representatives
sentatives Representatives who could tell you of similar
experiences. And they have many kinds of
academic backgrounds: business, engineer engineering,
ing, engineering, liberal arts, science.

Friday, October 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

They not only sell data processing equipment
as Andy does, but also IBM office products
and information records systems. Many of
the more technically inclined are data
processing Systems Engineers.
Check with your placement office
If youre interested in the opportunities for
engineers and scientists at IBM, ask your place placement
ment placement office for more information.
Or send a resume or letter to Charles
Cammack, IBM Corp., Dept. C, 1447 Peachtree
St., N.E., Room 810, Atlanta, Ga. 30309. Wed
like to hear from you even if youre headed
for graduate school or military service.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM.
HWQH

Page 5



Page 6

i. Th Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18,1968

RUN BY STUDENTS
Catholic Center Plans
'Mammoth Open House

The Catholic Student Center
will sponsor a Mammoth Open
House Sunday from 3-5 p.m. in
the student lounge at the center.
The purpose of the social is
to help new and returning
students get acquainted with
each other and to become
oriented to the center.
The Center is being run as a
parrish this year by students -a
situation unique and almost
unheard of on a state campus,

No Budget Set
1 For UF Veterans
The UF Veterans Club, center of a summer-long discussion over
approval of its charter and budget, still has no place in Student
Governments 1968-69 budget, even though it now has an approved
charter.
According to Bob White, summer chairman of the Student Senates
Budget and Finance Committee, the vets budget was held up because
their charter was not reviewed and approved until late this summer.
And according to Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich, the
club cannot receive a budget, with or without a charter, because the
dub is not classified as an organization that can receive a line-item
budget from Student Government (SG).
According to Goodrich, UF organizations receive funds in one of
two ways: through the budget or through special requests.
In order to get a budget, a group must either carry out some
function classified as governmental, such as the Association of
Women Students, Interhall Council, or Accent, or must compete on
an intercollegiate basis, such as the UF Debate Society, the meat
judging team, and the mens and womens glee clubs.
According to Goodrich, the Veteran's Club does not fit into either
category and hence must rely on special requests for funds. The club
has, however, been on the budget for the two previous years.
Goodrich and White ought to get together on their stories,
Veterans Club President Jim Hollis said. Goodrich is saying we dont
classify for a line-item budget, and White told me over the summer
that there would be no problem getting one approved once our
charter was reviewed.
Somebody should tell Goodrich that we have had a budget for the
last two years.
According to Hollis, the Veterans Club had turned in a budget on
SIBOO in the spring. This amount was cut to $660 by the Budget and
Finance Committee, which could do nothing else at the time since the
clubs charter had not yet been approved.
The charter sat in committee for about two months before being
approved near the end of the summer quarter. The budget request still
has not been brought out on the floor of the Senate.
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according to Father Gannon,
pastor.
Two folk masses each week
characterize the change in
operations of the student church
community. On Tuesdays and
Thursdays students gather in the
sanctuary around the altar and
sing folk hymns, accompanied
by guitarists.
The students are responsible
individually and collectively for
everything that takes place here,

in their own parish the
spiritual, intellectual and
fellowship programs, Father
Gannon said.
The decision to make the
chapel a parrish was made this
summer by Bishop Paul F.
Tanner, Bishop of the Diocese of
St. Augustine. He said the center
had come of age and todays
students were responsible and
mature enough to direct and
support a parrish.
The Newman Club was
disbanded and its leadership has
been integrated into the
workings of the church. A
Parrish council, drawn from the
3,000 catholic students at UF
will be composed of former
members of the Newman Club,
fraternities, sororities, other
campus organizations, graduate
and married students.
Every Sunday will be
dedicated to a different campus
organization such as medical
students, fraternities and
engineers. The organization
members will serve as ushers.
How will the student parrish
make it financially?
Ill bank on our Catholic
young people any day 1 have
no fear that they wont come
through, Father Gannon said.
A donation of SI.OO per
week has been requested.

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RK.Yonge:An Unregimented Approach

EDITORS NOTE: This is the
last part of a three part series on
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.
Here Alligator staffers Larry
Jordan and David Osier examine
the schools enrollment and
student views. They conclude
the series with some interpretive
comments.
By LARRY JORDAN
and
DAVID OSIER
Alligator Staff Writers
P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School (PKY) is small, you can
either loaf and pass, or you can
excell to an unlimited extent,
said PKY senior Kim Preston
now in his 13th year at the school.
Coming from a student this
comment tells two stories.
One is enrollment restrictions
at PKY. The other is a reflection
of the schools academic
attitude.
PRYS enrollment is limited
to 930 students equally divided
between boys and girls. The
classes of 30 students each are
kept small.
The enrollment waiting list
averages 2,000 and students are
selected proportionately. Half
are children of UF faculty and
the rest are members of the local
community.
PKY is not a private school
operated for the benefit of UF,
Student Affairs Director John B.
Hannum said however. Its
PRYS attempt to have a
representative sample of the
community.
Higher ranking UF faculty
members do not have preference
for getting their children into
PKY, Principal John F. Neller
added.

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All i gator

BACKGROUND REPORT

PKY has 50 to 60 Black
students, Neller estimated since
no exact figures are available
because of a Health, Education
and Welfare department
directive on discrimination in
records.
PKY has benefitted by the
contributions Black students
have made to the student body,
Hannum said. PKY doesnt
emphasize race or nationality
Students come from all over the

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world.
This school probably gets
more of a cross section than
most, Hannum said.
However, Neller did call PKY
a surburban school, since
enrollment may be slanted
toward middle or upper-middle
class whites.
There are, however, no
physical, mental or academic
requirements, Neller said. And,
the tuition is the lowest of any

laboratory school in the
country, he said. It includes
activities and materials fees
which total s2l from grades six
through 12.
PKY may be hard to get into,
but small classes and the
teacher-student informality
resulting from this approach
make for an apparent positive
student attitude toward
education.
Students are never pressured
by anyone, because they are
expected to go out and do the

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Friday. October 18. 1968. The Florida Alligator, I

job on their own, senior
Preston said.
With this atmosphere it's
easier to learn, senior and
student leader Owen Shoemaker
said.
These comments point out
PKVs unregimented approach
to education. And, resulting
from this is what administrators
call interaction.
(SEE 'WE' PAGE 13)

Page 7



Page 8

- Plomi* Alligator. Friday, October 18, 1968

EDITORIAL

Mrs. Carol Thomas, local civil rights
activist and wife of UF Professor Billy
Thomas, is back in jail.
i?? r \ and three young children
will be without a wife and mother for a few
months because an up-tight judge doesnt
believe m freedom of the press.
Mrs. Thomas and black militant Jack
Dawkins were convicted of contempt of
court charges last spring for publication of
an underground newspaper which branded
the grand jury as Klan-infested and called
black members of the jury Uncle Toms.
The newspaper, called Black Voices,
condemned the grand jurys whitewashing
of the Gainesville Police Department, the
topic of the jurys investigation.
The police had been condemned by the
black community for beating up blacks
without cause and for sexually abusing
black women in the city jail, where there
are no female matrons.
The grand jury exonerated the police,
although all female inmates were transferred
to the country jail.
The grand jury exonerated the police,
although all female inmates were transferred
to the country jail.

feswjwfflw nftaiMM>noe~~\ ,
(y^7

Changes <

SCENE CD CONFRONTS UF MATH DEPT
CHICKEN DINNER: When you converted to the
quarter system last year you gave me six credits too
many. Two courses too many.
ADVISOR X: You mean you dont want the
credits?
CD: No.
ADV X: You're a strange bird. Incidentally, I
didn't convert, the system did. I just want you to
know there's nothing personal in this.
CD: Yes I know.
ADV X: Well, what's your problem?
CD: With the conversion credits, I have a total of
39 hours. I can only take 3 more courses, 9 more
credits, or a total of 48 hours.
ADV X: That s all we allow anyone to take, 48
hours. These are Arts and Science rules, everyones
the same here. V ib. .u :
CD; Why is limit 1 5 for olitV v
major? I would think you'd want a major to take as
many courses as possible.
ADV X: A lot ot people think that way, but we
don t want our products leaving here with a
one-sided education.
CD: Twenty-five percent of one's education is a

Right To Dissent

Nothing Personal CD But Rules Is Rules

The newspaper indictment of the grand
jury led to the arrest and conviction of Mrs.
Tho/has and Dawkins by Circuit Judge J. C.
Adkins Jr.
Adkins contended that the newspaper
was prejudicial and inflammatory and that rt
obstructed a fair investigation by the jury.
The Alligator said then and reiterates
now, after the U.S. Supreme Court turned
down a bid Wednesday to overturn the
conviction, that Judge Adkins was dead
wrong to punish two deeply-concerned
citizens for exercising the rights guaranteed
them in the first amendment of our
Constitution.
Adlans ruling was indiscriminate and
ill-considered attack on one of Americas
most cherished civil liberties: the right of
dissent.
Precious human liberties which made this,
great experiment in government work
cannot long withstand such unbridled and
ruthless attacks by the very protectors of
those liberties, the courts of law.
Judge Adkins should either become aware
of this truth or stop the pretense of being a
defender of law and human rights.

little weak, though.
ADV X: Rules is rules, you know. Its out of my
hands.
CD: You see, 1 need to take 15 hours to get my
math degree, not nine. Five more courses, not three.
The way my schedule is now, I can only take one
math course each of the three regular quarters this
year.
ADV X, computing on paper: Yes, those figures
check.
CD: But I need to take two more courses to
graduate in math.
ADV X: Well, thats no problem. Just take the
courses. Theres just one catch: you wont receive
credit for them.
CD: But then Ill be taking 19 hours each ot my
next two quarters, for six of those hours.
, D: But that s not fair. You gave me the catlap
credits. Just take the damn things back.
ADV X: It wouldnt be fair to others if we took
them back. I don't see any need for that kind of
language.- Besides, you can take all the math you
want.
CD: Yes, unless youre a math major. Then you
can't take math. Do you realize 13 of my 16 credited

Watching s

Campus Set To Tremble

Perhaps the bitterness of the
presidential campaign is the key
to the bitterness on the campus
but it is not entirely to blame.
The anger in the Gainesville
ghetto is as hot now as it was
when the fire bombs were flying
last year. This was the town
where the national guard was
called out to patrol the streets at
night. That kind of anger comes
from a bitterness in the heart.
Frustrations on campus have
away of lighting fires off
campus.
But when the real shock
wave hits it wont come from
SDS, or the Afro-American
Student Assoc., or the Student
Government, or the Negroes
alone. The UF will tremble when
they are all fighting together.
There is a bitter odor in the
air like a room soaked with
gasoline fumes. And someone is
standing outside with a match.

The Florida Alligator
#'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook I
Executive Editor News Edilor
jM&BW*vy^wwAw.v.WtV.v.*.v.v.v.v.v:w.v.v.v.w.w.v.v.r.>v.v.:.x^^^^r^
{Alligator Inquizitor!
$ By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
S s
S Alligator Columnist
!
J Good morning. I was told to keep it short this morning, so here's*
: the questions: $
1. What state does the new Miss America come fron? (And a super*
\ toughie what is her name?) F £
\ 2. What is the name of the person who sang Well Sing In tI J
: Sunshine?
\ 3. The Tampa Spartans have suffered one loss this year. WhiriJ
: team beat them?
j Here are the answers to yesterday:
1. Albert H. DeSalvo, F. Lee Bailey 2. Marina 3. John Donne?
:4. Robert Taylor, Spangler Arlington Brugh; Kirk Douglas, Issur?
:Danielovitch; Doris Day, Doris Kappelhoff; Boris Karloff, William?
: Henry Pratt; And Sothern, Harriet Lake; June Allyson, Ella Geisman S
5. Nautilus. \
Fight a germ today. |

Returning students have
already sensed the bitter smell of
conflict from Tolbert to Tigert.
The traditionally timid student
government is wracking with
internal convulsions. Although it
is common for party splits,
unions, and backroom fighting,
it is uncommon for the fighting
to be so acrimonious.
Steve Hull and Bob White
tore at each others throats like
two enraged lions over a elected
post that has never held much
importance. The vice president
of the student body has become
hysterical and shouts political
prostitute at one opponent
while shaking an accusing finger
and screaming political
obstructionism at another.
Hysteria is becoming the
order of the day.
The atmosphere for conflict
is more intense this year than in

courses this year will be electives. Hell, Im
becoming an elective major.
. Real, y, I dont see any need for that
a ai l^ ua 8 e It s the same in all departments in
Arts and Sciences. Did you fulfill all your minor
requirements?
CD: Yes, last year.
u/oe ADV t lat s the way it is. We knew this
oln § adversely affect a lot of people but
nothing can be done about it.
CD: Can I petition 9
ADV X: Yes.
CD: Whats the catch?
rn V | Xi Nothing will com e of it,
credits | JtT a yWa >' 1 can S CI rid of
Anv v J an y"'i"g I can do?
i,. t ou always could go to another school.
fatter tlM!ko!j e SOnKOnC his Two heads arc
sto!; 11 3dvst)l y who.hears CD tcll his whole
i To Be Continued Monday

3 By Richard Thompson <

By Jeff Alford

recent history. The right and left
wing groups are determined to
inflame emotions and arouse
contempt as never before.
Before the school year is
over, UF activists want to
surpass the landmark
demonstrations of last year,
both in intensity and frequency.
You can feel it in the air like
an electrical storm.
Ed Freeman and SDS are
working to provide a suitable
encore for the Dow arrests last
year and Larry Jordan and Harry
Lamb Jr. have made it clear that
the Afro-American Student
Association will be stirring up
action.
SDS is seeking an issue and a
cause; today she is organizing,
recruiting and systematically
building an offense. Tomorrow,
when she finds an issue the main
event will begin and the campus
will shurirfor



Byline

A witch hunt occured at the last Student Senate
meeting.
The Student Senate passed a motion to delete
the name of Harvey Alper from a list of senate
nominees. The names were to be submitted to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell for confirmation to
vacated Student Eoard of Publications positions.
Alpers name was removed for his stand on the
Board of Publications censorship of an Alligator
editorial last year criticizing the Marshall Jones tenure
hearings. At least this is the reason given by the
senators who support the motion.
Harvey Alper showed by his walking out, one
senator said, that he supported the Board of
Publications censorship of that editorial.
And we dont need any student who favors
censorship on the Board of Publications.

I OPEN FORUM:
I Addui totd ViMwt
I "There is no hops for the complacent man."

I Hc jHI o-tc&i S OHVf
* C: S ? 30iM WOP. Ml. I
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This sign at the intersection of Newell Dr. and Inner Dr. has
created a blind corner for drivers trying to make a turn onto Newell.
There have been a few minor accidents at the intersection and unless
the sign is moved there will be more.

No Hope For Hope

MR. EDITOR:
>
It seems that everyone who
isnt a Greek should be totally
anti-Greek. This is the
impression that I got from
reading Hopes column, October
9.
Could it be that jealousy on
Hopes part of not being Greek
is the basis for that column? It
appears to me that Hope either
doesnt want anything to do
with the Greeks because of
maybe not becoming one or has
maybe been snubbed by a few
Greeks and from these, few,
Hope has formed a dislike for all
Greeks. This might be why Hope
considers all Greeks ( snobs,
'shbwb'ffs,' etc.,' wkich isnt
necessarily,true. r
Perhaps J kope should think
about the good that the Greeks
have done, especially in the
charity areas. They are also a

Student Senate: A Second Salem

dominant factor in school
affairs. Without the Greeks, the
UF would be minus a great
many things that it might not
have had if it hadnt been for
them.
I consider Hopes view of the
Greeks in bad taste and very one
sided. Perhaps if Hope was
Greek, it might be a different
story.
GARY GRIMME, DELTA CHI
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
letters to tl\? editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300- words
' i in.length; Writers names may
.o i liirifta just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

I feel that when Alper walked out, another
senator added, he failed to fulfill his obligation to
the students. And I dont feel that we need this kind
of person on the Board.
A question of freedom they said. Freedom of the
press. Censorship is wrong, and anyone who favors
censorship is wrong.
But, were these the real issues? I think not.
What are we coming to? If a man can not stand
up for what he believes in at this university, then we
are all lost. Whatever happened to freedom of
speech and the right of an individual to have and
express his own opinion? Are these just archaic
platitudes that we pay lip service to, but never
adhere to?
A rancid air prevailed the student senate meeting
after the motion passed. The spearheaders of the
motion quietly rose and threaded their way toward
the door. Mission accomplished.

Too Much Education

MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Primack seems to have let
his education go to his head.
Its not a matter of
believing; its a matter of being
educated, was the reply when I
asked an American Institutions
professor whether I was to
believe that a business
organization is a collective (er
collectivity) just like the
government, and is therefore
another instance of collectivism.
No Respect
For Judiciary
MR. EDITOR.
Removing political party
affiliation from Honor Court
elections might conceivably
avoid this weeks conflict
between the past and present
chancellors.
Their remarks, as reported in
Wednesdays Alligator, leave
very little reason to give the
judicial branch the respect it
should deserve.
Mr. Zinober, our current
chancellor, seems to be more
interested in obligations to his
party than in obligations to
justice. His legal arguments
appear to be a rationalization for
defending his political collegues.
Admittedly, he is in a difficult
polition, but he should not have
to face such pressures.
Various states have derived
methods to keep judicial
candidates from having to vie in
the political arena. Why cant a
TOWiiy. which w
come up with a similar or better
system?
LINDA MIKLOWITZ. 2UC

Liberals Sit Down,
Contemplate Navels

MR. EDITOR:
The naivete of your editorial,
A Great Literal, and of the
one similar to it in which you
deprecate Hubert Humphrey on
his stand on Vietnam prompted

This thesis ignores the fact that
if a corporation wrongs you, you
have recourse to law; if a
government wrongs you, you are
without legal recourse, outlaw.
I also wonder where Mr.
Primack finds R.E. Osteens
viewpoint such a common
one. I have found it all too
rare. Especially at institutions of
higher education.
DARCY MEEKER
Poor Leaders
MR. EDITOR:
I have just finished reading
Student Body Vice President
Gary GoedrichVattack on Scott
Holloway for -calling for a
quorum at the Tuesday night
Student Senate meeting.
Goodrich accuses Holloway of
obstructionism for the benefit of
the New Movement and of
sacrificing the needs of the
students for the benefit of the
New Movement. The Alligator
editorial in the same issue fully
supports Mr. Goodrich. Well, I
am a student. I am the person
being misrepresented and I agree
with Mr. Holloway. He did not
hurt the students. The senators
who did not bother to attend
the senate meeting hurt the
students They are responsible,
not Mr. Holloway.
Rather than attack Holloway,
the Alligator might check the
Senate Record and find out
which senators were not present
and publish their names along
with their party affiliation. Then
the students will know who does
(mot represent them and which
party or parties, are responsible
(jfpr obstructionism.
?fih- Perhaps stuejeph, ;fis t
only a reflection of student
leadership.
WILLIAM W. LEACH. 2MD

Friday, Octobar 18. 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

But they left an air behind them.
It was an air ot apprehension, an air of silent
desperation. The 13 senators who voted in favor of
including Alpers name and the small crowd that
had gathered to hear the senates proceedings,
watched with non-committed eyes. Could they see
what was happening? What had already happened?
In their over-zealous zeal to ensure freedom of
the press, the senators may well have destroyed
another value, an equally hard earned right on this
campus freedom of speech.
Persecuting a man simply because you disagree
with his opinion or his stand on a particular issue, is
reminiscent of the citizens of Salem hanging their
neighbors as witches, because it only rains near their
house.
Is this Salem?

By Mark Time

me to vent my spleen on your
lily-white, pure as light
attitude toward liberalism. This
seems to be the season for
privileged, white, middle class
liberals to sit around
contemplating their political
navels and bemoaning the fact
that Clean Gene wont get to
ride the Democratic donkey to
the White House on
palm-strewn Pennsylvania
Avenue.
The fact that Humphrey was
chosen does not justify the
holier-than-thou view
evidenced in your editorials.
Your myopic sight ignores the
real threats to liberalism
embodied in Richard Nixon and
causes when he endorses
minimum income protection,
increases in Social Security
benefits, block grants to states,
and bureaucratic reorganization.
And, he has proven to the
satisfaction of one liberal you
mentioned, Arthur Goldberg,
that he will end the tragedy of
Vietnam.
Now is not the time to make
sniping remarks about the purity
of liberals seeking public office;
the forces of the right are too
strong. Only the well-off liberal
can afford to play the pharisee
game in 1968 because poor and
black Americans will suffer for
liberal disunity.
STEPHEN BRYANT,7AS
Piping Out
MR. EDITOR:
This is in regard to my
Rational Observer column of
Wednesday entitled The Piper
The final two paragraphs
were taken out in the
production lab (where the paper
is set up) and this completely
changed the original meaning of
the column.
To those who took it to mean
my views on the song Dixie
this is not so.
.As ( to what th? original
meaning was. jr /jt wn j.j> o ,ftoo
. r explicated tq jherc.
maybe Ill write on it some other
time.
LEWIS ROTH LEIN

Page 9



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Runs great! Spare tire and rack,
buddyseat, and tool kit included. SBO
after 5:30 pm. 372-6506. (A-18-3t-p)
CAMPUS CONCESSION Good part
time money maker. Contact
weekends or eve. except Monday &
Thursday eve. 372-8634. (A-st-18-p)
Blond human hair wig with head and
case SSO. Extra long reddish brown
dyne! fall Only sls. Call 372-7101
after 5:30 p.m. (a-18-3t-p)
BSA Lighting 1965 650 cc with
helmet tag good tires. This machipe is
fast and ready to go. Call 376-8972
or 372-3378. (A-st-18-p)
Blue Lustre will not rid carpets of
soil but leaves pile soft and lofty.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-20-c)
Royal Portable Typewriter and
Leather Carrying Case. Very good
condition. Need to seil fast 549.50.
Call 376-1134. (A-3t-20-p)
Full length human hair wig. Color
light brown. Can be cut. Worn only
twice. S4O. Call 3 78-818 7.
(A-st-20-p)
FOR SALE 1967 Honda Super 65
Only 2,400 mi. Call Steve at
376-9138 or Come see at 2101 NE
Bth St. First offer of $199.00 takes
it. (A-3t-20-p)
New MGB mitten, S2O; Micronta
slide rule $lO. Call 378-8056 after 7
p.m. (A-lt-20-p)
Free Bookstrap with purchase of
1965 Vespa 125 cc 4 speed to 65
mph Call Ken room 9 376-9217
cheap best offer within 24 hours
takes it. (A-lt-19-p)

fcMKI 2nd WEEK!
L T -V"-JppL =di A FRENCH TOM JONES!
MICHELE MORGAN -KATHI.ee* CARROLL
MICHEL PICCOLI NYNews
PIERRE CLEMENTS wn
CATHERINE DENEUVE n JOClttfUtiMMi
wmOMraf^junmoearrmmar
130 "A DEUCATE
3;30 MASTERPIECE
9 40 jjjjj
- Y*W f -HUT new VOAKCA
I STARTING FRIDAY|"^
WEST SIDE STORY I
37W-2434 L ,l | j
. V V £ tfa 4 imHR
| | "*J6|
I P JVUiKli'MpclMj I
ftds^^JtmOSLi&ZiJ

FOR SALE I
ADORABLE SIAMESE KITTENS'
Two males and one female. Bumper
pool table and twin bed. *' all
372-2452 after 4 pm or 462-2516
after midnite. (A-18-st-p)
SAVE-SAVE-SAVE Desk, chairs,
files tables. Bookcases and typing
tables New Used-Refinished Save up
to 50% or more JR Office Furniture
Equipment Co. 620V2 S. Main St. Ph
376-1146. (A-l 7 5t p)
Fender Duo-sonic and hard case in
excellent shape S7O Call Keith at
376 9138 or 376-9498 and leave
your number. (A-3t-17-p)
Marimba Deagan 3-octave excellent
condition. Ideal for Combo $50.00
Ph. 376-1936. (A-2t-19-p)
1962 Chevy 327V8 keystone wheels
University Shell 1805 SW 13 St. No
calls $750. (A-18-4t-p)
Garrard Stereo Console, walnut finish
$l5O or best offer. Phone 372-0242.
Call after three. (A-3t-18-p)
Webcor fun size tape recorder 2
speed takes 9 in. reel, includes
microphone empty reel, tape &
carrying case. Call 378-3974 after 5.
(A-3MB p)
19t>8 Sport Honda 50 only louu
actual miles mint condition must sell
only $175 Call Dave 378-6620.
(A-3t-19-p)
LUDWIG DRUMS complete
including Paiste 602 cymbals stool,
white marine pearl. Original cost
$635 Now S4OO. like new. Call
378-6746. (A-7t-l£-p)
FOR RENT
* *******
MUST SUBLET LEAVING TOWN
Move in today. October rent paid
on a desirable 2 bedroom apartment
in a convenient location close to
campus. Very flexible arrangements.
Call 376-9688 between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m. for further information.
(3-20-ts-c)
Peter Pan Motel Williston Fla. Just 20
mi. from Gainesville. Reservations
available for Homecoming weekend.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-20-p)
Furn upstairs apt. 2 br, air cond. wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt. 2
br, air cond. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-19-ts-c)

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18,1968

|^|>ewe#owaM&elesvill^3
ll||jMUl 1:30 3:50 5:30 7:30 9:30
233 W. Uafoerstfy Ave. |
* IN A MOMENT HE COULD T w TZ e JrZf h Z
women who played the game
\ DEAD! the n /d man h irMup j
j going to arrest I
I RODMORiRBTOPHER PLUMMER ULLIRMMER CAMILLASfttRV' OAUAH \M J
1 THE HIGH COMMISSIONER'.
I---.-.-------... IN C0L0R...............!
, /T ~ ;n \ ZmmF - .......
i 35 3-35 5 : 35 I I
KOM3MIE) CBIdHDIFo
p|Ssi3i!
l^^ck|ngCha/^^^/j w ......
1:00 2:43 4:26 6:09 7:57 9:45 j
jIaCHGI a racliel is a double-barreled triumph' 1
. Joanne Woodward is extraordinary-and Paul Newmans
dlr ect n sexc l elI ntThisis Joanne Woodwards triumph
, and should make her a prime contender for an
Academy Award..
I David Goldman. WCBS Radio
j STREET VOU 2
I WOULDN'T £
| NOTICE HER |
I ntlfWftrtiibflMflWdPO OCT **s*2
i jranel, nl chal
SUGGESTED FOR MATUREAUDIENCES].

Use our handy
mall in order
form.



* G ATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
**
Modern 2 bedroom, carport, Air
Conditioned furnished Apt. Couple
or 2 graduate students only. Call
376*5828. Available Nov. 1.
(B-6t-8-p)
Apartmept for Rent. Apt. 151
Colonial Manor. Call 372-7111.
(B-st-18-p)
Spacious i-bedroom Fully Furnished
1 including washing machine. Within
walking distance so Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357, 3/8-0641.
(Btf 9C)
Homecoming room for two or
three large comfortable rooming
house. Central air cond. S6O for Nov.
1 & 2. Bob 372-9370. (B-19-3t-p)
WANTED
I;!
Baby Sitter needed for 1 year old
while I attend class on Mon., Wed.,
Fri. 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m.. Village
Park. 378-1744, fC-16-st-p)
COIN COLLECTORS AT Gainesville
Coin Club Meeting Friday night,
October 18, 8 p.m. Guarantee
Federal Bldg., 220 North Main
Street. Enter from parking lot behind
for coin displays, auctions, slide
talks, discussions. Everybody
welcome. (C-19-2t-u)
One coed to share 2 drm apt French
Quarter apt 72 call 378-9934
anytime after 4 p.m. (C-3t-20-p)
Need desperately 2 tickets to
Homecoming game. (West stand
desired) please call 372-5452 or
3 72-9415 and ask for Gage.
(C-2t-20-p)
Need Male Roommate large
comfortable home in NW section of
town, nice quiet atmosphere S4O a
month call 376-9080 ask for John.
C-st-20-p)
Needed: one male roommate to share
lux. 2 br. apt. with 2 others. Security
and Oct. already paid. Only SSO per
month. Contact Ricky or Ron Apt.
202 714 SW 16 Ave. (C-19-3t-p)

erosa
JML < STEAK HOUSB k:
I-KATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Day 9 Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
Coming in Person
JAMES BROWN
and his
1968 Spectacular of 40 Stars
at
Citizens Field
Oct. 28, 8:30 p.m.
f
Advance Tickets lidcets Available at
Adults 4.00 Record Bar
CUllArmn iM 9 50 discount Records
Children [ 12) ZSO Wjmafm Barbefshop
Tide eta cd Gate Russell Henry Barber Shop
' Windy's Barber Shop
Aduls-4io on University Ave.
Children (42) 3.00 Sedh's Piece
. #
- fad HowardProdudH* 1 """" 1

HELP WANTED
** *
X-:*:*:-x-x-v.sv:w-:-:-x-x-xx.x-:*v-v.%y->
Reliable Woman Tue. & Wed. 7:30
5:30 Housekeeping & care for 2 yr.
old girl. Transportation to NW &
references. $15.00 a week. 378-0844.
(E-2t-19-p)
Need students to work part time. Sell
guaranteed products on commission
basis. Earn SBO-100 monthly or more
if aggressive. Call 378-8787.
(E-2t-19-p)
Jazz Musicians or group interested in
performing locally. No rock. Steady.
376-0908. (E-3t-20-p)
Piano Player wanted for Shakeys
Pizza Parlor. Smg-a-long music 3
nights per week. Apply >n person,
evenings. 3510 SW 13th St.
(E-20-ts-c)
Part time male help wanted for
Shakeys Pizza Parlor, 3510 SW 13th
St. Must be 21 or older. Apply in
person after 4 p.m. (E-2t-20-c)
I AUTOS
>: ............. .-.V.-.-.V.-5
1963 Chevy SS 327 cu. in. 300 hp.
air. cond. auto, trans. chrome wheel
stereo tape extra clean one owner
Phone 378-4278 after 5 p.m. $1095.
(G-st-19-p)
1963 Anglia. S3OO. 31 mpg. excellent
tires and mechanical. Good body.
3224 NW 13 St. Trailer 17 or Call
378-5548. (G-st-19-p)
MGB 1964 conv r&h, wne wheels
rmdnite blue w/white top. Clean all
over & m good shape. Ecstatic driving
$1295, 378-6917, 301-6 Dia. Vill.
(G-19-st-p)
68 Chevelle SS 396 convertible 4 spd
stereo tape radio heat bucket seats
Best looking car on campus $2 700
Call 376-8740. (G-st-l 7-p)
1965 Mustang 289, 4-speed. AC,
radio, new tires, extras. Call Red or
Steve at 372-6776. (G-st-19-p)
60 MKIX Jag Biggest luxury Jag
built. SIOOO spent on complete eng.
overhaul 3 wks. ago. Radio heat air
excellent in & out. Offers over
SISOO. 3/6-0201. (G-8t 18-p)

Friday, Octobsr 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

REITZ UNION THEATRE sv ADM ADMr
r ADMr 4o<
If there's one thing
a woman won't talk lIH
, *JlMo *iM HoHy g woSdhM up
powro *s* Mfflw ROONPf SapsSjs- 5
SATURDAY OCT. 19
FRIDAY OCT. 18 7:00 9:15 PM
7:00, 9:15 P. M. reitz union theatre|
-'mL jm
I Cheer up with Morrisons Coffee I
I ...and a delicious Morrisons meal! I
I If you enjoy the deep-down satis* You can relax and be served all I
faction of a really good cup of cos- the coffee you want for the price
fee with or after lunch or dinner, of a single cup! Enjoy a delicious
then Morrisons is for you! We lunch or dinner with a built-in cos cos-1
-1 cos-1 serve our own brand an ex- fee break at Morrison's soon I
elusive blend of the worlds most and BE HAPPY! j
expensive coffees roasted to per- y#i
section in our own roasting plant fIIUISIiISUN 9
and brewed for fu11, rich flavor.
I And heres an extra happy note! JETl'diUMl' I
I SERVING HOURS
Lunch 11 a.m.to 2fM*V
Dinner 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. fh
I GAINESVILLE MALL I

Page 11



Page 12

* The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| AUTOS
66 Plymouth Satellite 426 HEMI
every possible oxtra and factory
experimental option, never raced, call
378-5405 after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-16-p)
0 i
196* Porsche 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2600.00.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-13-st-p)
Want to restore a car. Following
125.00 up 1940 Ford 41 Cad. 40
LaSalle 41 Cry. 40 Ply. 36 Buick 40
Chev. 31 Model A. Call 378-7951.
(G-10t-18-p)
65 Contain must sell! 4 dr. RH Perf.
running cond. Ex. family car SIOO
dn. take over payments. Call
378-8550 after 6 0.m.: A
SACRIFICE SALE. (G-3t-^B-p)
1963 Fairlane 500 Black & white w.
red int. R & H very good ct nd. Must
sell now $480.00. Cheap. Can Ruben
378-6874. (G-6t-20-p)
1966 MGB overdrive, wire wheels,
white walls, R & H and extras. Clean,
needs no work, only TLC. Call Dave
at univ. ext 3198 or 372-7024 after
5. (G-st-20-p)
Plymouth Wagon 1959 at power
brakes and steering. Inspected. S3OO
phone 372-9860 after 5:00 p.m. or
weekend. (G-st-18-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -1-00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
*W n
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*y.v.v;v.xv:
| PERSONAL |
Wwwmwwscwwjvwwswiws l !?
Broward S.E. coeds; your form &
espirt on the field were tops. Eager
for rematch this Sunday. Love ya!
Men of Fletcher L. (J-lt-20-p)
Tigress I still love you even if you
are an old maid. Don't worry, I'll be
at the church on time. Puppy kisses
forever, Tiger. (J-lt-20-p)
Your Personal Poster Headquarters,
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
incense peddler, far-out clothing
experimenter, blacklight dispenser to
the world, has just rece ved a large
shipment of INDIA PRINT
BEDSPREADS in both twin and
double bed sizes. Drop in and pick a
couple out while the selection is
abundant. 10 SW 7th St. just around
the comer from Santa Fe JC.
(J-15-6t-p)
| LOST & FOUND |
vr-X-X-v-v-v-v.
Misplaced 1 pr. brown weejuns and
umbrella in gold must. conv. by
mistake. If found, please call
378-6966. fL-3t-20-O)
Lost black wallet on campus, money
within is your reward for returning to
Herbert Norgorden, phone 378-8056
or mail box 13854 Uni. Sta.
(L-2t-20-p)

PERSONAL
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-10-ts-cl
Lost one brown attache case filled
with musical manuscript & scores. If
found please call 378-3958 or return
to band office c/o Henry Wolking
five dollar reward. (L-2t-20-p)
Found women's belt Oct. 15 on
Radio Road near Graham Area,
owner call 372-1821. (L-3t-20-nc)
Tipton Block Co. 4131 NW 6th St.
found 1 pair prescription sunglasses
left by customer. Please, come by
and identify. (L-3t-17-nc)
;..%wxvX^nnv. , aW///.vXv"*V".v;v>
SERVICES
UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP, 2814
NW 43rd St. Sundays at 10:30. Octo.
20 Kenneth Megill, Philosophy
Dept, on Radicals, European
Style." A report on 8 months in
Hungary. Oct. 27 William Carter,
Anthropology, on Religion and
Social Structure. Nov. 3 Thaxton
Springfield, Religion Dept. The
Reactionary in Religion and
Politics. You are invited.
Rubys Alterations has moved to
1126 V? N.W. Bth St. 376-8506.
(M-14-2t-p)
IImLLJLm mi
RUMMM ADULT I
Mi SHOWTIME jSyjSjL. I
730 DETtCIIYc! I
I als
9-5 BQHBEB&BISSSiI
florida cinema society presents
A REAL COWBOY
WIWM > -- ; xBIS
WILLIAMS. HART
America's first
white-hat good guy
in
"Tumbleweeds"
(1925)
union aud. Sunday

I FIRST RUN! MAIN FEATURE
jKMyMggjmttAT 7:30 AN p 11:05
jfonyAnfe^^^^|E7|
l iKI ks Hi M Dl r %;. MJ I
: ; v, Lgjfe jgw-jy
pCO-FEATUREAT 9:30
jjj^^^^^^^^^^^PSTARRINGSTEVEALAIM^

SERVICES I
Alterations and dressmaking.
Reasonable rates, Call 376-9594.
Student. (M-19-2t-p)
Looking
Used Car?
FIND IT UNDER
autos
IN GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
UNIV. EX: 2832
ARTE
} THE SILENCE'
1 PORNOGRAPHY OR
I MASTERPIECE?
1 There is no doubt that this
I film contains more overt
1 sexuality than we have
I sen on screen. The fascin-
I ating question is, however,
f how much of it is communi communi-1
-1 communi-1 cated to the viewer and how
I much of it offends. Cer Cer-1
-1 Cer-1 tainly the prudish and even
I the modest may be repelled
I by the several scenes of
I sexual gratification in which
I the two sisters indulge, but
1 even they would be hard
I put to argue that these ex- \
1 emplify gratuitous eroti-
I cism on Bergman's part or
1 are irrelevant to the prob-
I ing character studies he has
1 set for himself. ) v
| Mild
Y Wwr Yark Ramil Triton
/fIPsUHDVt^jPv
1 - ISy I
I lifiumu (
ii 1 V miter IjM
HI MflUlmif
llLvs.ti M


WEEKEN
DOINGS
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
SPECIAL EVENTS
FACULTY CONCERT:
Evelyn Taylor, sporano; Russell
Danburg, piano. University
Auditorium, Sunday, 4 p.m.
Admission free.
INDIA CLUBS MOVIES:
Through the Eyes of a Painter
and Vadya Vrinda (about
Indian Musical instruments).
Reitz Union, room 349, Sunday,
6:30 p.m. (These movies are
shown in conjunction with the
Indian Clubs celebration of the
Divali festival of lights.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST: Sigma Phi Epsilon
House, Sunday, 9:15 p.m.
CHESS TOURNAMENTS:
Union room 361, tonight, 6:30.
UNION DANCE: Union
Cafeteria, Saturday, 8 p.m.
Band: SAM.
BROWARD FRESHMAN
TEA: Room 122 of the Union
Sunday, 3 p.m.
CLUB MEETINGS
AFRO-AMERICAN
STUDENT ASSOCIATION:
Rooms 355 and 356 of the
Union, tonight, 7:15.
STUDENT RECEPTION: For
all international students,
tonight, 7:30, Baptist Student
Center.
FLORIDA FOLK
DANCING: Room 214 of the
Florida Gym, tonight, 8 p.m.
MENSA: Union room 150 B,
today, noon.
UF MUSLIM STUDENTS:
Union rooms 121 and 122,
today, 12:30 p.m.; and Sunday,
Union room 357, 2 p.m.
FENCING CLUB: Florida
Gym basement Recreation
Room, tonight, 7 p.m.
KAPPA EPSILON: Union
room 346, Sunday, 2 p.m.
CIVIL AIR PATROL: Union
room 123, Sunday, 8 p.m.
ARAB CLUB: Union room
357, Sunday, 3:30 p.m.
FLORIDA CINEMA
SOCIETY: Union room 347,
Sunday, 7 p.m
SPORTS
FOOTBALL: UF vs. North
Carolina State, Saturday, away.
CROSS COUNTRY: UF vs.
Manatee Jr. College, Saturday,
Bradenton, Fla., 11 a.m.
Sophomore
Wins SIOOO
Scholarship
Michael Eric Ross, a
sophomore from Miami, was
named Saturday as the first
recipient of the UF Alumni
Associations SI,OOO
scholarship.
Ross had a perfect 4.0
academic average during his
freshman year at the university.
Ross, who plans to major in
political science, was in
competition with more than 50
other freshmen who earned
Alumni Association tuition
grants of $375 during the
1967-68 academic yem.
His SI,OOO award was
announced during a luncheon
honoring 1968-16 Alumni
Association scholars and their
parents.



We Do A Lot Os Individual Projects

FROM PAGE SEVEN
Interaction is free discussion
between teachers and students,
and a form of self-analysis by
video-tape individual
teachers.
All this is coordinated with
what Nelkr calls PRY'S major
innovation: The way we view
people.
Compared to other schools,
PKY has a big advantage. The
school gets quite a bit of
information and material from
UF, Preston said.
But, some of the UF student
privileges should be extended to
PKY students, Key Club
Vice-President Rayfield McGhee
said. He said these include
library and Reitz Union game
room facilities.
PRYS athletic attitude may
be opposite that of other
schools. Although athletics
have always been emphasized.

2nd Scholarship Won
By 12 UF Students

Law scholarships awarded to
UF students show a consistency
in the selection of scholars
with 12 of 35 winners repeat
recipients from last year.
Second time awardees are:
William M. Douberly, Charles M.
Gadd Jr., Christy Harris, Thomas
Hyman Jr., Kathryn Lawyer,
Hugh MacMillan Jr., Ronald
Watson, Robert F. Williams,
William K. Zewadski, Robert
Graddy, William Lederer and
Roger Schwenke.
The majority of the grants
26 came from the Florida Law
Center. Five came from
non-resident tuition.
Other scholarships and
recipients: Crandall Memorial

FREE BEER I
GET IN THE RABBIT HABIT
For Old Gators W e Have
FREE BEER
FOR THE YOUNG GATORS WE HAVE FREE PEPSI
FOR ALL OF YOU WE HAVE 'GROOVY MUSIC'
BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE 'LEAVES OF GRASS'
*
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
From 9p.m. Till 2a.m. r
THE WHITE RABBIT
809 WEST UNIV AVE
3760011 372-9222
l

All i kw

BACKGROUND REPORT

they have never come before
academics, Preston said.
Participation and interaction
are stressed at PKY. Both of
these are linked up in the
classroom CORE program.
CORE is similar to a
homeroom format but the
similarity ends there. Language
arts and social studies are
emphasized in a two hour block
of instruction.
Students are enthusiastic
about CORE. We do a lot of
individual projects we want to
study, Preston said.
Great. Tremendous. It
stresses current events and
politics, McGhee exclaimed. It
is really whatever the students
want.

John Patrick Kuder; Martha B.
Culpepper John Arthur
McDermott; Pasco County
Ronald H. Watson; and
Robinson Reese Saunders
Roger Dean Schwenke.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV.AVE.
376*031C>
AND
10 1 N.MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins. 5 mins

* *
CORE, interaction, no
regimentation, new teaching
techniques, teacher-student
academic freedom, computer
link-ups, possible open-session
format, cross discipline
approach, limited enrollment,
and strong student-teacher
enthusiasm all this is PKY.
But, what is the school's
future?
Presently, die school is being
evaluated by a special College of
Education commission. Some of
the things being studied are
PRYS limited enrollment and
the schools adherence to the
colleges policies.
One thing stands out for PKY
no matter what the commission

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Student's Friend'
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Sh ow Your ID Card To Our Service Manager 1
* UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N. Main St. Phone 376-7581

concludes. Eighty-two per cent
of graduates go directly to
college.
And in a recent survey of
PKY graduates in UFs
University College, the students
in comparison to their peers,
although originally lower in
overall ability, achieved a

HtCAK/i tHAKfI
I uol. a m mm* I
IfEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE!
DINING ROOM
I COUNTER 1
I CARRY OUT I
I Open Til 1 AM I

Friday, October 18, 1868. Tha Florida Alligator,

significantly higher honor point
average.
Talking to students and
teachers at PKY it is apparent
they agree on most points. Two
stated goals of PKY, to develop
students who are life-time
learners and to develop teachers
that are continuing learners,
are apparently being achieved.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

m \ ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
Jll 1 j and NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTION TJT T TT7I T3TTT T LIirTITTVT
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION JjJj |J JHj Jj |J |j|J hi X 11N

Campus Calendar

Friday, October 18
Football Film, 150 C & D
Union, 12:00 noon
Mensa Meeting, 150 B Union,
12:00 noon
Freshman Football, Florida vs.
FSU, Florida Field, 2:00 p.m.
Chess Club Tournament, 361
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Dept, of Physics and Astromony
Cloolquium, Speaker, Dr. C.
F. Hooper, Jr., Bless Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie, Ist
show, "Hud," 7:00 p.m., 2nd
show, "War of the Worlds,"
11:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area South Hall Rec.
Room.
Union Movies, "Swedish
Wedding Night," Union Aud.,
5:00,7:00, & 9:15 p.m.
Afro-American Student
Association, 355 Union, 7:15
Phi Alpha Theta, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214
Florida Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 19
Air Force ROTC Air Force
Qualification Test, Room 208
ROTC Bldg., 7:45 a.m.
Football Univ. of Florida vs.
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Arnold Air Society Traditional
Member vs. Pledge Football
Game, Mr. Wright's
Residence, 1:30 p.m.
Union Movie: "Breakfast at
Tiffany's," Union Aud., 5:00,
7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Tolbert Area Council Movie, Ist
show, "Hud," 7:00 p.m., 2nd
show, "War of the Worlds,"
11:00 p.m., Tolbert Area
South Hall Rec. Room.
Dance in the Union, Cafeteria
and Snack Bar, 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 19
Program Office, Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.
Broward Hall Freshman Advisors
Tea, 122 Union, 3:00 p.m.
Faculty Concert, Evelyn Taylor,
soprano. University Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
St. Augustine Parrish Meeting,
Student Lounge, 5:15 p.m.
India Club Meeting & Movie,
349 Union, 6:30 p.m.
India Club: Diwali Celebrations,
Baptist Student Center, 6:30
p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Meeting,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Movie,
"Tumbleweeds," Union Aud.,
7:15 & 9:00 p.m.

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement -
Share loans *>-
Call ext 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan. M
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION flfc
Sth Avtnw of mt comor of 12th Str Hours : 8:00 ajfi. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

Civil Air Patrol Meeting, 123
Union, 8:00 p.m.
College Life Meeting, Sigma Phi
Epsilon house, 9:15 p.m.
Monday, October 21
Union Board Dancing Lessons,
245 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Tau Chapter of Alpha Phi
Omega Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Alpha Zeta Meeting, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Citrus Club Meeting, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, Painting
Classes, C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, Room 525 E & I
Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for Fall
Frolics, "THE FOUR TOPS."
$5.00 a couple, tickets are
also on sale for the Florida
Cinema Society, SI.OO.
REGISTRAR'S DEADLINES:
Oct. 18 is the deadline for
making a college change from
Lower Division to Upper
Division or from one college to
another. This deadline also
applies to applications for
post-baccalaureate status. Any
student graduating in Dec. and
who wishes to continue in
school must file an application
for either post-baccalaureate or
Graduate School studies. Oct. 25
is the deadline for applying for
Graduate School. Dec. 1 is the
deadline for applying for the
College of Law for the 1969
Spring Quarter. Applications
may be obtained and returned to
room 33 Tigert Hall.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST will be given Nov. 9,
1968, Feb. 8, 1969. April 12.
1969, and Aug. 2, 1969.
Registration forms and fees must
reach the Educational Testing
Service, Law School Admission
Test, Box 944, Princeton, N.J.
08540, at least three weeks
before the desired test
administration date. Forms may
be picked up at the Registrar's
Office and the College of Law.
STATE SCHOLARSHIPS: All
those students who have a
General Teachers Scholarship
Loan note or a State Nursing
Scholarship Loan note for the
Fall Quarter, 1968, please turn
them in at the Student
Depository before Oct. 21.
FALL QUARTER
GRADUATES: Students who
expect to graduate at the end of

the Fall Quarter must file an
application for the degree and
pay the graduation fee at the
Office of the Registrar no later
than Oct. 18. Students must
make application for the degree
on the Student Audit
Information Form in the quarter
in which they expect to
graduate, regardless of previous
applications.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. All
CBS 261 studtnes are expected
to take this test and each must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
bre required to use his SOCIAL
SECURITY NUMBER. Students
whose last names begin with (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,
10, or 11; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or 125;
(F) to Little 201, 203, 205, or
2Q7; (G) to Peabody 101.102
112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208, (f-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
(M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; IS) to Walker
Auditorium; IT-V) to Little 109;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Matherly
2,3, 4, 5. 6,7. 8,9, 10,11, 12.
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116, 117,118 or
119.
CBS 263 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. in
Little 101.
CY 201 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Walker
Auditorium; (M-Z) report to
Little 101,109,113,121,0 r 125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to Walker
Auditorium; (N-Z) report to
Peabody 1,2, 4. 5,7. 1 or 11.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with (A-F) report to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5, 6,7.8,9.10.11,12.13,
14, or 16; (G-L) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116.117,118, or
119; (M-R) to Little 101, 109,

Administrative Notices

113,121, or 125; (S-Z-)report to
Little 201, 203, 205, 207, 213,
215,217, or 219.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 18: CORNING GLASS;
GENERAL DYNAMICS (Ft.
Worth Division); FLORIDA
POWER & LIGHT CO:;
CHICAGO PNEUMATIC TOOL
CO. ME, IE. BAESc, BSSE,
BA, BS; UNION CARBI DE DELINDE
LINDE DELINDE DIVISION -- ChE, ME.
EE, CE, Engr. Sci, Met.;
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER
CO. -- Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts, Sales
Mgt, Acctg. LOCKHEED
GEORGIA & LOCKHEED
MISSLES; GULF POWER CO.
OCT. 21: LYBRAND, ROSS
BROS. & MONTGOMERY ~
Acctg.; ROCHE LABS
(Pharmaceutical) -- Pharmacy,
Lib. Arts, Sci, Jrs. for summer
employment; RYAN
AERONAUTICAL CO.
Electronics, Aerodynamics,
Mechanical or Physics Engr.;
NAVAL PERSONNEL
RESEARCH LABORATORY
Math, Ed, Soc, Psych; CORPS
OF ENGINEERS (Atlanta, Ga.)
CE,EE,ME, Engr. Sci;
GENERAL TIRE & RUBBER
CORPORATION OF AMERICA
- EE.; UNION CAMP
normally interviews chemistry,
ChE.; WILLIAM CARTER CO.
-- normally interviews chemistry
& engineering.
OCT. 21-22: ETHYL CORP. ~
Chem, Chem. Engr, EE, ME, IE,
graduate students for summer
employment in chemistry;
undergraduates accepted in
other fields. E.l. DU PONT DE
NEMOURS & CO., INC. ~
Chem. Engr, MW, IE, Chem.
PRE-MEDICAL &
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Students MUST register with the
P re-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 3, Anderson Hall.
Registration has been extended
until Oct. 25. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Those
who have not completed the
annual census card of the
Institute of International
Education are requested to do so
as soon as possible at
International Center.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMS: Oct. 25 is the deadline
for receipt ip the office of
foreign languages of applications
for all foreign language
functional examinations to be
given on Saturday, Nov. 2.
FOREIGN STUDENT
RECEPTION: A reception will
be held in the Baptist Student
Center on West University Ave.
at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, by
the Council of International
Organizations. All are invited.
STATE SCHOLARSHIPS: All
those students who have a
General Teachers Scholarship
Loan note or a State Nursing
Scholarship Loan note for the
Fall Quarter, 1968, please turn
them in at the Student
Depository before Oct. 21.
FULBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIPS:
Students who are working on
Fulbright applications for
one-year of graduate study
abroad are asked to contact the
Fulbright Program Adviser G.
A. Farris in International
Center at once as there has been
a drastic elimination of countries
in this program for 1969-70.
Phone Ext. 2837 or 2838 for
details.
. S'
PRELAW STUDENTS:
Professor Frank Booker of Notre
Dame Law School will be on
campus on Wednesday, Oct. 23,
for the prupose of interviewing
students who may be interested
in attending Notre Dame Law
School. He will have information
regarding available scholarships,
as well as information with
respect to a new program
involving a year of law study at
the University of London,
England, as part of the Notre
Dame law program. Interested
students should sign up for
interviews in the Placement
Office, Room G-22, Reitz
Union.
GENERAL NOTICES
ACCENT SYMPOSIUM:
Positions are available on the
following committees: finance,
public relations, publicity,
technical, program, speakers,
personnel, magazine and general
secretaries. Applications may be
picked up at the Student
Activity Desk, Reitz Union.
PEACE CORPS RECRUITERS:
The Peace Corps will be on
campus Oct. 24-31 outside the
Games Room of the Reitz Union
and at the Information Booth
across from the Hub.



Saigon Balks At Bombing Halt,
NLF Peace Talk Recognition

By United Press International
Reports swept the world
Thursday that Hanoi and
Washington were on the verge of
a compromise toward a
beginning of the end of
the Vietnam War. Diplomatic
sources said South Vietnamese
objections were holding things
up.
Pham Dang Lam, Saigons
head observer at the Paris talks,
emerged from more than an

Jackie To Marry
Greek Billionaire

NEW YORK (UPI) Mrs.
John F. Kennedy will marry
Greek shipping billionaire
Aristotle Socrates Onassis within
the next few weeks and possibly
within a week, it was announced
officially today.
The announcement was made
by Mrs. Kennedys mother, Mrs.
Hugh D. Auchincloss of
Washington, through the former
First Ladys secretary, Nancy
Tuckerman. Miss Tuckerman
said she thought the wedding
would take place within the
week but she said she did not
know where.
Another informed source said
the ceremony would be on an
island somewhere. Onassis
owns the Aegean island of
Skorpios.
The engagement came after
months of speculation over Mrs.
Kennedys friendship with the
Earl of Harlech, British
ambassador to Washington
during the Kennedy
Administration. While Harlech
was denying they were anything
but devoted friends, Mrs.
Kennedys longtime friendship
with Onassis was deepening into
love.
Mrs Kennedy is Roman
Catholic and the attitude of the
church toward her marriage to a
divorced person may force her
to be married in a civil ceremony

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UPI
NEWS
hour with U.S ambassador at
large W. Averell Harriman in
Paris Thursday. He looked

or in the Greek Orthodox faith
of Onassis.
Onassis was divorced in 1960
by his first wife, Greek shipping
heiress Athina Tina Livanos.
after 14 years of marriage. The
Vatican recognizes the validity
of Greek Orthodox marriages, so
that his remarriage within the
Roman Catholic church would
depend on unusual and
extenuating circumstances.
DIAMOMO MCHCHAKXO. 09 AMHOA
AORDONB
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nervous and brushed aside
newsmens questions.
Diplomatic sources and Paris
newspapers both said Saigon
refused to go along with a U.S.
plan to include South Vietnam
and the National Liberation
Front (NLF), the Viet Congs
political branch, in the talks.
Diplomatic sources said the
United States offered to bring in
the NLF and the South
Vietnamese government and
order a total halt in the bombing
of North Vietnam.
Hanoi has steadfastly insisted
no progress could be made at the
talks until the bombing and
other acts of war stopped
without any strings attached.
The United States has always
said such a halt would have to be
accompanied by reciprocal
North Vietnamese moves toward
peace.
In Paris, the newspaper
France-Soir said President
Johnson would already have
ordered the bombing stopped if

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it had not been for Saigons
refqsal to agree to the idea. The
newspaper also said Saigon
objected to letting the NLF
enter the talks.
In Saigon, U.S. ambassador
Ellsworth Bunker conferred with
President Nguyen Van Thieu
Thursday night for the third
time in 36 hours. Reports
persisted of a possible U.S.
bombing halt against North
Vietnam and an unspecified
reciprocal move by Hanoi to
promote peace.
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Friday. October 18,1968, The Florida Alligator.

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*-** w*' <*<

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator. Friday, October 18, 1968


ruxpresaons~~3
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Features Editor Q
South Dade High School had to drop D de as its school song. It
makes sense, though. After all, there are only a dozen Negro students
who attend South Dade and, after all, when the student body voted on
the issue there were only seven votes in favc; of abolishing the song so,
when you think about it with lots of imagination, it only makes good
sense that the minority should rule. A few indignant blacks went before
all sorts of boards and things and said that the song was racist. Wow.
University of Miami dropped it too. Thats funny, because there are
fewer Negroes there than at South Dade High. After all, when you really
and truly study the situation, it makes all sorts of sense, because in a
democracy the minority rules, right?
And now, right here at good ole UF in Gay-ness-ville/Hogtown, peopi,
are going berserk because Dixie is played at ball games and all. Wow.
And all our black students get so offended and feel so persecuted that
now people are demanding the song banned. I guess the cafeteria better
never ever again serve watermelon, know what I mean?
Think about it for a moment. Lets drop Dixie for starters. Then
watermelon, which has already been mentioned. Then we had better start
a crusade to get the mammy off the labels of Aunt Jemima syrup bottles
and pancake mix boxes. We could demand that she be replaced with a
white Anglo-Saxon Protestant elderly woman and changed the name of
the product to .. .well, what do you think?
Then we could begin a gigantic movement to go through all the
history books in the country and black out (no pun intended) all the
pictures of blacks in chains from the days of (the upcoming word is to be
whispered softly so as not to offend anyone) SLAVERY!!
After we accomplish all of this well really have some followers and
the movement will be in full power and force. Then we can really get
some action. For example, you know about the black justice (I think 1
just coined a new phrase: BLACK JUSTICE) on the Supreme Court.
Well, we could say that the other justices, being white, are discriminating
against the one lone persecuted black justice (love that phrase!) and that
they should all be kicked off the Supreme Court and replaced with
blacks. That would be fair, wouldnt it?
Then we could have a black president who, being sort of a dark
horse (got that?) in the election, could run on a Watermelon in Every
Icebox type platform. What do you think?
And then, for a grand finale, to pay all Negroes back for the mistakes
of our forefathers, we could put on chains for a few years and be slaves
to them for a change. For a change?? How does that sound?
We could voluntarily sit in the back of the bus and say boss and
yessuh for a while. Negroes who hole whites in contempt could
threaten to send em back to Europe. And everything would be fun
and games and, wow, it would be fair then, wouldnt it? To show we
really love Negroes we could pass laws making it mandatory to marry
someone of the opposite race. In a few generations we would be a country
of beautiful mulattos.
So you see, there is plenty Still to be done for our black brethren.
Education for starters. The common sense and we could play it by ear
after that. Anyway, I wish I was in the land of cotton because the ole
times there are not forgotten. Look away, look away, look away, baby,
cause the times they are achanging and its scary, know what I mean?
U. M. Coed Charged
With Infants Death
CORAL GABLES, Fla. (UPI) Police filed criminal charges
against a 19-year-old University of Miami coed Tuesday after
her premature baby,, found in garbage can outside a dormitory,
died.
Police said Sharron Mullanney of Sea Girt, N J., a sophomore
studying political science, was charged with willful and
wantonly depriving a child of treatment and attention.
The infant boy was found by construction workers Monday
night and rushed to a hospital, where he died early Tuesday.
Police said Miss Mullaney told them she gave birth to the
baby in the dormitory early Monday and, when it appeared
stillborn, put it in a garbage chute.
Miss Mullaney was taken to a hospital for treatment.

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Engineers
Like RMN
Nixon is the obvious choice
for President among UF
engineering students, says
James Hollis, SEG.
Hollis, who coordinated the
Florida Engineer Opinion Survey
this summer, found this and
other facts in the majority.
The survey, taken between
the Republican and Democratic
conventions, canvassed 235
students, selected at random.
Hollis, declined to give many
statistics. He said the results
would be published at the end of
October in the Florida
Engineering Magazine.
Students voted little support
for peace candidates McCarthy
and McGovern. Only two or
three students placed them on
the questionnaire, he said.
A majority of 163 students
voiced their disapproval of the
job Student Government is
doing representing students.
Other questions concerned
the necessity and effectiveness
of Action Conference; the
Administrations power over
students; and whether Student
Government should be
abolished.

Daugmvef BitSrhrjjon It a unique organization fagSjHNhmarJiroaien
only. x P #r ** VM ? u con n iy if you hod^^at
The selection promts Is thoroughly ovalijH ALL im 1
freshman women land Meet a certain number of rushees feifitonsideraf
Men before the fink cmouncement. ChannSmwe alrd&Mbnve.ya|> 3
TODAY.... 47
ffieta tCfteta Jfratermtp

/gj£\ Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE ?
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF
TROPICAL AGRICULTURE McPherson
TROPICAL & SUBTROPICAL AGRICULTURE Ochse
PRACTICAL LAND DRAINAGE Cooper
YOUNG RADICALS (Now in paper back) Keniston
THE MONEY GAME Smith
IBERIA Michener
MARC CHAGAL Greenfeld i

HOWTO HANDLE A WOMAN Gardner
THE NEW ROMANS Purdy
PETER SELLERS Evans
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. 12:00
* Campus Shop & Bookstore



I Letters

Dear Grandmother,
Hi, Grandmother! Bill took
me to see a real funny game the
kids at the college play. Its
called football because the ball is
made of the same stuff that
peoples shoes are made of. Isnt
that smart of them to think of
that name?
We went to a great great great
big big field with lots and lots of
boards that they sit on. In the
middle is a great big grass yard.
They dont take good care of it,
though, because somebody
spilled paint all over it and made
lines. And at each end of the
yard theres these posts that are
real high.
We got to the yard (only the
kids here call it field and
stadium) and there were all these
people just everywhere,
Grandmother! They were
pushing and shoving each other
to get in and sit down. A lot of
them were real sick because they
were drinking the same kind of
medicine that Uncle Oran keeps
in his car.
Everybody was yelling and
screaming at each other before
they got in. There were some
grown-ups who were selling
tickets to the kids who didnt
get any. They would shout,
Tickets! Tickets! Cheapest
tickets in town! It sure was an

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expensive game because the
grown-ups were selling the cheap
tickets for $lO each. Isnt it nice
of them to help the college kids
like that, Grandmother?
We finally got in and then
guess what happened? These
kids ran onto the yard and they
were dressed like giants with
space helmets on. It was so
funny to watch the game that I
laughed out loud. They would
beat up the kid who had the ball
(only its not really a ball
because its not round), but
that s not the funny part. The
funny part is when all these
great big kids kept patting each
other on the behind! I asked Bill
why they did that and he said
that football player kids like
each other an awful lot and only
do that to other football kids
and sometimes to the Greek girls
I told you about.
Anyways, it was real funny.
Everybody kept getting real
excited about who had the ball
and they would scream and
jump and drink medicine each
time a football kid took the ball
to the end of the yard.
Bills college did real good
because they played a real hard
team that was real good. Bills
college (its called University of
Florida) only let the other team

get three points. But they only
got three points too until the
end when something went wrong
and they got lots of points.
Girls must play football real
good, Grandmother, because
when we left to go home I said
to Bill that his team played real
good and he said yes, like a
bunch of girls. Maybe Ill play
on their team when Im old
enough. I told Bill that and he
said Id probably be the best
player.
You should have seen all the
cars and mix-ups in the road
when we left, Grandmother.
Everybody was just sitting there
and not going anywhere and the
policemen with the funny
accents got everybody mixed-up
and going the wrong ways. It
took a real long time to get
home. There must have been
about a million cars.
1 told Uncle Oran and Aunt
Angela about the game and they
said they were glad I had such
fun. I dont think Ill be able to
go to another game, though,
because the football kids are
leaving town. Uncle Oran said
that after this game all the
football kids will go to RadclifTe
with the other girls. Ill miss
them. Theyre funny. 1 will write
again soon, Grandmother.

Greek News

BETA THETA PI
On Wednesday October 9, the Betas had their first serenade since
winning the IFC Sing last spring. Sweetheart Sandi Taylor (4*14) and
Beta pinmates were serenaded. Daughter of the Dragon rush will begin
on Friday with a band social for the prospective daughters. On
Sunday the annual Pledge-Brother football game will be held on Beta
Field with the 36 new pledges striving for an unprecedented victory
over the brothers. ______
DELTA SIGMA PI
Delta Sigma Pi, a professional Business fraternity, welcomes its new
19 pledges for the fall quarter.
The Brothers and pledges of Delta Sig would also like to think Mr.
Keith Austin, a prominent C.P.A. in Gainesville, for his time and most
interesting talk given October 15.
Looking Ahead, the brothers feel that with our sharp pledge class
and excellent professional and social program Delta Sigma Pi will be
looking forward to a very active quarter.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
Last night, Alpha Kappa Psi Professional Business Fraternity held
its fall pledge induction ceremony Forty-two new faces will be seen
on campus wearing the Gold Phoenecian Galley.
This is the second largest pledge class of the Alpha Phi Chapter in
its history at the University.
Last Saturday evening A.K.Psi celebrated its 64th anniversary. This
marks, along with Alpha Phis attainment of a perfect efficiency
rating, A.K.Psi as one of the growing-est and going-est national
professional fraternities.
Absentee Ballots Available

Registered voters in Monroe
and South Dade Counties can
get form letters and addressed
envelopes from the Student
Committee for Re-election of
Congressman Dante Fascell to
obtain absentee ballots for the

Friday, October 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

upcoming national elections.
The forms arc available in
Reitz Union on the ground floor
between l and 3:30 p.m. daily.
The deadline for applying is
October 28.

Page 17



Page 18

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

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DELTA TAU DELTA PUT ON THIS SKIT ABOUT SOME SORT OF PROTEST
... about the state of the country or something to that effect ... dances away
1
The pictures on this page were taken Wednesday at Gator
Growl skit tryouts, but our photographers forgot to find out
what was happening in each picture. Even a representative of
Growl didn't know exactly what was going on, but he did know
the sponsoring groups.
The winners, who will appear at Gator Growl on Nov. 1, are
Phi Kappa Tau, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega and Pi Kappa
Our photographers did say that almost all the skits were
'earthy' so we'll let you figure out what kind of dirt it is.
ly j|| 7 '"' P '|| y-^iojlto'
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THE PHI TAU S MOCK THE COPS AND KLAN 7 ; -. '['?? : i \\ 7>*. 'V/7/*.. J-l- Av7 ; "V> *'A^V.*-\'' * '/f 7'.
... in a winning skit presentation
THE AOPiS PUT ON THIS THAT HAD SOMETHING TO DO WITH AUBURN
... the Gators Homecoming opponents




Poetry Readings
Prove Valuable
Poetry is meant to be both an audial, as well as a visual art,
although the vocal medium is all too often ignored. Thus, in an
attempt to bring poetry out into the open, the English department
has begun a series of experimental poetry readings.
Meeting on alternate Thursday afternoons, these informal sessions
have proved to be both informative and highly entertaining
Dr. George Harper, chairman of the English department, hosted the
first meeting, by presenting an introduction to the poetry of William
Butler Yeats. Personal and popular favorites were read by Dr. Harper,
and biographical details lended to Yeats an air of close familiarity.
At the most recent meeting, Dr. James Highsmith read and
discussed the poetry of Dylan Thomas. Highlight of the afternoon was
a tape of Dylan reciting some of his own, better-known poems, such
as Fern HDT and Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.
The poetry of Dylan Thomas is quite obscure to the average
layman; one often has to feel his message rather than understand it.
Professor Highsmiths presentation and personal commentary,
however, helped to bring much of Dylans complexities closer to
lucidity.
The next poetry seminar is to meet on Oct. 24, at 9th period, in
room 122 of the Union. Dr. Gordon Bigelow will read and discuss the
poetry of Wallace Stevens, and this session should be equally as
successful as the first two. Anyone interested in hearing poetry and
discussing poetry is urged to attend.
'Barberelfa Contest

The Plaza Theatre is
sponsoring a contest in
conjunction with its current
feature attraction.
Twenty free passes to the
movie Baibarella and a giant
poster of Jane Fonda in her
mini-spacesuit will be given away
daily Mon., Tues. and Wed. of
next week.
An unidentified Alligator
staff member will distribute the
passes and posters to students
wearing See Barbarella Do Her
Thing buttons on campus.
These buttons are available at
the front desk of the Student
Publications Office on the third
floor of the Union.
The movie runs with a short
before or after the ball game
McDonalds Amazing Menu
100% Beef Hamburgers
Tempting Cheeseburgers
Filet-O-Fish Sandwiches
Triple-Thick Shakes
Crisp Golden French Fries
Thirst-Quenching Coke
Delightful Root Beer
Coffee As You Like it
Full-Flavored Orange Drink
Refreshing Cold Milk
Make your first stop at
! McDonalds. Whether you have
| a oarty of two, four, or twenty,
I Ws can serve you in a few
'seconds each. Com<| in today,..
; v oul! get fast, cheerful cour courts
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in town at extra thrifty
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on college football halftimes
that features the Florida A & M
Band.
I Fry For Wallace I
There will be a fund-raising
fish fry for the George Wallace
for President Campaign on
Saturday from 4-9p.m. at
Northeast Park on N.E. 16th
Avenue. Donations are $2.00 for
adults and SI.OO for children.
Hot dogs will be provided for
the children. The Orange State
Jamboree Bands will supply the
entertainment.

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Bayers Host
Open House

How to Have a Gas and
Make Art Too is the theme of
the open house that the Florida
Players are holding this Sunday
afternoon around 3 p.m. or so in
the Constans Theatre (the big
brick box thats attached to the
Union).
Open house means that the
entire student body (and were
expecting all of you) is invited
to come and abserve that rare
bird, the Florida Player, in his
natural (or, as it may be,
unnatural) habitat: a theatre.
Perhaps you might even want to
become a part of it all.
Let me hasten to confirm any
rumors (ugly or otherwise) to
the effect that the Florida
Players are the sole, true
purveyors of works of live
dramatic art at the AF campus
(excluding, of course, any
freelance dramas which might
pop up at your friendly
neighborhood frat house, head
shop, or whatever).
Any student bodies who have
seen any of the Players work
(such as last seasons
Marat/Sade or The
Imaginary Invalid) may want to
find out if the Players are really
for real (tell them if you find
out for sure).
* Better still, students who
have worked in other theatres or
best, novices out looking for a
RAME HAIR STYLIST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549

new high may even want to
come join the marvelous
madness which is the theatre.
Sundays open house will not
only give students a chance for
free food, but also to meet some
of the Players and their
directors, tour the theatre, and
get a few glimpses of past
productions. The Players are
presently mounting their first
major production of the season
(John Ardens contemporary
play of war resistance, Sergeant
Musgraves Dance) and four
experimental theatre
productions for this season will
be underway in just a few weeks.
The Players philosophy is:
Art can be a gas, if the right
people get gassed. There are
more right people around
than ever before, and the Players
would love to meet you this
Sunday, around 3, in the
theatre.

mcuM GiotAm
FLORIDA
Super separates . JOHN ROMAINE S mix mixmatch
match mixmatch love affair circa 6B. Great leathers 1
supples, antiqued shaped into an A-line
skirt, with a jacket, and under it, a ruffled- |
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Friday. October 18,1868, Tha Florida Alligator, I

aVIL ENGINEERING
YOUR FUTURE CAN BE
IN TRANSPORTATION I
NEW YORK STATE
DEPARTMENT
OF TRANSPORTATION
Challenging opportunities available in
ou r expanding transportation
engineering program which includes
an annual K billion dollar
construction program.
No exam generous fringe benefits
including tuition refunds for graduate
study.
Our recruiter will be here on Thurs.,
Oct 31, 1968 Visit your Placement
Office NOW for brochures and SIGN
UP to hear the full story.
Or write to:
Director of Manpower
Staff Development and
Training Bureau
State Campus Building 5
Albany, New York 12226
Tel.: 518/457-4404

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

- SG DENIES BUDGET

No Funds For
UF Glee Clubs

By pat McDermott
Alligator Staff Writer
Question: What is the
students dream course?
Approximately one hundred
students know the answer but
refuse to let out their secret. At
last were going to bust it wide
upen.
What class has its own social
hour, throws picnics, requires
no papers, no notes, gives NO
FINALS, (perhaps an occasional
lecture), and even provides
expense-paid vacations? None
other than the UF Mens and
Womens Glee Clubs.
Directed by Mr. John R.
Girgsby, the Glee Clubs function
as autonomous groups, each
practicing separately three times
a week but joining forces on one
evening, at which time there is
occasionally a social hour
afterwards.
Each group sings music
peculiar to that particular group,
but they also have the
opportunity to come together,
says Grigsby.
What do they sing? Because
the groups operate both
individually and as a whole they
are able to undertake a variety
o*~ music. Both groups have sung
music ranging from light fun
songs, contemporary music, and
musicals, to traditional songs
and classic masterpieces.

Jj t[ i I"
Ifef
GLEE CLUBS PRACTICE TOGETHER
... Social hour comes later
NOW OPEN
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ON SUNDAYS Spanish bean soup
11:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M. BLACK BEANS + RICE
ESCARGOT
I WINES
gD 1 OPEN WEEKDAYS
10:00am 2:ooam
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: ' : 921 W. Univ. Ave.

This years officers for Mens
Glee Club are Lee Harmon,
president; Charlie Wilson, vice
president; and Bryan Page,
secretary-treasurer.
Harmon commented on the
Mens Glee Club for this year:
As the oldest singing
organization on campus, were
really excited about the
opportunity to represent UF this
year. The membership has nearly
doubled; a new spirit and
enthusiasm has overtaken the
group.
Activities for the men began
this year with a performance at
the Alumni Reunion on Oct. 4
and the presidential inaugural
luncheon on Oct. 8.
In Womens Glee Club, which
has also nearly doubled in one
years time, the officers are
Benneth Stamm, president; Sara
Balswin, vice president; and Pat
McDermott, secretary-treasurer.
Tentative performances have
been scheduled but nothing
definite is planned yet.
At the present time the major
obstacle for both clubs is the
lack of funds. Functioning as
campus orgainzations the Glee
Clubs receive their budgets from
Student Government. Due to
conflict within SG all Glee Club
funds have been held up.
We cannot make any plans
until our budget is secure, says
Grigsby. The holdup of our

,uw jrifiAk v
'bhHK .&$& a v
I
JOHN R. GRIGSBY
... Glee Club Director

funds by Student Government
has really left us in a dilemma.
Every year, in addition to the
combined Glee Clubs and
University Choir Christmas
concert and spring concert, the
Clubs go on tours to various
locations. In years past the Glee
Clubs have visited such places as
Jamacia and Puerto Rico. Last
year during spring break the
groups toured central and
southeastern Florida.
Also last fall the clubs
participated in the bi-annual
performance of Handels
Messiah. Mens Glee Club also
sponsored the Interfraternity
Sing-In, organized by Sid Heidt,
one of the clubs members.
Until the budget is set, plans
for this year remain
questionable. The groups will be
participating in the Christmas
concert, caroling at the VA
hospital, and performing at a
spring concert and on tour. The
tour schedule has not yet been
officially announced.

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FLORIDA FIELD 808 ELLISON
.. .the scene from above the roar of the crowd
Florida Fans Consistent ;
Win or Lose, They Gripe

(EDITORS NOTE: A similar column also
appeared in the Thursday edition of the
Jacksonville Times Union. Apparently the
loyalty of University of Florida Students to
their team is doubted by some sports writers
in the state.)
By JIM MACDONALD
Orlando Sentinel Executive Sports Editor
Football fans can be as fickle as a schoolgirl. As a
group, they consider themselves a combination of
Knute Rockne and Bud Wilkinson with a dash of
Vince Lombardi.
Lose a game and they are ready to deport the
coach.
Win a game and theyre upset because the victory
margin wasnt greater.lts a malady all college
coaches must put up with.
Hardly a day passes without some guy charging
me with the question:
Whats wrong with the Gators?
My first impulse is to reply:
About the same thing that is wrong with the Los
Angeles Rams theyre both undefeated.
Im certain there are a couple of hundred college
football coaches around the country whod like to
be in Ray Graves shoes today.
Heres Florida, almost halfway through the
season, with a perfect record and ranked seventh in
the nation by both wire services.
Some of the grumblers started after Florida s
close squeeze (23-20) over the Air Force in the first
game of the season. They were silenced briefly the
next week when the Gators not only defeated
arch-rival Florida State, but kept the Seminoles
from scoring a touchdown.
But then came Mississippi State and Tulane.
The Gators went into these two games favored to
win each by at least four touchdowns.
But somebody forgot to tell Mississippi State and
Tulane.
Although neither team has won a game in 1968,
eac h played surprisingly well against Florida, much
to the chagrin of many Gator fans.
It took strong last-quarter performances by the
Gators to defeat Mississippi State, 31-14, and
Tulane, 24-3.
No damage really, except to those guys who had
Bet the game and given the point-spread.

Granted, the Gators offense has not resembled
the Dallas Cowboys. One of the reasons for this is
that the Gators passing attack has been rather
disappointing. The coaches know it and the players
know it.
But remember, in each of the first four games,
Florida was using either a different quarterback or
different wide receivers. This week, for the first
time, the Gators will start the same quarterback and
the same two wide receivers who started the
previous weeks game.
Not even Floridas severest critic can complain
about the defensive unit. In the last three games,
only Mississippi State has managed to score a
touchdown. And this mind you, with Floridas best
linebacker David Mann out with an injury and
its second-best linebacker Mike Kelley slowed
by a bad ankle.
The defensive secondary, headed by the speedy
and sure-tackling Steve Tannen, has been superb.
Tulane, for example, threw 14 passes and completed
one for a net gain of zero.
Now that hes had several days to think about it
as well as examine films of the game, I asked
Charley Shira, Mississippi State coach, about the
Gators.
I thought they were just as strong as we thought
theyd be, he said. They have talent, depth and
speed. Florida has all the ingredients of a great
football team.
If they had a weakness against us, I thought it
was their punting game. But dont forget, we played
one of our better games against Florida.
Criticism of the Florida team because it is not
winning .more easily, reminded Shira of his days as
an assistant coach at the University of Texas.
In 1962. we tied one game and won all the
rest, he said. But we were winning games like
10-7. 14-12. 17-14, etc. You should have heard the
fans, even though we went unbeaten.
This Saturday the Gators play at North Carolina
a team which has won but four starts.
Should be a breeze*. l|uh? | \
Tell that to Aflie[ Sherman who took his
unbeaten New York Giants to Atlanta last Sunday
to play the hapless Falcons, who went into the game
with an 11-game losing streak. The Giants are now
4-1.
And dont forget, it's homecoming at Chapel
Hill.

Gators Racking
Tested By UNC
By MARC OUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
UF protects its number seven national ranking tomorrow against
the University of North Carolina.
UNC has a 1-3 record this season, with its only win coming over
Vanderbilt, 8-7.
The Tar Heels dumped the Gators 35-7 in their last meeting in
1947. UNC leads the overall series with UF, 4-1-1.
The Gators are leading the Southeastern Conference and are
favored to swamp the Tar Heels.
Its quite a challenge to us to play a great team like Florida,"
Carolina Coach Bill Dooley said. Im sure that our coaching staff will
have an extra incentive in this one.
The Gators go against the Tar Heels without the services of First
string linebackers David Mann and Mike Kelley. The linebacking
duties will be performed by David Ghesquire, from his defensive end
position, Tom Abdelnour and Bob Coleman, has been switched from
defensive end.
Gayle Bomar, UNC left-handed quarterback, is their big threat.
Bomar passed for 192 yards and ran for 79 yards more against
Maryland last week.
UNC is basically a running ball club, centered around the
quarterback option pass or run. Bomar is a better runner than passer.
The Gators can expect a tougher time with him than they had with
Air Forces Gary Baxter.
Another problem UF will face is the strong punting game of the
Tar Heels. Punter Chip Stone kicks the ball high and only 10 of the 23
he has kicked have been returned.
Having seen them against Maryland and Vanderbilt I definitely
say they are steonger and have more depth than Mississippi State and
Tulane Coach Dave Fuller said. They were leading South Carolina
by the score of 27-3 before they were defeated.
They also led Maryland most of the game. They have a good
football team and usually play well in Chapel Hill."
On defense UNC uses a basic six man front, two linebackers and
three defensive backs. The Tar Heels are supposed to be toughest
against the running game, but they have yielded 852 yards rushing to
the opposition. Their pass defense is more porous than any the Gators
have faced ail season.
North Carolina probably has the toughest defense weve faced
since the Florida State game, said Coach Jack Westbrook. They are
very tough and strong and do an excellent job against the running
game. Ken Price is as good as any safety we will face this year.

Frosh Game Postponed

Due to the potential arrival of
Hurricane Gladys, the Baby
Gator game against FSU that
was scheduled for today at 3
p.m. has been postponed.
The game has been
rescheduled for Monday,
December 12, at 3 p.m., or the
Thanksgiving weekend.
The Baby Gators, who
destroyed Auburn last week by a
score of 54-17, were going after
their second victory.
The UF team had been

US Olympic Team Behind
Black Athletes Protest

MEXICO CITY 4 (UPI)
The rest of the U.S. Olympic
team seems to be right behind
John Carlos and Tommie Smith.
Not, completely, perhaps, but
substantially enough so that not
one of those interviewed even
suggested either Carlos or Smith
be sent home in disgrace for
their actions after receiving their
medals in the 200-meter dash
Wednesday.
Smith, who won the race, and
Carlos; who ran third, raised
their hands in an unmistakable
Black Power gesture and sunk
their chests during the playing of
the National Anthem.
Both U.S. Negroes wore black
. glpves and, black scarves and in a
post-race interview Carlos was
sharply critical of White
America and those whites, he
said, whom he saw Putting
thumbs down on us in the
Olympic stadium.
Os the 20 U.S. white and
. .... ...

Friday, October 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

riddled by injuries this week.
Tommy Durrance was not
scheduled to see action.
Durrance is the starting
halfback. Also injured are
linebacker Eric Taggart, linemen
Butch Condon, Dave Edmonds
and Bob Latimer.
ASK GATOR RAY
Ask Gator Ray questions will
be accepted Sunday between
noon and 3 p.m. Call 376-3261,
ext. 2832.

black athletes asked for their
opinions, 13 spoke up in favor
of what Carlos and Smith had
done. Five were opposed, but
only mildly, one was undecided
and another had no opinion.
Tom Waddell of New York, a
member of the U.S. decathlon
team, was the most outspoken.
Waddell, a 30-ycar-old Army
physician stationed at Walter
Reed Hospital in Washington,
said he absolutely agreed with
the issues raised by Carlos and
Smith.
Waddell was asked whether
he didnt think Carlos and Smith
had discredited the American
flag by sinking their chins on
their chests and holding their
fists me& 4he \ flag** was I
£nd Anthem played.
i think they have been
discredited by the flag more
often than they have discredited
it, said Waddell, due for his
Army discharge, the day the
Olympics end.

Page 21



Page 22

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, October 18, 1968

Georgia,
Vandy Clash
In SEC Play
By DA VI DM. MOFFIT
United Pra International
ATHENS, Ga. The
ninth-ranked Georgia Bulldogs,
3-0-1, unbeaten between the
hedges at Sanford Stadium here
since late in the 1965 season, are
three-touchdown favorites to
post their 11th straight home
victory Saturday as the host the
Vanderbilt Commodores 2-2.
More than 56,000
homecoming fans are expected
for the 2 p.m. EDT contest. The
expected victory would be the
fifth straight for the Bulldogs
over the Commodores but it
would even their 75-year-old
series, at 14-14-1, for the first
time.
Saturdays game is expected
to feature a duel between
sophomore quarterbacks Mike
Cavan of Georgia and John
Miller of Vanderbilt.
Cavan was in a similar duel
last week against Archie
Manning of Mississippi and came
out on top as he led the Bulldogs
to a 21-7 come-from-behind
victory over the Rebels.
Cavan leads the Southeastern
Conference in total offense with
660 yards an average of 165
per game. Miller is fourth with
621 yards 39 behind Cavan.
However, the 5-foot-9.
158-pound Miller leads Cavan in
passing yardage 654 to 631.
Cavan has a big edge over.
Miller in that Georgia has a
much stronger running game and
a much stronger defense. Bruce
Kemp, No. 3 in rushing in the
SEC with 313 yards; Brad
Johnson and speedy Kent
Lawrence are all proven runners.
That Georgia defense figures
to be Millers undoing. Hell have
to spend the afternoon running
away from All-America
candidate Bill Stanfill and Steve
Greer, named SEC defense
player of the week for the job he
did against Manning. Hes also
going to have to keep the ball
away from Georgia safety Jake
Scott.

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i I

Gators Hold Light Workout,
'Three Touchdowns To Win 1

By NEAL SANDERS
AHigator Sports Editor
Hurricane Gladys threatened
the University City all day
Thursday, but the continuous
drizzle didnt prevent Florida
Coach Ray Graves from putting
his charges through a sweatpants
workout.
In fact, Graves came away
from the practice pleased
enough to where he has
cancelled any possible plans for
a Friday afternoon workout.
Were looking a lot sharper
out there, said Graves. The
main thing Im worried about
now is North Carolinas offense,
and whether we can stop it.
I dont think North
Carolinas record shows the iype
of game they play. Its going to
take at least three touchdowns,

NICK ARROYO
ECKDAHL TO YARBROUGH
... passing combination to see action against UNC
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and probably more, to win this
game.
Graves has proven unusually
accurate in his touchdowns to
win prognistication.
Graves said the defensive
team was hurting, but that
Jim Kiley and Bob Coleman had
both adapted well to their
starting spots.
I dont have to say how
concerned 1 was that these
changes might have come too
late, said Graves. Now, Im
sure I was wrong. Kiley has
shown some great work, and
Coleman is taking his change
very well. Still, these were just
necessary personnel
adjustments, and they would
have had to come like this
anyway.
Only three Gators will not
make the trip to Chapel Hill.
Wayne Griffith is on the sick list

with the flu, Mike Kelley has
suffered sprained ligaments in
his knee, which will keep him
out up to three weeks, and Dave
Mann is still recuperating from a
knee injury.
Im. confident Dave will be
back for Vanderbilt, said
Graves. Hes been running on
that leg all this week, and his
speed and agility gets better
every day.

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We have room for you to grow in all these areas.
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Gladys May Dampen
Seminoie Air Game

By KENNETH BOMAR
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida State Coach Bill
Peterson complained Thursday
that Hurricane Gladys may
throw a damper on Seminole
efforts to smother Memphis
State under an aerial barrage
here Saturday night.
If we cant throw the
football, then were in bad
trouble, Peterson said,
because we are going to be
putting the ball in the air all the
way against the Tigers.
The Seminole coach said he
was keeping a close watch on
Hurricane Gladys.
The Seminoles will work out
with a wet ball today, he said,
even if we have to take a
bucket of water out to the
practice field and dip it in it
after every play.
The Seminoles might have
another problem. The Tiger
secondary has intercepted 11
passes, 10 of them in the past
two games and will be primed
Baseball Great
Kinder Dies
JACKSON, Tenn. (UPI)
Ellis Raymond Kinder, a
baseball pitcher who won 102
games during a 10-year major
league career, died Wednesday
following a lengthy illness. He
was 54.
Kinder, a native of Jackson,
began his baseball career here in
1939, moved to the Memphis
Chicks of the old Southern
Association and eventually
played with the Chicago White
Sox, St. Louis Browns, St.
Cardinals and Boston Red Sox in
a career that ran from 1946 to
1956.
His best year was 1949, when,
as a pitcher for the Red Sox, he
won 23 games and lost six. In
1953, Kinder established a
record that stood until 1967
when he appeared in a total of
69 games.
His lifetime record was
102-71.
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for the wide-open game which
Florida State employes.
Theyre primarily a running
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stronger than we are, he said.
Rain would give them the
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Its casually correct, Include the turtleneck
when the sport coat for campus is one like in your plans, whatever else you plan for
this. Our selection of patterns is very wide, the fall semester. In its shirt-knit version,
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trousers of equal excellence. Groom soon, undoubtedly the treatment of the year,
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Vols Favored Over Tide

By CARL A. VINES
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)
Tennessee leaps bade into the
Southeastern Confereace
football race Saturday afternoon
against the Crimson Tide of
Alabama before a regional
television audience and a packed
Neyland Stadium.
The series between Alabama
and Tennessee ranks as one of
the top in the Southeast, dating
back to 1901. The Tide holds a
slight edge, 23-20-7.
The Vols, with three straight
nonconference victories and a tie
with Georgia in another televised
contest, are seven point
favorites on their home plastic.
Alabama knows about the j
artificial turf, however, having a
OK
Helga
SCENES NEVER
BEFORE SHOWN
on the
AMERICAN SCREEN!
v J

practice field covered with a
similar one, so there will be no
advantage, if there ever was one,
in the Tartan covering.
Kickoff is 2:20 pjn. EDT,
with 63,000 fans expected.
The 51st meeting of the
schools will be a severe test of
Tennessees offense, which
appeared to jell in the 51-0 romp
over Rice and held up for a 24-7
win over Georgia Tech.
The Tide attack is sparked by
Joe Kelley and Scott Hunter at
quarterback the running Ed
Morgan, Pete Moore, Pete Jilleba
and Buddy Sea, and the pass
catching of end George Ranager.

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Friday, Oetobar It, 1968. Tha Florida Alligator.

Tennessees ground game
came to life with the return of
tailback Richmond Flowers after
he flunked the Olympics, and
features fullback Richard
Pickens on the inside, plus
option running by quarterback
Bubba Wyche. Wyche likes to
throw to flanker-end Lester
McClain, to Flowers, and to ends
Ken DeLong and Gary Kreis.
The Vols withstood an aerial
assault of 61 passes thrown by
Georgia Tech last weekend, and
if the defense can hold up again
one of Alabamas best weapons
- passes to Ranager may be
spiked.

Page 23



5. The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 18,1968

Pap 24. Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 18, 1968 M
USED CARS <5. ySEI
-zs * \ x
AUTOMATIC
1965 CONVERTIBLE :|; m":
1943 automatic I The Harmon Football Forecast IfeilUflalll
IVOJ automatic TO p 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 595 Right, 178 Wrong, 21 Ties 770) ||l}, \\
FALCON SPRINT I i-southern cal 6-tennessee h-syracuse 16-texas tech
$ 2KANSAS 7GEORGIA 12AUBURN 17 HOUSTON I
AIR CONDITIONED I 3-ohio state 8 penn state 13-stanford is-mississippi I The Eleeant Frame-Up
' I 4PURDUE 9MIAMI, FLA. 14 NEBRASKA 19 ALABAMA I X liC F
I SNOTRE DAME 10 ARKANSAS 15 FLORIDA 20 MICHIGAN
HIGHUGHTS
I Saturday, Oct. 19MAJOR COLLEGES There just has to be one Saturday in Gant makes its Town collar straight
I Air Force 27 Colorado state 14 very football' season that is a little I and long to elegantly frame todays
I Arizona state to Oregon state 15 "quieter" than the rest when all heart I wider, fuller ties. More elegance the
1967 RAMBLER I Arnfy sas ?7 Rutgers 6 patients can relax just a wee bit. And after I subtle two-tone overchecks in this
AMCDirAk! I Boston college 2. tSSumT t,ci the events of last week, this week just has to I Gant Town shirt. Tailored with
I 5? Arixoni**** iS aLj ot th. old Irsr nw> Too I Sill ular precision from Collar ' CufTs;
CIOQS I BuMa, 21 viiianova is And of course the old (or new) Top j n a superior cotton madras. In blue,
# I §*S";n 55 muliu 15 Twenty went through a pretty thorough I een Qr obac al with wo tone
I VSSSSi 15 si.i. u over-hauling. Southern Cal took over the top I overchecks Thjs Town shir can be
our location and prices are off the 1 g!J*muth 14 Brown j spot with Kansas and Ohio State right on | wom or without a pin.
beaten track I Florida 27 North Carolina 7 their heels. Drop-outs were numerous as I
I SEE* u eSSST io L.S.U., Michigan State, California, I
I H'y cross 17 Boston u. Oklahoma and U.C.L.A. all disappeared I 9
a a.- m lowa 2S Wisconsin 14 ... . /TN /\ /t\
J J: Q J Kansas 34 Oklahoma state 14 from sight. Miami moved back into the I V H
waaing &UOIK | Louisville 33 MarahaM ? select group along with newcomers Texas | r
I **M?ami S F S ,. ate 5! V P r i da s,a,e l Tech. Stanford. Auburn, and Michigan. I 1 Jll E?
MalapC I Michigan 25 Indiana 14 Penn State, no. 8, Syracuse, no. 11, and I I TT
muiurb I Ui c v! ian S,a,e % R&E# 24 Houston, no. 17. are all resting on "quiet I DONIGANS
"CLOSEST DEALER TO I Sew "Vxico state is san SO jose state 13 Saturday." However, numbers one, two and I J| 11
THE UNIVERSITY" In. Carolina state 27 Virginia 21 three will all be very busy. Southern Cal I £a bbbbsb
North Texas 2t Tulsa IS 1A
imn caiitu uaiai Notre oame 4* Illinois 14 should get by Washington by about 28 v V
1012 SOUTH MAIN I Ohio State 28 Northwestern 7-- . I
TUI Ohio u. 24 Miami. Ohio 21 points .. Kansas is a 20-point favorite over
OPEN I ofegon ma 20 Idaho state !o a real upset-minded Oklahoma State... and I f 123 We UrIV. A Vl*
TIL 9 P.M. Ph. 378-2311 I ll cSgSe 13 Ohio State is P icked over Northwestern by
Purdue wake 21 points.
..... SilTcVroltn. 55 SSSum l 5 And U looks 85 ,hoU 9 h A'*!*" m '9 ht
The College Life i 0 m 5 ,, c *' 15 '*> s c nd mm* in *>* eeks.
* .l || I ISSKrtSS SiSiSft; sure '5 ? ,h rankad Tenttessee is an elerenpoint FLORIDA
lAAfhall lAfifflCf Tennessee 21 Alabama io favorite over the 19-rated Crimson Tide in
5" I! s " on* of there do-or-die Southeastern Ol IA DTCDI V
A 5? S? Conferencertniggles. UUAKItKLT
4W|I Utah state 21 Pacific o The big job of trying to de-rail the
we,, re... In!oitss e 55 undefeated Arkansas express goes this week ...
SwlnS? I"'* 1 "'* 5? S"" to the "almost-ranked" Longhorns of Texas. 330 ReitZ UlllOll
;vier 31 Northern Illinois is jhe Razorbacks, rated 10th, are favored to
,M Yale Columbia
resist and desist de-railment, however,
*A. winning by one point. %-Q ITIP U S
J^y^L Other CollegesSOUTH and S WEST Southern Mississippi gave Alabama a big
scare three weeks ago, and they're planning
a M 20 VS! l the same type of party for 18-ranked Ole I WANT TO
1;J5"55 rh* 55 Arkansas si. c.n... Miss > Saturday. This is just a hunch, but
tuc r*AkACC Bethany, w. va. 27 Adeibert we think the Southerners from the
I Fit UA/Vlti Carson-Newman 23 Elon 14 .. CIIDCTDIDC
Chattanooga 22 East Tannessoe is way-down Deep South are going to tip bUb jLKIdC
Coast Guard IS Southwestern, Tenn. 14 ... . . 0
Eastern Kentucky 28 fkron 12 MISSISSIPPI Dy J.
Florid. . North Cwoiin. f?_* "" JJ J Real busy mending their boilers this Send Me the
a.L U fZT" s S," 5S S we k 4,h ranked Purdue ma v have some October Issue
M r. Tanh Lamar Tech 24 Abilene Christian 21 trouble with Wake Forest .. the Deacons
Auburn VS. La*. Tach Lenoir-Rhyne 27 Guilford 13 .. .
Texas vs. Arkansas McMurry 24 sam Houston 7 are three-touchriown underdogs. Notre
Missouri vs. Nebraska So'lehwd 21 Younjitown 20 Dame, no. 5, should roll over Illinois by ] CODY $1.25
Michigan St. vs. Minnesota Murray 28 Middle Tennessee 17 about 35 points. r
Indiana vs. Michigan 33 MaJ*"* In the Big Ten, 20th-ranked Michigan is 1 year (3 issues) 3.00
Arizona St vs. Oregon St SW Louisiana 28 Delta State 8 Al- T
cm y, Ken tuck v Southwest Texas 28 Howard Payne IS expected to keep pace With Ohio State, A its __
fir* 51 !.,Lrau.,.l IS handing the Homier, of Indiana their fir,, 3 years (9 issues) 8.00
illll Lutheran 20 AnV.io'sut. ,! conference loss. The difference is 11 points. Heres my check
. , Jacksonville 7 7th-rated Georgia will beat Vanderbilt by
Washington 8. Lee 14 Hampden-Sydney 12 9 |
west va. Tech 14 concord s 23, and Miami, resting in the number 9 spot
> western Maryland 31 shepherd o and hoping to stay awhile, is 19 points too
Wofford 34 Newberry strong for Virginia Tech. BH
HI Ml 11
Your CLICA Representatives in Gainesville: I Bm HB
M UJ , llMwfl
R1 Hugh Brooker pvmimmw
Guest Prognosh Gators Sam Darby
MC A Breece Me Cray H I |-J an mumm|m|
CLICA SIGMA BETA THETA Bob Peterson II
-TSfi^r. Don vV
College Life BiWfJHiljllgi
Nebraska Nebraska Nebraska
st. 4. a i n
Company of America IIIIHII
Arizona st. Vic McKenzie & Assoc ofes IUIIII
* 4115 K. W. 13th St, ,
New Phone number is 378-2476 wfnai;iiaiaiia;iait];iiMl>irlWnPTffll

Page 24