Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Enaineerina Grads Play Waitina Game

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a three-part series
concerning draft deferments and
UF graduate students. Here staff
writer BUI Dunn examines the
effect of the draft on the College
of Engineering.)
By BILL DUNN
Aligrtor Staff Writer
Can you get me a deferment?
Thats the question
engineering seniors are asking
industrial recruiters at the
student placement center.

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 17 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Union Board Election Complaint Filed


Union Board Under Fire ;
Candidate Debate Fixed

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
After much red-tape and an
apparent mix-up, the two
candidates for the Reitz Union
Board presidency have finally
agreed to debate Wednesday
night
Steve Hull, New Movement
candidate, and Bob White,
Commitment party candidate,
decided after a phone
conversation Monday, to debate
in Jennings basement at 8 pm
on Wednesday.
Hull said he had been trying
unsuccessful! for three days
to get a debate promise from
Commitment party.
The steering committee kept
puting me off, he said Bob
White is a puppet of
Commitment party. What he
says and does is not what he
believes but what the bosses
believe.
Hull claimed he could not get
to White until Monday because
White was surrounded by his
puppeteers, the steering
committee.
1 had given up on the idea of
trying to debate Mr. White, he
said.
Nevertheless, the debate as it
now stands, will go on.
Hull, in an Alligator interview
Monday, pledged to hold
union-sponsored dances in the
residence areas, to bring the
union to the students.
These dances would help
people identify with the union,
Hull said. Once we get people
aware of the union, well get
them to come over to the
union.
Hull also pledged to pressure
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell into taking a stand on
the question of drinking on
campus.

Though many planned
previous to last years selective
service policy changes to enter
grad school, some have changed
their minds and stuck with draft
deferrable jobs of lesser prestige.
Others are playing a high stakes
crap game mid taking their
chances in grad school.
And that number is a healthy
one. as engineering grad school
enrollment on this campus even
increased from 379 to 420 over
last year. But enrollment in
Genesys, the graduate program

The
Florida Alligator

HEARING ASKED TO DETERMINE LEGALITY

Mr M
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STEVE HULL
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... his own man

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located in centers throughout
the state, took a nosedive from
490 to 329.
There has been no
immediate impact,* says
Associate Dean John Nattress,
despite the Genesys drop.
Everyones here that wanted to
be here.

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Denying that he is a puppet
of Commitment party and that
he has avoided setting up a time
to debate Steve Hull, Bob White
said Monday that he is his own
man.
Im supplying most of the
ideas for the Commitment party
platform, the candidate for
Reitz Union Board president
said.
According to Hull, Forwards
candidate for union board
president, White would not agree
to a debate.
All he had to do was call
me, White replied to this
charge.
White wants to change the
personality of the union by
making it student oriented. In a
telephone interview Monday,
White explained that the union
is presently run by hired
administrators.
(SEE 'BOARD' PAGE 2)

ANALYSIS

The Engineering Manpower
Commission reported Sept. 10
that only 18 per cent of the
1968 engineering graduates
planned to enter grad school this
fall. The figure compares to 25
per cent last year on a national
basis.
One reason why the UF

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Editor
Reitz Union Board President Roger Brown filed a civil
complaint with the Honor Court Monday, asking that the
court issue an injunction staying Thursdays election for
four union board posts.

The election also includes 40
Senate seats.
Brown, a third year law
student who has officially been
board president for three weeks,
told the Alligator that he was
requesting the Honor Court to
stay the election until it could
hold a hearing and determine if
the election would be
constitutionally legal.
Nowhere in the Student
Body Constitution is the
Student Senate given the power
to call for an election of officers
to organizations which are not
part of Student Government,
Brown claimed.
The Senate made the top four
positions in the union board
elective in a bill late this
summer. The Senate clearly is
empowered to set dates for
election of officials to student
orgainzations
But Brown contends in his
suit that the Senates power does
not include the Reitz Union
Board for Student Activities.
The union board is a
subsidiary of the Reitz Union
(SEE COMPLAINT' PAGE 2)

engineering grad school
enrollment did not drop so
much was the addition of
facilities to handle more
students.
We did not have to lower
our admission standards,
explains Nattress. If anything
they got higher because of the
new facilities. We dont expect
any major impact until winter.
Only time will reveal how
many will be plucked out of
grad school.
(SEE 'ENLISTING' PAGE 3)

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Top Lawyer
F. Lee Bailey
Here Tonight
F. Lee Bailey, one of the
countrys top criminal lawyers
speaks tonight at 8 in the Reitz
Union ballroom.
Bailey achieved fame when he
defended Dr. Sam Sheppard and
more recently Dr. Carl
Coppolino. Bailey has become
one of the most diverse and
sought-after speakers in
America.
He describes a trial lawyer as
a paid professional fighter. His
clients say, They want to take
my life away. Save me, Im
putting my life in your hands.
Bailey says that defending has
gotten to be the highest calling
of the legal profession.
At 33, Bailey has had only six
years of practice before the Bar.



Page 2

t, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 15, 1968

UNION BOARD ELECTION
Complaint Filed

PA6E 0*
Board of Managers, which is a
committee appointed by and
answerable to the president of
the university, Brown said.
The union board is not an
agent of Student Government.
Brown charged that SG
leaders are trying to put the
union board under their thumb
and use it as a political
football.
He said the contention that
putting the board under SG
would make it more responsive
to students is inaccurate.
In the first place, Brown
said, the union board is
controlled by the Board of
Managers, which has eight
student members and six faculty
members That is obviously
Student control.
The union board has to be
responsive to students, Brown
pointed out. If the students
don't like what the board is
doing, the programs get bombed,
and that hasn't happened yet.
The Senate bill grew out of
expressed dissatisfaction with
the union board, particularly the
slelction process for succeeding
presidents.
SG officials claim the board is
a closed organization because
the executive committee selects
the next president, who in turn
appoints the new executive
committee.
Brown agreed that the union

Board Under Fire;
Hull, White Debate

HI FROM PA6E ONE
Policies should be determined
by the students and be more
progressive, White said.
White 0 charged that the
present organization of the
Union Board of Managers lacks
effective leadership.'
The key reason for this
being an elected position is to
get new people to have new
ideas, he continued.
New proposals White is
suggesting are that the union be

muM STEAK SPECIAL
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LON PON BROIL STEAK
''FRVED WITH
CHOICE Or POTATOES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
HOT & BUTTER
7 /
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
/j BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la p*ttohed five Mates weakly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opttdona of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Unloa Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
M fcpud class matter at tbs United States Pst Office at Gainesville, Florltto, 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S 3 .SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and in revise or turn away copy which It considers objectloiwble.
ns Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
lavotvlag typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Meager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
sol be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to res several times Notices tor correction roast be given before next Insertion.

board has a closed selection
system in that qualified and
experienced people move into
the higher positions.
He said, however, that
making the presidency elective
will do the board more harm
than good because any politico
who knows nothing about
programming or activities can
get elected.
UF Students
Hit, Robbed
During Game
Two UF students were
assaulted and robbed by two
young Negro males while selling
programs outside the stadium
Saturday afternoon during the
UF Tulane football game.
One student was struck in the
side of the head by a tire tool.
He was treated at the infirmary
and released Saturday afternoon.
The other student was kicked
in the side of the head by his
assailant.
A total of sl3l was taken
from the two students, who
campus police refused to
identify.
Some suspects were picked
up after the assault took place,
but the students werent able to
identify any of them,
Investigator Gene Watson of the
campus police said.

open 24 hours a day for
studying. The University of
Miamis student union is run this
way White said.
I also think the space in the
union could be better utilized
Id like to see the College of
Architecture run a space
utilization study. White also
said he would ,like to see the
snack bar in the union open 24
hours a day. He said he will
check with Sevomation-Mathias,
the UF Food Service to see if
this is possible.

I ; I I
TUTORIAL PROGRAM
... for disadvantaged students

Aid To Underprivileged
United Under SAMSON

A UF organization working
with local anti-poverty programs
is recruiting volunteers to serve
as tutors or help with recreation
and entertainment programs in
local poverty areas.
Project SAMSON will meet in
Education
Chairman
To Speak
Dr. Eugene Todd, chairman
of secondary education, will
speak to the student Florida
Education Association today in
Norman Hall at 8 p.m. on The
Politics of Education.

Mid-year graduates...
Are you interested in a career in
MARKETING MANAGEMENT CREDIT MANAGEMENT
CONTROL MANAGEMENTPRODUCTION MANAGEMENT?
Sign up in your TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY
placement office now. An equal opportunity employer

the Reitz Union Auditorium
tonight at 7 and will
feature speakers representing
various anti-poverty programs
throughout the state.
SAMSON was organized last
spring by UF students and serves
as a manpower agency to place
concerned students in position
where they are most needed and
can do the most good.
SAMSON is currently
interested in a tutorial program
for disadvantaged students in
Alachua County.
The project works with
VISTA, Project Headstart,
Neighborhood House, Project
Grey, various community
centers, independent tutoring

and employment agencies and
the Governors Operation
Concern.
SAMSON serves to unify
these various groups now
working in the anti-poverty areas
and man them with interested
students.
Persons unable to attend the
meeting tonight can contact
Project SAMSON through the
student government offices,
376-3261, ext. 2545.

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.



Enlisting Engineers Disappointed

HNB HE OB
Many engineers obviously
preferred to seek employment
where they might have some
chance of receiving an
occupational deferrment to
possible induction into the
Army if they tried to continue
their education.
Those that have gone in the
service are also finding it tough.
Since the services already have
more engineers than they need,
many engineers who volunteer
or are drafted will be away from
their fields for two years. They
wont be doing their thing.

According to one official were virtually eliminated last
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GATOR G/Rl
Today's Gator Girl b Robin Keeley, lUC. She b a Delta Gamma
pledge, majoring in elementary education.
COUPQNIBBBBBBMBBB
nun
B with Gravy
TUESDAY ONLY J
I
214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
114 NW 34tn 372-3649 I
KfNG COUPONmbbmbJ

CANT 'DO THEIR THING

survey, more engineers went into
the armed forces this year than
in any year since 1961 with
nearly 11 per cent of the 1968
graduates reported as entering
one branch or another. Half of
these were enrolled in ROTC
programs, which traditionally
have drawn considerably from
engineering circles. The balance
were volunteers.
The Manpower Commission
Report indicated that 71.5 per
cent of the new engineers had
either accepted employment or
were still choosing from offers
when the survey was made this
summer.
Since grad school deferments

year, it is obvious nevertheless
that most ofUFs engineer grads
have taken the advice of
Assistant dean of graduate
studies Robert Bryan to come

Gator Growl Skits
Strong On Politics

Gator Growl skit tryouts
the annual battle of the barbs
will take place at the north end
of Florida track at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
Fifteen organizations will be
vying for the honor of
presenting their skits
Homecoming Eve, Nov. 1.
The free public tryouts last
year attracted more than 3,000.
This year, according to Mike
Moore, director of Growl,
4,000 are expected to attend.
He added that, a crowd
encourages the performers.
Besides those who come to
tryouts get to see the skits
uncensored.
Skits, which are five to seven
minutes long, will be played out
on a stage set up on the infield
of the track. In case of rain,
tryouts will be held in the Union
Ballroom. Although students
wont be in full costume, props
and color are traditional to
tryouts.
Reflecting the Homecoming

fcJ^VOTE
C *4i HULL

I llll I
*+ + **** . i ****** *#^tw#***t***
*
*
I Meet The
* 4
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* 4
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i Demooratie i
* 4

*
* O' n&didnt@s
*
;
TUESDAY OCTOBER 15th J
115 SE 2nd AVE 7:OO-9:00PM :
LIVE DIXIELAND BAND
FREE SOFT DRINKS*DONUTS
* 4
*J 4
* SPONSORED BY THE ALACHUA COUNTY J
DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE :
>
*
'*+i***#*44rV> r- % £ £ + g £ £ £.

ahead to graduate school in
hopes taht most boards will
allow restraints in letting the
grad student complete most if
not all of their graduate work.

theme, Gators Reign In 6B
Campaign. the skits will have
strong political slants. Even
without a political theme, skits
usually ridicule administrative
policies government and
university alike. However this
year Gov. Claude Kirk. George
Wallace, and other candidates
will get extra doses of heckling.
Judges are: Dr. Lester Hale,
vice president for student affairs;
William Cross, assistant director
of the Reitz Union, Robert
Foster, assistant director of
bands; Mary Elizabeth Graham,
assistant professor of physical
education, and Mike Moore of
Lakeland, Gator Growl director.
Public Rooms
The number of rooms
devoted to public service on the
UF campus in the fall of 1967
was 121. This came to 1.1
percent of the total area on
campus.

H Loans lip To S6OO
Bu4* Payday. Ante
Signature
Prompt Caurtaaw
CanlWantial
Marion Financo Co.
376-5333
222 W. Uni varsity Ats.

Tuasday, October 15, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

five till nine
dining room only
99c y
\hawaiian/
HAM >
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f Center cut ham \
\ steak broiled I
i with Hawaiian t
/ pineapple, served \
\ with tossed salad, 1
1 and french fries a
I a regular J
value
Ss&
2310 S.W. 13th Street 376-2696
1505 N.W. 13th Street 378-2481

Page 3



Page 4

L The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 15, 1968

f m ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
I anC J NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR ' ~T~ *W* Tl ~1 TT T* IjVl 1 i IVT
BLUB BULLrLi JLirN

Administrative Notices

CAMPUS CALENDAR FOR
OCTOBER 15,1968
Tuesday, October 15
U.S. Army Recruiting, Games
Area, 8:00 am.
State Pharmacy Board Exams,
MSB Aud., 8:00 a.m.
Simchas Torah, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
MBA Club Meeting, Matherly
Hall, Rm. 103,10:00 a.m
Center for Latin American
Studies, Luncheon, 233
Union, 12:00 noon.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet
Meeting, 123 Union, 4:30
p.m.
Angel Flight Interviews, 356
Union, 6:3U p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma Meeting, 362
Union, 7:00 D.m.
Christian Scientist Meeting, 356
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons,
15 C, 15 C, 7:00 p.m.
Project Samson Meeting, Union
Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Expectant Parents, "Preparation
for Childbirth," Classes, MSB,
Rm. M-203,7:30 p.m.
Program Office Beginning Oil,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
University Dames, Welcoming
Coffee, Home of Mrs.
O'Connell, 7:30 p.m.
Tau Beta Pi Meeting, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Arnold Air Society, Diningln
Organizational Meeting,
Arnold Air Headquarters,
7:30 p.m.
Forums: F. LEE BAILEY,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, 347 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Program Office, Charm Classes,
363 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Students for a New Party
Seminar, Little Hall 101,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept., Faculty Concert
Samuel Teeters, piano,
Clementine White, harp,
Univ. Aud.. 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, October 16
U.S. Army Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, 8:00 a.m.
State Pharmacy Board Exams,
MSB Aud., 8:00 a.m.
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 B Union,
12:00 noon.
Florida Speleological Society,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00
p.m.
I ntemational Circle K, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Society, 363
Union, 7:30 p.m.


Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance --
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT I TMlflM flWfr
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 ajn. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday xSr

Gator Growl, Skit Tryouts,
Track, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society, 123
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting, 270
New Annex Eng. Bldg., 8:00
p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
349 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, October 17
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 B Union,
12:00 noon.
Student Government Elections,
Ballroom, Union, 3:00 p.m.
Sigma Delta Chi, 123 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Occupational therapy
Assoc. Meeting, 346 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Blue Key Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Sailing Club Movie, "North
American Lightning
Championships, 347 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Water Colors,
Rm. C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Arnold Air Society Meeting,
Military Building, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi, 363 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Organization & Social
Affairs Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Phi Eta Sigma & Alpha Lambda
Delta Dance, Union Terrace,
9:UU p.m.
October 18
Football Film, 150 C & D
Union, 12:00 1 toon.
Freshman Football, Univ of Fla.,
vs. FSU, Gainesville, Fla.
Field, 2:00 p.m.
Chess Club Tournament, 361
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Union Movies, "Swedish
Wedding Night," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Afro-American Student
Association, 355 Union, 7:15
p.m.
Phi Alpha Theta Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214
Florida gym, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Forums Committee Speaker,
F. LEE BAILEY, $.75 for
1.D., $1.50 for Faculty, Staff
and General Public, tickets
for the Florida Cinema
Society, SI.OO. Tickets are

also on sale for FALL
FROLICS, "THE FOUR
TOPS," $5.00 a couple
i
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS:
Scholarships for Oxford
University for approximately
$3,200 per year for two to three
years. Must be male citizens of
at least junior standing between
the ages of 18-24 on Oct. 1,
1968. Apply to Professor A A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 23.
REGISTRAR'S DEADLINES:
Oct 18 is the deadline for
making a college change from
Lower Division to Upper
Division or from one college to
another. This deadline also
applies to applications for
post-baccalaureate status. Any
student graduating in Dec. and
who wishes to continue in
school must file an application
for either post-baccalaureate or
Graduate School studies. Oct. 25
is the deadline for applying for
Graduate School. Dec. 1 is the
deadline for applying for the
College of Law for the 1969
Spring Quarter. Applications
may be obtained and returned to
room 33 Tigert Hall.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST will be given Nov. 9,
1968, Feb. 8, 1969, April 12,
1969, and Aug. 2, 1969.
Registration forms and fees must
reach the Educational Testing
Service, Law School Admission
Test, Box 944, Princeton, N.J.
08540, at least three weeks
before the desired test
administration date. Forms may
be picked up at the Registrar's
Office and the College of Law.
STATE SCHOLARSHIPS: All
those students who have a
General Teachers Scholarship
Loan note or a State Nursing
Scholarship Loan note for the
Fall Quarter, 1968, please turn
them in at the Student
Depository before Oct. 21.
FALL QUARTER
GRADUATES: Students who
expect to graduate at the end of
the Fall Quarter must file an
application for the degree and
pay the graduation fee at the
Office of the Registrar no later
than Oct. 18. Students must
make application for the degree
on the Student Audit
Information Form in the quarter
in which they expect to
graduate, regardless of previous
applications.

Campus Calendar

CPS 121 PROGRESS TEST will
be given Thursday, Oct. 17 at 7
p.m. All CPS 121 students are
expected to take this test and
each must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
Students whose last name
begins with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4, or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D-E) to Little 113,121 or
125; (F) to Little 201,203,205
or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102,112 or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205 or 208; (l-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215,217 or 219; (M)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, 237 or 239; (N-0) to
Anderson 104, 112 or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. All
CBS 261 studtnes are expected
to take this test and each must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
bre required to use his SOCIAL
SECURITY NUMBER. Students
whose last names begin with (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 109; (B)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,
10, or 11; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113,121, or 125;
(F) to Little 201, 203, 205, or
207; to Peabody 101,102,
112, or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205, or 208; (l-J) to
Flint no or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
(M) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, or 239; (N-O) to
Anderson 104, 112, or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 109;
(W-Z) to Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116,117,118 or
119.
CBS 263 PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. in
Little 101.
CY 201 PROGRESS TEST:
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-L) report to Walker
Auditorium; (M-Z) report to

Little 101,109,113,121 ,or 125.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with: (A-M) report to Walker
Auditorium; (N-Z) report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,1 or 11.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST:
Thursday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with (A-F) report to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; (G-L) report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116,117,118, or
119; (M R) to Little 101, 109,
113,121, or 125; (S-Z-)report to
Little 201, 203,205,207,213.
215, 217, or 219.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8t Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 15:
NEWPORT NEWS
SHIPBUILDING & DRY DOCK
CO. CE, EE, IE, ME, Met,
Engr, Engr. Mech.
WEST VIRGINIA PULP &
PAPER CO.
THE UPJOHN CO. --
background in science.
ARO, INC.
OCT. 15-16:
ALCOA ALUMINUM
OCT. 16:
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM
CORP. Geology, Math,. Phy.
EE, CHE, CE, EE, ME. ES.
LTV AEROSPACE
NATIONAL SECURITY
AGENCY
BRUNSWICK CORP. ME, EE,
ChE.
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO
CO.
OCT. 16,17,18:
CORNING GLASS
OCT. 17:
COMBUSTION ENGINEER ENGINEERING.
ING. ENGINEERING. INC. ME, CE, IE, IND.
Mgt, Met. and Acctg.
CHEVRON OIL CO. CE, ME,
Chem. Engr.
GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER
CO. ~ CE, EE, ME, ChE, IE,
Chem.
CELANESE Chem. ChE, ME,
Physics, Acctg.
NAVAL SHIPS & SYSTEMS
COMMAND
SQUARE D CO.
OCT. 17-18:
GENERAL DYNAMICS (Ft.
Worth Division)
FLORIDA POWER 8i LIGHT



HHH Forces Fear Deal
Between Nixon-Wallace

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Hubert H. Humphreys campaign
manager said Monday Richard
M. Nixon, Republican
presidential candidate, might try
to work out a private deal with
third party candidate George C.
Wallace to prevent the election
from being thrown into the
House.
Former Alabama Gov. George
C. Wallace is running the
strongest third party presidential
campaign in Pennsylvania since
Theodore Roosevelt carried the
state on the Bull Moose ticket in
1912.
His support is variously
estimated between 10 and 20
per cent of the total vote, but a
better augur is the consternation
he is causing among the
Republican and Democratic
party regulars
The latest soundings indicate
that Democrat Humphrey has
moved to within striking
distance of Republican Nixon.
Wallace is a distant third.
Edmund S. Muskie said
Monday he would be
discouraged if new polls do
not show Democratic gains
throughout the nation.
Sirhan Trial
Postponed
Seven Weeks
LOS ANGELES (UPI) The
trial of Sirhan B. Sirhan, accused
of the murder of Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy, Monday was
postponed until Dec. 9 and the
judge announced that the jury
would be locked up for the
entire trial, expected to last two
or three months.
Dep. Dist. Atty. Lynn
Compton, displayed at todays
hearing the testimony given
police by 67 persons who said
they saw Sirhan at the
Ambassador Hotel on June 4-5
when Kennedy was killed.
Compton also brought in the
testimony given by 15 persons
who said they saw Sirhan at a
target shooting range the day
before Kennedy was shot.
I The Eye
Opener.
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Open your eyes to real value in a
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Crane
Import
506 Bast University
Gainesville Sports Car Club
of every month at Crane Imposts
Showroom, 7:30 PJH.

UPI
NEWS
If theres no movement by
us in those polls, the
Democratic vice presidential
candidate said. I think Ill begin
to get discouraged.
The Maine senator said he
never predicts victory, but noted
the elements of Democratic
victory exist.
90thAdiourns
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
90 th Congress finally quit
legislating, appropriating and
squabbling today and adjourned.
The 91st Congress will convene
Jan. 3.

"But Dr. Mulliken!
I thought the orbitals have rotational symmetry
about the axis of the molecules!

Youve met George before. The guy fill thempermanently. Answer this Koppers. We do all sorts of things
with all the answers. We feel the ad if you answer this description- with plastics, wood, metal and
same way you do about him. But let's anxious to test your knowledge and chemicals. Koppers supplies more
face it, hes often right. Koppers isnt ability, impatient to learn and than 270 products and services to
looking for wise guys like George. in your profession, at home with some 40 industries. Interview us.
But you dont have to be a wise guy fresh ideas. We want chemists, Make an appointment at your
to speak up when you think youre chemical engineers, civil engineers, Placement Office. And write for our
right. Sometimes, what it takes to mechanical engineers, metallurgists, recruiting brochure, "Koppers and
get ahead is a little impatience. metallurgical engineers, electrical the Impatient Graduate. Write R. C.
Koppers is after impatient young engineers, business majors, liberal Dingman, Koppers Company, Inc.,
graduates. We have more job arts majors and MBAs. Koppers Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
openings than we can fill, and we Afraid you might get into something 15219. Koppers has always been an
need young graduates to help us you wont like? It's not likely at equal opportunity employer.
Try your Impatience. Interview...

He chided Richard M. Nixon
for refusing to appear on a
nationwide television debate
with Humphrey and charged
Nixon forces killed a
congressional bill which would
have opened the way for free
televised debates.
Dr. Ralph Abernathy, head of
the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, said
Monday a committee of Negro
leaders had decided not to
support anyone for president at
present.
Meanwhile, there was growing
confidence at the island
headquarters of Richard M.
Nixon Monday with a report of
an upward trend in the polls,
including one survey showing
him leading Humphrey in his
own state of Minnesota.

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.

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Tuesday, October 15, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Fraf Brawl
Over Lion
'Unfortunate'
Sigma Nu adviser Jay
Gebhardt labeled the move by
his fraternity to start a brawl at
the SAE house Sunday morning
an unfortunate high-spirited act
on the part of Sigma Nu.
Gebhardt couldnt be reached
at the time of the incident.
But he verified the rumor that
Sigma Nus painted the lion in
front the the SAE house,
resulting in the head-shaving of a
Sigma Nu pledge.
Gebhardt said there was a
rumor that the pledge had been
abused by SAE. He said the rumor
was untrue.
Sigma Nu 'President Frank
Granling, Randy Briggs, SAE
president and Jay Stormer,
fraternity adviser of the deans
office, have met to dissolve
differences, Gebhardt said.
Sigma Nus dont consider it
a feud, just a flare up,
Gebhardt said.
Inspection
Tags A Must
On UF Cars
By November, drivers on
campus will be required to have
their state auto inspection
stickers properly attached to
their motor vehicles.
The campus deadline for
having stickers will be the end of
this quarter according to UF
police dest Sgt., Jim King.
As soon as the deadline
comes we will start picking
people up. Theyve already had
their warning period, said King.

o Ilf
P9r nBB v A
(jgiMU
Say, Have you seen what We've been doing at 1
Twig? We took in the store next door, 1
knocked out the wall, and SPREAD OUT. 1
Come jn and enjoy our new spacious facilities. 1
While you're in, check out the new looks in 1
pants by Mister Pants, PantsviUe, and 1
Elli. ... also give our lingerie section a once I
over and let us know what you I
need.. . we'll get it. By the by, we're I
carrying more formats and semi-formats. So I
come in... and check out the new I
Twig. ... 1131 W. Univ. Ave and in the 1
Mall. I

DROPOUTS

g g^:

Students Join Faculty Committee

By WILLIAM MORDEN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Undergraduate
Committee of the College of
Education, consisting of 15
faculty members, voted last
week to admit two students as
visiting members.
The visiting members will not
be able to vote, but they will
attend meetings and discuss
matters before the committee.
The Undergraduate
Committee determines the
requirements for the granting of
degrees, course requirements,
and general college policy.
The students, Mrs. Jane
Atkinson and Edward Taylor,
both seniors, are organizing
presidents of the developing
undergraduate student
government of the college.
The action was the latest in a
series of moves made by
students and faculty of the
college to increase student
participation in policy making.

IN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Chief among them were
recent steps taken to oiganize an
embryo student government to
study and deal with
undergraduate problems.
Committees are now working
on the basic structure and
constitution. Elections are
expected to be held in the winter
quarter.
At present two sub-groups are
planned. The elementary
education group will be open to
all students enrolled in
elementary education courses

PR Smoker Tonight

The public Relations Student
Society of America (PRSSA) is
holding a Fall rush smoker
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in room
150 F-G of the Reitz Union.
Rush is open to public relations
majors or to any students
interested in public relations.
PRSSA, formerly Student
Public Relations Organization
(SPRO), recently became the
charter student chapter of the

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and the secondary education
group will be open to all
students enrolled in secondary
education courses.
Members of the councils of
both groups will form the
Student Senate consisting of 50
members, and the Deans
Council, which will be selected
from the Senate. Members of the
Undergraduate Committee will
be selected from the Senate.
Its a cooperative effort. The
faculty was very helpful. We
share the mutual goal of turning

national Public Relations
Society of America.
PRSSA gives students a
chance to meet and hear persons
in the public relations field and
to actually work in the field.

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.

BY HOWARD POST

out the best teachers and people
we can to live effectively in a
changing world. As teachers we
want to be as well prepared to
do our jobs as we can be, Mrs.
Atkinson said.
Research Space
There were 2,509 rooms
devoted to research on the UF
campus in the fall of 1%7. This
was 21.9 per cent of the UF
area.
pwon
2 'Shull
Hr P d P>- a d.
f 11 '
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
ggiwewl
SAL ES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373



UF Life Sciences Building Dedicated

J^Wmmk
jf : .jffm Ww'9 \< I I
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B Bill w'l
yv'&sJS?
1
KSgife.
,\£,.^*v';-Yj'^K'';^i','' r ='l^ Syi^^A^^^.^^^' (V-'^'u^ '^Fw^fl|PP k J^L % t JP>
LIFE SCIENCES COMPLEX
. .modern facilities
Goddard To Receive
Forestry Citation

Dr. Ray E. Goddard, UF
professor of forestry, will receive
the Technical Contribution
Award of the Florida Section,
Society of American Foresters,
during its annual fall meeting
Thursday and Friday in Panama
City.
Goddard received the award
tor his research in forest tree
genetics during the past 20
years. He is supervisor of the
tree improvement program in
Florida, a cooperative effort
involving ten pulp and paper
companies, the Florida Forest
No Sales
Board of Regents policy
requires that there shall be no
sale on the campus of
merchandise except for the state
newspapers provided in vending
racks and the traditional honor
apples.

Free car wash
O \ Purchase Os
jjBL C \ 23 Gallons
11/--. O*3 TEXACO GAS
ll Cl IJust Save Your
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Just 2 Blocks And Get A
North Os Campus FREE
303 NW 13 th CAR WASH

Service, and the U.S. Forest
Service.
He received his B.S. in
Forestry from the UF in 1947
and received his masters degree
the same year. In 1960, Goddard
received his PhD, in genetics
from Texas A&M. He joined the
UF staff in 1959.

CIVIL ENGINEERING SENIORS I
YOUR FUTURE CAN BE IN TRANSPORTAHON!
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT
Challenging opportunities available in our expanding transportation
engineering program which includes an annual 54 billion dollar highway
construction program.
No exam generous fringe benefits including tuition refunds for graduate
study.
Our recruiter will be here on Thurs, Oct. 31, 1968 Visit your Placement
Office NOW for brochures and SIGN UP to hear the full story.
OF TRANSPORTATION
Or write to:
Director of Manpower
Staff Development and Training Bureau
State Campus Building 5, Albany, New York 12226
Tel.: 518/457-4404
k

The new seven-story Life
Sciences Building, called one of
the most modern teaching and
research facilities in the country,
was dedicated Saturday.
Within the life sciences
complex are sophisticated tools
for biological studies- an
electron microscope, a genetics
teaching laboratory,
neurophysiology and
embryology laboratories, animal
laboratories, environmental
control rooms, and glass pipes to
carry powerful fluids into
laboratories.
Located between the medical
and agricultural centers, the first
unit of this $1,690,341 complex
was named William Bartram Hall
in formal ceremonies at the
Constans Theatre.
Naturalist Bartram is the
author of The Travels of William
Bartram, first published in 1791
and still in print. The book
Bar Association
Plans Skits
The 1968 JohnMarshallBar
Association skits will be given at
10 p.m. Nov. 2. The site of the
show is the old Law School and
bleachers will be erected.
The theme of the skits, is Ted
Hacks Original Political
Amateur Hour. Acts will
include the Swinging Supremes
(Supreme Court) and Little
Dickie Daley and His Electric
Cattle Prods.
,i-*|VOTE
£*4] HULL

included a list of 215 species of
birds, together with speculation
upon the migratory nature of
many of them.
The building to bear his name
houses offices of UFs Division
of Biological Sciences
Department of Zoology and
related uqits. Two of the seven
floors are devoted to graduate
studies and research laboratories
in these areas.
Campus Communications
Student Publications provide
a primary means of
communication on the campus.
This department boasts one of
the finest college daily
newspapers in the South- The
Florida Alligator published
Monday thru Friday during the
regular school year. The
Alligator is edited solely by
students drawn from various
academic areas.

Bob White
[X| President
pd. political adv.

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Tuesday, October 15, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Dr. Stephen H. Spurr, dean of
Michigan's Horace H. Racknian
School of Graduate Studies,
made the dedicatory address.
Other program participants
included members of the Board
of Regents, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and
representatives from the
National Science Foundations
and Title I of the Higher
Education Facilities Act.
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Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. October IS, 1968

EDITORIAL

Revamp Ticket Policies

0
For years, the UF Athletic Association
has listened to gripes from students, faculty
and alumni about tickets for home Gator
football games.
For years, the UF Athletic Association
has promised to find the causes of the ticket
problems and to solve them.
And for years, the UF Athletic
Association has done next to nothing.
Take this year, for example. At the
Mississippi State game, several students
complained when they received tickets for
seats which do not exist.
Secretary of Athletic Affairs Miles
Wilkins discussed the problem with ticket
officials. They gave him what amounted to a
lot of doubletalk, then assured him the
problem would not be repeated.
Guess what?
At -the Tulane game, scores of students
held tickets for nonexistant seats.
On the surface, that appears to be
somewhat ineffective problem-solving
Another problem:
At the Mississippi State game, ticket
officials told a UF staff member that he
could buy tickets using a staff discount if
he sat in the end zone. If the staff member
wanted to sit in the east stands where there
were about 1,000 seats left, he would have
to pay $6 instead of $3.
Such a situation might be justified if the

7 Knew The Press Would Distort My Stone Age Quote
' -1 ' ; :
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Boerd of Student Publications.
Editorid, Bummm. Advertising offices in Room 33), Reitz Union. Phone
ext. 2832
"Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the arricle jnd not thore of the University of Florida."

game were a sell-out, but is ridiculous when
thousands of seats go begging.
And a third problem; perhaps the most
significant of all:
It is no secret anywhere that UF football
players are selling their complimentary
tickets to anyone who wants to buy them,
the going rate being around sls each.
This practice, affectionately referred to as
scalping, violates not only NCAA
regulations but Florida law, as well.
If the NCAA were to investigate the UF
and discover the hundreds of instances of
scalping by football players alone the Gators
could write off a Southeastern Conference
championship or a post-season bowl game
for at least two years.
That's a pretty stiff penalty for a few
extra bucks in a players pocket.
* *t
Add to all this a considerable amount of
student frustration when they couldnt get
tickets to the Air Force or Florida State
games because hundreds of them didnt
receive information and ticket forms last
summer.
The picture is not a pretty one, and the
anger directed at the Athletic Association
over ill-planned procedures is justified.
Weve had enough promises. How about
some action?

Changes

Too Old, Too Short, Too Bad

CASTE KILLS.
lt is timeless, borderless,
sexless, cultureless, and, mainly,
an unconscious process: thus its
constant success.
Caste is hype manipulative.
It has others fight its battles,
others do its work, others
running to Marathon to relay the
message. It hates change, seeking
changeless perpetuation.
Caste is absolutist,
discriminatory, xenophobic. By
its magic it seeds division with
every breath, filling the air with
labels by which you may
more-easily hate.
Caste endlessly blames.
Its authority rests on force
not equity. It makes enemies of
friends. It speaks in tongues to
confuse. It is deaf and blind.
Look, it blinks.
Caste demeans.
Its allotropic voice will tell
you you are too fat or too thin
or too average. It insists you are
too stupid or too smart or too
commonminded. It covets
confusion.
Caste loves faultfinding.
Medusa-tongued, it will blame
you for being too young or too
<44 or too inbetween. Under
castes rules you will always feel

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
A is die exerciM of rMponiibility. M
*' Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
. Dave Doucette
YUJMIm Managing Editor
M Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor
I 1 Alligator Inquizitor j
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Hello. 1 dedicate todays column to John, Hilda, Dusenbury, ;
Shapiro, and Spiro Agnew. May your days be as nice as a gray tree.
Here are some questions: j
1. What is Muskies first name?
2. What is the name of Caroline Kennedys horse?
3. In the spring of 1964, President Johnson caused quite a stir i
among dog lovers by lifting his beagles by their ears. Do you j
remember their names?
4. For what sports are the following cups awarded?
a) Wightman
b) Americas
j c) Davis
: d) Stanley £
ij; e) Ryder |
j 5. Can you name the five great Lakes? §
j: 6. If a man were to take a thick line of twine, and hang it from the >:
: hand of the Statue of Liberty, would this be a justifiable case of:
v Statutory Rope? :j:
"HI
Dont they get bad? Yesterdays answers: 1. Lizzie Borden >:
5: 2. WCKR 3. Emerson 4. J.Russel Wiggins 5. Nelly-Belle
I f
:j; (A note on answer sos yesterday: I was stormed with irate letters j:j
J on how Jingles didnt have a Jeep-it was Pat Brady. Jingles was on the §
Wild Bill Hickock Show. How utterly Senseless of Me! Where Have I
: Gone Wrong? My Gross Apologies.) !:
$ Swish your mouth today. ft
K # {

that you must be other than
what you are. Failing that, it
convinces you to be satisfied
with your lot.
Caste loves privilege.
It teaches hate and violence
as necessary, and will convince
you evil and bad and the poor
will always be with you.
r
Caste succors status.
Under the caste system, you
are either too liberal or too
conservative or too moderate.
Under caste either the past or
the future or both control the
present. It subtly subdues.
Caste teaches superiority of
races, sexes, ages, mentalities,
cultures, political -ystems. It
stamps you with illusions, not
substance.
Caste tells you what words to
speak and hear and write. It tells
you what to wear and what your
morals must be. Caste, if you ask
it deep enough, is divine.
Caste forbids deviance.
Its architect is fear, its
blueprint force. There is only
one way and that is the way of
caste. Tell caste its true name
and it will mock you, try to
change it and it will break you.
It labels endlessly.
Under caste you are either

iy Richard Thompson

too religious or not religious.
enough. You are rich, poor or
hopelessly stuck in the middle,
fighting not to get left behind.
Hurry.
Caste is money others cant
have. It is places others cant go.
Caste is things others cant have.
Caste is secret clubs and secret
words and secret right to
collectively destroy.
Caste loves shadows. /
With caste to guide you you
are always seeing shadows, even
in the sunshine. Caste knows.
You want to do things, so it says
you cant do them, subtly
conquering you each time you
express yourself.
Caste loves obedience.
Under caste one must war
ceaselessly against the infidel,
for he is always with you under
caste. Caste always has excuses,
thus its perfection.
See caste. See caste dance. It
has a natural sense of rhythm.
You are the one out of step.
Caste knows.
Caste is super vivisectionist.
To caste all things are
sel fdefining. It prefers
predictable happy, fun is its fun,
joy its joy, play its play, work its
work.
CASTE REIGNS.



OPEN FORUM:
,:,F ; j
Adoiaod ViAAMt
There is no hope for the complacent man .*
Speaking Out
Working For Changes
b

MR. EDITOR:
In a recent issue of the Alligator (Richard
Thompsons article entitled UF Black Students
want Fast Changes), Mr. Thompson includes in
quotation marks many statements that are not at all
accurate nor are they direct quotes. Among these is
the statement concerning my attitude towards the
military as being that I would serve if called.
Unfortunately, this statement is a result of
misinterpretation by the interviewing reporter and
results also because of an obvious lack of his
understanding of the true nature of the Reserved
Officers Training Corps of his failure
to indicate my own attitude towards ROTC in
particular and the military in general.
If one wishes to catagorize, it is possible to
include me among those pro-ROTC guys, &
pro-Universal Military Training. I did not attend the
University of Florida as an undergraduate, and I was
not affected, therefore, by the
compulsory-voluntary ROTC debate. My decision to
enter advanced ROTC was completely voluntary
and was not influenced, nor did the thought ever
occur that the forces of the United States were
or/are, in Mr. Thompsons words, just another arm
of a racist, imperialist country.
Yes, I do have faith in the United States and in
democracy. If there are changes to be made in our
country, it is my sincere hope that these changes
can be made within our existing structures, the
Establishment, if you must and to this end, and

SDS Needs \ Goal

MR. EDITOR:
If one is asked to join an
organization, be it political,
philosophical, professional, or
whatever, one essential
consideration for the decision of
whether or not to join is the
purpose of that organization.
The first step in the creation of a
political organization, for
example, would logically be the
affirmation of the expression of
certain political principles. Next,
the objective of the organization
would be defined with reference
to those principles. Most
broadly, for example, to uphold
those principles through
whatever means are appropriate
and available; or, more narrowly,
to propagate those principles.
Since the future especially the
political future is
unpredictable, one cant
reasonably demand a completely
detailed program of all future
activities of the organization:
the actions most appropriate and
profitable will depend not only
on the particular political
philosophy, but also on the
political environment of the
organization through time. But
what one can and must demand
before joining a political
organization is the knowledge of
its political principles.
SDS-SSOC has members, and
is evidently committed to a
political mevement, the radical
movement, without knowing

what it is. Chairman Freeman
states, Right now we should be
working on a philosophy of the
movement. (Alligator, 10/7/68)
Is this not to establish or
enter a movement first, and then
concern oneself with a
philosophy for it?
Also, since the SDS-SSOC is
planning (among others) a
seminar on violence versus
non-violence, it is as yet
undecided about that issue, and
may, presumably, choose
violence. Violence, as a course of
action of a political
organization, may have as its end
either violence itself or the
establishment of a new
government. Violence for the
sake of violence serves only the
political principle, anarchy; so
does violence directed at the
overthrow of a government,
unless this is itself the means to
establish a new government. If
SDS-SSOC is not devoted to
anarchy, it must seek to
establish a new government.
In this case even if tne
SDS-SSOC is unable to identify
its political principles, it should
at least give a description of the
government which it seeks to
establish be it limited or
unlimited; constitutional
republic or totalitarian state
(perhaps, named a republic);
laissez-faire capitalism or some
variant of collectivism, such as
unlimited democracy.
%
R.E. OSTEEN

by these means will f work to bring the changes that
are undeniably necessary for the continued
maintenance of our government in its present
form.. .which has worked in the past.
It is true that this democratic machinery has
worked with seemingly unwarranted slowness, but
democracies dont thrive or exist on radical change.
It is also true, that many of the minority views of
yesterday have come to be the majority views, and
in many cases, laws, of today. It therefore follows,
that because of my faith and my expressed belief in
America, that I chose to fulfill my military
obligation by electing to qualify as an officer in the
United, States Army rather than as a draftee.
If I may, to further illustrate my point, refer to
the August issue of Ebony magazine (which is a
special edition devoted to the subject of the Black
Soldier), point out that this nations military offers
the greatest degree of functional democracy that has
been granted to black people. To quote Ebony:
Always from the first days of the Republic, the
black soldier has fought away for the freedoms
denied him at home. At the back of his mind always
has been the vain hope that America would
recognize his bravery away from home by
recognizing him as a nan at home. To my
satisfaction and to many other blacks who are in the
military, America has proven that all men are equal
in the military. Now America faces the necessity of
proving that all men are equal on her ambiguous
streets.

UF In Sad Shape
MR. EDITOR:
Having just read both your editorial entitled Violence No
Answer and your analysis of the position of SDS as outlined by Ed
Freeman, I feel compelled to question several things.
(1) Did the individual who wrote the editorial actually listen to Ed
Freeman? The tone of this editorial would indicate that if so, he
certainly did not understand Eds comments.
(2) How can the statement be made that he (Ed Freeman) is
against anything and everything in your editorial and yet you quote
him in the article SDS-SSOC Fights For Recognition as saying the
heart of my commitment is, let the people decide.
(3) You point out as a sign of progress that the Board of Regents
recently abolished compulsory ROTC. You neglect to mention that at
the same meeting the same Board of Regents voted to allow,
encourage and back President OConnell should he care to dismiss a
student without a hearing for an act that has interfered with the
orderly processes or operation of the University of reflected dishonor
or discredit upon its academic reputation. It should be noted that no
attempt at definition of these acts was made, but was left entirely to
the discretion of OConnell.
(4) While the Board of Regents may not be technically responsible
for the proposed changes in the Student Code of Conduct being
presently quietly circulated on this campus, it is fair to say that their
influence on liberalized university goverance is clearly mirrored in
one of the key changes. To quote No action by the civil authorities
shall operate as a bar to an action against the student by the
University under this Code of Conduct.
(5) With all due respect to the Action Conference (of which 1 am a
member) I must disagree with your statement that some of the finest
minds on our campus are engaged in heated debate within that forum.
There has been a minimum of heated debate, a very small amount of
action, and if we 75 individuals represent the finest on this campus
intelluctually, then the UF is in very sad shape.
I am not a member of SDS-SSOC, and I am deeply opposed to
violence, but I must agree with Ed Freeman when he says that radicals
have brought the problems of this into the public arena. For this they
are deserving of praise, not criticism, regardless of whether one
chooses the same method of correction for the problems which they
propose..
NORMA P. MUNN,4AS

&£ wm
y The New Nixon
Holloway Sincere
In Calling Quorum

MR. EDITOR:
I have found it necessary to
write this letter concerning the
Alligator editorial of October
10, 1968, in which Scott
Holloway was condemned for

Tudy, October 15,1968, The Florida Alligator,

calling for a quorum at the
Student Senate meeting
Thursday night.
1 must question the
Alligators motives in
condemning Mr. Holloways
actions and sincerity. It is quite
obvious that you know little of
this hard-working senator. 1 have
known Scott Holloway for
several years and have lived with
him for one of these years. The
sincerity with which he called
for a quorum is the same
sincerity with which Mr.
Holloway attacks any problem.
In this case, it simply happened
to be a question of letting 23
students run the Student Senate
and ignoring the constitution.
Mr. Holloway merely acted to
uphold that constitution (which
you seem to have so little
respect for).
The statement that the
university was virtually
paralyzed is also unfounded. No
one questions the importance of
the proposals in question that
night they no doubt will pass
at the tiext meeting if there are
enough senators who care
enough to come.
TIM SMITH
NEW MOVEMENT CANDIDATE
STUDENT SENATE
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 15,1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

, vwvv*v. .w.v.*;*:w:c*To--r*wr* # y*,
FOR SALE
vwwm^av.vawc':>v
YAMAHA 180 CC 1967 excellent
condition. A steal at $429.00. Call
376*0695. (A-14-st-p)
Ace out! Make sense out of your test.
One new set of Colliers
Encyclopedia. Excellent reference for
typically muddled U of F courses.
Better than a tutor. Can even outwit
the prof. Call 372*5463 after 7 pm.
(A*l4*st*p)
4 piece colonial style living room
suite. 1 ea. sofa, upholstered rocker,
coffee table, end table. $75.00. Call
372-7323 after 3:30. (A-3t-16-p)
LUDWIG DRUMS complete
including Plaste boz cymbals stool,
white marine pearl. Original cost
$635. Now S4OO. like new. Call
378-6746. (A*7t-16-p)
Surfboard 9ft. 6 in. custom made to
test east coast shape glass/resin
content and other features, must be
seen to be appreciated. Call
afternoons or evenings 376-6623.
(A-st-13-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
1966 Honda s9O 4000 miles excellent
condition helmet & mirror included.
$225 or best offer call m rots
378-5744 or 372-9479 ask for
mickey. (A-st-13-p)
Wm. S. Haynes Flute Solid Silver
standard model new, perfect
condition, with pebbled goatskin
case, also leather carrying case. S7OO
value, Price $520 call 824*3521, St.
Augustine. (A-st*l4-p)
Exquisite canal property on Atlantic
side in Fla. Keys Russell 376-3211
ext. 5642 or 378-8774 after five.
(A-3t-16-p)
Drawing table (30x40) excellent
condition. Call Bob 378-5086.
(A-2t-16-p)
VOX ESSEX Bass Amp $75 or best
offer also have 12 string Call
372-1095 after 3:00 p.m. (A-3t-16-p)
Volvo 1800 S overdrive excellent
condition SI7OO Call 378-7441.
(A-3t-16-p)
Private book sale: Britannica, Great
Books, paperbacks (signet, penquin,
etc). Buy 10 & 1 free, after 430,
273-7 Schucht Village, 378-7124.
(A-st-15-p)
SAVE-SAVE-SAVE Desk, chain
files tables, Bookcases and typing
tables New Used-Refinished Save up
to 50% or more JR Office Furniture
Equipment Co. 620V2 S. Main St. Ph
376-1146. (A-17 5t p)
Magnavox TV-Stereo Phono Cab. 21
B&W. Good working condition.
$l7O. Call 376-6249. (Al73tp)
Poker Table, seats eight, Great
posibilities for Rec Room. $30.00
Call 378-9302, G. Vason. (A-2t-17-p)
Fender Duo-sonic and hard case in
excellent shape S7O Call Keith at
376-9138 or 376-9498 and leave
your number. (A-3t-17-p)
Zenith 14 inch TV said to be sold by
mistake IS STILL for SALE at 216
NW 3 ave - 376-1005 only $35 call
or see after 1:30. (A-2t-17-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-17-c)
R ugs/Kerman/Oriental/French/Hook
C h inese/Tufted/Hook/French/Hook
other/Hooks call/ 3762802.
(A-17-3t-p)
ALUQAToft 6iT I
cUKiFitf* ttsunq
SPECIAL
TONIGHT |l
LADIES i
DRINKS j!
19C )
Alibi Lounge ;!
3334 W. Univ. Ave.

FOR RENT
Spaoious J-bedroom Fully Furnished
including washing machine. Within
walking distance to Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372*3357, 378*0641.
(B-ts < c)
MUST SUB-LET: Finish lease on a
two (2) Bedroom Apt. in a Desirable
and Convenient location Next to
the V.A. Hospital and Medical
Center. Move in today-Oct. rent
paid. Call 376-9668 between 9:00
a.m. and 6:00 p.m. for further
information. (B-15-ts-c)
X-X-ff-XANSIWVX'X-X'X'X^XW-NSNWX-X*:*#
WANTED |
:*X-;*x-x-x*x*N!YX-x*x*x*x.:-x*vx*x*X>:i
Desperately need place to stay for
married couple homecoming
weekend. Will pay. Phone 376-9529.
(C-3t-15-p) _____
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
.with the nations top college daily
'work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
/reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
Baby Sitter needed for 1 year old
while I attend class on Mon., Wed.,
Fri. 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m., Village
Park. 378-1744. (C-16-st-p)
Female roommate to share one brm
apt. in French Quarter. Call
378-9346 after 5:30 p.m. Apt. 36.
(C-16-3t-p)
One coed to share 2 br., ac, Fr.
Quarter apt. with 3 other girls. Apt.
96. 372-5246. (C-3t-16-p)
One roommate for French Quarter
Apt. one pool. Call 378-7804
anytime after 8:00 p.m. or on
weekends. (C-4t-16-p)
Mature male roommate needed for
Landmark Apt. Call 378-0674 after
7:00 p.m. (C-3t-15-p)
HELP WANTED
: :*x-x*x*>&xm*w # ; >x*x*xx-xx*x*m>fm.%v<£
WANTED: Someone artsy-craftsy"
who enjoys climbing ladders,
crawling under counters, full-time for
low pay and long hours in a
frivolically fun environment. If you
dare-inquire within: The Party Line,
Gainesville Mall. (E-13-st-p)
Wanted: coeds to sell and distribute a
new line of products part time.
Training will be furnished. Call
481-2370 after 4 p.m. (E-15-st-p)
Elem. teacher needed: Inquire
Haynes Brabham, Bell School, Bell,
Fla. phone 463-2196. Elementary
certificate required. (E-15-3t-p)
Opportunity interested in earning
SSO-300 monthly in spare time call
378-7773 for appointment.
(E-3t-14-p)
X*xx!x*xv;*x%v*v; # x*;s*x*.*.*..:s%s # ; # >#*.
AUTOS
!*X*XNV*S*X # X # X # X*X # XX*XX*XX!*NV*V*VV
1963 Austin Healey 3000 Mark II
radio wires overdrive heater 3 tops
wide oval tires. $1250 2157 NW 9th
Ave. 378-8884. (G-4t-15-p)
pTSOIK
1 3 sf7 9 THE
--TirYEAR S BEST
i IP NY. Times
X. N Y. Herald Tnb
5 Post
Saturday Review
%j I FA Time Magazine
\ iA. D a ny News
INGMAR Newsweek
BERGMANS Newsweek
u,|a M Cue Magazine
CERTAIN ESSENTIAL SCENES IN THIS FILM
SHOULD BE SEEN ONLY BY ADULTS. THEY
ARE NOT SUITABLE FOR YOUNOER, MORE
IMPRESSIONABLE MINDS. WE STRONGLY
RECOMMEND THIS FILM FOR ADULTS ONLY.

CHICKEN-SHRIMP-SANDWICHES
FREE i#
free PORE-BOY DIAL THE DISCOVERY NUMBER
DC I IX/ED Y 1029 w UNIV. AVE. ACROs/ Q_ 4 AQ4
I V Elx I FROM UNIVffiSITY CITY BANK W# I If

AUTOS |
!*>.;.?.?;?;-x*x< x x x*x x x-k*vns'X x x x j v
63Fiat Spyder Convertible white
w/Blk top call 3728601 after 5 pm.
(G-2t-17-p)
68 Chevelle 55396 convertible 4spd
stereo tape radio heat bucket seats
Best looking car on campus $2700
Call 376-8740. (G-st-17-p)
1962 F>ontiac auto-trans, Power
Steering, radio great condition. S7OO.
Call 378-7908. (G-lt-17-p)
66 Plymouth Satellite 426 HEMI
every possible extra and factory
experimental option, never raced, call
378-5405 after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-16-p)
1964 Porsche 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2600.00.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-13-st-p)
VW 1965 Sedan Excellent condition
FM radio $950, 378-3284.
(G-15-3t-p)
Full race tuned exhaust system for
corvairs. Fits all models except turbo
charged. Looks wild, sounds bad,
increases performance. Ed 378-7803.
(G-3t-15-p)
v.VX*X*X*X*X-XX*X*X-X-I*X-X*:-XXXXX';\
PERSONAL
V 'J*
Your Personal Poster Headquarters,
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
incense peddler, far-out clothing
experimenter, blacklight dispenser to
the world, has just received a large
shipment of INDIA PRINT
BEDSPREADS in both twin and
double bed sizes. Drop in and pick a
couple out while the selection is
abundant. 10 SW 7th St. just around
the corner from Santa Fe JC.
(J-15-6t-p)
GIRL WANTED TO cook evening
Meals Mon.-Thurs. for PRE-Med
students. NO dishes. Call 372-6884
Olympia Apts. 201. (J-13-4t-p)
Miles and Margaret Hotchkiss invite
you to enjoy Spudnuts The Big
Donut that is better. Call us for your
next party or meeting. SPUDNUT
DONUT SHOP AND SNACK BAR,
1017 W. University Ave. 3723100.
(J-3t-16-p)

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
I WED NIGHT s
LADIES DRINKS
19<
DANCE TO THE MUSIC
of RICHARD PARKER and
the SWINGING WITNESSES
WED. thru SAT. 9PM-2AM
LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE
1 N.W. 10 AVE. Phone 378-1636
NO SLACKS AFTER 9PM PLEASE

r.vxvx-;-:-:-x-x-x-x*v.:.v.*.*xw-x*xw.
PERSONAL
A
EXPECTANTLY YOURS
Gainesville's only shop for the
mother-to-be 706 W University Ave.
372-3850. (J-st-17-p)
| LOST & FOUND |
Lost black kitten with flea collar in
407 NW 15 st. 5 months. Call
378-8507 after 5:30. Reward.
(L-13-st-p)
SERVICES
The Teddy Bear Nursery will be open
for Florida football games. Hours of
operation will be 7:00 am until 6:00
pm. Night service for all home games.
Contact Mrs. Townsend at 376-0917
or 372-4021 for reservations.
(M-2t-4-p)
ALTER NATO RS-GENERATORS RS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical
STARTERS-Electrical RS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical systems tested
repairs. Auto electric service-603 SE
Second Street 378-7330. (M-10-ts-c)
Vi i*i
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Sundown
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also at 9:45
"for singles only"
IftroWl 1.11:30. 3:30, 5:30
7:30, 9:30
J PIERRE CLEMENTI
CATHERINE DENEUVE..
Benjamin
COLOR -^L
hnwri
; ; :.X
jimjpy, ENDS TODAY!
1 T.i#"m ITS-I4M *
I color 2:00 5:15 8:40 I
'v?4'
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J



Betas, Fijis Top Fraternity Swimming

By STEVE ROHAN
Correspondent
Beta Theta Pi, winning five of
six events, swept to a big victory
in last weeks Orange League
swimminp finals.
Don Cooper was the
outstanding swimmer of the day
as he won the 50-yard
backstroke and 50-yard
breaststroke.
The Betas totaled 60 points,
29 ahead of the closest runnerup
Phi Delta Theta, who scored 31.
ATO followed closely with
30 and then; came SAE and
AEPi with 15, Delts with 8, TEP
and KS with 3, and Sigma Chi
and Lambda CHi Alpha with 2.
Sigma Nu, SPE, Pi Lam, Pi
Kappa Phi, and KA did not
score.
In the Blue League, Phi
Gamma Delta placed in every
event to win the Blue

Bulldogs Second Half Team,
Warns Ole Miss CoachVaught

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Other teams on
Georgias schedule would do
well to heed the words of Ole
Miss coach Johnny Vaught.
I tried to tell our kids in the
dressing room that Georgia was a
second half team, Vaught said
after the Bulldogs came roaring
back from a 7-0 halftime deficit
Saturday to beat the Rebels
21-7.
Just one week earlier, Georgia
had bounced back form a 20-7
halftime deficit to beat South
Carolina 21-20.
The Bulldogs are stomg, real
strong, said Vaught. Theyve
got the strength to wear you out
in the late going.
Georgia, still trailing 7-6
going into the final period, was
sparked again by Mike Cavan
who came out on top in
Saturdays meeting with the
Rebels Archie Manning in the
duel so sophomore quarterbacks.
Cavan, who completed 12 of
20 passes for 180 yards Manning
was 10-26-150, hit on passes of
19, 13 and 11 yards to set up
Georgias first touchdown with
11:37 left to play; then threw a
63-yard bomb to ailing Dennis
Hughes for the clincher with six
minutes left on the clock.
I told them at halftime that
they could beat Ole Miss by two
touchdowns if theyd just go out
and play like I knew they
could, Georgia coach Vince
Dooley said.
1 was terrible in the first
half, added Cavan. It took me
that long to get going.. .it
certainly took me long enough.
The victory by the
KISER OFFICE EQUIPMENT
OCTOBER SPECIAL
42 MANUAL TYPEWRITERS
(ALL-MAKES)
RECONDITIONED &GUARANTEED
FROM $45 to $95
L '
20% DOWN
BAL. IN 6 PAYMENTS
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ADDED
604 N. MAIN ST. 372-9607

competition. The Fijis
managed to win only one event
the 200-yard free relay But*
managed to place two men in
every event to squeak over Chi
Phi who won four of the six
events.
Carl Holzer was the star of
the meet as he paced Chi Phi
with victories in the 50 back and
50 free and in the medley relay.
The FIJIS win was sparked
by an overall team effort. FIJI
won with 55 followed bv Chi
PHi, 41; Delta Chi, 23; Theta
Chi, 23; TKE, 7; Phi Tau, 5;
DSP, 4; AGR, 3; and Pi Kappa
Phi, 1
ORANGE RESULTS:
150 medley relay: BTP
Bivens, Cooper, Hames, 1:22.0;
2)SAE; 3)PDT; 4) ATO; 5) TEP;
100 free; 1) Ross Keeler,
ATO, 52.4; 2)Helm, PDT

The
Florida
Alligator
13th-ranked Bulldogs, now
3-0-1, over the 15th ranked
Rebels 3-1 highlighted another
big weekend of college football
here in the deep South.
The weekend started off with
a shocker Miami upsetting
eighty-ranked Lousiana State by
the amazing score of 30-0-and
ended on a wild note Kentucky
upsetting Oregon State 35-34.
In between:
Ninth-ranked Florida had to
break out of a 3-3 third-period
deadlock to beat winless Tulane

Bob White
|XI President
pd. political adv.

y a~
REITZ UNION BOARD
FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES
DANCING
LESSONS
BALLET TAP-MODERN
STARTS OCT. 21
MONDAY
4SPM ROOM C-4
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
FOR INFORMATION
CALL
MRS. HAWKINS EXT. 2741

ORANGE. BLUE LEAGUE

3) PDT 4) Anderson,
BRP 5) Dahl, KS 6)Post, BTP
50 Back; 1) Don Cooper,
BTP, 28.4 2)Smith, PDT 3)
Bean, BTP 4) Kahn, AEP 5)
Jack, LXA 6) Donaldson SAE
50 Free l)Gary Hames BTP
23.5 2)Keeler, ATO 3)Borland
PDT 4) Parker, ATO 5) Kahn,
AEP 6) Dahl KS.
50 Breast 1) Don Cooper,
BTP 30.7 2)Bivens, BTP 3)
Stephens, SAE 4) Skaggs, DTD
5) Poyle, AEP
200 Free relay 1) BTP,
Bemin, Klink, Post, Anderson,
1:37.3 2) ATO, 3) AEP,
4) PDT, 5) DTD 6)SX
BLUE RESULTS:
150 Med. Relay: 1) XP,
Grees, Holzer, Proger, 1:26.5 2)
PGD, 3) TX, 4) DX, 5) PKT, 6)
TKE.
100 free: 1) Scott Smith DX,

24-3; 12th-ranked Tennessee was
held scoreless until the fading
minutes of the first half but
went on to beat Georgia Tech
24-7; Alabama didn't really get
going until the second half while
beating Vanderbilt 31-7.
Auburn trailed 3-0 at
halftime and came roaring bac bacto
to bacto beat Clemson 21-10 ;
independent Southern
Mississippi crushed winless
Mississippi State 47-14; Memphis
State took over the Missouri
Valley Conference lead by
beating West Texas State 42-21;
Tampa suffered its first loss after
three wins in a 31-28 contest
with Cincinnatti: and Virginia
Tech edged Wake Forest 7-6.
Miami, which took its only
loss last week at 2nd ranked
Southern Cal, led previously
unbeaten LSU only 6-0 at
halftime but exploded for 17
points int he third perion on the
passing of Dave Olivo.
jpgvoTE
C^HULL

57.7 2) Griffin, PGD, 3) Hoover,
PGD 4) Lane, DSP, 5) Cromer,
TKE, 6) Malik, PKPSI.
50 Back 1) Carl Holzer XP,
28.8 2) Young, PGd, 3) Barron,
PGD 4) Gray, TX 5) Proger, XP,
6) Lane, DSP
50 free: 1) Carl Holzer, XP
25.5, 2) Rowe, DX, 3) Lime

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Tuesday, October 15
explore an
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Talk with Newport News On-Campus Career Con Consultant
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Tuesday, October 15,1968, The Florida Alligator,

PGD 4) Jensen, PGD 5) Proger,
XP, 6)Lane, DSP
50 Breast: Wright Gres, XP,
32.4, 2) Goldwyn, PGD, 3)
Frederikson, TX 4) Macdonado,
DX 5) Wallace, PGD, 6) Still TX.
200 free relay 1) PGD, Lime,
Hoover, Young, Griffin, 1:42.3
2) DX, 3)TX 4)Xp,

Page 11



Page 12

L Th> Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 15. 1968

r& **I
I Mam Gator Ray
Is it true that the only team in the SEC that can stop the Gator
offense is the Florida coaching team?
I have never been one to try to look for someone else to blame for
my mistakes. 1 told our squad Sunday I thought I was responsible for
the way they played against Tulane. I think I have given them too
many offensive and defensive responsibilities, and in trying to carry
out these assignments they have made too many mistakes. I also think
they were overworked last week in practice and were too tired,
mentally and physically, to play the kind of game they wanted to
play. I have taken steps to try to correct and simplify our game plan
this week and hope this will help to improve our play against North
Carolina.
I do want to congratulate the Florida students for their loyal
support. They are winners and all of us recognize their support was a
big factor in giving the team the confidence they needed to play an
outstanding fourth quarter and win.
Would it be too much to ask why you didnt give Larry Rentz a
chance at quarterback in the second and third quarters when Eckdahl
couldnt move the team?
I thought Rentz was more valuable at flankerback and the primary
reason our offense was being stopped was not Eckdahl.
How about putting Larry Smith as the deep man on the kickoff
return squad? 1 bet hed get more than six yards per game in return
yardage.
I dont remember any games where we got only six yards in kickoff
return yardage. Saturday we received one kickoff which was returned
27 yards and almost broken all the way by Jerry Vinesett. Smith is
working some on kickoff returns now, something we had planned on
all along but have been unable to do because he missed 10 days work
i pre-season drills and has been having all he can manage just to
catch up in conditioning. Larry will get a chance to return some
kickoffs as soon as we think hes ready. In the meantime we have
confidence in those who are currently handling this assignment.

Game Rims Shown

The fourth in a series of 10
film showings of UF football
game action highlights is
scheduled at 8 p.m. Thursday in
the Reitz Union Auditorium.
The screening of the
FJorida-Tulane contest, won by
the Gators, 24-3, is open to
students, University faculty and
staff, alumni and local citizens
without charge. It is sponsored
by the Alachua County Alumni
Club.
With road contests at North
Carolina and Vanderbilt the next

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two weeks, films will be shown
Oct. 24 and Oct. 31,
respectively.
Student Appointments
The Student Traffic Court
consists of a Chief Justice, who
must be a law student, a Clerk,
and a number of justices all
appointed by the President of
the Student Body. All
appointments are approved by a
majority vote of the Student
Senate.

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