Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 15

ON QUORUM CALL

Holloway Denies
Goodrich Charae

See Editorial Page 8
By DAVE REDDICK
Assistant Executive Editor
Scott Holloway, student
senator who called for a quorum
at Tuesdays senate meet, has
denied charges by Vice President
Gary Goodrich that the move
was political obstructionism.
You just cant be an honest
politician anymore, Holloway
said. I tried to do the right
thing and Goodrich has made all
of these accusations against me
and my party.
Holloway called for a quorum
at the beginning so the meeting
and forced Goodrich to recess
the group.
Only 23 senators were
present and the constitution
requires 40.
I called for a quorum
because Id like to see the
students represented as they
should be, Holloway said. He
felt 23 was not a good
representation.
Because the senate couldnt
conduct business, several
matters, termed by Goodrich as
vital, could not be taken up.
The call halted progress of
Student Government and
virtually paralyzed the
university, Goodrich said.
Among the questions to be
considered by the seijate were
requests for $3,000 for the
reading clinic; a number of
student appointments to
university committees; a
proposed charter for the Reitz
Union and a request for money
to pay the way for a group of
students to attend a convention.
Im not sorry, I called for a
quorum, Holloway said.
If there is no quorum next
week, Ill call for one, he
added.
Holloway said Goodrich used

The
Florida Alligator

the obstructionist charges to
further his interest in SG.
Its an accepted fact that
Goodrich is planning to run for


To lie: Vacancies
Cause Absence

Secretary of Legislative
Affairs Ed Tolle stated Thursday
possible reasons for the absence
of 21 senators from Tuesday
nights Student Senate meeting.
Heading this list is the fact
that a number of senators are
occupying seats which will be
filled in next Thursdays student
elections.
Other reasons suggested were
that seniors who have graduated
and students who have not
returned to the UF have not
been replaced. Students whose
average fall below the required
grade of 2.0 or who have
transferred from the living area
or college elected
to represent, are ineligible to
serve.

Challenge Aids Dropouts

A new concept in helping the disadvantaged
will begin work Monday night with the opening
of the Challenge tree Academy.
Many other organizations say Give the
disadvantaged jobs*. But no one says Prepare
the disadvantaged for these jobs; qualify them.
Challenge Free Academy is unique in this
endeavor, says CFA Director Caron Balkany.
Challenge Free Academy is for high school
and grade school drop outs who want to obtain a
job or a better paying position.
In tutoring towards these goals, CFA prepares
the drop out for his new position and helps him
pass the preliminary tests as well.
Its not enough to merely give* the

University of Florida, Gainesville

president next Spring, he said.
He seems to have used this as
a machine to the Spring
Election, Holloway said.

Only 23 senators were at the
Tuesday night meeting. Forty is
the required number for a
quorum.
Although there are 70 seats in
the Senate, graduation caused
many vacancies. Tolles best
estimate of the number of
senators in school is 44. So
about 21 senators did not attend
Tuesdays meeting.
Senators still serving terms
must fill out affiliation forms
listing party affiliation and
current address. These are
available from the office of
Legislative Secretary Ed Tolle
and must be returned to Student
Body Vice President Gary
Goodrich.

BETTER JOBS

disadvantaged jobs, says CFA co-director John
McLaughlin. That wont help them keep the
job: they must be prepared and qualified.
Tutors at the CFA located at the Carver
Branch Library are University of Florida
students. Gamma Beta Phi, a campus honorary
and service fraternity is supplying most of the
teachers. Education majors are assisting.
The Alachua County School Board has lent
some unused text books, and local merchants
and civic organizations have donated supplies and
money. Operation Concern, serving in its
capacity of co-ordinator of local agencies, has
helped to contact these people and make the
necessary arrangements.

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RANDY BASSETT
AEPI SHOWERTHON
... trying to break the record

SUSPENSE
Students gather in the TV
lounge of the Reitz Union
Thursday afternoon to watch
the seventh and deckling
game for the World Series.
The game was scoreless
until the seventh inning wher
the Detroit Tigers scored
three. The game ended 4l
with the Tigrs winning the
world championship from th<
St. Louis Cardinals.
For story see page 21.
PHOTO BY NICK ARROYO

America's
Number I
Col toga
Daily

Friday, October 11, 1968

Reitz Union
Board Needs
Poll Workers
Officials for the Oct 17
Reitz Union Board and
Student Senate elections need
precinct workers to man the
polling booths.
Workers will be paid $1
per hour for about ten hours
work while the polls are
open. Interested students
should contact the Student
Government information
desk for applications before 7
p jn. to4ay.



Page 2

* T** Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11,1968

TO HONOR 48

Alumni Chiefs
Meet Saturday

The Executive Council of the
UF Alumni Association meets
on campus Saturday for a
business meeting and luncheon
honoring 48 winners of 1968-69
alumni scholarships.
' wr lH
' /A Wm
PUk $ :W'
STEPHEN O'CONNELL
... to report
Man Assaults
UF Employe
Gainesville police are
investigating the rape of a UF
employe, Thursday at 1:08 a.m.,
in the 800 block of SE Bth
Street.
The employe, a 16-year-old
Negro, told police she had been
picked up on the UF campus
after finishing her night work
there. She said she was offered a
ride to her home but her
assailant, a 24-year-old Negro,
took her out the Archer Road,
threatening her with a pistol. He
then drove back to the city
where he put her in the back
seat and assaulted her.
The accused man has been
arrested and is in the Alachua
County jail pending arraignment.
Alachua Students
Alachua County contributed
2,958 students to the UF
enrollment last fall.

NOW OPEN I
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
AMERICAN WAY
RESTAURANT
1-75 & WILUSTON RD.
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AMERICAN OIL SERVICE STA.
The Florid* Alligator reserves the right to reguuue toe typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible ~
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given tothe Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (I) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for mor* than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May," June, and July when
It is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla., 32C01. The Alligator is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Ofc* at Gainesville.

The session begins at 9 a.m.
in room 361 of the Reitz Union.
Reports from UF President
Stephen C. OConnell,
Association Treasurer W.A.
Gus McGriff of Gainesville
and Association President
William O.E. Henry of Bartow
are on the agenda.
Recommendations for
honorary alumni, who will be
recognized Nov. 2 as part of the
Homecoming weekend program,
will also be on the agenda. Those
chosen must not be graduates of
the UF.
Highlight of Saturdays
luncheon will be the
announcement of the first
recipient of a SI,OOO scholarship
from the association. The award
will go to the student who
displayed the best academic and
leadership record as a freshman
in 1967-68.
UF Student
Wins Grant
Arvid Myklebust, UF
mechanical engineering student
from Hialeah, has been awarded
a SSOO Monsanto Engineering
Scholarship from Monsanto
Company of St. Louis, Mo.
Myklebust, a transfer student
from Miami-Dade Junior
College, hopes to receive a
bachelor of science degree in
mechanical engineering in
December, 1969.
A B-plus student, he is
secretary of Pi Tau Sigma,
honorary mechanical engineering
fraternity, and a member of the
American Society of Mechanical
Engineers and the Society of
Automotive Engineers.

Bob White
fx] President
pd political adv.

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SWEETHEARTS RUSH

Three of the prettier Army ROTC sweethearts
serve up a soft drink Wednesday night in the
Military Building during a rush date. Both Angel

Rhodes Applicants Sou ghl

Applications for Rhodes
scholarships, offering stipends of
approximately $3,200 per year
for two to three years of study
at Oxford University, are now
available to UF students.
Applicants for the
scholarships must be male
citizens of the United States,
unmarried, of junior rank, and
between the ages of 18-24 by
Oct. 1,1968.
UF applicants will be
interviewed by the universitys
selection committee, which will
send the names of two nominees
on to the state selection

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committee. The state committee
will in turn select two names to
be sent to the district
committee, which will make the
final selection of winners.
There are eight district
committees, each committee
naming four scholarship winners
from its district. A total of 32
Americans are awarded Rhodes
scholarships each year.
The selection committees
judge candidates on the basis of
scholarship, character, leadership
and well-rounded personalities.

Flight and Army Sweethearts are currently seeking
freshman, sophomore and junior coed members.

Persons interested in applying
should contact A. A. Murphree,
assistant professor of English
and chairman of the UF
selection committee in room
202, Anderson Hall.
I Counseling Center i
All enrolled students and
their spouses are eligible to use
the services of the University
Counseling Center free of
charge. Faculty and staff are
encouraged to make referrals of
individual students or to consult
with the professional staff
regarding counseling assistance.



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COMFORT
This student studies in the shade of one of the many pines offers an escape from the often-hot fall
trees in the Plaza of the Americas. The shade of the sunshine.

Four More Qualify I
II For Student Senate |

Four students whose names
were originally purged from the
list of eligible candidates for
Student Senate were requalified
Thursday.
Secretary of the Interior Ric
Katz said die students have been
cleared through the Office of the
Registrar and conflicts
concerning grade averages and
required course hours have been
resolved-
Requalifying were John
Gilbert (New Movement),
Towers; Mary Jo Mills

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Bob White Thinks So!
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Other students whose names
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Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

LBJ Hits Nixon, Wallace
In First Political Blast

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Johnson, in his first
outright political speech of the
campaign, attacked Republican
nominee Richard M. Nixon
Thursday as a presidential
candidate who would pull the
country into another cycle of
Republican reaction and
inaction.
In a nationally broadcast
speech in behalf of Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey,
Johnson also assailed third party
candidate George C. Wallace as
a false prophet of fear.
The President spoke on a
broadcast sponsored by the
International Ladies' Garment
Workers Union, devoting most
of his remarks to domestic
policy.
Johnson touched briefly on
the Vietnam war, which he
called a conflict that we did
not invite but from which we
could not run.
He said he had done all that
Illegal Funds
To Justice
Are Returned
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) lt
didn't take long for Supreme
Court Justice Wade Hopping to
return a SI,OOO campaign
contribution to Nathaniel Reed,
Gov. Claude Kirks conservation
consultant.
Reed asked for the
contribution to be returned afte<-
television reporter George
Thurston said Reeds holdings in
a corporation which has a state
liquor license made him
ineligible to contribute to
political campaigns.
Hopping quickly got another
SI,OOO check signed by
Reeds wife. The legal restriction
did not apply to her.
Reed, of Hobe Sound, said he hemade
made hemade the original contribution
without thinking of the liquor
license, which is for a bar and in
a swank club at Jupiter Island.

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he announced he would not seek
reelection and would cut back
the bombing of North Vietnam
in an effort to get peace
negotiations started. He
expressed hope that those
negotiations would produce an
agreement to end the war
within the next few months.
Johnson highly praised the
Democratic ticket of Humphrey
and Sen. Edmund S. Muskie,
nominee for vice-president. He
said they were among the ablest
and most active leaders ever to
serve the nation.
Picking up a Republican
slogan, the President said,
Nixon is the one who cast a
tie breaking vote to kill an aid
for education bill in the Senate
while serving as vice president in
the Eisenhower administration.
He also said Nixon is the
one who once said Medicare, a
program enacted during
Johnsons administration, would
do more harm than good.
The President also attacked
Nixon for seeking delay in
Senate approval of the treaty to
prevent the spread of nuclear
weapons. Johnson said delay
would jeopardize acceptance of
the pact by other nations to
the lasting detriment of world
peace and to our own American
society.
He said the GOP candidates
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for president, vice president and
congress had promised to
dismantle what had been built
under Democratic
administration
Theyve proposed nothing
more or less than to pull this
nation downward and to pull it
back into another cycle of
Republican reaction and
inaction, Johnson said. And in
doing so, they really promise to
pull America apart.
He led into his comments
about Wallace by saying there
were harsh political voices
trying to divide the American
people.
The man who stood at the
school house door, defying the
law. is now pretending to be the
apostole of order, the President
said in a reference to Wallaces
attempt to prevent integration at
the University of Alabama.
He said he doubted that
many Americans would be
swayed by empty rhetoric and
violent appeals to motion.

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IN VIETNAM
Aid Spending
Called Wasteful

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
Controversy continued this
month in the U.S. Senate over
the attributes of the State
Departments Agency for
International Development,
(AID), a group that recruits and
sends civilians to work in
Vietnam. Sen. Stephen M.
Young, D-Ohio, has lambasted
the agency claiming there is
evidence many officials of AID
are selling cigarettes, whiskey,
radios and other commissary
merchandise to the South
Vietnamese.
Tribute Paid
By Alumnus
Special tribute will be paid to
47 UF Alumni Scholarship
winners and their parents during
a noon campus luncheon
Saturday in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
William O.E. Henry, president
of the Alumni Association, and
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will be featured
speakers at the luncheon.
Scholarship recipients were
selected by local alumni club
committees, based on
outstanding academic
achievement in their respective
high schools.
Among the winners, 43 are
from Florida, 2 from Georgia,
and 1 from New Jersey and
Virginia.
FSU Initiates
Problem Hearing
Seven subcommittees, dealing
with student problem areas, have
been set up by Florida State
Universitys special Committee
on Student Affairs.
The committees will start
public hearings this week to air
grievances and to consider
changes in all areas of student
life, according to Chairman
David F. Dickson.
Dickson, assistant professor
in the College of Law, said the
committee, with student,
faculty, administration and
alumni representatives, will
disband when its final
recommendations are made to
FSU President John E.
Champion in the winter quarter.
We dont intend to replace
any of the existing groups on
campus, although we will work
very closely with all of them,
Dickson said.

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Young also attacked what he
called exorbitant salaries and
fringe benefits the AID officials
are receiving.
AID is the agency that has
contracted four UF professors
faculty members to strengthen
the University of Saigon College
of Architecture as well as set up
graduate exchange programs in
agriculture between the two
countries.
Figures showed that the AID
director in Vietnam receives
more than $44,000 annually; 28
officials-$42,000; 82 received
$35,000; 262 were paid
$30,000; 409 were getting
$24,000 and 76 more than
$19,000 annually.
There was strong anti-war
sentiment in the Senate
opposing spending such
manpower and money in an
undeclared war effort.
Platts talent hunts have made
Florida a prime scouting grounds
the past two summers. The AID
program is the agency that has
recruited four UF professors
agriculture professors to
strengthen the University of
Saigons College of Agriculture.
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Friday, October 11,1968, The Florida AWfrtor,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator. Friday, October 11, 1968

Page 6

Albert's Cage
Being Moved
For Safety
After 9 years in the same cage
beside Century Tower, Albert
the Alligator is being moved.
Thomas Carnes, organizer of
the move Albert committee,
said it had always been intended
that the mascot would be
transferred to the Reitz Union
when it was completed.
The rivalry the UF has
created with other schools puts
Albert in danger and the Union
is a better spot for him, Carnes
said.
Albert V is the sixth alligator
to serve as UFs mascot, and the
fate of Alberts of the past
counted heavily in the decision
to move him to the Union area.
Carnes said Albert V would
either be placed in the Union
pond or in a park area to be
developed around the pond. In
either case, he will be in a cage.
The ducks in the pond are
not in danger, he said.
Cames said the move should
be completed this term and
could cost anywhere from SSOO
to SI.OOO.
Projects
Featured
Starting next week, a regular
column in the Alligator will
feature student and
university-sponsored projects
which need volunteers.* Types of
skills needed, and who to
contact will be listed under the
name of each project.
Information may be
submitted to Caron Balkany in
the Alligator office.

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FOR UNITED FUND

AEPi Holds Showerthon

Youre going to be one of
the damnest, cleanest bunch I
know, said Dean Frank Adams
at the kick-off banquet for the
AEPi Showerathon.
The Showerathon was
originated by Don Kahn, Todd
Kliston, and Ron Waldorf in an
attempt to break the record of
306 hours presently held by the
University of Oregon. They will
try to raise money for United
Fund.
Approximately 85,000
gallons of water are expected to
be used during the 15 day
period.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor had prior
commitments and was unable to
stay for the ribbon cutting
ceremony, so Robert Treweek,
the 1969 campaign manager of
United Fund, did the honors.
The total goal for United
Fund this year is $250,000. The
campus provides about $50,000
and the teaching hospital about

SIB,OOO. Between the campus
and the teaching hospital this is
approximately 30 per cent of
the total goal, Treweek said.
Roger Davis and Mark
Peewee Schwartz were the
first brothers to step under the
shower. Actually, they sat down
on a chair placed inside a
bathtub with a show nozzle
attached. Schwartz even brought
his soap.
For 350 straight hours the
brothers and pledges plan to
alternate shifts of two and three
hours, but always making sure
that at least one person is in the
shower at all times.
Donations will be accepted
by the AEPis and the Little
Sisters of the Golden Lion for
the next 15 days. Spectators
may also place contributions

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/A'
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A CENTRALLY LOCATED A QUICK EFFICIENT
RESTAURANT SERVICE IN ELEGANT
A TEMPTING ARRAY OF SURROUNDINGS
? EL i2 us F i??P. A relaxing atmosphere
A TOP LEVEL BUFFET A VIEW OF THE CAMPUS
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BY HOWARD POST

mside the cannister alongside the
shower on the front lawn of the
AEPi fraternity house.

WALLET PHOTO SPECIAL
20 morosroit $1.50
Made from your
negative or print.
1232 W. UNIV.
376-7657 1

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.



Marriage, College Life Subject Os Study

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Are you planning on getting
married or do you have
friends who are?
It may surprise you to know
that almost one out of four UF
students are married. This
includes both graduate students
and undergraduates.
About 1,60 G married and
single students will be selected
next quarter for a part in a
three-year research project on
Marriage and College Life, being

Veterans Hosted
At Home Games

The UF Veterans Club IT
treating 32 patients from the
Veterans Hospital in Gainesville
to a UF home football game.
Jim Hollis, president of the
Veterans Club, said members of
the club were sponsoring 8
patients to each of the 4 home
football games.
Student Government and the
Athletic Department worked
with Hollis in getting the
patients admitted to the games
on date tickets.
The entire cost of the project
is being absorbed by members of
the Veterans Club, either
through dues or donations.
The patients attending the
games are selected by doctors at
the Veterans Hospital who
determine who is physically able
to attend.
Hollis said they decided on
this type of project after
sponsoring patients from the
Naval Hospital to the

[BBBBB#BeB#BOB CBBBeB^BBBBBBBBB^BBBWBOB^BeBBBeB^BSIBBBABSIBeB
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Offers Three Groups For j
GRADUATE STUDENTS j
1. One's Personal Faith The purpose of this group will be to allow members to evaluate 2
their own past religious experiences in order to locate where they are in their faith and to
come to some understanding of the way in which he got there as well as where he might
move from that point
2. Sensitivity and Encounter This group is to allow one to talk about emotions rather §
than intellect; to discuss feelings rather than thoughts; to face what is, as opposed to what
should be. This type of group has been described as an attempt to meet the isolation of 2
contemporary life as a means of interpersonal growth. 2
3. The Social and Ethical Revolutions The nature of this group is an unstructured but I
eager attempt to discuss on a theoretical and practical level, the causes of revolution in
society today: education, race, poverty, changing values, war. §
The first meeting will be held at 7:30, October 14, 1968, at the Presbyterian University 2
Center, 1402 West University Avenue. If you are unable to attend this meeting and would {
like to join one of these groups, call 376-3851. #
AM AM AM AM AM AMI AM A

conducted by three members of
the UF Mental Health Service
staff.
Financed by a $234,000
grant from the National Institute
of Mental Health, the project is
directed by Dr. Carl T. Clarke.
Dr. Benjamin Barger is
co-director Hall Jr. is research coordinator.
We want to understand
what enables some students to
cope with the problems of being
both students and marriage
partners what makes some

Georgia-UF game on Veterans
Day last year.
This year the guests will sit
in the Veterans Club bloc rather
than on the sidelines, Hollis
said.
The view from the stands is
better, Hollis explained.

I ROBBIES I
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successful and others not,
Clarke said.
Clarke has been accumulating
information on married students
for some time, but actual work
on the project began in August.
He has already found that:
In almost 100 per cent of UF
student marriages, the male
spouses are students.
In only about 15 per cent of
the marriages are the wives
students.
A majority -about 60 per
cent have children.
How will the researchers get
1,600 volunteers?
Were going to have to
appeal to students to volunteer.
We hope to enlist the assistance

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.

of the upper division colleges,
the representatives of the
married villages and campus
leaders, and through our own
contact with married students,
Clarke said.
The project calls for 80
married and 80 single male
students from the ten colleges
which have the most married
male enrollment.
Eight hundred women
subjects will be divided into
three groups: married and single
students from the five colleges
with the greatest female

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Friday, October 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

enrollment and non-student
wives. .. s
The purpose of the study is
not to eventually lower the
divorce rate, Dr. Clarke stressed,
but to add meaning and
satisfaction to student marriages.
What excites me about this
program is the tremendous
opportunity colleges have to
have a part in the long-range
effects of marriages in our
society. The style of a marriage
is set in the first three years
that's when most of the types of
adjustments a couple is going to
make occur."

Page 7



Page 8

K Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Octofaor 11, IMS

The Florida Alligator
/ufljKlMk The price of freedom
is Ihe exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
AM Raul Ramirez James Cook
xecutive Editor News Editor

The Spectator

"A Few Licks

Either the Reds will elect to
fight and get tom up, or theyll
withdraw. Personally I'd rather
see them fight because we owe
them a few licks."
These are the words of one
Lt. Col. Daniel Connelly in
reference to a major drive aimed
at lifting a North Vietnamese
seige of the strategic Green Beret
camp, 25 miles southwest of Da
Nang, Vietnam.
These words indicate the
attitude of many who list their
occupation as professional
military service." It is this
distinction, the business angle of
war, that has led so many
military personel to commit acts
of inhumanity in the line of
duty. They simply felt they
owed the enemy a few licks."
Where does irrational
response end and reason begin?
Is war just like any other
profession? Can we gauge our
success as a nation by showing
annual figures of military
efficiency and net increases over
our competitors?
Take, for example, the grisly
and inhuman body count, which
has become the public relations
tool of the military machine.
Numbers of bodies do not tell
the story in this or any other
war. Issues are the determining
factor.
Psychologists have reported
from Vietnam that many men
are being affected and that there
is cause for serious alarm.
Conversations overheard among
the soldiers have indicated that

Reflections'

Now that the conventions are over, it seems an
appropriate time to add this chapter to Profiles in
Courage.*' And let no one say that it is being done
with mere mundane goals in mind. Moreover, this
tribute is given for our satisfaction in realizing that
W Eugene McCarthy gave us more than just his name
to be placed in nomination.
It is not necessary to agree with his philosophies
or policies in order to afford him this honor. For
this is not a question of political right and wrong. It
is, in essence, a question of courage.
It was Dante who said, the hottest places in hell
are reserved for those who, in time of great moral
crisis, maintain their neutrality. It was not the
manner of this man, in our time of need, to embrace
any such lukewarm position. Senator McCarthy,
acting not as an ambassador from Minnesota, or the
tool of any pressure group, but as a United States
Senator, took not to the antiseptic Senate floor,
but to the littered city streets to bring his cause to
the people. With the coolness of a television
reporter and the eloquence of a poet, he brought a

sfiy Stephen Robitaill

New Profiles Chapter Needed
.

involvement in this conflict has
led many to react as dogs in a
back alley fray, not as rational
human beings fighting in defense
of an issue in which they
honestly believe.
Americans are by nature
competitive. They do not like to
lose. It is assumed that if we are
ever defeated in a social conflict,
we should retaliate with the best
punch we have. Unfortunately
this process has been extended
to military tactics where lives of
innocent people are the residue.
Many argue that man is
inherently militaristic and war is
simply another social institution
of the species Homo Sapiens.
Statements such as that offered
by Lt. Col. Connelly give some
credence to this Neanderthal
assumption.

| Alligator Inquizitor | 1
I By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
IG'momin I have a big announcement to make. Somewhere 5' J ?\
this quarter we will have a trivia contest in which there will be : yVV A awj
difficult questions and prizes. Watch for it. > J /
And watch for these: : j / I
1. Who was Horatio Alger? $ j \ I / ( *1 \ /v I \
2. Can you name the present Pope and his three predecessors? | [ \%\ \ I\ \\
3. Who was the famous atheist who got the Supreme Court to -I. c /jrrJ Jr \t\
make the decision banning prayer from schools? | gtf-wwwnj s
4. Who was the Mayor of New York before Lindsay :!
5. Who was Charles Shepherds vice president? i \
6. Is fertility rite? rjSTm l wv / \
Quickly to yesterday: g I In J iV
1. Adam West, Burt Ward 2. Samson 3. Georgia Tech 4. She S 1 Hfil I \
gave her father 41 5. Junior & C y( I- \ \
Sing to your girl today. g \ / LJ
And I thought you were one of those kookie abstract artists.

EDITORIAL

Freshman Student Senator Scott
Holloway, an idealist who believes in
representative government, was angered
Tuesday night when considerably less than
half of the Student Senate bothered to
attend the meeting.
So Mr. Holloway called for a quorum.
And Student Government business came
grinding to a standstill.
Holloway may have shown political
naivete, but he wasnt the real culprit.
The call would never have been necessary
if the rest of the senators who are still
students here had cared enough about the
people they were elected to serve to find out
when and where the Senate was meeting
and to be there.
Secretary of Legislative Affairs Ed Tolle
claims there are a number of problems
during the first weeks of classes in
contacting senators.
Tolle notes that some senators have
graduated, flunked out of school or
transferred to other universities Also, he
says, some senators dont know whether
they are still members because of the UFs
system of summer replacements for absentee
senators.
Tolles points may be well taken, but
they hardly justify the fact that a
considerable numbers of senators simply

new era to American Politics and earned the
nickname of Clean Gene.
It would certainly be foolish to say he loved the
public more than himself. It was, instead, his great
sense of purpose, his self confidence, and his
unmitigated integrity which forced him to follow
what at first seemed to be an attempt at political
suicide.
In the few short years since John Kennedys
death this country has seemed to have forgotten the
quality of courage that may be brought to political
life. Even taking into account the gaps that exist
between our generations, it is indeed a sad
commentary on the total population when they
now fail to insist, en masse, upon the quality of
courage that was prevalent such a short time ago. It
was McCarthy, however, who pushed his skiff
alone from the shore and sought neither a
politically tenable nor a materialistically practical
position.
It was McCarthy who did not rise above his

Do They Care?
A

could not care less.
We submit that if students who are
elected to the Senate cared about serving th C
people who elected them, they would make
any effort necessary to attend regularly
scheduled Senate meetings. y
If they cared, they would be anxious to
do their part in trying to provide meaningful
goyemment for the students of thh
university.
If they cared...
But they dont. At least 21 of them
apparently didnt care last
Tuesday.
They are:
Don Goodman Howard Foster
Sharyn Hackney Bob Glenn
Stewart Hershey Jay Howell
Karen Johnson Jeff Weil
George Miller Armistead Neely
Robert Moore Elizabeth Padron
Becky Pierce Elvin Phillips
Tom Blackman Bob Sftyder
Ronnie Bloom Pat Tidwell
Susan Erb David Tullis
Perhaps some of them had legitimate
excuses. But our bet is that most of them
simply didnt care.
If apathy is away of government for
these representatives, then perhaps the
students who elect them should consider a
different system for replacement of
absentee senators.

principles into a state of placid myopia. And it was
McCarthy who was the embodiment of Carlyles
statement, the courage we desire and prize is not
the courage to die decently but to live manfully.
In the political sense, time may do him justice;
but in the very least his name will weigh heavily in
the balance of our history as a man who walked
steadfastly towards the national interest. And
someday they may say of Eugene McCarthy what
they said of other courageous men, They came,
they left their mark, and this country was not the
same because these men had lived.
~ The ~
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida
under the auspices of the Board of student Publication!
Editorid. Busin**. Advertising offices in Room 33, Rein.
Ution. Phone Ext. 2832
Opinions expressed in the Honda Alligator are those of
he editors or of the writer of the article d not thoae o#
he University of Florida."

By Bruce Greer-



TO YOU FRESHMEN WHO HAVE NEVER
HAD A PROG HERE IS A SAMPLE FOR
PRACTICE GOOD LUCK:
1) color green is
a) red
b) orange
c) green
d) blue
2) Who did it?
a) Shakespeare
b) Homer
c) The Kind, Old Man
d) None of these
3) George Wallace
a) Stands up for America but not for Its a Grand
Old Flag.
b) Had his VP picked two years ago, but he was
assassinated in Memphis.
c) Doesnt wear sunglasses because his eyebrows
block the sun.
d) Secretly wants to make a McCleanss commercial.
4) Which of the statements below comes closest to
this one: Time is nigh, but life is hereafter?
a) Jack Frost holds his nose high in the air.
b) Are you lonesome tonight?
c) Hair grows faster in the Winter.
d) Sarah Blottum writes for the Hargrove Press.

Fight For Freedom

MR. EDITOR:
I wish to answer Mr. Spizios
column ROTC is Military
Madness. Mr. Spizio does not
feel a college man is
accomplishing something by
fulfilling his military obligation
as an officer.
It would appear to me that a
leader of men could quite
possibly be of more service to
his country than a follower of
men; providing, of course, our
college man does wish to serve
his country. Mr. Spizio
apparently does not wish to
participate in a system according
to him That trains people to
kill for peace.
Let us analyze this statement.
I am sure that very few military
men enjoy killing.
Unfortunately, at times this is a
necessity. I think we might
rephrase Mr. Spizios statement
to freedom belongs only to
those who are willing to fight for
it.
Our system of government
certainly could use a few
changes. But I say it is still the
most democratic system on the
face of the earth. It would not
be here today if it were not for a
group of men who decided to
fight for their freedom 192 years
ago. These men were called
patriots. Right on down through
the present day patriots have
risen to detend our country in
times of peril.
Mr. Spizio. times are a
changing" in that today we have
nuclear weapons to detend
ourselves. Believe it or not a
Balance of Power does maintain
peace by making it evident to a
potential belligerent that the
cost of agression would be too
high for the possible rewards.
Mr. Spizio, the world is not

The Rational Observer

Freshmen Prog Practice

a changing. Czechoslovakia is
an example. They were gaining
new freedoms but did not have
the military might to defend
them.. The men of the military
are our present day patriots who
keep this country free, so that
democratic change may take
place.
JOSEPH M. WEHBY
U.S.Savior
MR. EDITOR:
In these times of violence,
corruption, and moral decay few
Americans recognize the perUs
facing their nation. A small
minority of hard core
Communists have subverted the
basic institutions of our society.
Those who would undermine the
ideals established by our
Founding Fathers have
succeeded in destroying the
respect for law and order and
the American way of life that
existed before 1954. In that year
Earl Warren and his followers
ushered in the .rule of federal
bureaucrats who have destroyed
the common mans right to rule
his own affairs. They are even
trying to turn us away from
God.
There is one man who has
shown concern for the average,
hard working, God fearing
American.
This man is George C.
Wallace. All true Americans
should work and pray for tbi*
God fearing man who is not
afraid to stand up for America.
It's time to stand up for
America. He's not afraid. Are
you?
MIKE LEE. 4 AG

5) Sartre, in plebsce prose, recites his surlas in the
padra trokic style.
a) This is obvious in retrospect to cincinnattus
ovagus.
b) Indeed he does!
c) on the other hand, begs to receive
sarsantipulously, his palpatable dreck.
d) His next trick is even more impressive.
6) Cassius Clay
a) Is found right beneath the red clay in the Georgia
soil.
b) Is tall, dark, and handsome.
c) Could probably beat Stephen OConnell on a
good day.
d) Cleverly calls his period of fighting with the U.S.
Government, the Boxer Rebellion.
7) How long is a mile, true or false?
a) true
b) false
c) a and c, but not b
d) b and c, but not a
e) It depends on the mile.
8) Pineapples grow, but little dogs play. What is
wrong with this statement?
a) If you look hard enough, youll find an
extraneous root.
b) It should read, Play, Pineapples, grow little dog
butts.
c) What statement?
d) Only big dogs play.

OPEN FORUM:
AArt'ixi ml DiatoMf
There is no hope for the complacent man.

MR. EDITOR:
The recent cry of political"
prostitution levelled at leaders of
the New Movement by Student
Body Vice President Gary
Goodrich was the sound of a tired
and run-down politician.
Goodrich has run out of gas
along with the rest of United
Party.
Throughout the democratic
political history- and I would
hope we are at least attempting
to practice the Democratic
at the University of
Florida American political
parties have had to stand for
some kind of idealism. The
Republicans stood for a weak

Hill
jj§| mm w

United Party Out Os Gas

By Lewis Rothlein

9) Which quote can you attribute to Elizabeth
Singrow?
a) none of these except maybe one
b) all of these
c) a and b
d) Death is a sad thing"
10) Salvo:
a) s last name is Dali.
b) that wasn't very funny.
c) -mation is the name of the UF iood service.
d) b of another question
11) The American Indian can see fifteen stars in the
cluster Andriedes, while the average American
can sec only five.
a) Well, goody-goody for them.
b) This is why they are living on reservations today
c) So, 1 once knew a man who could see 11 of them.
d) Which goes to prove that for every Indian, there
are three Americans.
12) Ursela Andress
a) Has a different image than Doris Day.
b) Has quite a distinct image.
c) Cannot see her feet.
d) Cannot see the ground she walks on.
e) Sometimes gives a false impression.
0 Can go without water for three days.

central government. The
Democrats would have more
government to help the people.
But the real government is
somewhere in between.
What do Goodrich and the
new United-First-Forward Party
coalition stand for? Apparently,
it is only a political bargain. If
Goodrich can explain his charge
that the New Movement is
trying to pull the wool over the
students' eyes with their
idealism kick and show cause
why its leaders should he
labelled political prostitute." I
would be most happy.
I believe in the Democratic
Process and the idea that each

Friday, October 11. 1968, Tha Florida Alligator, I

individual should have a say in
his government no mattei how
idealistic that may seem. I am
supporting the New Movement
because it is dedicated to the
proposition that each student
should have a say in a
representative of Student
Government.
If what is described above is
the kind of "idealism Goodrich
is talking about, perhaps it is
time for him and the rest of the
Uniled-F irst-F orward Party
coalition to get out ofSG.
TIM STHRLING
Tuition Hike
MR I DITOR
I appreciate your courtesy
and accuracy in both the
editorial and the story by Dave
Reddick in the Florida Alligator
on September 2b concerning a
propos'd advanced in tuition
lees. I should like to add only
one .hing that Mr. Reddick
omitted from his story and
which mav have led to the last
two paragraphs of your editorial.
I si led to Mr. Reddick that I
would oppose any tuition
increase which did not carry
with it the funds to aid those
who would otherwise be
pre.i idcd by that increase Irom
ecei\ u* in education.
RORI.RI li MAI 1/

Page 9



), The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

Page 10

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

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just about anything of equal value.
Call 376-7439. (A-3t-14-p)
Wm. S. Haynes Flute Solid Silver
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62 TR3 Roadster rebuilt engine, new
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cash for expenses $450 call
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Ace out! Make sense out of your test.
One new set of Collier's
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Better than a tutor. Can even outwit
the prof. Call 372-5463 after 7 pm.
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BSA 1967 65occ excellent cond.
Helmet, tools & megaphones come
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GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
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For hunting season 22-cal marlin bolt
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condtion S3O call 372-3749 ask for
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196 7 Triumph-500cc, like new
condition, only 3000 miles, trailer
included. Call 376-4167 after 6:00.
(A-4M2-P)
1966 Honda s9O 4000 miles excellent
condition helmet & mirror included
$225 or best offer call m ross
378-5744 or 372-9479 ask for
mickey. (A-st-13-p)
Zenith 14 inch portable TV in good
condition but must sacrifice for
studying time-only $35.00 at 216
NW 3 Ave or call 376-1005 after 1
pm. (A-11-st-p)
Nikkorex F F 2 Auto Nikor, F 4
200mm Auto Nikor Lunasix never
used all cases, multiple acces. SSOO
value best offer 376-7326 8-10 p.m.
(A-2t-15-p)
Private book sale: Bntanmca, Great
Books, paperbacks (signet, penqum,
etc), Buy 10 & 1 free, after 4:30
273-7 Schucht Village, 378-7124.
(A-st-15-p)
SPOTS BEFORE YOUR EYES on
youi new caipet remove them with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-15-lt-c)
| FOR RENT
MUST SUB-LET: Finish lease on a
two (2) Bedroom Apt. m a Desirable
and Convenient location Next to
the V.A. Hospital and Medical
Center. Move m today-Oct. lent
paid. Can 376-9668 between 9:00
a.m. and 6:00 p.m. for further
information. (B-15-ts-c)
Spaoious l-bedroom Fully Furnished
including washing machine. Within
walking distance to Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357, 378-0641.
(Bif9c)
Peter Pan Motel Williston Fla. Just 20
min. from Gainesville. SB.OO, 2 pers.
Twin Beds. Also 8 x 38 trailer for
sale SISOO Call 528-3941.
(B-13-3t-p)
Show Tam >|
I 30 Fenur*
mSSm I
I color

WANTED 1
:*i*:*>x.x.-.v.w.xK-:.x.x.x.v.v.w.-:*:-wi-
One Female Roommate to share Ig.
apt. with one other girl 37.50 mo.
125 NW 10 st. ar 5 Charlene.
(C-st-11-p)

derosa
JUL l STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
KKwnv-H
BSbHLB SiadbTodcuf
"GRACEFUL
AND WICKED!
QUITE BEAUTIFUL
v nues
TACTCI MiChEIE MORGAN
IHO I L S MICHEL PfcCOLI
-tetter, rut new route* PiERRE CLEMENT!
CATHERINE DENEUVE
Benjamin Tkf DiAKYOfAH iNMOcenrr Youmg Bar I
|n ,i *,Hkjij,
fi( < >.t Lhl s!fcS'-'
JACQur.S DjFiLHO
522 1:30.3:30.5:30.7:30 9:3d
V __ 1 LIFE MAGAZINE
9
M7R 1 < 11 I
( IM> w* *o*
SIEVE MCQUEEN =3 5
C ICHIRO ATTENBQROU6H RICHARD CRENNA
* CIHDICF RFRRFN filmed in panavision*- color BY DELUXE
SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES 2;oo .5:15.8:40

WANTED |
>: .. v.;,?
Desperately need place to stay for
married couple homecoming
weekend. Will pay. Phone 376-9529.
(C-3t-15-p)

[ Rocking Chojr___/Tw?n\J M
WilklHli 1 1 1:00 3:09 5:19 7:34 9:49
[ 1015 N. W. 13th St. \AZJ
I Carson McCullers searching and sensitive story of
, iih | ni
jrQfeHeart is Hunter |
M3|kll3|Mi X, J 2:40 4:54 7:08 9:22 f |
I Downtown Gainesville (
1:30 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:30
| JAMES HENRY |
I SIESTA!
I Firecreek... you came here to get buried
or hide from life or do your chores I
from sunup to sundown.
When Larkin and his killers came, I
nobody expected Firecreek



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;r. fTOi*w.v,w>v.v,v.vw
I WANTED I
?' *
? g f l ? to y| y In. IW* Cessna 205
la V y d rt>,tt g*- Inexpensive. Call
Wit Pittman at 378*5184 attar 6om
IMfclW pm
One coed to share 2 bdrm. apt
French Quarter apt. 72 call 378-9934
iMtfUw after 4 p.m. (C-3t-14-p)
Mature male roommate needed for
Landmark Apt. Call 378-0674 after
J:00 p.m. (C-3t-15-p)
Elem. teacher needed: Inquire
Haynes Brabham, Bell School, Bell,
Fla. phone 463-2196. Elementary
certificate required. (E-15-3t-p)
Memberships are now available for
triangle flying club. Low cost flying
with premium equipment. Cherokee
180 with full gyro panel, dual
nav-com, aof, auto-pilot. Please call
378-2431 for further information.
(C-st-11-p)
WANTED: Good full coverage
helmet, preferably metal flake, but
white will do if helmet looks good,
call Dale, 372-9410, rm. 206.
(C-2t-14-p)
Attractive co-ed to cook for four,
male grad students. Call 372-2182
between 5 and 7 p.m. (C-st-l 1-p)
I HELP WANTED
V *'
Secretary wanted for the period Oct.
15 Nov. 25. No experience
necessary. Apply in Student
Publications office or Seminole office
after 3:30 p.m. (EtfBnc)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50 for 1
hour session, must be native english
speaking and have normal hearing
please call Harriet Wilkerson, ext
2049. (E-st-11-c)
Models for commercial photography
write Liggett Enterprises PO Box
1011 Gainesville. (E-st-12-p)
WANTED: Someone artsy-craftsy"
who enjoys climbing ladders,
crawling under counters, full-time for
low pay and long hours in a
frivolically fun environment. If you
dare-inquire within: The Party Line,
Gainesville Mall. (E-13-st-p)
Immediate openings for part time or
full time male personnel. Better than
average salary and good chances for
advancement. Now interviewing from
3pm to spm daily. Apply in person,
ARBYS Restaurant 1405 S.W. 13th
St. (E-2M3-C)
WNTEOi Student JoumiMl
IfiUtted to accuracy and
oM activity. Gain valuable expeihwaa
with the nations top coltaa* dam
wash at the canter of caaMMf
activity, pay availiabla for
MMortenced and Jiard-worttfftf!
raflWi and desk men. The Florida
mmmm. Room 330, Relt> union

WANNA GROOVE?
THE WHITE RABBIT -- THATs'wHERE
THE ACTION IS!!
OVER 21 BRING YOUR OWN BOTTLE!
UNDER 21 YOURE STUCK DRINKING ALL THE
PEPSI YOU WANT FREE
The Sound Brought To You By
NOAHS ARK (unicorn horn)
Bring Your Date And This Ad And
SAVE ONE DOLLAR on the admission fee I
THE WHITE RABBIT
809 W. UNIV.
Ph 372-9222 -376-0011

HELP WANTED I
Boy or Girl--Cashier-Clerk Wanted
full time. Morning or evening shift
Call Mrs. Rowley 378-1001 for appt.
(E-13-3t-p)

TWU SAT. 3:00 SOO 7M 900 *2O S
Iff JUUUS CAESAR 1
imm h MARLON nkm iames mason MMWy
U EBON! nW OIUIBANSON Hi Ww >
rsUN-HON OCT
ItUES-WED OCT 15-16 ... INGMAR BERGMAN'S "VIRGIN SPRING'J
SAT OCT 17-19 ... INGMAR BERGMAN'S "THE SILENCE" J

REITZ UNION THEATRE A.
wi>*n m south*-* Chtitomth unit utttu*nt City stu I have ever made!"
"ALFIE meets SHIRLEY l
I GO
I TELLTHE -Ml jKgElip&f
II ENDING- .MW. Hr jM ; J : : : :
II its too H ?P^pJ
II tokeep 3 Ml 17 ALFRED .
SI SECRET! ml m HITCHCOCKS > J
I I/i- M TheUxte" ; 4f*j
4881 y ** TECHNicoLo/r
SHIRLEY MICHAEL
II MacLAINE raises CAINE I
gambit
TECHNICOLOR. Kty!MH
I HERBERT LOM-roger c carmel Arnold moss 'UuscbyWimajMS I
Scnmfebi JOUW*SedU*S*ttin FromaStnbSDKYCMVU W '
ftreaed b) HMD KM Produced by liO l FUCHS Unwrsal Pttm £Bl
FRIDAY OCT. 11 7:00, 9:30 PM. SATURDAY OCT. 12 7:00, 9:30 P.M.

HELP WANTED
% *
Wanted: coeds to sell and distribute a
new line of products part time.
Training will be furnished. Call
481-2370 after 4 p.m. (E-15-st-p)

Iladies drinks I
I DANCE TO THE MUSIC I
I of RICHARD PARKER and I
I the SWINGING WITNESSES I
I =WED. thru SAT. 9PM-2AM I
I LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE I
I 1 N.W. 10 AVE. Phone 3784636 I
rKEEPIi^OUa^M'H*GATO^DVERTISER^^

Friday, October 11,196 H Tlw Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I AUTOS 71
1960 Corvair automatic transm.
Radio and heater. New paint for
$175.00 See at Pridgeons
Automotive & Body Work 12 sw
Deport Ave. 372-3480. (G-10-st-p)
Porsche for sale 59 Roadster 1600 N
In fine shape already inspected best
offer takes it call evenings 378-6540.
(G-st-l 2-p)
FUN CAR! 1966 Triumph TR-4A
IRS. Light blue with white top and
tonneau. A good car at a reasonable
price Call 372-1C39. (G-st-12-p)

the florida cinema society presents
'WEEKEND
a danish drama of discontent, lack of values and
alienation among young married couples
best film award, 1963 Copenhagen festival
Sunday, oct. 13 union auditorium 7:15 & 9 p.m.
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
-U GO tO n
ll l| p| £
o|£?*so 52
| >
5
___ z
f
Q
Ol A W N M
a a a a a r?
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<< <><< 3
" VI VI VI wt M
o, . 5 4
- 3 * 2
ga S S SO

a a a ~ 2
R R 8 £
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c c c
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TO
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£ >
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ro
HH HH

VV.V#V.V.V.V.V.%V.V/.V.%v.*.v.v.w.w.wv
AUTOS |
1965 Shelby GT3SO. 289C1D.
4-speed, AC, full instruments,
competition suspension, 2-seat
model, new tires, new paint.
372-9474 ask for Susie. Room no.
16. (G-4t-9-p)
JEEP 1963 4W D S7OO or make an
offer. Call 546-2428 after 6:30.
(G-14-2t-p)
Volvo 1225, 1965 Air, new brakes,
coil new clutch, new Dunlop tires, no
body damage, one owner $1450 Call
378-0159 or 378-7124. (G-13-3t-p)

AUTOS
1963 Ford Fairlane 500 black and
white w. red int. 6 cyl. r & h very
good cond. best offer, call Ruben
378-6874. (G-st-11-p)
Corvette-1967 maroon coupe 390 hp
air cond power disc brakes-power
windows and steering AM-FM radio.
Good condition 372-7070 after 6.
(G-st-12-p)
Full race tuned exhait system for
corvairs. Fits all models except turbo
charged. Looks wild, sounds bad,
increases performance. Ed 378-7803.
(G-3M5-P)
1963 Austin Healey 3000 Mark II
radio wires overdrive heater 3 tops
wide oval tires. $1250 2157 NW 9th
Ave. 378-8884. (G-4t-15-p)
VW 1965 Sedan Excellent condition
FM radio $950, 378-3284.
(G-15-3t-p)
PERSONAL
j
Your Personal Poster Headquarters,
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
incense peddler, far-out clothing
experimenter, blacklight dispenser to
the world, has just received a large
shipment of INDIA PRINT
BEDSPREADS in both twin and
double bed sizes. Drop in and pick a
couple out while the selection is
abundant. 10 SW 7th St. just around
the corner from Santa Fe JC.
(J-15-6t-p)
35 months of happiness-why stop
now? Im willing to forget past-are
you? I hope we have many more
elevenths, do you? I'll wait for your
answer! (J-lt-15-p)
GIRL WANTED TO cook evening
Meals Mon.-Thurs. for PRE-Med
students. NO dishes. Call 372-6884
Olympia Apts. 201. (J-13-4t-p)
DAVID: I miss you and love you
very much. Remember the future is
ours. I trust you. S. (J-14-lt-p)

******'** *******
* Keep In Step Read the Alligator
4- 4
#**#*#****#** 4 ¥#*##*******4*
(Act of October 23,1962; Section 4369, Title 39, United States Code)
1. Date of Filing: October 10,1968.
2. Title of Publication: The Florida Alligator
3. Frequency of Issue: Mornings Monday through Friday except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and durina
student holidays and examination periods.
4. Location of known office of publication: Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz
Union, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
5. Location of headquarters or general business offices of the publishers-
Flor'da 33 32601 Wayne ReitZ Uni n Universit y of Florida, Gainesville,
6. Names and addresses of Publisher, Editor and Managing Editor:
Publisher: Board of Student Publications, Room 330. j Wavne Reit*
Union, University of Florida 32601. y Z
Editor: Harold E. Aldrich, Jr., 244-B Flavet 3, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32601. y r 'aa,
Managing Editor: David Doucette, 503 NW 21st Lane Ant 3
Gainesville, Florida 32601. P
7. OWNER: The University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601
8. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owninq or
holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or
other securities: None. s
9. Extent and nature of circulation:
Average No. Copies Actual No. Copies
Each Issue During of Single Issue
Proceeding 12 Months Published Nearest
A. Total No. of Copies Printed Fi,in9 Date
(Net Press Run) 16,941 20,000
B. Paid Circulation
1. Sales through dealers None None
and carriers, street
2. Mail subscription 64 83
C. Total Paid Circulation 64 83
D. Free Distribution (including
samples) by mail, carrier or
other means 16,763 19,748
E. Total Distribution
(Sums of C and D) 16,827 19,831
F. Office Use, Left-Over
Unaccounted, Spoiled
after Printing 114 16g
G. Total (Sum of E & F
should equal net press run
Shown in A) 16,941 20,000
I certify that the statements made by me above are. to the beet r.*
my knowledge, correct and complete. of
B. G. Myking
General Manager

PERSONAL
For all our friends who cant get in to
Antonys on the weekdays we are
now opening on Sundays from 11:00
a.m. to 7:00 p.m. (J-2t-14-p)
| lost A FOUND I
LOST CONTACT LENS Were
contained in a small white case.
Campus vicinity. Reward. Call Chris
376-8553. (L-3t-13-p)
Lost black kitten with flea collar in
407 NW 15 st. 5 months. Call
378-8507 after 5:30. Reward.
(L-13-st-p)
SERVICES
The Teddy Bear Nursery will be open
for Florida football games. Hours of
operation will be 7:00 am until 6:00
pm. Night service for all home games.
Contact Mrs. Townsend at 376-0917
or 3 7 2-4021 for reservations.
(M-2t-4-D)
Child care during ball games, iviy
home. SI.OO per hour. Also, 1 or 2
children regularly day or week. Price
accordingly. 1826 NE Bth St.
372-3823. (M-2t-15-p)
ALTER NATO RS-GENERATORS RS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical
STARTERS-Electrical RS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical systems tested
repairs. Auto electric service-603 SE
Second Street 378-7330. (M-10-ts-c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt-11-p)
For all our friends who cant get in to
Antonys on the weekdays we are
now opening on Sundays from 11:00
a.m. to 7:00 p.m. (M-2t-14-p)
Rubys Alterations has moved to
1126Vz N.W. Bth St. 376-8506.
(M-14-2t-p)

WEEKEND
DOINGS
By DAVID CHAFIN
1 Alligator Staff Writer
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
SORORITY OPEN HOUSE:
Alpha Epsilon Phi house,'
tonight, 9 til 12. Band: Certain
Amount. All boys invited.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
BRUNCH AND SWIM PARTY:
11 a.m. brunch, at Hillel
Foundation, 12:30 p.m. swim
party, at Lake Wauburg, Sunday.
Meet at Hillel Foundation, then
after brunch drive out to
Wauburg.
Hillel members free, others
50 cents.
COLLEGE LIFE WEEKLY
MEETING OF CAMPUS
CRUSADE FOR CHRIST:
Sigma Kappa Sorority House,
Sunday, 9:15 p.m. Ander
Crenshaw, third year law
student, speaks on Charisma of
Christ.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
MOTION PICTURE
DISCUSSION: Baptist Student
Union, tonight at 7. (This
discussion centers around
discovering religious experience
in the secular. The first movie
to be discussed is Tea and
Sympathy, a study of
masculinity.
REITZ UNION DANCE:
Union Terrace tonight. Band:
Styrofoam Soul. Dance begins
at 9.
DEDICATION OF LIFE
SCIENCES BUILDING:
Reception, rooms 122,123,121
of the Union, tonight at 9.
CHESS TOURNAMENT:
Two tournaments, amateur and
open, also casual games, tonight,
room 118 of the Union, 6:30.
ART EXHIBIT: First floor,
Constans Theatre, Sunday, 2:30
p.m.
AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION STUDENT
CHAPTER: Organizational
meeting room 349 of the Union,
tonight at 8.
MENSA: Room 150 G and F
of the Union, noon today.
FLORIDA FOLK
DANCERS: Room 214 of the
Florida Gym, tonight at 8.
MUSLIM STUDENTS: Room
122 of the Union, today at
12:30 p.m. and Sunday in room
357 of the Union, 2 pjn.
SHARE COUNCIL: Room
349 of the Union, 9:30 a.m.,
Saturday.
LATTER-DAY .SAINTS
FIRESIDE DISCUSSIONS:
Mormon Student Center, 1220
SW sth Ave., Sunday night at 7.
F. Lee Bailey
Here Tuesday
F. Lee Bailey, nationally
known defense attorney from
Boston, will speak in the Reitz
Union Ballroom at 8 p.m.
Tuesday.
Bailey, who has served as
defense attorney for Dr. Sam
Sheppard, Dr. Carl Coppolino
and the Boston Strangler, has
appropriately entitled his
program The Defense Never
Rests.
The address is sponsored by
the Forums Committee of the
Reitz Union Board for Student
Activities. Admission is $1 for
University students, faculty and
staff and 51.50 for the public.



WAIT FOR REASON, FAIRNESS TO PREVAIL
UyjftL? n !LMcke Second Court Nomination

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Johnson gave up the
fight Thursday to name a new
chief justice to succeed Earl
Warren before he leaves the
White House.
Eight days after he withdrew
his appointment of Justice Abe
Fortas for the job in the face of
a Republican-led filibuster, the
President issued a statement
saying he would not submit
another nomination to the
Senate.
He said it would be best if the
77-year-old Warren defer hi}
retirement plans and remain on
the high court until

Collins Backs De-Escalation,
Calls Gurney 'War Hungry*

JACKSONVILLE (UPI)
Democratic U.S. Senate
candidate Leoy Collins called
his GOP opponent, Ed Gurney,
war hungry Thursday and
claimed his proposal to escalate
the Vietnam war was contrary to
the position of all three
presidential candidates.
C a mpaigning in the
Jacksonville area, Collins
charged that Gurney wants to
escalate the war and make more
war. Shocking as it sounds, he is
war hungry.
The Democratic candidate
said all three presidential
contenders now agree that the
Vietnam war must be
de-escalated and de-
Americanized.
JUST OUT!
; *%?,.
famjitis
The Hll-neui
1968
gqcrihpiis
& CAREER
RRAURIi
The in guide to groom grooming
ing grooming and grooving for the
college man-in-the man-in-theknow
know man-in-theknow and on-the-go.
With such features as:
Your Fall/Winter
Wardrobe: Whats In.
Choosing A Career:
The Right Job For
You.
Gary Beban: Is The
Heisman a Jinx?
Tips on Shaving, Side Sideburns,
burns, Sideburns, & Beards.
Co-Ed Roommates:
Extra-Curricular Cam Campus
pus Campus Capers.
A Post-Graduate Dis Discourse
course Discourse With Dustin
Hoffman.
NOW ON SALE FOR $1
at newsstands and lead leading
ing leading mens stores, or
send $1 to: GQ Campus
& Career, Dept. N, 488
Madison Avenue, N.Y.,
N.Y. 10022.

UPI
NEWS
emotionalism subsides, reason
and fairness prevail.
This was an obvious reference
to the Senates refusal to
confirm Fortas, his old friend
and confidant, to be Warrens
successor. The President
withdrew the nomination at
Fortas request, as well as that of

Every professional opinion,
the platforms of the political
parties and the personal
positions of the three
presidential candidates are now
agreed that the invasion
proposed by my extremist
opponent would be an

Two kinds of men
make good CPAs.
1. Guys who like to have a boss.
2. Guys who like to be the boss.
| If he wants to, a CPA can join almost
j any kind of business. Or a large ac-
I counting firm. Then he'll have a boss.
Or he can start his own practice
! and work for himself. Then he'll be
t the boss.
;
Or he can form a partnership with
j other CPAs. That way he'll be one of
; the bosses.
I You can select courses that will
; help you earn your CPA certification
! soon after college graduation. Or you
!
; can do graduate work. Ask your sac sac;
; sac; ulty advisor about it.
You may wonder if you have the
right temperament. Being able to
work with all kinds of people helps. So
does an ability to analyze and solve
diverse problems. (A CPAs work
these days is seldom routine.) And
you should be the kind of person in
v/hom people can put their trust and
confidence.
.
/7 >*

another triend. Federal Judge
Homer Thornberry of Texas, to
become an associate justice in
Fortas place.
In asking to retire, Warren
noted he would stay on as chief
justice until his successor was
confirmed. The Senate rebuff to
Fortas left both on the Supreme
Court in their usual seats when
the justices opened the courts
new term on Monday.
Johnson expressed regret that
the filibuster had prevented the
Senate from voting on his
nominees.
In ordinary times, I would
feel it my duty now to send

extremely disastrous move,
r ollins said

Bob White
[X] President
pd. political adv.

another name to the Senate for
this high office. I shall not do so
now, he said.
Johnson, who leaves office
Jan. 20, commented:
These are not ordinary
times. We are threatened by an
emotionalism, partisanship and
prejudice that compels us to use
great care if we are to avoid
injury to our constitutional

I STAK*SHAK i
| Student Special
* (With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88t Steakburger I
Luncheon And Any 15 < Dri n k I
| $1.03 Value Only 85{ plus tax
I Steak n Shake I
1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I

Friday, October 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

system.
Our distinguished chief
justice has indicated Ins
willingness to serve until his
successor qualifies. Under the
cirumstances, the foundations of
government would be better
served by the present chief
justice remaining until
emotionalism subsides, reason
and fairness prevail.

Page 13



Page 14

I, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

C CTO ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND
JL JL JLefL and NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SHV!C
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR ~W~ y * TT ~W~ I I fTVT
E:ss J3LXJE BU-LlLiB 11IN

- Administrative Notices

CPS 121 PROGRESS TEST will
be given Thursday, Oct. 17 at 7
p.m. All CPS 121 students are
expected to take this test and
each must bring a No. 2 lead
pqncil and will be required to
use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
Students whose last name
begins with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D-E) to Little 113,121 or
125; (F) to Little 201,203,205
or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102,112 or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205 or 208; (l-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215, 217 or 219; (M)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, 237 or 239; (N-0) to
Anderson 104, 112 or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS:
Scholarships for Oxford
University for approximately
$3,200 per year for two to three
years. Must be male citizens of
at least junior standing between
the ages of 18-24 on Oct. 1,
1968. Apply to Professor A A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 23.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST will be given Nov. 9,
1968, Feb. 8, 1969, April 12,
1969, and Aug. 2, 1969.
Registration forms and fees must
reach the Educational Testing
Service, Law School Admission
Test, Box 944, Princeton, NJ.
08540, at least three weeks
before the desired test
administration date. Forms may
be picked up at the Registrar's
Office and the College of Law.
V--
The Association of Women
Students currently is accepting
applications for the offices of
first vice president, recording
secretary and freshman
representative. Applications are
available from all A.W.S.
representatives, the Intarhall
Office (3rd floor Reitz Union)
or the Dean of Women's Office.
Applications must be returned
no later than Oct 11. Elections
will be held Oct. 17.

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Cfedlt. Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance mi ~
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
Call ext 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan. 14
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION fR*
Slh Av rn will* CQfHTof 12a Stwt Hour*: 800cun. -330 pjn.Mondoy through Friday

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 11:
MONSANTO ChE, ME, IE,
EE, Chem. Juniors for summer
employment.
TENNESSEE CORP. CE,
ME, ChE, EE.
GENERAL DYNAMICS
ELECTRONICS DIVISION
EE, ME, IE, Math, Computer
Sci., Acctg., Finance.
VITRO LABORATORIES
EE, ME, Math, Physics.
BURDINE'S Acctg., Gen.
Bus., Ind. Rel, Ind. Mgmt, Mktg,
Finance, Lib. Arts, Advtg. (Dec.
and March grads).
AMERICAN HOSPITAL
SUPPLY CORP. all majors.
RICH'S, INC. Bus. Ad, Lib.
Arts.
CHARLESTON NAVAL
SHIPYARD Engrs, Physicists,
Metallurgists.
UNITED STATES
GENERAL ACCOUNTING
OFFICE Acctg.
GILMAN PAPER CO.
MCGRAW-EDISON (Power
Systems Division).
ARTHUR YOUNG & CO.
Acctg.
ELECTRONICS
COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
OCT. 14:
ARGONNE NATIONAL
LABORATORY Chem,
Physics, Rector Physics, Physical
Metallurgy, Math, EE, ME, NE,
MetE. Dec. and March grads.
BELL TELEPHONE
LABORATORIES, INC.
Doctorate level in physics, chem,
math, metallurgy, EE, ME, Engr,
Physics.
COMPTROLLER OF THE
CURRENCY Bus. Ad, Acctg,
Econ, Banking or Finance and
law.
UNITED STATES GYPSUM
CO. ME, EE, IE, ChE, BC,
Acctg, IM.
STONEROCK,
HOLLINGSWORTH &
SIMONET Acctg.
SHELL COMPANIES
Acctg, Mgt, Insurance, Finance,
Econ.

RADIO CORP. OF
AMERICA computer systems,
sales training program, engr, sci,
bus, lib. arts
JOHN HANCOCK
INSURANCE training
programs, sales & sales mgt,
summer actuarial training
program.
RADIATION all engr,
acctg.
GENERAL TELEPHONE
CO.
AMERICAN POTASH &
CHEMICAL CO. CE, Chem,
Bus, Ad.
BURROUGH'S WELLCOME
CO.
M.A. MONTENEGRO & CO.
REGISTRAR'S DEADLINES:
Oct. 18 is the deadline for
making a college change from
Lower Division to Upper
Division or from one college to
another. This deadline also
applies to applications for
post-baccalaureate status. Any
student graduating in Dec. and
who wishes to continue in
school must file an application
for either post-baccalaureate or
Graduate School studies. Oct. 25
is the deadline for applying for
Graduate School. Dec. 1 is the
deadline for applying for the
College of Law for the 1969
Spring Quarter. Applications
may be obtained and returned to
room 33 Tigert Hall.
GENERAL NOTICES
STUDENT FEA: Dr. Eugene
Todd, Chairman of Secondary
Education, will speak to the
Student FEA meeting Oct. 15,
at 8 p.m. in Norman Hall on the
topic "The Politics of
Education." Everyone is
welcome.
KAMPUS-KHANA: On Sunday,
Oct. 13, the Gainesville Sports
Car Club will hold a parking lot
gymkhana in the New
Engineering Complex parking
lot, across Radio Road from the
Reitz Union. Entry fees for the
Kampus-Khana are $2 for sports
car club members, and $2.50 for
non-members. Registration and
practice from 10 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Drivers' meeting at 12:45
p.m. and racing starts at 1 p.m.
Course Marshalls are Ed Alberi
(372-9876) and Bill Kaiser
(372-2292).

Campus Calendar

Friday, October 11
Mensa Meeting, 150 F & G
Union, 12:00 noon.
Football Film, 150 C & D
Union, 12:00 noon.
Young Republicans Membership
Drive, Service Booth, 9:00
a.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 6:30
p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00
p.m.
Union Movies, Gambit," Union
Aud., 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Dedication Life Sciences Bldg.,
Speaker: Dr. Stanley A. Cain,
McCarty Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Student's Chapter, American
Civil Liberties,, Union, 349
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing, 214 Fla.
Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Dedication Life Sciences Bldg.,
Reception, 122 Union, 9:00
p.m.
Union Dance, "Styrofoam
Soul," Union Terrace, 9:00
p.m.
Saturday, October 12
Life Sciences Bldg., Dedication,
Constans Theatre, 12:00 a.m.
Football, Tulane vs. Univ. of
Fla., Florida Field, 2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "The Birds,"
Union Aud., 7:00 and 9:15
p.m.
Sunday, October 13
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Brunch, 11:00 a.m.. Swim
Party, 12:30 p.m.. Camp
Wauburg.
Broward Hall Leadership
Meeting, Union Aud., 1:00
p.m.
Program Office, Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.
Art Exhibit Reception, Constans
Theatre, 2:30 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship Meeting, 355
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Meeting,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society Movie,
"Weekend," Union Aud.,
7:15 and 9:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation, Shemini
Atzeret, 7:30 p.m.
Pi Sigma Alpha, symposium, 349
Union, 10:00 p.m.
College Life Meeting, Sigma
Kappa House, 9:15 p.m.
Latter-Day Saints, Fireside
Discussion, Latter-Day Saints
Student Center, 1220 S.W.
sth Ave., 7:00 p.m.

Monday, October 14
U.S. Army Recruiting, Games
Area, Union, 8:00 a.m.
State Pharmacy Board Exams,
MSB Aud., 8:00 a.m.
Tau Chapter of Alpha Phi
Omega, 361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Union Board, Dancing Lessons,
245 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Fencing Club Meeting, Basement
Rec. Room, Fla. Gym, 7:00
p.m.
Florida Cicerones, General
Meeting, 123 Union, 7:QO
p.m.
Semper Fidelis Meeting, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Self Defense
Lessons, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Tuesday, October 15
U.S. Army Recruiting, Games
Area, Union, 8:00 a.m.
State Pharmacy Board Exams,
MSB Aud., 8:00 a.m.
Simchas Torah, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies, Luncheon, 233
Union, 12:00 noon.
Angel Flight Interviews, 356
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma Meeting, 362
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Scientist Meeting, 356
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons,
150 C Union, 7:00 p.m.
Project SAMSON Meeting,
Union Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Expectant Parents, "Preparation
for Childbirth" Classes, MSB,
Room M-203,7:30 p.m.
Program Office, Beginning Oil,
C-4 Union, 7:30 p.m.
University Dames, Welcoming
Coffee, Home of Mrs.
O'Connell, 7:30 p.m.
Tau Beta Pi Meeting, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Forums: F. LEE BAILEY,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, 347 Union, 8:00
pm.
Program Office, Charm Classes,
363 Union' 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept., Faculty Concert:
Samuel Teeters, piano;
Clementine White, harp,
Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Cabinet
Meeting, 123 Union, 4:30
pjn.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Forums Committee Speaker, F.
LEE BAILEY, $ .75 for 1.D.,
$1.50 for Faculty, Staff and
General Public, and also tickets
for the Florida Cinema Society,
SI.OO.



| Bax To Speak Here






p:?


|||
B
||
l JAMES A. BAX
: :
;} Economic Opportunity Director
S
X<
Frosh Dropouts: The Exception

Freshman dropouts are
becoming the exception rather
than the rule at UF, according to
Thomas A. Graham Jr., assistant
registrar.
Statistics for the 1967-68
school year have not been
officially validated for
publication yet, but the statistics
for 1962-1966 show a drop in
freshman withdrawals of 2.3 per
cent.
In 1962 5.2 per cent of the
freshman class withdrew while in
1966 2.9 per cent of the frosh
class withdrew.
Graham said the reasons for
the significant drop in
withdrawals of freshman were
many.
On the whole, the
University of Florida is getting a
better student every year. This
fall the average freshman had a
Senior Placement Test score of
420 out of a possible 495. said
Graham.
He attributed the guidance
counselors in the high school
and the improved high school
curriculums as the reasons for
the more prepared freshman of
today.
High school seniors are
advised by their guidance
counselors about their chances
at a large university and. if
necessary, advised to attend a>
smaller college or a junior
college for the first two years of
their post-high school education.
Mrs. Ann Henderson, senior
guidance counselor at Gainesville
High School, said it wasnt so
much that the high school
graduates were getting any
better as it was that the
university's entrance
I
Mid-year
grads...
FIR is
coming!

, |
Fconnmt n dircctor of Govein r Kirk's Division of 5
i sssrs -addressanopcnmeetins i
y
hoject Student Concern, which serves as a liaison between ;jj
Us students and community activities, will be the topic. With J
Bax will be Perker Meeks, also of the Governors Office, who $
las co-oidinated Operation Student Concern with its larger
sponsor, Operation Concern. $
x
Operation Student Concern serves as a link between students x
and local anti-poverty agencies.
Operation Concern has been helpful in the development of
pioject SAMSONs tutorial project. It has published an
information brochure lor SAMSON and has helped coordinate $
student tutors. g
Volunteers are needed for all Project SAMSON tutorial S
piograms in local high schools. The public is invited to attend
the SAMSON meeting at 7:30 p.m. on the third floor of the §
Reitz Union. H
I;

requirements were becoming
higher.
The minimum requirements
for entrance at UF are 300 on
the Senior Placement Test ar.d
an overall B average in high
school. Florida State University
requires a 350 score and a B
average for first quarter
freshmen.
Although 300 is the
minimum score for acceptance
at the UF, Mrs. Henderson said,
we usually will recommend
students who make below 350
on their test to consider a
smaller college or a junior

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college before applying to a large
university like Florida.
Mrs. Henderson added the
students biggest complaint with
the junior college was they
considered it too much like high
school.
Graham said many people
had asked him about the effects
of the quarter system on

I Bob White
X] President
pd. political adv.
BMaBaBBHiHHBaHHBHaaHaMaHa

VINING. NEW EDITOR

Florida Quarterly
Now Organizing

The Florida Quarterly has a
new editor, Dan Vining who is
filling the post in replacement of
last year's editor, Mike
Mahoney.
Vining said the main
objectives for the magazine are
to develop an image, increase
distribution to be regularly
state-wide, and increase student
participation.
Vining also hopes to change
the general organization, he said.
Previously, there had been an
editor with four associates
responsible for the poetry.

freshman withdrawals but said
with the facts at hand no one
could effectively compare the
withdrawals under the quarter
system with the withdrawals
under the trimester plan which
was used from 1962-1 %6.

VAN HEUSEN
417 VANOPRESS SHIRTS
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British Accent!
The British are coming... and campus patriots
couldnt be happier! Colorful British cluster stripes
and checks from Van Heusen are buttoned-down
in new Stay Clean fabric permanently pressed for
a wrinkle-free appearance. Further fashion features
include authentic York button-down collar and V-
Taper fit for the slimmer, more modern look. For a
little bit of Britain in a lot of shirt, check out a new
Van Heusen 417 today!
VOTE
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The college man with a colorful imagination
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from Van Heusen . the front runners with richer,
deeper fashion tones! Even the new stripes and
checks are strong candidates in their bold mas masculine
culine masculine color accents. New Stay Clean fabric keeps
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for every active 8.M.0.C. Stop in... cast ycur ballot
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Friday, October 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
anwi
SAL ES-SER VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4873
P

prose, articles and art
departments. Each department
will now be headed by two or
three individuals and the editor
will have an assistant.
Students interested in
working on the staff are asked to
come to the Quarterly's office in
room 336 of the Union where
they may till out an application.
Those wishing to submit
material are asked to take their
work to room 207 in Anderson
Hall,

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

Characters Invade Paper

By JOHN PARKER
Alligator Campus Life Editor
City Desk.
Hello. Do you have
someone there that goes around
and picks up little stories and
interesting things to put in the
paper?
Yes, we do.
Well, could I talk to one of
them please.
Im one of them,
Oh. Well Ive got
something down here that you
might be interested in. See,
theres this guy down here at the
Shell Bar whos painted this here
mural on the wall. Hes a real
interestin fella and he paints
real good, and I thought you
might like to come down and
take some pictures and talk to
him. Hes got a real uiusual
philosophy of life and
everythin. He just goes around
painting murals and things and
thats all he does. Like I say, hes

THOUGHTS

By CYNTHIA OBOLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Sorrow is an endless joy. Who said that? Stevie? It was on
that painting he did and gave to his mother. But she doesnt
believe it. Nothing he says is believable anymore.
I understand that painting now. Dark, wild, frightened colors
in the background. And two hands, winding together, not really
outstretched, just there. Beautiful within themselves.
No arms, though. Alone, cut-off. Stevie. I cant say alienated.
Everyones said that, until the word hasnt gained connotations
but only lost meanings. Maybe just amputated is the word.
Is sorrow really an endless joy? Does Stevie remember what
sorrow feels like? He told me once, Drugs dont do anything
much ... mind expansion is just so much bull. People who talk
about expansion and enlightenment and revelations are
rationalizing. The only thing drugs do is just make you feel a
little bit better. Thats all. But now when he tells me hes
having a blue day he laughs. Blue cheer and blue morphine.
Before he stopped painting he gave me one of his poem
paintings to help me in my weakness. A nude, like Gauguins.
Vital, but serene. The words are almost invisible, but I know
theyre there and I can read them. They were written by
Ferlinghetti: The world is a beautiful place to be born into if
you dont mind happiness not always being so very much fun.
The words are right, and Stevie was right when he believed
them. But now he has fun playing with oblivion, yet l think
happiness has become too abstract for him. Not as real as a
needle, or a cap, or a tab. And I cant believe in his reality
anymore.
We used to share one reality, Stevie and I. No one
understood our reality, but it was a gentle world without the
violence of Stevies speeded-up world of today. That summer we
had our jug band. Sitting on the beach at night, Stevie playing
spoons, me playing kazoo, Walt on the twelve-string, and
whoever else passed by singing or just plain stomping. Coney
Island Washboard. Good-time music. Moths, and quiet waves,
and quiet joy. The world was a beautiful place to be born into,
and happiness was even fun.
Happiness for me isnt so much fun without Stevie. I guess
fun isnt too happy for Stevie since he's still looking everywhere
for it except within himself. But hes living inside a crystal ball,
and I cant believe in his reality anymore.
Free V \ /Mr Live Band
Set-ups \ \[p

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Dance to the sounds off NOAHS ARK
Age minimum 18
50c OFF ADMISSION
WITH THIS COUPON
Oct. 11th and 12th
Doors Open 9p.m. till 2a.m.

real interestin to talk to, and
you might like to do a story
about him for the paper.
Well, he sounds like a very
colorful character.
Oh, he is. Not too many
left like him. Just travelin
round painting murals for a
living. Nossir. Not too many like
him left. Real colorful
character.
Well, do you know how
long he will be here? Are you a
friend of his?
Im him.
Oh, I see.
What I mean to say is, I
figured you could send someone
down for a interview and print
the story in the paper ind you
fellows would get a real
interestin story and I get a little
mention out of it and that way
everybody benefits. See? So if
you could just send someone
down to the Shell Bar tomorrow
about 10 oclock for the

interview and pictures. Do you
take pictures?
No, not me personally.
Well, thats OK. I've got
some you can use.
No, 1 didnt mean that.
Weve got staff photographers if
we decide to write the. .
Great! You wont regret it.
People really like to read about
things like this. Real human
interest, you know.
Well, to tell the truth,
Friday is an awfully busy day
around here. I doubt very much
if anyone will be free to come.
Look, this is a real good
story here. There can't be that
much going on then. Just have
someone who's not doin nothin'
to come on down. It won't take
too long. I'll be here at the Shell
Bar at 10 oclock.
Well, all right If there is
no one covering a story at that
time. .
Great. Seeya then.
* *
City Desk.
Hey, someone was
supposed to come down to talk
to a fella here at the Shell Bar at
10. Hes a real interestin guy.
See, what he does, he goes
around painting these murals.
Thats all he does. Hes a real
colorful fella. Not too many like
him left around, you know? I
thought you fellas might like to
come down and...
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Headquarters Meetings Second Week
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Showroom, 7:30 P.M.

Go Caving
Visit Bats
One of the more active and
exciting groups on the campus is
the Fla. Speleological Society
that means caving!
The society was organized in
1952 and for the past 16 years
has been engaged in cave
exploration, mapping, rescue
and conservation activities.
Each weekend and during the
quarter break, members of the
club travel to caverns in Florida,
Georgia and Tennessee.
Emphasis is placed on proper
and safe caving techniques, and
many courses are offered
throughout the year in all
aspects of the sport including
cave diving, photography, safety
and first aid.
The new members were
recently given their formal
introduction to caving by
receiving instruction in rappelling
(going down) and prusicing
(going up) a series of ropes set
up at a local quarry.
Meetings are held each
Wednesday evening, beginning at
7 p.m., in the Union.

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Greek News

ALPHA DELTA PI
The ADPFs received the
trophy for best chapter in the
nation at the National
Leadership Convention held at
Cluber, Indiana.
Carol Still, 1967-68
Homecoming Sweetheart, was
crowned Miss Panama City and
Pam Pemberton was chosen Miss
Camp Wauberg.
Homecoming Sweetheart
candidates for this year include
Donna Betts, Kathy Amick and
Pam Pemberton.
Kristie Koontz is the Theta
Chis sweetheart.
Carol Butler is Executive
Secretary of Gator Growl and
Beth Vann is her assistant.
Kathy Amick is Executive
Secretary for Florida Blue Keys
Homecoming Banquet.
Pam Pemberton is Sales
Manager of the 69 Seminole and
activities editor is Celeste
Hardee.
PHI SIGMA SIGMA
Phi Sigma Sigma carried home
the honors from National
Leadership Conference held at
the University of Illinois this
summer.
The UF chapter won the
National Parents Club Award,
the District V award as
outstanding chapter, and past
president Jackie Jedel received
special recognition.
Phi Sigs are very pleased to
welcome their great new pledges.
KAPPA DELTA
The Kappa Deltas warmly
welcome 35 new pledge sisters
to their home, and wish them a
happy and meaningful
pledge ship.
Under the leadership of

rAt the t
Main Entrance I
GAINESVILLE MALL [
CarmlntUa's <&wak <4 j
O^fA^nlH3i^!l!iol^i
I A Kehx.. JLI j i j -r;r, 41
II fcl""" 1 A" l= i ! I / Hour,: §
1 £ $ i FI H = Sorving Continuous J |
Mij Liu j i^JsLsLiJf
// Gainesvilles Finest ]
If and Most Intimate ]
urn V

Pinkie Plumer, President; Leslie
Cauthen, Vice-President; Debbie
Moschell, Secretary; Becki
Hucks, Treasurer; and Manny
Southerland, Pledge Trainer, it
looks like another great year for
the KDs.
PHI KAPPA TAU
Phi Tau Little Sister Janet
Manheim of DPhiE sorority
represented us in the
Homecoming Sweetheart
Contest.
In the pledge-brother football
game held Saturday at Norman
Field, the brothers were
victorious, as always, in a 24-0
final score.
Brother Randy Williams has
been working as Program
Director for Gator Growl.
Brother Lamar Sawyer is
head drum major for the Gator
Band and has been leading the
spirit and enthusiasm at the
football games.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Lambda Chi Alpha returned
to the University of Florida this
year bigger and better than ever.
Last years accomplishments
included, finishing fourth in
Orange League Intramural
competition and seventh in
scholarship. Three Lambda Chi
Little Sisters were entries in the
Homecoming Sweetheart
contest.
To kick off another
successful year. Lambda Chis
have added an excellent new
pledge class.

NOTICE- 1
Camp WAUBURG
Closed At 12 pm
ON FOOTBALL SATURDAYS
Oct. 2, Nov. 30 Nov. 2

HUMOR

Titus Oates Citation

This weeks award goes to
Cynthia McFarland, 2UC, 6-3
and 220, for perserverance in the
face of adverse circumstances.
Miss McFarland, a Broward
Hall resident, was arranged as a
blind date for one Clemson
McCool, 3AG, a frat man and a
fine quarter-miler.
On the night of the arranged
meeting, Clemson pulled up to
Broward in his 6B Black and
Gold GTO. No expression
showed on his face when he met
Miss McFarland. He calmly
walked her to the door, stepped
out into the fresh air, let out a
horrifying shriek, and broke into
his powerful sprinting stride.
Although Clemson set a
blistering pace, Miss McFarland
caught him just under the bell
tower. Not only did she win a
four-year track scholarship and a
spot on the mile-relay team, she
also set a new school record of
46.9 in the 440.
Say It With
.Mr Ads

With Clemson tucked firmly
under her left arm, Miss
McFarland commented, Hes a
pretty fast Til dickens, but no
endurance. Aint he cute?
Asked his side of the affair,
McCool explained, I should

mm |
PANTS AND JACKETS
p r Cords.
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JBpK] Matching Jackets
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BABY CARE PRODUCTS
DAILY 8:30 AM-10PM SUN. 1 PM-10 PM
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376-2568

'MtirdcuXX iOMC Mi

have known what to expect
when somebody told me not to
give her any chicken bones
because they would get stuck in
her throat. I didnt believe them.
But when she started baying at
the moon, I knew it was all
over.

Page 17



Page 18

t, Tl Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

BmlH

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
UFs art collection is now on
display at the University Gallery.
This exhibit, which was opened
to correlate with President
OConnells inauguration,
includes a majority of the art
owned by the university.
Although there are many
items of interest included in the
show, it is still a disappointment.
In the introduction of the
booklet announcing the exhibit,
Mr. Roy C. Craven, Jr., director
of the gallery, states: This first
showing chosen from the
University's embryonic Fine
Arts collection is a moment of
excitement and pride but, if we
are honest, it is also a moment
of disappointment.
Pride to see that a number
of significant works arc already
present in the collection, and
excitement to know that several
generous patrons have recently
enriched our holdings with fine
and important gifts.
Disappointment comes with the
realization that these good and
varied works become quite
meager when we remember they
must serve a Twentieth Century
university with an enrollment of
nearly 20,000 students.
At every orientation address,
alumni reception and
commencement exercise, the
audience is repeatedly told that
the UF has the distinction of
being the cultural center of the
South. Certainly the visual arts
should be included as a part of
this vast amount of culture we
ave at our disposal. However, if
this collection is an indication of
our resources, perhaps the UF is
a little off center.
. Amid a myriad of woodblock
prints, engravings, etchings and
lithographs, a few art pieces
stand out.

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"PRAVATI"
. . part of University Exhibit
Six engraved pages from
Brevis Narratio carry an
interesting historical note. While
Fort Jackson was still in
operation near the present site
of Jacksonville, Florida, a
French artist named LeMoyne
drew several color sketches of
tile American Indians.
In Frankfort, Germany in
1591. these sketches were made
into engravings for a book by
Dery. This means that UF has
in its possession the first art
work from America other than
that done by the native Indians.
The voluptious bodies in the
engravings have a look that
reminds one of Rubens work.
This is explainable since
LeMoyne saw the Indians
through his French art trained
eyes and later, Dery added his
own European touches to the
scenes.
The Rubbing House: New
Market, an oil painting that is
probably the most valuable piece
in the exhibit, was done by John
Wooten. This art work, donated
by Ms and Mrs. Marshall C.

Sewall, usually hangs in the
Presidents office.
Mr. George P. Bickford, an
international traveler and art
collector from Cleveland. Ohio,
presented most of the Indian
work to the university that is in
the show.
The statue, parvati from
South India, was given to the
University in 1966 by Mr.
Bickford. This work is from the
seventeenth century and is made
of bronze. It is from a collection
of six statues that Were once
carried on trips in India as
religious pieces.
A distinctive piece of work in
the exhibit is Jacques Callots
Miseres et les Malheurs de la
Guerre. This engraving was
done in 1633. The scene is of an
intensified battle strewn with
mangled men and unmerciful
killing. Callot conveys the
violence without color and with
only one facial expression by a
victim.
Although most of the work in
this show was donated and only
the inexpensive pieces purchased
by the university, it does contain
a start toward an art collection
of which a state-supported
institution can be proud.
It is indeed unfortunate that
most of the work will be
returned to a storage room after
the show.
Across the street from the
new Florida State Museum to be
constructed soon would be an
excellent spot for the art
museum UF needs and will soon
demand.

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HILLEL FOUNDATION FESTIVALS
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nu
; ;.o: :

'
; ;
;
,
'

i-:fy
SjaSS
.
. ..
.
SALLY KLINE SEEMS BORED
... with Jay Laner in "Barefoot In The Park"
WITH NEIL SIMONS PLAY
Little Theatre
Opens Season

Barefoot In The Park
opened last night at the
Gainesville Theatre. This
hilarious comedy by Neil Simon
will play Thursdays, Fridays and
Saturdays through October 26.
Directed by Tom Godey, this
first play of the 1968-69 season
features Sally Kline and WDVH
disc jockey Rob Sharkey as
Corie and Paul Bratter. These
newlyweds are living in an
ancient fifth floor Manhattan
apartment.
Other members of the cast

FICTION
Airport Arthur Hailey.
Couples John Updike.
True Grit Charles Portis.
Testimony of Two Men
Taylor Caldwell.
Red Sky at Morning
Richard Bradford.
Topaz Leon Uris.
Preserve and Protect
Allen Drury.
Heaven Help Us! Herbert
Tarr.
Vanished Fletcher
Knebel.
Myra Breckinridge Gore
Vidal.
NONFICTION
The Money Game Adam
Smith.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
425 W. UNIV. AVENUE
INVITES STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO
SERVICES OF WORSHIP
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Early Worship 8:30 a.m. Chorale (College choir) 5:00 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.' Vesper Service 6:00 p.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Snack Supper (free) 7:00 p.m.
Seminars and Training Umon 7:30 p.m.
-FREE BUS TRANSPORTATION-
fs~,yor~g end School! ors Worship) Colleve Choi, Practlc.l
1 and Evening Worship |
The Bus Leaves at I
I Mallory Hall. 3,10 10,25 EOT EST
. 10:27 MayOct. Nov.April |
I Broward Hall 9:12.
o.vc 10:30 4:45 p.m 3:45 p.m.
Jennings Hall 9:15 __
I Q 9n 10:35 4:50 p.m 3:50 p.m.
| Hume Hall 9:20
. Frat Row 9 = 23 10:38
Tolbert Hall 9:25 -*-*-*-*-*-' * 10 40
| Cafeteria (west) 9:30. .* 10.45
Murphree Area 9:32 I
a in ..10:50 4:55 p.m 3:55 p.m. I
1 c 11:00 5:00 p.m 4:00 p.m. I
Arrives at church 9:45 0
19 .1 C 8:30 p.m 7:30 p.m.
I Return to campus 12.
*

Best Sellers

include Yvonne Dell (7AS) as
the bouncy Mrs. Banks, Cories
mother; Jay Lauer as Victor
Velasco, a likeable freeloader
who likes mother; Jay Gebhardt
as the amused telephone repair
man; and Dr. Herb Schweyer
(Chemical Engineering) as the
confused delivery man.
Early reservations are
essential and must be made by
telephoning the theatre. Curtain
time is 8:30 p.m. and all tickets
are $1.75 each. The theatre is
located at 4039 NW 16th Blvd.

The Rich and the
Super-Rich" herdinand
Lungberg.
Iberia James A.
Michener.
Between Parent and Child
Haim G. Ginott.

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Danish Drama Planned

By Cinema Society

Weekend, is a Danish
drama of the lack of values
among young married couples.
This film will be presented by
the Florida Cinema Society
Sunday night at the Union
Auditorium at 7:15 and 9 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents.
Swedish director Jorn Donner
calls Weekend an accurate
and vibrant analysis of relations
between people. . the most
interesting Danish movie in
many years.
The film, winner of the 1963
Copenhagen Festivals best film
award, concerns several young
married couples who meet for a
weekend at a summer resort.
They meet, talk, start to eat and
drink.
Then comes Saturday
night, writes Donner, when
conventional reticence begins to
dissolve and hidden emotions
come to the surface. After ftiis

THE
PRE DATE DROP
JUST ONE
FRESHENS
i
Binaca
CONCENTRATED GOLDEN BREATH DROPS

FOR THIS SUNDAY

night of truth, happiness and
despair, comes the explosion,
the inescapable settling of
accounts between friends.
In a review of the film, Time
magazine has stated:
Weekends underlying
seriousness emerges in one crisp
scene, in which an elderly couple
stops in to say hello, and stays
for lunch. As the aged innocents
chatter amiably about the idyllic
days of their own youth, the
chasm between generations sets
the young hosts fidgeting. One
by one, guiltily, they drift away.
The point is neatly stated.
Next Sunday the Cinema
Society will present

The Yellow-Billed Wordpicker
doesn't write words.
It helps you remember them.
V;>
: .;.. I
m3sl i B
v' %> %oS^''
.*-. /ja^BWfflKsXa{S6|BS^^'-
.s>;
:'S'sS^^^^BSK^^Rpi£v''-''
;A iv£gj^^^Hu^^^^^^HHss£p£v
vis
y'jfeto^MasSw^SsTOi|^B^^v'--.
, .ijjag
-
14jifl^:^^^HpifiF'
Wordpicker is a marking pen
that pinpoints names, gleans words, and
highlights them all in bright yellow. You dont
use it to write down the words you have to
remember. You use it to write over them.
The Yellow-Billed Wordpicker.
It reminds you how smart you should be.
And for 49c, you shouldnt have to be
reminded to buy one.

Friday, October 11,1968, The Florida Aligator, I

Tumbleweeds, the last film by
Americas first cinema cowboy,
William S. Hart. The remainder
of the FCS schedule: Oct. 27
Les Liaisons Dangereuses by
Roger Vadim; Nov. 3 The
Historical Underground from
the Bell & Howell experimental
film series; Nov. 10 Nights of
Cabiria by Federico Fellini;
Nov. 17 Zazie by Louis Malle;
Dec. 1 Protest and Politics
from the Bell & Howell
collection.
Student Loans
4,489 students received loans
from UF during the 65-66
school year.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 11, 1968

Albert

By Albert The Alligator

Albert has a headache this week. Parties are great, but not on a
Tuesday night.
Oh: a real fast note. Im happy to report that gatorade cola and
rum is great. The rum kills the dietetic taste, and the whole thing just
turns out wonderful.
Anyway. I didn't keep up the average quite as good as I did my
first week. 12 for 16 is pretty good though, for an inebriated alligator.
Now to the games. First, an upset. The Hurricanes will bounce
back and chew up the LSU Tigers by 6 points. Ted Hendricks, by the
way will chuckle himself to death throwing the LSU quarterback for
20-yard losses.
In other games:
Georgia over Mississippi by 3.1 still havent seen any loose bricks
around the old cage this year. Things are really looking up.
Tennessee over Georgia Tech by 10. How can you tell if a politico
has class?
Alabama over Vanderbilt by 17. His Mommy tatoo will be
spelled right.
Auburn over Clemson by 6. When Marc Dunn got his hair cut, it
cost ten dollars.
Southern Mississippi over Mississippi State by 27 Neal Sanders is
a good guy.
Oregon State over Kentucky by 14 ignore the previous remark.
Theres no telling what it will say after Sanders reads over this page.
Notre Dame over Northwestern by 10 I am really going to lay it
on the first person who tries to move my cage to the Union. I like it
here.
Purdue over Ohio State by 21 Theres lots of juicy ducks in the
Union Pond, but Im partial to coeds.
And, finally, my namesakes will roll over the Greenies by the score
of 38-6.
As evey week, there will be a victory party in my cage for anyone
whos too much under to find a fiat house. This ol Albert will supply
the Alka-Seltzer.

ASK GATOR RAY
ASK GATOR RAY questions
will be taken after the game
Saturday till 6 pm. and on
Sunday from 12 to 3 pjn.
If you have any questions for
Gator Ray on the Tulane-UF
football game call 376-3261,
ext. 2832, the Alligator Sports
department.
Answers will appear in
Mondays edition
Student Tickets
*-*-.*
Each student who pays the
activity fee is entitled to
admission to each home football
game. Reserved seat assignments
are issued at Gate 13 as follows:
AUBURN
October 24, 2:30-8 p.m
October 25,1-5 p.m.
GEORGIA
October 28, 2:30-8 p.m.
October 29, I--5 p.m.
MIAMI
November 21. 2:30 p.m.
November 22. Is p.m.
The tickets are thoroughly
mixed and issued at random so
at any time. Students must
accept the ticket issued. Date
tickets are issued at the same
time.

F. LEE BAILEY
8:00 P. M. TUESDAY OCT. 15,1968
REITZ UNION BALLROOM

Predicts

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We're the students friend, so stop in and save money.
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RENTZ FLANKER. GRAMLING B-TEAM

Gators Go After Greenies,
Playing Games One By One 9

Tulane University comes to
town tomorrow, with three
losses, to try and upset the
nationally ranked Gators.
Tulane has been beaten badly
by Houston and Texas A&M and
edged out, 17-14, by Tampa
University, a small college.
The Gators go into Saturdays
2 p.m. contest with several
changes in the starting team.
Don Gramling, starting
flanker against Mississippi State
last week who quit the team
Wednesday, had a conference
with Coach Ray Graves
Thursday and has been
reinstated. Gramling will be on
the B-team until he works his
way off.
In other changes Larry Rentz
will probably be the starting
flanker with Paul Maliska
playing behind him. Rentz may
also see some action at
quarterback, but Harold Peacock
will be backing up the starting
quarterback Jackie Eckdahl.
Ted Hager has been switched
from his right comerback
position to play behind Guy
FLYING HAWKS, INC.
Flying club has
several openings in
1966 CESSNA 172
CALL 378-8046
or 376-4288

McTheny at split end. Mark Ely
will move into Hager's old
position and Jack Burns will be
at safety in place of Ely.
Sophomore Mike Kelley,
right linebacker, will not dress
out for the game because of a
pulled tendon in his ankle. He
was injured in the MSU game.
Brad Powell will fill in for Kelley
with former B-team player Steve
Ely behind him.
Defensive tackle Terry Morris
returns to action this week, but
he has lost his starting position
to Wayne Griffith who has done
a good job of filling in for him.
The Tulane-UF rivalry dates
back to 1915, with the Gators
holding a 9-6-2 advantage. UF
has won the last seven straight,
Tulane won 27-13 in 1946.
Theyre a team like
Mississippi State and they can
get up, Graves said. Weve
found that, with our offensive
troubles, its best just to play the
games one by one.
The Gator offense has been

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Being with each other, doing things together ... knowing that
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less than spectacular in their first
three games. Eckdahl has
completed 21 of 36 passes for
210 yards. But Larry Smith and
Tom Christian have taken up the
slack. Smith is second in the
Southeastern Conference in
rushing with 255 yards.
Tulane has been averaging
245 yards per game compared to
414 yards for opponents.
Tulane's big punch comes with
senior fullback Nick Pizzolatto
who is averaging 3. yards a
carry.
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15 mins. mins.



By ED SAINSBURY
UPI Sports Writer
ST. LOUIS Mickey
Lolich stopped the St. Louis
Cardinals on five hits Thursday
to pitch the Detroit Tigers to a
4-1 victory and their first World
Series triumph in 23 years.
Jim Northrup provided the
power for the Tiger attack with
a seventh inning triple which
sailed over centerfielder Curt
Floods head after he stumbled
starting for the ball. Northrup
also turned in a ninth inning
single which advanced pine 1
runner Dick Tracewski into
scoring position.
Lolich became the eighth

Sports Car Club Gymkhana
The Gainesville Sports Car Club will hold a parking lot gymkhana
Sunday in the New Engineering Complex parking lot.
Entry fees for the Kampus-Khana are $2 for sports car club
members, and $2.50 for non-members. Drivers will compete for
trophies. Safety inspection and metal-to-metal seat belts are required.
Registration and practice will be from 10 ajn. to 12:30 pan. A
drivers meeting is scheduled for 12:45, and competition begins at 1.
Course Marshals are Ed Alberi and Bill Kaiser.
A parking lot gymkhana is a short auto race, with one car on the
course at a time. The course is narrow and winding to keep speeds
down, placing emphasis on driving skill, cornering ability, and short
wheelbase, and is defined by rubber pylons. The object is to get
through the course in the shortest possible time, while knocking over
as few pylons as possible.
Last years event, Tigert Trials, a gymkhana held in the parking
lot behind Tigert Hall, will serve as guidelines for Sundays event.
THE PEACOCK-lEST
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I asks where you found the melon, the por por-1
-1 por-1 celain blue, the chrome buttercup yellow?
1 Our newest dress shirts are of the pea-
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8 Unlv. Ave. u ; '-ville Mall 8
to H y

Tigers Capture World Series

pitcher ever to win three games
in a World Series and although
he was working with only two
days rest, he fanned four
Cardinals, walked only three,
and allowed only four singles
until Mike Shannon homered
with two out in the ninth for St.
Louis only run.
The Tigers are only the third
team in World Series history to
become champions after trailing
three games to one in a series.
Norm Cash and Willie Horton
singled with two out in the
seventh to put runners on first
and second before Northrup
teed off on pitcher Bob Gibsons
first throw to drive in the first

DETROIT UPSETS ODDSMAKERS

two runs of the game. Bill
Freehan then doubled to score
Northrup.
The Tigers needed no more
scoring to win, but with one out
in the ninth Willie Horton singled
and Tracewski, running for him,
went to third on Northrups
single. After Freehan fouled out,
Don Wert singled to score
Tracewski.
Gibson, taking his second
defeat in nine World Series
decisions, had two record streaks
broken but attained another
record in defeat. He struck out
eight Tigers for a total of 35 for

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the seven game Series to erase
the previous mark of 31 which
he set in 1964.
However, he had won seven
straight series games until
Thursday.
Another record was set when
the Cardinals Dal Maxvill was
put out in his first two
appearances at the plate to give
him no hits for 22 at bats in this
Series, wiping out the old record
of 0-21 held by three men.
It was the third World Series
victory for the Tigers and only
the fourth time in 12
appearances that the Cardinals

Friday, October 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

had lost.
It was the first time the
Cardinals had ever lost a
seven-game Series after six
victories in previous attempts.
The Cardinals had been 17 to
10 favorites to win both the
game and the Series.
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Page 21



Page 22

!. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

SEC Football Teams Improving
Record Against Major Colleges

Birmingham, Ala., For the
first 35 years of existence, 1933
through 1967, Southeastern
Conference football teams won
69 per cent of the games against
other teams classified as
major-college. Now, in 1968, the
SEC is apparently bent on
improving that record.
The first week of the 6B
season SEC teams met eight
schools outside the league and
defeated six of them. The
second week they met six and
won all. A winning percentage of
this type, 85.7 per cent, will
upgrade the 35-year record of
709 wins, 303 losses and 46 ties
for 69.2 per cent.
SEC victims to date this
season include the Southwest
Conference champion, the
Atlantic Coast champ and some
of the nations strongest
independent teams. The
toughest win was LSUs 13-12
edging of Texas A&M (SWC
champ), while Georgias 31-13
lacing of ACC champ Clemson
was possibly a form of family
revenge for the 14-7 loss handed
them by ACC runnerup N.C.
State in the Liberty Bowl last
December. Florida defeated the
Air Force (23-20) and rugged
Fla. State (9-3) and Vanderbilt
upset Army (17-13) among the
major independents. Other
notable victories over teams of
other conferences include
Kentuckys 12-6 win over
Missouri of the Big-8 and those
of Ole Miss (21-7) and Tennessee
(24-17) over Memphis State of
the Missouri Valley.

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All iffator

BACKGROUND REPORT

The two losses to date were
to SMU of the SWC, 37-28 over
Auburn, and La. Tech of the
Gulf States, a small-college
conference 20-13 over Miss
State.
Tomorrow SEC teams tackle
North Carolina and South
Carolina of the ACC and Baylor
and Rice of the SWC. The next
week they catch Oregon State of
the Pacific-8, Miami and
Southern Mississippi of the
long-time independents, and
former members Tulane and
Georgia Tech of the new-line
independents. Later they pick
up UCLA of the PacificB,
Texas Tech and TCU of the
SWC, and independents Houston
and West Virginia.
Tommorrow SEC teams
tackle North Carolina and South
Carolina of the ACC and Baylor
and Rice of the SWC. The next
week they catch Oregon State of
the Pacific-8, Miami and
Southern Mississippi of the
long-time independents.
The SEC holds and edge over
nine of the other ten
conferences classified as
major-college, and the overall
average is 68 per cent victories.
The teams comprising the
Pacific-8, as the Old Pacific
Coast Conference and as the

AAWU, cause the SEC the
greatest trouble. Pacific-8 teams
have won 8 and lost 7 with SEC
teams entering this season. Their
6B meetings are October 12,
Oregon State at Kentucky, and
Nov. 2 UCLA at Tennessee.
SEC teams have won 70 per
cent of their games against
independent teams of
major-college classification.
Divided into the five major
geographical areas of the United
States, the reocrd is: 59.1 per
cent victories against West Coast
teams, 60 per cent against
Eastern Independents, 70.3 per
cent against Southern, 75 per
cent against Southwestern and
87.1 per cent against
Midwestern.
All ten SEC teams have a
winning percentage against
teams outside the Conference
whether playing other
conferences or independents.
Entering 1968, Auburns
21-14-1 record for 59.7 percent
is the SECs worst against other
conferences while Floridas
26-25-1 for 51 per cent is (he
poorest against independents.
Vanderbilt, however, has the
least winning percentage overall,
a. 48-32-5 record for 59.4 per
cent, just under Floridas
70-47-4 for 59.5 per cent.
With Florida and Vanderbilt

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both winning their first two
games of 1968, over Air Force
and Fla. State, and over V.M.I.
and Army respectively, there is a
very good chance that the record
at the close of 1968 will show all
SEC teams winning no less than
60 per cent of the games against
outside opposition, an! the
composite record over 70 per
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HPI SMALL COLLEGE PQII
Tampa Ranked Bth

NEW YORK Tampa, which
completed the transition from
floormat to powerhouse in less
than a full season, burst into the
listing of the top 10 small
college football teams
Wednesday when the 35-member
United Press International Board
of Coaches awarded the
surprising Spartans the No. 8
ranking in the nation.
Upset by the schools dismal
2-7 record last season, which
included four shutouts, Tampa
officials hired Fran Curci, a
former star quarterback at
Miami, Fla., to add punch to the
attack. Curcis success as new
head coach at Tampa has been

Tide Out To Improve Record

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. UPI
Alabama hopes the old theater
adage that if the rehearsal is bad
the performance will be good
proves true when it meets
Vanderbilt Saturday in its home
opener.
Off to its worst start in nine
years, the Tide held a dress
rehearsal this week and found its
No. 2 offense scoring four times
on the No. 1 defense. It was
embarassing, Coach Bear
Bryant said.
It was even more so when it is
noted the Tide has scored but
four touchdowns in three games,
one of them a recovery of a
blocked Ole Miss punt in the
Rebel end zone.
Alabama held Ole Miss to one

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flawless thus far as his team has
put together three consecutive
victories, including a 17-14 upset
of major college Tulane on
Saturday.
The stunning victory brought
Tampa, unranked at any time
this season, into the no. 8
ranking among small colleges in
the nation.
San Diego State. 1%6 and
6'7 small college champion, was
ranked no. I for the 21st
consecutive week, receiving 25
first place votes and 330 points.
North Dakota State took
second, also for the 21st
consecutive week, with five first
place votes and 280 points.

touchdown in the 10-8 loss last
week, but the Vanderbilt offense
may be something else again
Vandy quarterback John
Miller is third in the SEC in the
number of passes completed and
has the best average and the
most yards. His favorite target,
Have r
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if OVERHAULED Soecial
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U:\u.s A&l. tilth last week,
advanced to third with Northern
Michigan and Eastern Kentucky
dropping a notch each to fourth
and fifth. New Mexico
Highlands, which knocked
Adams State out of the top 20
with a 28-6 triumph, moved up
to sixth, and Chattanooga
moving into the no. 7 slot.
Arkansas State. 1 Ith last
week, took ninth with Louisiana
Tech taking 10th despite a
stunning upset by McNeese
State. Tech had knocked off a
pair of major colleges in its two
previous games before dropping
its first small college encounter.

end Curt Chestley, is second in
the conference in receiving and
Chestley missed most of last
weeks Commodore loss to
North Carolina.

U.STB'AR & f>KG.|
'* SUNDAYS
DCCD
(your mJ mm Lb IV On Your Left,
closest weekend 3 MiUs Past Archer
| refueling station) Toward Cedar Key

i VJ
I Three Netters Participate -I
In Southern Tournament I
All-American Armi Neely leads Gator tennis players this weekend
in the Southern Intercollegiate invitational Tennis Championships at
the University of Georgia.
Neely. Jamie Prcssly and Steve Beeland arc among the top college
players in the South invited to participate dedicating the new hard
surface courts at Athens. <
Neeh and Pressly were first team selections on the All-SEC team
last season after the Gators won the SEC tennis crown. Coach Bill
Potter was named SEC Coach of the Year.
l F compiled a season record of 23 wins against one loss.
Neels and Beeland. the Gators' number one doubles team won the
SEC doubles title and reached the quarterfinals of the NCAA's
doubles play before losing to Stan Smith and Bob Lutz of the
University of Southern California.
The Gators placed fifth in the NCAA tournament held at San
Antonio. Tex.

KARATE CONTEST
UF's Universal Karate Dojo
will participate at the 1%8
Open North Carolina Karate
Championships, at King's
Mountain. N.C. tomorrow. UF's
club is a (karateand self-defense
group composed of UF students.
Meetings are at 224 W. Univ.
Ave. five nights a week.

Friday, October 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 11, 1968

- : : zr *~ f~ r ~ r yplg^-,
SCOVILLE NIBS BID TO ARRC >
The Hard-Riding Variety. 4 fB/
The annual American Road Race of Champions is the event that determines the TJ rr T i u '/Sr
National Champions It must be rugged. It must have a gentle f
Datsun driver, Jack Scoville of Corvallis, Oregon has guaranteed himself a bid to a serviceable cavalry twill suiting
the all important ARRC to be held at Riverside in November. His second place -the kind that holds its shape |B|Mr
finish at Continental Divide, Colorado September 29th gave him enough points in wearing after wearing. And we SfJ|PjFA IjldiiM s *^^.
his division to insure his spot on the starting grid. Scoville is just 2 points out of : \ *
first place in the class C Production standings of the Northern Pacific Division. construction In British Tan, w\
The Datsun racer split the two team Porsches on the starting grid at CDR and Luggage Brown
finished behind the pole winner at the finish It was an exciting race between the TOBB4*iWhi
three cars, until one of the Porsches blew an engine while running behind Scovilles DCRnS^Rt*
seethe I The Harmon Football Forecast llerx^
nATSUN TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 469 right, 130 w ong, 18 ties 783) I
IPURDUE 6 |7
A N STATE 20 ALABAMA
OT Saturday, Oct. 12MAJOR COLLEGES HIGHLIGHTS KM: fHMRI,If
f i It's much too soon for all the chips to be
Alabama 21 Vanderbilt e involved in some big conference battles this
m ZNmh. a Arizona State 34 Washington State 14 ..... Mjjfw mm&Mm:
gA.,. i---* -W Arkansas 33 Baylor 7 weekend! Early title-ticklers like JBMK W
fWKJCii.. Auburn 17 Clemson 9 ~ 0 ~ :
Boston college 2j viijanova 7 Georgia-Mississippi in the Southeast Wf
Colorado mlssoum ts Eight. .. Purdue-Ohio State in the Big Ten.. \
T*s,drive erea,sports C,, x SSS&JT 8 KBSSL 5! a d Southern Cal-Stanford .n the Pacrfic TMBffIHH: I
_ Cornell 25 Pennsylvania 13 Coast Conference.
your Datsun Dealer! Florida 31 Tuiane The Number One*rated Riveters, tne \
Hoiycro*. 2i Colgate* ? Boiler-Boys from Purdue, should hold firm
!io"" 20 SSmST Is on all fronts with a 21point win over 17th
Godding & Clerk K.n 3 ioTr.sk. ?1 ranked Ohio State. Runner-up Southern Cal /T) K (T\
f*""* s!al ?! lOW state is mirfit be in for a difficult afternoon against 4 < /a \ I
**L.S.U. 17 Miami, Fla. 8 ... 1 f
i K | . | Louisville 21 Tulsa 20 scalp-conscious Stanford. Using an Indian |J|- 55=55551ga
Nearest dealer JJ JK.'S"""* li appraisal from the East Coast, however, it I sl ¥
to the University g looks as though the Trojans will notch DONIfANX
Michigan state 21 Michigan io another win, this one by 14 points. u l/v/lilVJiillO
Minnesota 35 Illinois 7 1 H I
into caiitu uaui Mississippi 15 Georgia 14 All stoDS will be Dulled out in Lincoln in a /nil A
IUIZ rfUUIrl IVIAIIN No Carolina State 23 South Carolina 20 BBSS nW
North Texas 30 Northern Michigan 14 meeting between tWO Big 8 powers, 4th V 1 N/s Jr9JSB^-- J y
_ Ohio' u. am, 20 SSSKr*n. s ranked Kansas and 13th rated Nebraska.
Open Evenings S!£T* $( w",t.n And at th risk * eatin 9 i> aa *y ited mo ur 11, j w l w
Til 9 pm. Ph 378-2311 S 3 ££*?, S Nebraska crow again, the Jayhawks will clip H. van. nw.
Penn state u.c.l.a. 21 the Cornhuskers by nine points.
Purdue 0 3? io Ole' Miss was in the frying pan last week
COIMOtt Lira SL C tse nd Lshigh itade S against Alabama, and Georgia almost had a
i 11 s t M*u em Ca 27 T t c n u rd 2i coronary over South Carolina. They'll both P| QPIH A
llllltllllll FftFAfflf southern Miss. 30 Mississipoi state obe right back in the fire this week. . the VJr\
Tennessee 28 io Rebels are no. 8 and Georgia is no. 10. a nTCDI V
Texas A E k m SO) 17 TeJfsVech is Power quotients can't get much closer. QUAK I tKL I
utalf 0 20 New'kfexfco* 0 *2 Mississippi will pull it out in a squeaker by
Utah State 35 Wisconsin 12 just a point.
* wake n< Forest 14 v.pll 1 ? And speaking of frying pans, fires, etc., | 330 Reitz Union
western Michigan 14 Kent state s last Saturday Miami battled the likes of
y a y ie min 33 Brow^ m V UOg 1 o Southern Cal ... this week, it's 7th rated
4iiP^ r Louisiana State. Everybody just gets tougher CQ IT! P U S
and tougher. So. . the Tigers to quiet the
Other CollegesSOUTH and SWEST Hurricanes by nine points.
>4 v Another battle of Titans takes place in I \A/ A KIT TO
r Appalachian 27 Lenoir-Rhyne 20 , i <- i a i r * Mis I IV/
Arkansas a& m 14 Ouachita 13 Los Angeles where U.C.L.A. takes on Penn
vc ap acm aw* Ark. State College 18 Louisiana College 7 State Penn is ranked 14th while the Bruins
THE GAMES Arkansas State U. 21 SE Louisiana 20 oiaie. renn is ranKea I4tn wniie xne Drums ei m
Austin* 00 is sewanee *7 s * carson-Newman 26 Georgetown o to Syracuse. The Uclans will try to bounce
concord oo8 13 Newberry 8 back, but we sorta think the Nittany Lions Send Me the
- L OR^ A
Mississippi Georgia Fairmont H, ,y 22 SalSm'"* 0 one point.
Kansas Nebraska Florence i7 Miss, college 15 in the Southwest Conference, undefeated
... Glenville 35 West Va. Wesleyan 6 , ... ... .
M,aml L.&.U. Henderson 20 Southern State 7 and 15th rated Arkansas Will continue to 1 CODV 1125
North Carolina Stale Soutti Recline L,. S win. this time bumping Baylor by 26 point.
Oklahoma SOS?" T h 3 SUSS&T U Elsewhere among the "favored few" it 1 year (3 issues) 3.00
UXX.A. y" sat t USES 25 iouthwmuem, renn. *7 will be 12th ranked California over Army by 3 years (9 issues! BQO
Michigan Michigan State Morehead 20 Austin Peay 8 14 points . .Michigan State toppinq J years issues/ o.UU
Randoiph-Macon 34 Bridgewater o Michigan by 11 (the Spartans climbed from Heres mv rharL
\ iouthwest Texas 40 Anca?. 4 state 'o 79th last week to the no. 9 spot). .Notre
iiv t!35 Lutheran TirtthSi"* 1 t* Dame Btill in 3rd > ,u nin 9 Northwestern by bywest
west bywest Liberty wSaf va. stat. '? 6 nkad Tennessee trimming
ftji m mk
" Your CLICA Representatives Gainesville: BVfl
JM Brooker
Guest Prognosti Gators Sam Darby BJaaaflaiilynHl
Breece Me Cray
CLICA DELTA SIMGA DELTA TAU b ei ? n |^|
phi delta Don Wiggins I nJ||lJ M
Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee mm
Mississippi Mississippi Ooll6QC LtfC
Kansas Kansas Kansas
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Company of America HI Mil
Vic McKenzie & Associates 111 HM
Michigan State Michigan State Michigan State 4115 K W 13th Si m MHH HBPf H
New Phone number ia 378-2475