Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF Black Students Want Fast Changes

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LARRY JORDAN
... racism everywhere

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 13 University of Florida, Gainesville Wednesday, October 9, 1968

OUTLINES GOALS
O'Connell Pledges
To 'Make UF First'


OConnell Post
Becomes Official

Stephen Cornelius OConnell
was officially inaugurated
Tuesday as the 6th UF
president, after almost a year on
the job.
In inaugural ceremonies
conducted at the Florida Gym,
Chester Ferguson, chairman of
thd State Board of Regents,
charged OConnell with the UF
presidency he undertook 11
months ago.
Clyde Taylor, president of the
student body, Dr. Raymond E.
Crist, research professor of
geography, and William O. E.
Henry, president of the Florida
Alumni Association, greeted the
president on behalf of the
groups they represent.
Gov. Claude R. Kirk was
scheduled to speak at the
convocation on behalf of the
state of Florida but was unable
to attend when his plane was
grounded due to fog.
Taylor, calling UF students
the most vital segment of the
university community, said the
students needed OConnells
help.
He said OConnell, as a former
UF student and student body
president, could understand the
problems facing the students of
today.
During the inaugural
ceremony, in his first official act
as UF president, OConndl
presented four honorary degrees.
Mrs. John J. Tigert, widow of
the former UF president,
received the doctor of humane

By RICHARD THOMPSON
Alligator Staff Writer
UF black students want
change. They want it fast and
they want it from top to
bottom.
Any method of dissent is
possible this year, says Harry
Lamb Jr., were just waiting to
see what comes out of the
Action Conference.
Lamb, 4AS, is president of
the 50-member Afro-American
Student Association (AASA).
Although he wont say it, Lamb
is afraid the conference is just
more motion and
tokenism.
Lamb wouldnt use those
expressions when interviewed

letters degree. She was cited for
personal contributions to the life
and growth of the UF.
Dr. Elvis J. Stahr,
president-emeritus of Indiana
University and Dr. Jack K.
Williams, vice president for
academic affairs at the
University of Tennessee,
received doctor of laws degrees.
OConnell also recognized Dr.
Gerald Langford, associate
professor of comprehensive
English in the University
College, recipient of the 1968
Thomas Jefferson Award for
teaching excellence.

gjggafr i f r, ... g i
> T sJJnMHr :
/ if w' ''*&> | MB' .zJmi
1 r ~ J V
NICK ARROYO
REGENTS CHAIRMAN CHESTER FERGUSON
. .charges O'Connell with UF Presidency

A1 i igator

recently. They belong to activist
Larry Jordan, 3JM, one of the
original founders of AASA last
year and its past press secretary.
Jordan uses tough phrases
with ease, proud of AASAs
accomplishments last year, sure
that AASA will continue to be
a force to deal with whenever
the UF administration makes
any decision affecting blades.
Jordan says AASA, the only
all-black organization on
campus, was founded to serve as

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
Stating that the road to
greatness demands self-criticism
and evaluation, newly
inaugurated UF President
Stephen C. OConnell Tuesday
said the UF is too good not to
become much better.
OConnell, officially
inaugurated after serving 11
months as UFs 6th president,
accepted the charge from
Chester Ferguson, Chairman of
the State Board of Regents, at
the inaugural ceremony at
Florida Gym.
Speaking to invited and
honored guests and a sparce
gathering of students, OConnell
spoke on his goals for the UF.
My short experience here
indicates that this institution is
(SEE 'O'CONNELL' P. 2)

INTERPRETIVE

a vehicle to provide blacks with
a social release mechanism and
to address itself to each isiue
that affects blacks.
Lamb says AASA is
important, very important
because it is a social activity that
leads to other things.
UF was integrated in 1961.
Between then and last year
several attempts were made to
form a black organization, but
all fell through.
We had to form, > says

Vw" ;
4;§||
;
TOM KENNEDY
O'CONNELL ADDRESS
. . first in the South

Jordan of AASAs creation. It
was a question of survival. The
UF was a place to become a
robot for blacks. We were lost in
a sea of whiteness.
We didnt find identity
here, Jordan says, we found
after being here that we were
further loosing our identity. It
was essential that we group
together, and it was essential
that we become politically active
if we were to survive.
And both see the absolute
necessity for politics to
continue to be the main thrust
of AASA in the near future.
Jordan talks from the top of
his head in short bursts of
expression. Until you become
(SEE 'BLACKS' P. 14

ACP Names
UF Alligator
Model Paper
The Florida Alligator Monday
received its second straight
All-American rating from the
Associated College Press.
This is the highest honor
rating possible by this!
association, which gave the
Pacemaker Award to the
Alligator last spring.
A second semester of strong
journalism, ACP said of the
Alligator. The Pacemaker was
well-earned.
v Called a model paper,
certainly one of the nations
(SEE 'ACP' P. 2 )



Page 2

!, The Florida AtHgator, Wednesday, October 9,1968

BY REGISTRAR

Fall Candidates Okayed

Candidates for UF fall
elections have been approved by
the Office of the Registrar.
Those candidates whose names
do not appear on the lest were
purged either by the registrar
because of grade average, hours
violation, or by their party
affiliate.
Ric Katz, Secretary of the
Interior, said non-qualified
candidates may pick up a release
slip from his office in order to
obtain a refund of qualifying
fees.
Write-in candidates must pay
their qualifying fee by 6 p.m. on
election day, Oct. 17, in order to
serve in a particular office.
Application forms for election
officials may be picked up in the
elections office, third floor,
Reitz Union. Deadline is
Thursday.
The following is the list of
candidates, in alphabetical order.
Party affiliations are listed as
New Movement (NM);
Commitment (C) and
unaffiliated (U).
UNION BOARD:
President: Steve Hull (NM),
Bob White (C).
Vice-president: David Home
(NM), Janis Mohrbacher (C).
Secretary: Ronna Ellerback
(C), Connie Knight (NM).
Treasurer: Richard Brarer
(NM), Bill Levens (C).
SENATE:
Hume: Steve Cold (NM),
Robert Fleischman (C), Jim
Saunderson (NM).
Graham: Linda Dallager (C),
Kip Johnson (C), Lester
Nickolson (NM).
Tolbert: JoAnne Glisson (C),
Rodney Margol (NM), Jay Scott
(NM), Bruce E. Thomas (C).
Murphree: Tom Colmenarer
(NM), Marshall Constantino (C),
Sam Davis (NM), Dan Eckert
(C), Tom McGrady (C), Douglas
Tannenbaum (NM).
Rawlings: Toby Goldstein
(NM), Micki McCartan (C).
Broward: Jane Barnett (NM),
Patsy Maxwell (U), Joyce
Roberta Miller (C).
Yulee: Sue Howard (C), Mary
Jo Mills (U), Faith Tulina (NM).
Towers: Linda Bayer (U),
Laurie E. Clark (C), Karen
Kinnin (NM), Bill Modlin (C).
Jennings: John Lanehart
(NM), Kathy Waldman (C).
Diamond Village: Sam
Hudman (G).
Corry: Skip Kedney (C).
Flavett III: Steve Bull (NM),
Jim Money (C).
Off-campus: Ashley
Abramson (NM), Jorge Amaro
(NM), Ann Bardsley (NM), Jeff

H Loans Up To S6OO
Budget Ante
*ConfMenttel
Marion Financo Co.
376-5333
222 W. University Av.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper at the University of Florid*
and to published fir* Unas weekly npt during June, July and August whsn It to pttoltohsd
semi-weekly, sad during student holidays and nan periods. Editorials represent only the
opinions at their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Kelts
Union Building, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 3MOI. The Alligator to entered
as f oqnd class matter at tbs United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, WOl.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3 .SO per quarter.
Ike Florida Alligator reserves the rigid to regulate the typographical tone at all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments at payment tor any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice to given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day alter advertisement appears. His Florida Alligator will
not he responsible tor more than one Incorrect insertion cl an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Mottoes tor correction must be given before next insertion.

Bayman (C), Larry Bercu (C),
Donna Betts (C), Bruce
Boudreau (C), Percy Brown
(NM), Tom Clark (C), James F.
Comander (C), Thomas E. Cone,
Jr. (C), David Cook (NM), John
F. Cosgrove (C), Douglas Crow
(C), Ann Curran (C), Jan Dyro
(C), Linda Edmunds (NM), Jim
Giles (NM), Sam Greenlaw
(NM), Buddy Grisinger (C),
Harriet S. Halperin (C), R.
Michael Hembree (C), Chuck

OConnell Says:
Make UF First

FROM PA6t ml
on a sound constructive course.
It has as many excellent faculty
as can be found in any
institution of like size. Our
students are as good as most and
better than a great many and
most persons on this campus are
committed to the constant
improvement of what we do and
how we do it, he said.
Renewing his pledge to make
the UF first in the South and
second to none in the nation,
OConnell called on students,
faculty members and
administrators to enter into
self-criticism and self-evaluation.
Here is a demonstration, a
protect, that all can join and hail
as effort and one
that I pledge to lead, he said.
We can and will protest
against ineffective and
uninteresting teaching wherever
it exists; we will wage war on the
impersonality and discourtesy of
students as well as teachers and
staff.
We will require reason and
logic to be shown for our
policies, rules and regulations,
and we will treat inefficiency
and waste as an evil that must be
rooted and cured, and
obsolescence as deadwood that
must be removed to make room
for new growth.
I ask all of you to join me in
this movement, this protest, he
said.
OConnell rejected the
positions of those who maintain
the status quo and those who
propose radical reformation by
destruction.
We need to ask ourselves
again and again what kind of
product is it that we are trying
to turn out, and how well we are
succeeding, he said.
Curriculum, teacher
evaluation, counseling, tenure,
impersonality and insensitivity
of administrators and

McCormac (NM), Steve McGuire
(NM), Arch Maldonado (C),
Larry Martin (C), Dick Moore
(NM), John Morton (C), Nick
Nicosina (C), Ralf Nobo (C),
Walter OTCon (C), Joseph A.
Rosier (NM), Bart Ross (NM),
Susie Shapiro (NM), Tim Smith
(NM), Sybille Steinmetz (NM),
Joe Still (C), Patricia Tuck (C),
Jack Vaughn (C), William E.
Walker (U), Walter C. Ward
(NM).

unnecessary or outmoded
regulations were among the
things OConnell suggested
evaluating and possibly
revamping.
He said the role of the
university and the role of
university president were hard to
define.
Quite obviously the
university cannot do all that
everyone asks of it nor can it be
all things to all people, he said.
OConnell said one of his
most important functions as UF
president is to interpret to the
citizens of the state how well the
UF is serving the state.
I see in this function, too,
the necessity to convince the
business world and sources of
private funds that we are in need
and worthy of their help for
those things that tax sources
either cannot or will not provide
and that their assistance may
well be the difference necessary
to our attaining true
distinction, he said.
Calling the UF uniquely
different from the others in the
Florida system, OConnell said
the state should not enforce
mediocrity on all universities in
the process of building the
system.
It (UF)has achieved a degree
of distinction and a breadth of
purpose that requires that we be
treated differently if we are to
continue to achieve and progress
as we should.

COMMITMENT
to
STUDENTS

pick Up
Hall of Fame
and
Whos Who Applications
j
Student Publications Office
J. Wayne Reitz Union

ACP Calls Alligator
'Model Newspaper'

ffOH PA66 OWE
best, the Alligator scored 3790
points out of a possible 4000.
The Alligator deserves its top
spot, judge Arthur Levin said.
It shows effort, originality and
the best in creative journalism.
Warned not to give the paper
a crisis orientation, ACP said,
You seem to go from crisis to
crisis. But then maybe its the
year.
On coverage, the Alligator
scored 760 points out of 800.
Some campus coverage of
less important issues is needed,
though, ACP said. Life in the
ghetto series was well done. The
fraternities seem to need a
study, and human interest is
needed. Joe Torchia had a great
nudist series.
On content of news stories
and features, the score was 830
out of 850 points.

An equal opportunity employer
Chicago Pneumatic is not based in Chicago. Its headquar headquarters
ters headquarters are in New York City with sales offices in 26 major
cities throughout the U.S'.
A 67-year-old Company, CP is listed among the top 500
U.S. Corporations.
Plants: New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Texas, the
United Kingdom, the Continent, Australia and Africa.
Products: pneumatic and electric power tools; air and gas
compressors; diesel engines; construction equipment;
automatic assembly machines; Jacobs chucks; Allen
screws; precision gauges, thermometers, controls.
Markets: aviation, aerospace, mining, construction, chemi chemical
cal chemical processing, refining, metalworking, automotive.
Formal and OTJ Training for down-to-earth engineer, busi business
ness business and management majors desiring growth, challenge
and achievement.
Openings exist in our Plants located in UPSTATE NEW
YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, CONNECTICUT... and in Sales
Offices throughout the U.S.
This is only half the story. For complete information, pick up litera literature
ture literature at Placement Office. We will be on campus:
OCTOBER 18
CHICAGO PNEUMATIC TOOL COMPANY
6 East 44th Street, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017

Content of department pages
received 560 points out of 650.
Editorials were called too
generalized, but editorial page
features were called excellent.
Sports were said to be the
weakest area.
Physical properties and page
make-up scored 710 points out
of 750. Headlines and
typography were said to be
good, and received all possible
points.
Copyreading is excellent,
said *he Press.
Picture content was called
outstanding, and Nick Arroyo
was called a pro. Photographs
received 380 out of 400 points.
ACP commented on the
coves age of the incident last year
when five Alligator editors
resigned.
Both sides were handled
fairly, even to printing the
in-depth charges of Editor Steve
Hull.



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Wwfrwd*y. October 9, 1968, Th Florid* Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9,1968

Short Funds Slow Project

By DAVID OSIER
Alligator Staff Wrrtar
UFs College of Engineering is
beset by one of the major
problems of state education
lack of money.
The rapidly growing college is
currently looking for more
money from alumni and
industry.
Completion of the new
engineering materials building
may be. the last new
construction for awhile unless
more funds come in, Engineering
External Programs Director
Marion Forsman said.
State bond issues are not the
answer, Forsman said, they
alleviate the problem only
temporarily.
Named to his present post this
summer by Dean Robert E.
Uhrig, Forsman had previously
served as Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station
director.
The external programs office
is set up to solicit funds from
sources other than regular state
education appropriations.
Our programs will be
coordinated with the Alumni
Association and University
Relations and Development
(URD) office, Forsman said.
Engineering has a separate
fund in the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc. sponsored by
URD, he said.
Presently, money from bonds
for construction amounts to
$5.7 million. This appears to be
adequate, Forsman said.
But, by 1971 the college
expects an enrollment of 1,500
undergraduates and 700
graduate students. Additional
funds may be needed to
accomodate this increase, he
said.
Bonds have to be paid off
eventually and if taxes arent
raised accordingly to pay them
off, construction money and
money for operation may be cut
off, also, Forsman said.
According to Forsman, the
answer to the colleges dilemma
may be a program aimed at
getting more donations from
alumni and industry.
The college has not achieved
the level of giving from alumni
and industry that other similar
colleges have throughout the
nation, Forsman said.
OCT 10 IS THE DEADLINE
FOR APPLYING FOR THE
UNVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STUDENT HEALTH AND
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
INCLUDING MAJOR
MEDICAL. MAIL IN
APPLICATION
TO McGRRIFF McGRRIFFSCARBOROROUGH
SCARBOROROUGH McGRRIFFSCARBOROROUGH &
ASSOCIATES PrO. BOX
1407 OR COME BY
OUR OFFICE AT 537
ME Ist ST. AFTER OCT. 10
COME BY OUR OFRCE
THE HOME INSURANCE COMPANY
EARL M. SCARBOROUGH
Servicing Agent
McGriff-Scerborough end Associates
537 ME Ist ST.
GAINESVILLE 376-8393

ENGINEERING COLLEGE

All iurator

BACKGROUND REPORT

Fund raising programs
existing at other universities
include:
0 The University of Texas at
Austin has an engineering
foundation advisory council.
The council includes many
corporation presidents interested
in engineering programs.
0 Ohio State University has a
research foundation sponsoring
programs for the entire
university. Over sls million for
contract research was collected
in 1967. The list of contributors
includes federal government
agencies and 39 private
corporations and institutes.
An alumni fund at lowa
State University provides
approximately $500,000
annually for projects. Another

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foundation at lowa State
recently collected $12.5 million
for new campus construction.
Forsman said he is trying to
put together a plan to present
to industry for more
participation in UFs engineering
programs.
However, once a plan is
established, Forsman said, it
will take three to five years to
realize any progress.

COMMITMENT
to
STUDENTS

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"LITTLE BIT OF
ISRAEL



Dubcek May Resign
DueTo Red Measures

PRAGUE (UPI) The ruling
Presidium of the Czechoslovak
Communist party met Tuesday
to consider new and harsh
Kremlin conditions that could
lead to the resignations of First
Party Secretary Alexander
Dubcek and three other top
reform leaders.
It was the first meeting of the
21-member committee since the
three-man delegation headed by
Dubcek returned from Moscow
late Friday with Soviet purges
and long-range posting of Soviet
troops in Czechoslovakia.
The session began before
noon. Dubcek entered party
headquarters in Prague, smiling
broadly and chatting amiably
with well-wishers at the door.
Other leaders who arrived
after him, however, looked
glum. President Ludvik Svoboda,
Premier Oldrich Cemik and
National Assembly President
Josef Smrkovsky entered the
building without even a wave of
the hand for applauding crowds
outside.
Dubcek, Cemik and Gustav
Husak, Slovak party leader,
represented Czechoslovakia in
the Kremlin talks Thursday and
Friday with Soviet Communist
party leader Leonid 1. Brezhnev,
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin and
President Nikolai Podgorny.
Sources close to the top party
leadership said Dubcek and
Cemik threatened to resign
rather than accept the terms laid
down by Moscow, particularly a
proposed treaty which would
legalize the continued stationing
of Soviet occupation forces on
Czechoslovak soil. Similar
treaties have provided for the
temporarypresence of Red
army troops in East Germany
and Hungary for years.
The sources said Svoboda and
Smrkovsky were prepared to
offer their resignations along
with Dubcek and Cemik. Husak,
five till nine
dining room only
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who has been mentioned
favorably in the Soviet press
recently, also was said to have
opposed the troop treaty but did
not go along with the threat of
resignation.
Other conditions set down by
the Kremlin for what it called
the return to normalization of
life in Czechoslovakia included
imposition of effective press
controls, purges of political and
intellectual ranks and a share in
direct supervision of key party
and government offices.
Housing Space
hr
In 1960 Corry Villages
capacity was 192 persons.
Shucht Villages capacity was
104 persons.
In 1960 the combined
capacities of all married students
quarters at UF were 903
persons.

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October 10, 1968
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Viet Bombing Resumes

SAIGON (UPI) American
852 bombers struck at North
Vietnam Tuesday for the first
time in more than two weeks,
dropping a half-million pounds
of explosives on Communist
positions. But Communist
gunners scored a direct hit on a
U.S. destroyer off the North
Vietnamese coast.
In South Vietnam at least 147
North Vietnamese were reported
killed in a heavy running battle
with U.S. infantrymen and
paratroopers that began Monday
and raged ino Tuesday near
Trang Bang, about 25 miles
northwest of the capital.

COMMITMENT
to
STUDENTS

AFTER TWO WEEKS

The battle between U. S.
forces and troops of the 101st
North Vietnamese army
regiment was one of the largest
in recent weeks around the

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
Oct. 9 MEETING rm. c-4
8-10p.m. Reitz Union
SAVE LIBERALISM
CLOSEST SHOP
TO CAMPUS a
For Journalism A | ifk
And Art Students
1232 W. Univ. Ave. f
376-7657 V V

Wfednaaday, October 9,19681 Ttw Florida Alligator,

capital. U.S. casulties were listed
as eight dead and 13 wounded,
as American forces caught the
Hanoi unit operating on
unfamiliar ground.

Page 5



Page 6

y The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9, 1968

WHAT'S
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN EXPORTING OUR
GRAND AMERICAN
TRADITIONS: The Negro as a
Second-Class Citizen in the
Americas will be the topic of
discussion at tonights meeting
of the Latin American
Colloquim in the Colloquim
room of the College Library at
8.
IN ENMITY: The Young
Republicans Club meets tonight
in room 150 C-D of the Reitz
Union at 8; Dr. Robert Cade,
inventor of Gatorade, guest
speaker.
The Young Democrats caucus
in room C-4 of the Union
tonight at 8 p.m.
IN ALL RIGHT,
MAGGOTS, FALL IN!!: UFs
AFROTC Angel Flight begins its
rush tonight. All girls who have a
2.2 overall, had a 2.0 last
quarter, have 7th and Bth
periods free on Thursday, and
are second or third quarter
freshman, a sophomore, or
junior, between 5 ft. 2 in. and 5
fit. 8 in. in height are eligible.
Two parties will be held
tonight: those girls whose names
end in A through M should come
at 7:30; those whose names end
in N through Z at 8:30,.
The parties will be in rooms
120 through 123 of the Union.
IN IN HEARING HEARING
DOUBLE DOUBLE: The
steroph iles meet in room
403 of the College Library at 8
tonight.
IN THE BETTER
BOURGEOISE: Which is, of
course, the women, and they
convocate at the home of Dr.
and Mrs. John James, 910 NW
37th Dr., tonight in the form of
the Business Administration
Dames.
The meeting starts at 8; all
business dames welcome.
IN MORE OF THOSE
COLLEGE ALTERNATIVES:
The UJS. Coast Guard will be
recruiting in the games area
lobby of the Union today
beginning at 8 a.m.
AND IT THAT BUGS YOU:
The Entomological Club,
meeting today at noon in room
150 D of the Union, has no
sympathy for you. You should
only hear their troubles!
IN FIRST, YOU GRAB A
HANDFUL OF GUTS . .: A
short course in meat-packing will
be given by the Florida Meat
Packers Association in McCarty
Auditorium today. The course
begins at 7:30 a.m and lasts til 5
p.m.
Debate Squad
Takes Third
UFs debate squad
participated last weekend in the
Middle Tennessee State
Universitys Early Bird debate
tournament.
The affirmative team of
Gregg Mathews and David Biyon
came in third place by defeating
the University of Alabama,
Emory University, Vanderbilt
University and the University of
Arkansas.

COMMITMENT
1
to
STUDENTS

DROPOUTS

L

Students Form
'New Party

Several UF students are
involved in establishing a new
political party in Florida. The
group, called New Party,
represents the views of Sen.
Eugene J. McCarthy, the
unsuccessful contender for the
Democratic nomination last
August.
Bob Acker, Mice and Judy
Kurman, and 20 other students
are members of the Students for
a New Party on campus.
Floridas deadline is past for
filing a petition to place the
name of another candidate on
Novembers ballot, so McCarthy
will be a write-in candidate.
New Partys activities will be
f Who's Who
Due Today
Today is the deadline for the
applications for the 1969
Seminoles Whos Who and
Hall of Fame. Applications
may be picked up in Room 337
of the Reitz Union.
Eligible applicants are seniors
in their tenth quarter who have
been here two quarters previous
to this fall and have maintained
a 2.0 average. They must have
excelled in one major field of
interest within one year of the
time of consideration and shown
a degree of interest in a minor
field.
Students named in a previous
edition of the Seminole are
ineligible.

When it comes to campus politics youve never had a reason to
Candidates were hand picked ...
political patronage and deals.. you know the whole story.
THE NEW MOVEMENT
lets you pick your candidates for union board and student senate in
open conventions. We will continue to involve people in politics. .
Get the message?
. ._ V
Now you have a reason to care.
THE NEW MOVEMENT NEEDS YOU.
THE UNIVERSITY NEEDS US.
(Paid political advertisement)

V\. o *-

centered on showing an
organized party representing
McCarthy and his views exists in
Florida, and outlining the
procedure for writing in
McCarthys name.
There are groups of McCarthy
backers organizing at other state
universities: Florida State, New
College, University of South
Florida, and Florida Atlantic
University.
The local Students for a New
Party will try to incorporate
former supporters of the late
Robert Kennedy into the New
Party.
New Party met in Orlando last
Saturday and wrote a platform
concerning international and
domestic issues.
The platform calls for a total
bombing halt in North Vietnam,
withdrawal of U.S. troops and
replacement by a United Nations
observation group. Also free
election 4 representing all
elements in South Vietnam,
including the Communist-backed
National Liberation Front, is
called for in New Partys
platform.

F. LEE BAILEY
8:00 P. M. TUESDAY OCT. 15,1968
REITZ UNION BALLROOM

BY HOWARD POST

young democrats
Oct. 9 MEETING RM. C-4
8-10p.m. Rei,z Union
SAVE LIBERALISM
Dine for less at L&tM
Low prices every day!
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
MOUTH WATERING VEAL SMOTHERED SALISBURY
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49< 49<
Home-Style Cooking. Dollar-Saving Prices
313W.Univ. Serving
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Florida Theater

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Wadnaaday, October 9t 1968. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



I The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9,1968

Page 8

EQHQ&IAL

To Each His Own

President OConnells statement
concerning the pamphlet by three UF
professors criticizing the new proposed state
constitution is worthy of notice.
The university should not, has not, and
Will not take any position on the merits of
the proposed constitution. Each student,
faculty member or other member of the
university community has a right to do so, as
all will agree they should, OConnell said.
He also said that each individual is alone
responsible for what he or she says and
writes in support of his views.
The pamphlet brought these three UF
professors more publicity than they deserve
simply because of their connection with the
university.

Alligator Inquizitor
By LEWIS ROTHi-EIN £
Alligator Staff Writer <1
Good morning. Somebody wrote me a letter yesterday calling me a M) I jXy
nut. So today I will be serious. Theres a war going on, you know, and (
people are dying of disease, and so many people are sad. It is better K J\
that I be serious. Here are our questions:
1. What was the name of Mr. Luckys sidekick on the Mr. Lucky A,
2. Who won the Heisman trophy last year? \y\ j \
i 3. Here is a group of rather remarkable characters. Can you n. 7 \I \
identify the books in which they appear? / / Mjl
a. A water rat who writes poetry? *** 08/1
b. A talkative walrus \ \*/\
c. A pig named Napoleon who becomes a dictator at Manor Farm L
4. Can you name the four Bferida Governors since Charlie Johns? I v
5. The first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, August 6,
1945. Three days later the second atomic bomb was dropped where?
6. Is there life after death?
Here are the answers to yesterdays Inquizitor. 1. True 2. Thomas m
Paine 3. the number of senators plus the number of representatives in
the House 4. The sayings of Christ in the Sermon on the Mount as
reported by Matthew (Matthew V) 5. 175 lbs. m
Sit on a squash today.

'Changes

CLICK.
In my mind I heard the
CLICK over and over. I stood by
the open door watching the rain,
listening to the conversation in
the dead receiver.
Where have you been? she
demanded.
1...
Strong expression and
impatience ruled her.
Why havent you called me
since I called you so many times
and why didnt you come out?
And you were out last, huh?
Laurella was mostly spirit,
attached to a body for the sake
of convenience. She was five and
it was her night to make her
weekly call. She was the
daughter of a friend, and she
lived in a beach home. I was her
first crush.
Im really sorry I didnt
call, I said. Will you forgive
me this time?
I dont know. Ydu havent
come cut to see me on
Saturdays and the weather is
good now and everything.

"Dont You Think God Answers?

What we did was walk along
the beach and run and skip thru
the water while her father
barbequed dinner. Her mother
was ill and would not recover.
Laurella was great at sensing
things.
It wasnt good this past
Saturday, I said. It was
raining. You know that.
Besides, 1 teased, you didnt
invite me out.
She exploded at my adult
nonsense:
You dont need to be
invited and you know it Richard
ratfink.
Sometimes Laurellas phrases
would upset her parents because
she always said what she was
thinking. She was then an
uncensored creature.
I was lazy and joking and
trying to cover it and she knew
it, and also knew I really loved
her. That made her all the more
explosive.
Sometimes you just dont
make sense, she said,
emphasizing her sigh in the

- ; _____
OConnells statement was necessary to
keep many Floridians from believing the UF
is opposing the proposed caistitution.
His statement is correct in asserting that
the members of this university community
have the right to express their opinions as
individuals on important matters, and should
exercise it.
Too often in the UF has been
held responsible by the state press and its
readers for statements made by members of
the university community.
This has been the case too many times
and hopefully OConnells statement will not
have to be repeated every time a member of
the UF community exercises his right to
express an opinion.

phone. But when we walk on
the beach or sit and talk you
really are nice. Sometimes 1 just
dont understand you, she said,
her voice trailing off in a deep
sigh.
Dont yell over the phone,
Laurella.
She ignored the statement as
she ignored all that didnt fit her
reality.
I suppose you know, she
semishouted, building up
strength, Im going to get God
to give good weather and all this
weekend. She stressed God.
I was packed and probably
would be leaving that weekend. I
had changed jobs and was
moving.
Are you sure you can
arrange it? 1...
Richard ratfink dont you
think God answers Drayers!
We 11...
I know he does so there and
you better come out or I'm not
going to forgive you.
And she meant it.
Well, if you're sure you car

The Florida Alligator
#The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Dave Doucette
Pwt/kl)bl/l/ Managing Editor
AH Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor

Spectator

Questionable People
Closing The Grove

Coconut Grove, South
Floridas famous art colony and
home to some of this nation s
first truly beautiful people, is
now under attack v The bearded
poets, the sidebumed minstrels,
the just plain free thinking
people that make up this
community are no longer
considered desirable by the
areas law enforcement officals.
Much of the repression
naturally stems from the
increasing problem of drugs and
drug sales in the Miami area. It is
a tragedy, however, that a few
careless experimenters in the
drug scene are destroying the
world of beauty and art that was
the Grove.
I remember Sunday
mornings, when walking through
the park, you could hear the
sounds of Spanky and Our Gang
as they played for the friends
that had gathered there. Kites
flying, artist painting, sailboats
departing in wakes of crystal
foam. Sometimes Fred Neil, who
records for Elektra, would pull
up on his bike and join the Gang
as they did their thing.
It wasnt everybodys type of
world, but it was the only world
for those who looked forward to
those Sunday afternoons.
Theyve closed the Gaslight
Coffee House too, because there

fix it up ...
Richard we only have 122
minutes of freedom left came
very softly across the wires,
falling evenly on my ear to the
rhythm of the rain.
We what, Laurella?
Richard I swear you dont
love me you never pay attention
my teacher told us the other day
about people like you.
She was out of breath.
What did you say before
that Laurella?
Oh so what.
What did you say. Really. I
want to know. I really do.
I said I wouldnt foraive
you ...
No, after that.
Richard ratfink 1 swear you
never listen to me anymore,
someday I said if you don't
mind we only have 122 minutes
of freedom left.
What does that mean
Laurella 0
Dont you know. Richard?
No. 1 swear 1 don st .
I had never been more

By Stephen J. Robitaille

By Richard Thompson

were too many questionable
people hanging around outside
between shows. But the sounds
of the musicians that played
there still hang in the Grove air.
The sounds of Simon and
Garfunkle, I ah and Sylvia, Josh
White, Odetta, Gordon
Lightfoot, Bob Dylan and Tom
Rush continue to harmonize
with the rustling palms that line
the Grove streets
But Saturday night many of
the visitors to the Grove were in
jail. Theyve been picking them
up by the car loads the minute
they begin to congregate outside
a restaurant or in the park. Oh,
the police have got charges to
validate the arrests. Charges like
vagrancy (if you want to be safe
in the Grove carry a fin),
jaywalking (first time theyve
ever enforced this law here), and
theres always that good old
standbye, disturbing the peace
(so dont sing too loud).
Well, theyll put the heads in
prison, then theyll get the
pushers, the dealers and the
buyers. And pretty soon all that
will be left will be the bearded
ones, the moustached, the
sideburned and the beaded, but
theyll find a law for them.
Theyll straighten things out in
the Grove.
The hell they will.

serious.
Besides, we only have 121
minutes now ...
What could we do with all
that time?
Waste it.
I saw the hammer hitting the
cliisel as she carved those words
in stone.
Thats beautiful, Laurella.
There was no reply, only a
muffled sound as she talked to
someone in the background. She
never revealed this little mystery
part of each phone call, but I
was sure it was her parents
telling her it was time to end the
call.
I could be your ladybug,
she said urgently, returning to
her phone conversation world.
Well, if...
I have to go now Richard
please let me hang up first, she
said as I stood looking thru the
door at the rain, knowing I
would never see her again.
CLICK.



OPEN FORUM:
jAJmULOMjI ViAAMt
Tktre is no hope for the complacent man.

MR. EDITOR:
The letters on the editorial
page seem to think that the
Southerner is rotten-to-the core
racist, I am a southerner and I
am damn proud of it.
Mr. David. Miller, the author
of a recent Dixie-burning article,
said that he remembered two
things about a Pro football ganje
- the prayer, and the playing of
Dixie. I realize that there are

Drop Dixie At UF

MR. EDITOR:
AN OPEN LETTER TO
RICHARD BOWLES:
We have read with great
interest the statement attributed
to you in the October 3rd
ALLIGATOR that the Florida
Band will continue the playing
of DIXIE at public functions,
and that you have received but
one letter of complaint on this
issue. Let us register a second,
for a 100 percent increase in the
mail in favor of dropping this
racist time.
Again according to the'
ALLIGATOR, you argue that
DIXIE is a tradition at the UF
and, therefore, is by implication
in: some way sacrosanct. This is
utter nonsense. Other old,
distinguished Southern
traditions such as lynchings,
disenfrachisement of blacks, and
riding in the back seats of buses
have subsequently been
reevaluated and found lacking in
Why Not Get
A Better Job
MR. EDITOR:
I fell compelled to reply to
Gerald Spizios wild ravings
concerning Colonel Arlo
Mitchells article dealing with
ROTC. Spizio wonders how
stupid Colonel Mitchell thinks
students are. Well, if Spizio is
any indication we are in sorry
shape. He seems to feel that
there., is something wrong with
wanting more pay, a better place
to sleep and a job which requires
a little intelligence. Since when
has this been a crime.
The issue says Spizio is Do
we want to participate. I
contend we have little choice in
the matter. As I understand it
Canada has some very cold
winters and most jail cells dont
have wall to wall carpeting or
T.V. Dont get me wrong, Im
not a ROTC red hot. I simply
feel that under the present
conditions, be they right or
wrong, Uncle Sam eventually
will point his finger at me unless
I blow off a toe which seems
rather drastic. And when my
number is called Id much rather
be wearing gold bars and leading
men as opposed to wearing no
stripes and cleaning out johns.
Each to his own. Think about
this when you receive Greetings
From Your Friends and
Neighbors. ROB

MMMp

Standing Up For Dixie

probably many people that care
what he remembered. I do care
when he grossly misinterprets a
prayer and then tells the campus
that the preacher said, Lets
knock em dead for Jesus. This
is an out and out lie. Mr. Miller,
you wont find a true
southerner cutting down Jesus.
Mr. Miller, find a true
southerner burning Old Glory,
burning his draft card, knocking
religion or talking about the

their social merits. DIXIE is
but another such institution and
a constant reminder to many of
good, old Southern rascism. If
you do not think of DIXIE as
such, you are remarkably out of
touch with the currents of the
times. Deservingly or not, the
UF has incurred the reputation
as a racist institution, and
DIXIE helps immeasureably
to perpetuate this image.
With due respect, we ask you
to come forward into the
twentieth century and to make a
moral testimony to this advance
by dropping DIXIE from
future UF programs. In all
likelihood you can expect no
concrete reward and, indeed,
may earn condemnation from
many who prefer their
comfortable rascist tradition. On
the other hand, you may win a
personal sense of pride and
dqcency which comes with
having taken a morally right
course of action.
We are both UF alumni,
raised in Florida and now
faculty members of this
University. We, and most UF
students, know full well the
deeper meanings of DIXIE. Its
continued use is a needless
reminder of much that is wrong
with the South, much that needs
forgetting, and much that
embarrasses the South
throughout the nation.
DAVID T.GEITHMAN
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF
ECONOMICS.
JREDERICK GODDARD
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF
ECONOMICS

Editorial Criticized As Specious

MR. EDITOR:
In the wake of a threatened
witch hunt by Bob Sikes
concerning hippie-left wing
Conferences, I feel that your
editorial of Friday, Oct, 4
(Violence No Answer) was
quite specious, to say the least. I
disagree emphatically (but not
violently, of course) with your
belief that things at UF are just
fine, that the milk-and-honey
millenium is right around the
comer.
Every right, every privilege

disease inhuman regime of the
North. YOU CANT DO IT!
Another thing I would like to
clear up -a sentence in your
article. We must rise, Phoenix
like, from the ashes of the Old
South. First, I resent the use of
the word we I dont want
people to think that you and I
are in any way connected. And,
fella, if you dont think the
South has risen yet you are
worse off than I thought you
were.
Mr. Miller, you just got too
carried away with something
you have heard other people talk
about. If you havent
experienced the prejudices of
a rebel, you really dont know
for sure! Do You?
Mr. Miller, my ancestors
were wrong on some points, but
they were honorable gentlemen,
And I respect their ideals and I
will uphold their honor.
I dont care how many so
called wits tell the public how
degenerate the southerner is.
This guy will always be proud of
his heritage, and the honor of his
ancestors. When Dixie is
played, Mr. Miller, I will be
standing up!

RONALD CLARK

Exchange of Hates

MR. EDITOR:
The vehemence of the editorial The Dixie
Mentality; A Paranoiac Prejudice only serves as a
further reminder to the hate and intolerance which
thrives in our society today. Mr. Miller violently
decried the prejudice and social injustice which still
abounds in the South. He lambasted those
institutions which have been a barrier to social
progress, scorned those who still harbor hate or
resentment toward the Negro cause, and labelled
everything symbolic of this society as un-American,
including Dixie, the word rebel, and George
Wallace. It appears that the only thing he left out
was bacon and grits.
It Is hard to understand how a man with such
idealistic views can expect a poor, immoral middle
class Southerner to display a lack of prejudice which
he himself is incapable of. Is not die liberal in his
virulent attacks guilty of the same moral crimes
which he so righteously denounces? The
unfortunate fact remains that two wrongs do not

conferred upon students by
reluctant Administrators has
been fought for people like Ed
Freeman, by groups like S.D.S.
Significant progress is a myth;
the Board of Regents and Tigert
Hall give ground grudgingly, if at
all. Revisions in the FDC and
Student Code of Conduct came
about because of teach-ins,
sit-ins, deep-ins, and other
demonstrations, not because of
any benevolence on the part of
our in loco parentis guardians.
Demonstations at FSU last year
resulted in liberal guidelines tor
student publications; when
would they have come about if

In Defense of
George Wallace...
MR. EDITOR: W
It seems that everyone is quite disturbed by that man from
Alabama, George Wallace. Continually they compare him with Hitler
of Nazi Germany and tell ridiculous stories about dreams of
persecution and police states. Actually I doubt if many of those who
so severely chastise him know anything about his actual beliefs.
It is a common occurence to hear a line, taken from a Wallace
speech, pronounced as the utterings of a mad-man when the essence
of the speech is disgarded and completely ignored. If Wallace could be
heard by all those who repudiate him, they would realize that he does
not say what they have been led to believe. Before condemning a man
you should know more about him.
Wallace stands for law, order, peace, and democracy. I believe he u
the man who represents the majority of opinions in this country
today, and if others knew his stand they would no longer call hhi
America's Hitler.
RAYMOND H. TRINE, 2UC
******************************
MR. EDITOR:
Monday seems to have been your anti-Wallace day. The three
pieces of authorship however have cried the same old arguments
which all critics of George Wallace have been using. These arguments
have in the past been satisfactorily answered by others.
Mr. Hittleman proposes Collins and Humphrey as the best choice.
These two are but mere spokesmen of that type of politics which
begun with FDR 30 years and which has led this country toward ruin
financially, politically, and morally. From the New Deal to the New
Frontier to the Great Society, these spokesmen of this politics have
denied civil rights and individual freedoms.
They have building not a better democratic government.
Americans, long unaware of this great tragedy because of the fancy
talk, are now demanding an end to this type of politics.
George Wallace fulfills that demand. He talks straight. He talks
honest. And he talks sense. He will restore our liberties, our freedoms,
our right to govern ourselves.
JOE HARRISON, 4EG

it hadnt been for the furor that
led John Champion to
temporarily resign?
Like the Soviet Union, Tigert
Hall and the Regents are adept
at taking one step back, two
forward. Sure, Compulsory
R.O.T.C. is no more (It should
have been abolished in 1853).
But now President OConnell
can can a student WITHOUT a
hearing. 1984, anyone?
No, Mr. Editor, it is the naive
Panglosses, like those who write
insipid editorials, wheo are all
wet; the few activists on
campus are trying to change this
sheep farm into a university. In

HMnwhy, October 9,1968, Tht Florida AHtgotor.

make a right, and consequently people such as
himself can only do more harm to the cause of
human rights than good.
The bigoted attitude of the traditional
Southerner toward the Negro is assaulted, but here
we have a person who would just as soon see the
Southerners shipped of to Africa. So instead of
trying to create an era of love and understanding, he
has merely exchanged one hate for another, rather
trying to rationally solve the problems of the day.
The substitution of a North-South conflict for a
white-blade conflict, I think we would agree, would
accomplish nothing with the possible exception of
disuniting the country still further. And yet they
pay no heed and continue to fan the flames of this
inherently dangerous conflict.
The Great Idealists of the North seem dead set
upon remaking Southern society overnight and at
any cost even if that cost is the destruction of the
very society in which they live.
BRENT COX

his Letter from Birmingham
Jail, Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. wrote that time does not heal
all evils, for the forces oi
oppression are often the only
ones to take advantage of time,
thus perpetuating the conditions
that cause injustice and misery.
We can never allow complacency
to slow us down in our quest for
the rights that should belong to
each individual upon earth; as
long as there is one human being
who is being wronged by our
society, our entire society is
unjust and must be changed.
Democracy is not for the faint
of heart, Mr. Editor.
DAVID MILLER

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9,1968

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MAAS BROTHERS
Gainesville Mall
Hi, I'm Lynn. Sudden showers got you
down? Step high over those puddles in
this baby blue dirndl rain coat by Outer
Ltd. Do your own thing by adding your
own fantastic accessories. The coat can
be found in our own Rain Drop Shop.

'hmm

V
',W IBBK'M § r m
*rM ; m : *- -
BL
COLONY SHOP
Gainesville Mall
College Town comes to Florida. Skirts
and Jackets are big on any campus This
tweed is green wool trimmed with brass
buttons and belt. $16.00. A-line pleated
skirt, $14.00. Dacron and cotton blouse
with long ruffled sleeves $7.00. Modeled
by Tricia.

v SCOTT
' ; / Classmates '6B. Fashioned in wool by
,'s Bobbie Brooks. The long sweater vest is
over a navy fly-front pant skirt. Also
available are matching blazer and classic
:SS fegll -'.V u- cardigan. All wool, from SB. Sizes 5-13.
jH&B HHHHnL A variety of blouses to choose from.
Sizes 28 36 Modeled by Ellen.
-
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flhastffll

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vi-;--' r A' y.-.-:x : 'i,y'y;v ( J : \ '\.: v .y\.W ; WY V "-^Hsi?'
DONIGANS
University Avenue
Light weight woolens are great for
between seasons. This dress by Lanz
with shoes by Villager will be an all
purpose slip into for any occasion. The
shoes are square toed with gold buckes.
Earrings by Accessocraft. Modeled by
Penny.

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K if
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Bp* 6, **** *. ~.. _-.. 1*? 1 /** **
ill! i! 1 1 .-$? V- *?'
IIIIIIIIIm Him & *SS^&ME h :>';
mjjXim aftl
University Avenue B i V dflL .wK
Gay and Colorful Abstract prints like the SjjBBK |Hh #lj
one in these Dacron and cotton flounce *BBF '~^~ *agSfj leg slacks by Elli. The blouse is chocolate v< V : ,;' fIBfIBBVBfIBHjB' Wh|h
brown with a turtle neck, with french I iBBBBBBBBBBBBBB Sf-'* MB.
cuffs and made of crepe. Modeled FIGURE FAIR hH^K
Gainesville Mall
Dorm or apartment dweller, you never
have too many loungers, right? This one iBBy
is 100% quilted Kodel Polyester Fiberfill ; | -jg^|r -jg^|r
-jg^|r in vivid colors. Available in sizes S-M-Lg. B%tt / *
Only SIO.OO. Modeled by Caroll. jBR
>*<<.*, *.V JT i -:; Jllte;.
BiBHHMiH 881 I ?#jS ;
Jfl
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twig
SILVERMANS Gainesville Mall
Avenue >
Trip Ihe light fantastic in bell bottom
P V?^sJr 'J2 trousers in a plaid of red, gray and black.
Elegantly effervescent . .a one piece, Top it with a black velvet vest and very
button front dress designed with a black sissv blouse in gray. Modeled by Jan.
top, contrasting white collar, and a *a 'f^'^^^WiiM y t
black, white and red checked skirt. Open * If
V neck allows a scarf to be worn
Young Edwardian, orlon, wool
and acrylic. Modeled by Cris.
Photos by GUS MUSTELIER
jS-yy War ~.# >..' ''iiSt vt- '-' **f ' t .

Wednesday, October 9, 1968, The Florid* Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9,1968

Page 12

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


FOR SALE I
K $
196 z Vespa 125, runs well, S6O or
best offer Call Jerry at 378-4732.
(A-st-8-p)
1966 Honda s9O 4000 miles excellent
condition helmet & mirror included
$225 or best offer call m ross
378-5744 or 372-9479 ask for
mickey. (A-st-13-p)

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -%00 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
U (*) IO o
I I tn
__L_ 8 1.1 | £! I n
___ L_ 1 I 5
_ Li 5
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>
- |' " O! £> W to M
1,1 I < < < < < 3
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L 1 o > q z
? -H o c >
105 O o
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I in 5
tn i" 4
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--L s >
L Z f
t i r
L

I FOR SALE
196 7 Triumph-500cc, like new
condition, only 3000 miles, trailer
included. Call 376-4167 after 6:00.
(A-4t-12-p)
Vespa 90 for sale Scooter in good
condition. With helmet S6O. Call
Emery Swearingen between 7 and 10
pm 376-7014. Good student
transportation. (A-3t-12-p)

FOR SALE
:* ....{;.
vx.w>:o:ww* .wx mwww.v. .w.v.'
For hunting season 22-cal marlin bolt
action repeater whole gun in perfect
condtion S3O call 372-3749 ask for
Don. (A-13-lt-p)
1967 Moto Guzzi 700 cc with large
saddlebags, windshield, driveshaft,
electric starter. This is the V7 seen in
cycle magazines. 376-0229.
(Ast9p)
For Sale SCHWIN BICYCLE good
transportation, side baskets 26 in.
Call 378-5087. (A-3t-11-p)
Zenith 14 inch portable TV in good
condition but must sacrifice for
studying time-only $35.00 at 216
NW 3 Ave or call 376-1005 after 1
pm. (A-11-st-p)
1967 Honda Super Hawk, excellent
condition. Many extras. Helmet
available. $495 Call before 10:30 am,
or after 5:30 pm. 378-3156.
(A-11-4t-p)
Sport coats slacks shirts from
Donigans. Size 39-40. Too small for
meNeed money fast. David
378-1922. (A-11-3t-p)
BSA 1967 65occ excellent cond.
Helmet, tools & megaphones come
with it. Inquire at 309 S.W. 16 Ave.
Apt. 124 Gatortown Apt. (A-11-4t-p)
Custom Surfboard Hawaii AAA, blue
pigment. 4 mts. old. originally S2OO,
now $95. For a novice or adv. surfer.
Call Tom Eason 376-9208.
(A-11-3t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
7:30 Factor*
** THE DIRTIEST **
battlefield*,
if vny'-*different name ... marriage.^
MFVMPnHI
it 4 HT
Ti > JUUECWRISriE
GEORGE /
********
********
LAUGHING.. .**
JC LOVING... \
£ SWINGING! \
* -AS NEVER BEFORE!!
Kdqiey fttUtcr J
WlflYcJk?
r 191% N.W.im
@lg§§yj**
* c & \
if oVUL 4
t£e < Heart is a < Looe^ < ftmter^
If you want a picture that
touching,.tender and
J beautiful, go see this one."
i
3=09
5:19
+* 4

SKM&v %yw%ywww ^
nrV VV vw W* *
FOR SALE J
S?*>x<<<<<<*x # x # **-*w*^-*-** # ** w#v v#v w-# ***'****'
Bel! tape deck in portable case,
suitable for any amp. New $250 now
S9O. Alson Heath AM tuner in new
condition $30.00. 378-2719 after 3
pm. (A-2t-13-p)
196 5 Honda 305 cc (D ream).
Excellent condition. New
custom-made seat, saddle bags,
windshield, helmet. $450 or best
offer. Call 376-8159 after 6:30 pm.
(A-st-10-p)
Surfboard 9ft. 6 in. custom made to
test east coast shape glass/resin
content and other features, must be
seen to be appreciated. Call
afternoons or evenings 376-6623.
the most beautiful film
ever made.- Newsweek.
m LAST
Jiffll 3-S-7-9

I WED NIGHT I
I LADIES DRINKS!
I DANCE TO THE MUSIC I
I of RICHARD PARKER and I
I the SWINGING WITNESSES I
I WED. thru SAT. 9PM-.2AM I
m 1 as
I LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE I
I 1 N.W. 10 AVE. Phone 378-1636 I
THIS WEEKS
COCKTAIL SPECIALS
i MONDAY NIGHT
COCKTAILS 29<
i TUESDAY
LADIES DRINKS 19<
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
DOUBLESfor the price of SINGLES
i THURSDAY NIGHT
: FROZEN DACQUIRIS 59<
| ALIBI LOUNGE
3334 W. UNIV. AVE

.9;4(f
MjkJlZ.
\sicuthloiloui\
A ROBERT WtSt PftfIOUCTION
SIEVE MCQUEEN
RICHARD ATIENBOROUGH
RICHARD CRENNA
CANDICE BERGENmARAYATANDRIANE
ROBERT WISE TOKRf ANDERSON WCHARO McKENNA
safe.:*
BORIS LEVEN JtRRY GOLDSMITH
AN ARGUE sot AR PRODUCIIONS PHI USE fit MED IN PANAVISKM*
COE OR NT DElUtt
I -SPECIAL I |
SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES!
2:00-5:20-8:40
-i iHi I ii j



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

, 7; >J!p:.> 1
1 FOR SALE
X r S
Bonanza mini bike 4 hours use
$165.00 contact Bob. 114 tolbert
phone 376-9280 new tag fill tank for
only 9c. (A-lt-13-p)
23" Console TV 1966 Zenith.
Excellent condition. Best offer over
SIOO. Phone 378-1698. (Ast9p)
FOR RENT
-I^V.VXXX-X-X-X-X-X.X.NWXX-X-y.y.W.-O
i Bedroom-1 Bath house for rent
I ivingroom-d in ingroom-kit chen chen-12x16
-12x16 chen-12x16 enclosed fla. room Sleeps 6
comfortably, walking distance of
campus. $l5O/month. Call 378-9813.
(A-st-6-p)
Must sublet one bdr. apt. in Colonial
Manor. Pool, AC, only 100 yds. to
campus. Deposit already pd. Call
378-8481 after 5:30 p.m. (B-3t-11-p)
Peter Pan Motel Williston Fla. Just 20
min. from Gainesville. SB.OO, 2 pers.
Twin Beds. Also 6 x 38 trailer for
sale SISOO Call 528-3941.
(B-13-3t-p)
Somebody who wants to have our
cat, 10 months old, and will take care
of it well. Lack room for both cat
and coming baby. Call 378-5504.
(C-lt-13-p)
Wanted: Babysitter for two young
children in my home (Flavet 3)
Monday and Wednesday afternoons.
Hours flexible but must begin at
3:30. Call 378-4910. (C-lt-13-p)
Must Be Over 21 Hours to Suit You
Apply In person at the PIZZA HUT
1723 S.W. 13th st. (E-lt-13-p)
Immediate openings for part time or
full time male personnel. Better than
average salary and good chances for
advancement. Now interviewing from
3pm to spm daily. Apply in person,
ARBYS Restaurant 1405 S.W. 13th
St. (E-2M3-C)
WANTED: Someone artsy-craftsy"
who enjoys climbing ladders,
crawling under counters, full-time for
low pay and long hours in a
frivolically fun environment. If you
dare--inquire within: The Party Line,
Gainesville Mall. (E-13-st-p)
Boy or Girl--Cashier-Clerk Wanted
full time. Morning or evening shift
Call Mrs. Rowley 378-1001 for appt.
(E-13-3t-p)
1964 Porsche 356-C. One owner car.
Never raced or wrecked. $2600.00
Call 372-6018 after 5:30 weekdays,
anytime weekends. (G-13-st-p)
1965 Shelby GT3SO. 289C1D.
4-speed, AC, full instruments,
competition suspension, 2-seat
model, new tires, new paint.
372-9474 ask for Susie. Room no.
16. (G-4t-9-p)
Volvo 1225, 1965 Air, new brakes,
coil new clutch, new Dunlop tires, no
body damage, one owner $1450 Call
378-0159 or 378-7124. (G-13-3t-p)
GIRL WANTED TO cook evening
Meals Mon.-Thurs. for PRE-Med
students. NO dishes. Call 372-6884
Olympia Apts. 201. (J-13-4t-p)
Determine tomorrow-today analyze
opportunities, evaluate commitments
increase involvements, and do this
with us. Pnat C.K. Tonight Rm 349,
7:30. (J-13-lt-p)
Dearest SH, I love you and I always
will as we share life and grow old
together. With all my heart, Jude.
(J-13-lt-p)
All's well with JWL--Happy 28th! (all
you need is) LOVE (is all you need).
(J-13-lt-p)
LOST CONTACT LENS Were
contained in a small white case.
Campus vicinity. Reward. Call Chris
376-8553. (L-3t-13-p)
Lost black kitten with flea collar in
407 NW 15 st. 5 months. Call
3 78-8507 after 5:30. Reward.
(L-13-st-p)
Babysitter Student wife will care for
a second child in her home. 905 SW
6th Ave. Phone 378-6822 weekdays.
(M-lt-13-p)
Furn upstair apt 2 BR, air cond wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt 2
BR air cond Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-3-ts-C)
Spacious 1-bedroom Fully Furnished
including washing machine. Within
walking distance to Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357, 378-0641.
(Bts9c)
New 1 bedroom fully furnished with
A/C quiet, 3 1 /i miles from campus.
Prairie View Apts. Call 376-0292.
$102.00 per month. (B-3t-12-p)
WANTED
Daily Passengers To And From Jax
..eave Jax at 7:30 arti Gains.
Contact Helen Lundy 387-1055 Jax.
(C-3t-11-p)

I WANTED 1
...... >:
* * *****"*
Memberships are now available for
triangle flying club. Low cost flying
wth premium equipment. Cherokee
180 with full gyro panel, dual
aof aut -P t??? 1 for further information.
(C-st-11-p)
One Female Roommate to share la
S "'JJ? " e ther 9*' 37.50 mo.
,:j;*x*vWX-x M*x*x*Ny*:*x*xx*x*x-xix4*
HELP WANTED f
X*e*X*X4*X*X*S^s$ I BpX*X*X*X a X*X a X*NX*XXX4!S*!
Waitress for night shift, must be 21
yrs. of age. Apply at LUMS
Restaurant 1621 SW 13th street.
(E-ts-a-c)
Nite Help from spm til closing. Pick
your nites. No experience necessary.
Apply at Burger Chef 715 N.W. 13th
St, (E-st-10-p)
Engineering student wanted for very
interesting part-time work. Send
resume to P O Box 13199,
Gainesville. (E-14t-8-c)
Secretary wanted for the period Oct.
15 Nov. 25. No experience
necessary. Apply in Student
Publications office or Seminole office
after 3:30 p.m. (E tf Bnc)8 nc)
Attractive co-ed to cook for four
male grad students. Call 372-2182
between 5 and 7 p.m. (C-st-11-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50 for 1
hour session, must be native english
speaking and have normal hearing
please call Harriet Wilkerson, ext
2049. (E-SMI-C)
Electrical engineer wanted for
part-time work to assist inventor on
electronic research work. Send
resume to P O Box 968, Alachua,
Fla. (E-14t-8<)
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
with the nation's top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and dekmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
Models for commercial photography
write Liggett Enterprises PO Box
1011 Gainesville. (E-st-12-p)
AUTOS
1964 didsmobile Cutlass, good
condition, power steering, radio heat
bucket seats $750.00 Phone
372-7934. (G-6t-8-p)
1960 Corvair automatic transm.
Radio and heater. New paint for
$175.00 See at Pridgeons
Automotive & Body Work 12 sw
Deport Ave. 372-3480. (G-10-st-p)
Porsche for sale 59 Roadster 1600 N
In fine shape already inspected best
offer takes it call evenings 378-6540.
(G-st-12-p)
FUN CAR! 1966 Triumph TR-4A
IRS. Light blue with white top and
tonneau. A good car at a reasonable
price Call 372-1039. (G-st-12-p)
Corvette-1967 maroon coupe 390 hp
air cond power disc brakes-power
windows and steering AM-FM radio.
Good condition 372-7070 after 6.
(G-st-12-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph 650 recently
overhauled still on warranty, will
sacrifice. Call 372-9358 after 8 p.m.
(G-11-3t-p)
1963 Ford Fairlane 500 black and
white w. red int. 6 cyl. r & h very
good cond. best offer, call Ruben
378-6874. (G-st-11-p)
rtolls Royce styling and size.
Superbly maintained 1960 MK. IX
Jaguar. 4 door, air cond. 400 miles
on new engine. Complete with bar.
3760201. (Gst 4p)
64MGB dean & in good shape wire
wheels R&H $1295 378-6917 or see
at 301-6 Diamond Village.
(G-st-l 0-p)
PERSONAL
Your Personal Poster Headquarters,
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
has finally received its long-awaited
order of denim bellbottoms. Five
colors, most sizes, while they last
and for a paltry $6. If you don t wear
clothes, float in and check out the
selection of btacklites, posters,
incense, candles, roach clips, earrings
and other magnificents too qpnteTOus
to mention. The address is 10 SW 7th
St just around the corner from
Santa Fe Jumor t Q,ojl9^(j-^ >t 9 ~Pj

I PERSONAL I
p i Beta Phi transfers on Campus
follow the arrow! Your help is
needed. Please call 372-3193 soon!
(J-10-st-p)
SPECIAL NOTICE-The J. Wayne
Reitz Union has a few guest rooms
available for the weekend of Oct
12-14. Please call Guest Desk at
X 3486 or 372-3631. (J-12-3t-c)
SERVICES
SPECIAL: PAINT JOB $49.95
COME IN WHILE IT LASTS. 12 SW
DEPORT AVE. (M-3t-12-p)
Piano Lessons, beginners to third
grade. $2.50 half hour children,
$4.00 an hour adults. Call
372-1646 after 6:00 p.m. weekdays.
(M 5t 9p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, BUT you'll
be glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (Mts6c)
ALTERNATORS-GENERATORS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTA
STA ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTA RTERS-Electrical systems tested
repairs. Auto electric service-603 SE
Second Street 378-7330. (M-10-ts-c)
ST*
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-13-lt-c)
I
I e j
flj V
f 8
j .*1
IK Hi
1 K
S. s
m.. ,h',
I
y'* B

wpk
SONDRA LOCKE LOSES INNOCENCE
. .in "The Heart is A Lonely Hunter"
jW >WKW?WKWWKftSViWKPi K .VW>>K X K K : X : : >>>>>X*>K*>>>>!'!WH'Wi v >
| at |
I the
I flicks..
O>X*KW:'>X >>:OXsWW>>RWX WW>KW>M'K < WWWWW
By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
There are few things as painfully moving as the exposure of
someone elses incureable loneliness. Being a witness to the aloneness
of another recalls all too acutely hundreds of melancholy moments,
those still remembered solitary nights and days we all have known:
nights and moments and days spent in meaningless meanderings,
searching and wishing for somebody, somewhere, to reach out, to
understand...
The human heart needs the companionship of others. It cannot
exist alone without breaking; it cannot live without searching for its
complement. Loneliness is the heart's unfulfilled search, as necessary
as it is painful, as universal as it seems unique. The heart, is indeed, a
lonely hunter.
From the novel by Carson McCullers, Warner Brothers The Heart
is a Lonely Hunter (now playing at Center I) is perhaps the most
poignantly personal film of the year.
Alan Arkin, in his portrayal of John Singer, a deaf-mute desperately
trying to communicate with the world and the people around him,
turns in the finest performance of his career. Sondra Locke, a
newcomer to the screen, is also superb as Mick Kelly, a 14-year old,
filled with all the first, awkward emotions of growing into
womanhood.
Filmed entirely on location in Selma, Alabama, The Heart is a
Lonely Hunter portrays the racial prejudices of todays deep South
with a starkness that is all too real.
Parallelling Singers isolation because of his dumbness, Dr.
Copeland, a Negro, is isolated from his daughter because he cannot
accept her marriage to the man she loves, instead of her becoming a
doctor and bettering herself as he had always dreamed.
Ironically, although Singer mutely brings meaning into the lives of
everyone he touches, no one ever attempts to penetrate his silent
world. His lonely existence remains empty and unfulfilled.
Applications being
accepted for
MANAGING
EDITOR
o
Yearbook experience
required
Apply 3-5 p.m. aL
^s ji-rd,
.Roam Union. [ J V

Wednesday, October 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9, 1968

'TOP TO BOTTOM'

Blacks Want Chanae Now

no one recognizes you, he said.
Nothing is accomplished.
AASA has helped halt the
alienation process for blacks
here.
Lamb, more cautious, says the
organization hasn't made
definite plans on confronting the
administration this year. We
haven't decided what issues we
will raise," he says, or what
vehicle to use to approach the
administration."
But talking to the AASA
representatives it is clear there
are several grievances.
AASA member Emerson
Richardson Thompson Jr., AC
member, is not impressed with
AC at this point.
Lamb says a recent 10-page
faculty proposal for changes
had nothing in common with
what we are aiming at.
Jordan says hell no, one
course in black history is not
enough. We need several more
with black professors teaching
them, not whites.
Freshman government courses
are scheduled to include black
history for the first time. White
professors are scheduled to
teach.
We need counselors for
blacks, Lamb says. We need
black-oriented courses.
We need a voice in
determining which black
professors are to come here to
teach, Jordan says. If they
give us a Tom they do us more
harm than good." Lamb agrees.
Both are proud of AASA's
accomplishments last year. We
had help from federal
legislation, Jorday says, but
we got nondiscrimination in
approved student off-campus
housing. That and the Adam
Gayton Powell case helped
academic freedom on campus.
There was a noncensorship
this week from the
Faculty Senate partly as a result
of our work, he says.
The Faculty Senate voted this
week to permit anyone invited
to speak on Florida campuses.
Jordan also feels AASAs
very existence influenced (UF
President Stephen C.)
O'Connell's decision to initiate
the AC.
Talking to the black leaders it
is clear there is enormous
pressure on them They identify
with several widely different
national leaders. They have to
help" UF blacks but are
outnumbered almost
20,000-to-one.
There is always home and
parents to think about, and the
future.
Lamb, who says he still
believes a little in democracy, is
an advanced Army ROTC Lt.
Colonel. I will serve if called,
he says, not completely
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
4DA
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
806 E. ttntv. Are. 378-4373

All iljjil t(

convinced the Army is just
another arm of a racist,
imperialist country.
This is Jordan's sentiment:
Theres a jail or Canada waiting
for me, he says. Im not going
to Vietnam My war is right here
and establishment whites know
it.
AASA is glad to have other
groups support it when support
is requested, and smiles at the
financial support that followed
the assassination of Martin
Luther King.
Lamb says former Alligator
Editor Steve Hulls statement
last week that AASA will replace
SDS (Students for a Democratic

i
Ife not often
an engineer
gets to
design
a company.
r
. j
. u : . __
When he does,, he tends to take care The engineer who wants to be a No question about it: the engineers
of his own kind. technical specialist here can do as well at LTV Aerospace are takinq care of
He designs a company that is a the en 9' n eer who gets into themselves.
one heck of a good place for an a ministration. An LTV Aerospace represent tj .
engineer to work. The engineer who wants to keep tell you how to get in on it
w t working on an advanced degree can
You can tell LTV Aerospace Corporation do It right here. CAMPUS IMTFPmcuuc 1
is an engineering oriented company. i*aiwkUo INTERVIEWS
And the projects: they range from deep WEDNESDAY ott ik
The ratio of engineers to space to the ocean floor military 16
everybody else is exceptionally high. and commercial aircraft, V/STOL;
The computer support is tremendous. launch vehicles; extra vehicular Schedule an appointment or write write_
_ write_ activity research and development; high College Relations Offir
The Robert McCulloch research mobility ground vehicles; missile LTV Aerosoace Cnrnnrati
laboratory is the newest and one of the systemsfcomputer, technical and P o Box 5907 n* rfv
finest big labs in the country. management services. Aa equaUp rtX Jplo?er
t*-''.' . r '
om UMfl-riMeo-vouaHT; me oallab
.. /
oiviwom a/vo mm*om 0,vi,0/v oomaut.a lopv //vc rrmnj-r mo

INTERPRETIVE

Society) as the more active
reform group on campus has
no basis whatsoever.
Then he adds: I realty don't
want to say too much yet. It
really depends on what the
administration doesor doesnt
do.
Jordan explained, Its
important to realize its an
enormous problem to tospecifically
specifically tospecifically identify and locate
the deep-rooted racism in this
country.

COMMITMENT
to
STUDENTS

1 Board Challenged I
v The newly-born New Movement party has challenged Union Board
candidates to a debate Monday night.
The Union Board spends $500,000 of the students* money, said
Steve Hull, New Movement candidate for Union Board president We
would like to see more student involvement.
Invitations have been issued to UF president Stephen C. O Connell,
the major members of the administration and the deans of the
colleges, Hull said.
We want the administration and deans to understand the
problems of the UF, the importance of the Union Board and how it
affects the university community, he said.
nVhat We really hope Hull said, is that the Committment party
will debate tissues.
i STAK*SHAK I
i |
| Student Special
I (With The Coupon) j
Our Regular 88t Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
| $1.03 Value Only 85{ lus tax |
Steak n f Shake l
16105. W. 13th St. Gainesville I




AEPis Shower Wealth To United Fund

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
The AEPis are out to be the
cleanest fraternity on campus.
They are sponsoring a 350 hour
showerthon to break a prior
record of 306 hours held by the
University of Oregon.
According to rules for a
showerthon, at least one person
must be in the shower at all
times. The AEPis are out not
only to break the record, but
to also raise money for the United
Fund.
Highlighting the 15 day
period will be when Aunt Helen
Sherman, AEPi housemother,
who will wash her troubles

- V. ~Jtr # W
" ; .A < ~ 'v6\ x- .. s
[ J 9
CLEAN FUN
Two AEPi's do their stint in the shower outside Playboy. Guess you might call this good clean
the fraternity house Brother on right is reading fun. _____^________

Group
All students involved in
Marine Corps Officer program
are invited to the first meeting
of Semper Fidelis, Wednesday,
October 10 in room 150-B of
the Reitz Union at 7:30 p.m.
Staff Sergeant Bill Carr,
USMC, will be guest speaker.
Anyone interested in joining the
Marine Corps program is
welcome to attend.
The present members plan
physical fitness programs based
on Marine Corps training and a
clothing drive for Vietnamese
refugees.
The UF Stereophiles
will have their first meeting of
the quarter Wednesday, October
9, 8 p.m. in room 403 of the
college library.
High Earnings
In the 61-62 school year
professors in the College of
Medicine earned more on the
average than professors in any
other College.
it YwrGwMrator \
f OVERHAULED Sotckl f
V*A 50 )
% mtuiorr
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
wnwr a* avc oamcsvku
( AM-7FM SAT. TKJ Ml
WKRM

away at noon Saturday. The
showerthon begins tonight
(Wednesday) at 8 pjn and
concludes at 6 a.m., Thursday
the 24th.
Operation Showerthon is
the brainchild of Don Kahn,
AEPi Vice-President; Todd
Kliston; and Ron Waldorf, past
Vice-President. The main
objective of the showerthon at
first was merely to break the
University of Oregons record
but the goal now is to raise
money for the United Fund.
If every person on campus
contributed even a dime, we (the
AEPis, who, incidentally, won
the Dan McCarty Service Trophy
last year) could raise about
$2,000, said Waldorf. As the

Activities
The group is composed of
hi-fi buffs and people just
interested in good music.
Events planned by the group
include listening parties and
workshops on
building and purchasing.
For further information call
Geoffrey Langdon at 378-0187.
RAME HAIR STYLIST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549

B VISIT GAINESVILLE'S COMPLETE
'Heres Arlene in one of WOMEN'S STORE
the sharpest styles on
Campus. .This fQR YOUR EVERYDAY CLOTHING NEEDS
meditation style of
dress with a Nehru V £
collar is the
football games and
that special date when f 1 f I
you want to look your y y
best. Trimmed in gold
brocade with exciting \ I|Z| | | j*
shocking pink colors 1220 W. UNIV. AVE NOT HAVE SEEN US IS
to set you apart from Ph. 376-2585 BECAUSE WE'RE RIGHT
your Competition. Who sdys you have Id be UNDER YOUR NOSE!!!
Sizes range from 5-13. great big to be great?
Come & see it today. JUST Q N g BLOCK OFF CAMPUS

350 HOURS UNDER DELUGE

showerthon ends the 24, wed
like to be able to present the
check to the United Fund at Fall
Frolics the next evening.
The shower will be 1 built on
the front lawn of the AEPi
house so spectators at any time
may come by and be assured of
seeing at least one boy in die
shower. A large cannister will be
placed alongside the shower for
donations.
Wearing shirts reading AEPi
Showerthon, all the brothers will
be collecting money around
campus for the 15 day period.
Aiding them will be the Little
Sisters of the Golden Lion.
A banquet kicking off the
Showerthon takes place tonight.
Honored guests are Clyde

MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
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Taylor, Student Body President;
Jim DeVaney, Interfratemity
Council President; Steve Zack,
administrative assistant to the
Student Body and former AEPi
President; Colonel LJK. Cannon,
executive director of the United
Fund of Alachua County; and
Mr. Roberts R. Treweek, the
1969 Campaign Chairman of
United Fund.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell declined the
invitation to attend the opening
due to prior committments
concerning his inauguration, but
did promise to attend sometime
during the 350 hours.
Clyde Taylor will cut the
ribbon on the shower at 8 p.m.
as the first AEPi brother steps
into the shower.
Every two hours at least two
men will have alternately
occupied the shower. At night
the shifts will be increased to
two men per three hours. In case
of rain a shower will be going
inside the house to insure
someone always getting we.
Last year Action Line, a
question and answer section of
the Alligator, advised thte AEPis
not to hire professional judges.
The actual judging of the
Showerthon (making sure
someone is in the shower at all

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times) will be left up to the
integrity of the AEPi house.
According to Waldorf there is
a possibility that Lever Brothers,
makers of Lifebuoy soap, the
soap for the shower that can last
all day, may film a commercial.
Waldorf said that a
community service is a necessity
for fratemities-were just trying
to put a little life into it.
However, a novel idea like this,
especially for the purpose or
raising money for a fund like
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wholehearted support of the
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Page 15



Page 16

I, Tlw Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 9, 1968

'Action Stresses Classroom Performance

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Correspondent
A teachers performance in
the classroom will play an
important part in his evaluation
q Letters B
5 i rom n
iH 0 PEI
DEAR GRANDMOTHER,
How are you? Fine I hope. 1
am doing fine and so are Uncle
Oran, Aunt Angela and Bill.
Guess what, Grandmother? Bill
and me we went to the college
again and Bill showed me where
the Greek students live. They
have these great big houses with
funny letters carved in them.
When I saw the letters I said to
Bill that they sure cant write
too good and he said they cant
do anything very good.
I feel kind of sorry for the
Greek students because they live
so far from everybody else. I
asked Bill if the reason for them
living so far from everybody else
was because nobody liked them.
He said yes, that it was
something like that.
Then he drove us to where
the girl Greeks live and do you
know something, Grandmother?
The girl Greeks live even farther
from everybody than the boy
Greeks! Its like they wanted to
keep to themselves and not talk
with the rest of the kids, and Bill
said yes, that was the reason. We
stopped and Bill tried to talk to
some of them but they werent
very friendly or nice.
Grandmother, why cant the
Greek girls here be more friendly
to people who arent Greek? The
Italians and Indians are nice. Bill
said so.
Then Bill told me about what
rush is. Do you know what it is?
Its real funny and is mixed up.
He said that sometimes the
Greek kids ask other kids to
come and join their clubs. He
said that the kids who put oh
the best acts for the Greek kids
can join the club, but that the
ones who dont laugh alot and
shake hands alot and do acts
cant get in the clubs. I wonder
why they like show-offs so
much? Do you know,
Grandmother?
Well, I guess the Greek kids
only like show-off kids and
nobody else. Bill said the Greek
kids hardly ever talk to other
kids. I guess they must be better
than the rest of the kids,
Grandmother. But wouldnt it
be nice if everybody was
friendly to everybody else?
Everybody would be happy
then, wouldnt they,
Grandmother? I will write to
you agtu. very soon and tell you
what other funny things happen
here.
L.OV3 an i x*x
/fD |oe

if the Action Conference has
anything to say about it.
The 7 5-member group
recently created to study the
Universitys problems last week
passed unanimously a resolution
recommending all faculty
members participate in this
years voluntary teacher
evaluation program sponsored
by student government.
They want the results to be
given not only to the instructor
but to his department head and
dean as well.
The Conference also agreed
that evaluation of teaching skills
should be added to the
evaluation of other criteria now
used to determine a professors
merit, such as quality of research
and publication.
For some reasons that sound
good on the surface, teaching
has not usually been included in
the evaluation. We recognize
many different styles of teaching
- we just want to focus on

K
we were
happy
with the world
the way it is,
we wouldn't
need you.
Kids choke on polluted air. Streets are jammed by But we need more people,
cars with no place to go. Lakes and rivers are a We need help from a lot of young engineers and
common dumping ground for all kinds of debris. scientists; and we need help from business and
This is the way the world is, but its not the way liberal arts graduates who understand people and
it has to be. their problems.
Air pollution can be controlled. Better transpor- If you want to help change the world, wed like
tation systems can be devised. There can be an to talk to you. Well be visiting campus soon. Why
almost unlimited supply of clean water. not drop by the placement office and arrange for an
People at General Electric are already working interview? You might be able to turn a problem
on these problems. And on other problems that into an opportunity.
need to be solved. Problems like developing more pri|r nA | . p Avn I A
efficient ways of providing power to our cities and bCNC RA L Bfajjf; ELECTRIC
figuring out ways our production capabilities can
keep up with our population needs. An equal opportunity employer

IN TEACHER EVALUATION

teaching, explained Dr. Corbin
Camell, chairman of the Action
Conferences task force on
curriculum. He is also a faculty
representative to SGs evaluation
program board.
Every department has some
kind of teacher evaluation.
Teaching skills are only a
criterion in the education and
engineering schools, in the
political science department, and
in perhaps a few other
departments, according to Dr.
Camell.
The present SG program for
which a professor may volunteer
to participate distributes to
students a multiple-choice
questionnaire developed at
Purdue University. The
textbooks, classroom conditions,
work load, courses catalog
description, and student
participation are examined in
addition to the teacher.
Were trying to measure how
the teacher comes through to

the student in that course, and
we hope evaluation will improve
curriculum under the quarter
system, Dr. Carnell said.
In past years only a fraction
of professors have participated.
In return, SGhas provided them
with the results, including
students comments.
Those who volunteered
were already doing a good job in
many cases. Some who didnt
participate may be those who

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need the feedback from their
students, he noted.
I believe some of the student
discontent in this country can be
attributed to neglect of
teaching, Dr. Camell stated.
The six-member curriculum
task force has also formulated
recommendations for a pass-fail
system and reviewed the quarter
system. The committee consists
of two members from each part
of the administration-faculty administration-facultystudent
student administration-facultystudent trichotomy.



( .. r ... . ..
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But we believe that making our world a
better place to live in makes good sense
as well as good business. And this kind
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the world. People like you. Bring your
ideals, and your motivation, where theyll

Wadnasday, October 9, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator, I

make good things happen. See our
interviewers on campus. Or send a
resume to: Mr. G. O. Wheeler, Manager
Professional Recruitment, 717 Fifth
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022
ARCO Chemical Division
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Page 17



Page 18

I, Th Florida Alligator, Vfednasday, Octofaar 0,1968

Wire Services Honor Three More Gators

Christian Runner-Up
UPI Offensive Back

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA In this era of
wide-open, pro-type offenses,
the college defensive backs have
acquired new status.
Such a man is Robert Walter
Bailey, Monster man for the
University of Mississippi. Bailey
was given a tough assignment
last Saturday: guard Alabamas
George Ranager, one of the
nations most promising
sophomore receivers.
Ranager, who had scored
three of Alabamas first four
touchdowns this season, never
caught a pass and Ole Miss won
10-8.
For this performance, Bailey
Tuesday was named
Southeastern Conference
defense player of the week by
United Press International.
Placekicking specialist John
Riley of Auburn, who kicked a
conference record four field

d& Mb £ m>. S 3|b 1 I^hhmS
fmzW _^M^*mSm^^^KKF9Ez££Xir(^U^^Hmm!MmsJPwit^a
|g||||i. W'"'" wM* ::: wir& ATL*s§£
:v '-, f w k, -'fiw^^^BH^Kl^Kk
CHRISTIAN (31) CUTS DENNIS (77) LEADS
. . downfield for 58-yard TD ... blocking for Smith (33)

Hager Remains On Defense, Injured Heal

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Florida Head Coach Ray
Graves yesterday put down any
lingering stories about Ted
Hagers immediate future by
saying that the sophomore will
have to remain at comerback
at least for the Tulane game.
We have minor injuries to
both Jerry Faix and Steve
Tannen, said Graves, and at
this time, theres just no
opportunity to shift him to
offense.
I will say that sooner or
later, Hager will be moved to
offense. Hes far too good a
receiver to stay on blocking
assignments, although he also
stands out in that position.
I had originally planned to
shift Ted over after the Florida
State game, but injuries have just
never permitted it,
Floridas injuries continued to
lessen, with Brit Skrivanek back
working at full speed.
Even the Gators long term
%. injuries have improved. David
Mann, who started in the
defensive backfield against Air
Force, has begun running drills.

COMMITMENT
to
STUDENTS

goals in the Tigers 26-7 win over
Kentucky, was named SEC
offense player of the week by
UPI.
Also earning high mention
was Alabama linebacker Mike
Hall, a previous winner, who was
outstanding in defeat Saturday.
Hall not only harassed
Mississippi quarterback Archie
Manning, but blocked a
last-second punt that kept
Alabama from being held
scoreless for the first time since
Bear Bryant took over as coach
11 season ago.
Runnerups for SEC offense
player of the week were Tommy
Christian of Florida and Richard
Pickens of Tennessee.
Christian, despite a broken
nose, scored on touchdown
jaunts of 51 and 58 yards in
Floridas 31-14 victory over
Mississippi State and Pickens
gained 116 yards hr just seven
carries to highlight the Vols
explosive attack.

He is expected to play in the
North Carolina game in two
weeks.
Gary Bimson, a junior college
transfer who has been injured
since Fall practice, may be
red-shirted if his condition does

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YARBOROUGH'S (88) GRAB
.. sets up Gator touchdown

not improve. That way he will
have three full years of
eligibility.
* In addition, game captains
have been named for the Tulane
game. They are Guy Dennis for
offense, and Tannen on defense.

Dennis Named AP
Offensive Lineman

UF Offensive guard Guy
Dennis was named Southeastern
Lineman of the Week by the
Associated Press Tuesday for his
play against Mississippi State.
Dennis, 6-2, 252 pounder,
graded 95 per cent in blocking
and completed all 51 of his
assigned blocks against the
Bulldogs.
Guy Dennis had the most
fantastic blocking day of anyone
Ive had play for me, Coach
Ray Graves said.
The burly guard wasnt
content with merely taking out
his own man. On five occasions,
he wiped two opposing players
while he protected the Gator
passer.
UFs Jim Yarbrough also drew
nominations from the APs
Southeastern All-American
Advisory Board along with
Sammy Milner, a Mississippi
State end who caught eight
passes against the Gators.
Tom Christian, Gator

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halfback, was also mentioned for
Southeastern Back of the Week
honors. Christian ran two
touchdowns of more than 50
yards.
Other linemen praised for
their performances Saturday
included guard David Roller of
Kentucky, Buck Shiver of
Georgia Tech, Mike Hall of
Alabama, Ole Miss linebackers
Frank Trapp and Robert Bailey
and Florida State linebacker
Dale McCullers who made 20
unassisted tackles.
Southeastern Back of the
Week honors go to Georgia Tech
quarterback Larry Good, who
hit 14 of 24 passes for two
touchdowns against Clemson.
Other backs mentioned from
the panel included kicker from
Auburn John Riley, who set an
SEC record with four field goals
against Kentucky; LSUs Freddie
Haynes who guided the Bengals
to four touchdowns in five series
of plays.



Soccer Record Impressive
But Fails to Draw Crowds

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Awstant Sports Editor
Vln Western Europe,
Scandinavia, and Latin America,
among other places, a game
often known as football is
played with five forward
linemen, three halfbacks, two
fullbacks, and a goalie.
In the United States another
game known as football is
played-with different rules, a
different alignment of players,
even a different-sized playing
field.
Almost the only point in
common for the two games of
football is that they both have
11 players to a team.
For the uninitiated, the first
game of football changes its
name when it crosses the
American border, taking on the
more familiar name of soccer.
A UF challenge to American
football comes from the UF
Soccer Club, organized in 1952
by a student from Honduras.
The purpose of the club is to
give students interested in the
game a chance to practice and
participate in the game. It is also
open to newcomers wanting to
leam the fundamentals.
The club now has 60
members, representing 16
nationalities and 13 states.
Out of the 11 players in the
starting lineup, seven come from
outside the United States: two
from England and one each from
Brazil, Honduras, El Salvador,
Argentina, and Mexico.
The four remaining starters
come from Florida,
Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and
New York.
The club carries an overall
record of 130 victories, 15

Only In America

Only in America:
Could a refugee learn to play
football well enough to be
granted a full scholarship.
Carlos Alvarez came to the
United States in 1960, from
Cuba not even knowing what a
football was.
The Boys Club of Miami
offered him his first opportunity
a t football, after Carlos had
seen some boys practicing at the
local high school.
I couldnt figure out what
Jhey were doing, Carlos said.
The helmets and the shoulder
pads really threw me.
Carlos started out playing
quarterback for a midget league
team in North Miami, his
hometown. He played in the
league for two years.
In high school Carlos also
played baseball and basketball as
well as football. But never did he
lrna gine he might be sought by
joajor colleges because of his
football prowess.
In my junior year some
schools started approaching me,
* nd I was really surprised,
arlos said. One thing I knew
tor sure, I wouldnt be going to
college unless I did get a
scholarship.
Carlos, who plans to major in
either history or political science

| 1 j|| jj H IP?? v
a-!; 1 11 B
I \ m R j 1 2 V
UF SOCCER CLUB
... stops opponents scoring drive

losses, and 14 ties since its
organization. This includes
Saturdays 4-2 victory over
Embry-Riddle Aero Institute of
Daytona Beach, the first match
of this season.
Games this year will include
matches with the University of
South Florida, Georgia Tech, the
Orlando Soccer Club, the St.
Petersburg Soccer Club, Maxwell
Air Force Base, and the
Homecoming Weekend game
with Florida Presbyterian
College.
Due to its wide exposure over
the world, soccer is a game that
many American players seem to
pick up easily when they come
into contact with it.
In fact, there are more
American students who have
picked up the game of soccer
than there are foreign students
who have picked up the
American game of football,
according to Soccer Club advisor
Alan C. Moore.
But more foreign students
play soccer well than Americans

and go to Law School, played
his first college football game
Monday.
The 5-foot-11. 175 pound
halfback caught nine passes for
194 yards and set up the second
Gator score with a 34 yard pass
reception from quarterback
John Reaves. Carlos also scored
one touchdown himself.
Carlos is an amateur juggler.
Ive been juggling for a few
years to relax myself, Carlos
said. Its great when youre

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do, Moore said.
The largest attendance that
the club has had for a game in
Moores recollection is a crowd
of 3800 persons who watched a
match with FSU played in
Florida Field several years ago.
The average attendance for
home games, which are played
Saturday mornings on Fleming
Field behind the stadium, is
about 300.
Needless to say, were not a
spectator sport as much as we
are a participant sport here,
Moore said.
But it is only in the United
States that soccer is not widely
heralded as a spectator sport. In
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, soccer
games consistently fill a
200,000-seat stadium, making
the 102,000-seat Rose Bowl
look small in comparison.
Many players become heroes
to their fans, and at least one
Pele, of Santos, Brazil, who has
been billed as the worlds
greatest soccer player has been
declared a national resource and
cannot be traded or sold.

studying in the dorm and you
start to get tensed up.
There are two other Alvarez
brothers attending school at UF.
They are Caesar, 21, and
Arthur, 20. The older brothers
are Carlos biggest fans.
Next year the wideout
receiver position at UF shouldnt
be hard to fill.
Only in America:
Could a refugee become an
All-American football player.
Carlos Alvarez is on his way.

| Blue League Finals |
| In Swim Competition i
f By STEVE ROHAN §
$ Alligator Corraapondant :j;
! Phi Gamma Delta came up with a strong showing in the
§ preliminaries of the Blue League swim meet by placing in every event, j
winning both relays and are odds on favorites to win the entire meet 5
| tonight at Fla. Pool. \\
| Chi Phi is running a strong second as they came up with the best:jj
times in the 50 yard freestlyes, backstrokes and breaststrokes.
Craig (joldwyn, Julian Jensen, and Worth Barron of Fiji turned in a i j j
pleading time of 1:28.5 seconds in the Medley relay. They wereijj
by Chi Phi, DX, Phi Kappa Tau, Theta Chi, and TKE in that ill
border.
Scott Smith of Delta Chi won the 100 Free in 57,3 seconds Fiji, j
gDelta Sigma Phi, Fiji, TKE, and PKPsi finished afterwards in that; |
border.
§ Chi Phis Carl Holzer easily won the 50 Back with a 28.3 Phi |
| Gamma Delta, Phi Gamma Delta, Theta Chi, Phi Kappa Tau, and TKE |
| also placed.
| In the 50 Free, Holzer again qualified first with a 24.5. DX, DSP. £
XP, and RGD also qualified. :
5 s
Â¥ Wright Gress also of Chi Phi squeaked out a narrow win in the 50 $
$ Breast with a 32.6 time. In close pursuit were PGD, TKE, TX, DX, j*:
jjTX, and PGD. %
>1 The Fijis with Danny Lime, Jim Hoover, Steve Young and Dane:*:
Griffin, took the number one position in the 200 freestyle relay with:*:
jija time of 1:44.3. The OXS, TKEs, XPs, TXs, and AGRs followed. |
: These times are not the final times as the finals will be held tonight:*:
|i:and times and places may change. Eight out of 11 fraternities placed:*:
3 men into finals. . wt r& uwv -.- 1J v |
coming THE
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Wwdnwday, Octoter 9,19681 Tht Florida Alligator,

Page 19



I, The FtfliWi Alligator, Wednesday, October 9, 1968

Page 20

Gators Up and Down

NEW YORK UPI Purdues
powerhouse Boilermakers, who
steamrollered Northwestern
Saturday in a tuneup for their
Big Ten showdown with Ohio
State this week, are still the
lords of college football.
The 35-member United Press
International board of coaches
named Purdue No. 1 in the
nation for the second straight
week today, casting 32 first
place votes for Jack
Mollenkopfs unbeaten
Boilermakers, now 3-0. Purdue
drew 344 points to easily
outdistance Southern California,
the defending national
champion, which received two
first place votes and 303 points.
Penn State retained its No. 3
ranking after beating West
Virginia and Kansas, which
demolished New Mexico 68-7,
moved up to fourth. Notre
Dame, which fell from No. 1
two weeks ago to eighth last
week, began to move back up
the ladder, taking fifth with 152
points.
Nebraska finished sixth with
123 while only two points
separated the next three teams,
Ohio State 111, Louisiana State
110 and Florida 109. Houston
was a distant 10th with 58
points.
Michigan State, rebounding
from a dismal season last year,
climbed to No. 11, followed by
Tennessee and Georgia.
Surprising California waS 14th
and Mississippi, which beat
Alabama for the first time in 58
years Saturday, rose to 15th.
Southern Lai Knocked Miami
Fla. out of the top 20 with a
28-3 thumping and Notre Dame
flattened lowa 51-28. Nebraska
was idle, prior to its crucial Big
Eight meeting with Kansas this
week, and Louisiana State
trounced Baylor 48-16. Florida
easily beat Mississippi State
31-14.
UPI
1. Purdue 32 3-0 344
2. Southern Cal 2 3-0 303
3. Penn St. 3-0 202
4. Kansas 3-0 166
5. Notre Dame 2-1 152
6. Nebraska 3-0 123
7. Ohio State 2-0 2-0 111
Br. Louisiana St. 3-0 110
9. Florida 3-0 109
10. Houston 1 2-0-1 58
Second 10 ll. Michigan St.
51; 12. Tennessee 36; 13.
Georgia 35; 14. California
32; 15. Mississippi 30; 16.
Syracuse 16; 17. Arkansas
14; 18. Stanford 9; 19. Oregon
St. 8i 20. Wyoming 6.
Others receiving votes
Arizona State, Colorado, Texas
Tech.
AP
The Top 20, with first place
votes, records and total points
(points award for first 15 picks
on basis of 20-18-16-14-12-10-9-
8-7-6-54-3-2-1):

COMMITMENT
t I
STUDENTS |

-AP 7th,UPI 9th 9th

1. Purdue 35 3-0 736
2. Southern Cal 1 3-0 660
3. Penn State 1 3o 492
4. Ohio State 2o 424
5. Notre Dame 2l 401
6. Kansas 3-0 398
7. Florida 3-0 369
8. Louisiana St. 3-0 276
10. Tennessee 2ol 184
11. Houston 2ol 183
12. Michigan St. 3o 118
13. Mississippi 3o 113
14. Arkansas 3o 85
15. Syracuse 2-1 81
16. California 3o 64

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an equal opportunity employer

17. Georgia 2ol 62
18. Stanford 3o 42
19. Florida St. 2-1 29
20. Oregon St. 2l 23
Others receiving votes, listed
alphabetically: Alabama,
Arizona State, Boston College,
Colorado, Indiana, Miami, Fla.,
Missouri, Ohio University,
Southern Methodist, Texas,
Texas Tech, UCLA, Virginia,
Washington, West Virginia,
Wyoming, Yale.

U.S. Team Ready
MEXICO CITY (UPI) Americas Olympic athletes, black and
white together, joined hands in an impressive flag raising ceremony
Monday, listened to a talk by U.S. Ambassador Fulton Freehan and
then went about their business getting ready for the games, now only
six days away.
Every black member of the U.S. squad of 393 athletes took part in
the flag raising ceremony, which included a salute to the flag and the
singing of the National Athem. John Carlos, the world 200-meter dash
record holder who shattered the Olympic calm Sunday when he
announced black athletes would hold some sort of demonstration
during thejgames, was there and sang as loudly as any one.
Hilmer Lodge, U.S. track and field committee chairman, the track
coaches Payton Jordan and Stan Wright again stated their belief Carlos
was speaking only for himself when he made his demonstration
announcement Sunday.
We have fine rapport on our team, said Jordan maybe the best
any team has ever had. Personally, I dont believe there will be any
sort of demonstration.