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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
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Daily bulletin
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Orange and blue daily bulletin
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the students of the University of Florida
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Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
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Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
INAUGURAL SPECIAL

Pacemaker
All-American

V01.61yN0.12 University of Florida Gainesville Tuesday, October 8,1968

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The
Florida Alligator

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

UF Jnauaurates First Alumnus

Campus Welcomes
600 State Leaders

The UF comes into its own
today.
About 600 leading Floridians
are expected on campus today
to join the university
community in the inauguration
of Stephen C. OConnell-the
first native of Florida and first
Florida alumnus to serve as
president of the state's largest
university
Included in the universitys
sixth inaugural ceremony will be
Gov. Claude R. Kirk Jr. and
other state and national officials.
Among the guests will be
representatives of the Florida
Board of Regents and the
Florida Supreme Court, past and
present university presidents and
student, faculty and alumni
leaders.
University students will be
excused from second, third and
fourth period classes Tuesday to
attend the once-in-a-student
life-time inauguration at Florida
Gym.
Mixed with the traditional
pomp and circumstance will be
reminders of the inaugurations
contemporary theme, The
Function of the University in a
Modem World.
Pre-inaugural cultural
activities start with a lecture, A
University Collects, by Jack D.
Flam of the Department of Art
at 7 p.m. Sunday in the
University Gallery Auditorium.
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DR. ELVIS J.STAHR
... inaugural guest
i
DR. JACK WILLIAMS
... symposium speaker

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is Gw official student newspaper at the University of Florida
and Is published five Uses weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
sent-weekly, aad during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Belts
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
M agoond class jnattar at the United states office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rite is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.,
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertise
tise advertise meals aad to revise or tun away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible tor more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. OCONNEU

The University of Florida
Collection exhibit will open
with an 8 p.m. reception in the
gallery.
The Space Sciences Research
Building will be dedicated at
10:30 a.m. Monday. Thomas 0.
Paine, newly appointed by
President Lyndon B. Johnson as
acting chief of the National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA) will
speak at the Bless Auditorium
ceremony. Paine will assume his
duties on the day of the
dedication.
President OConnell will
accept the building for the
University with Henry Kramer,
vice chairman of the Board of
Regents, accepting for Florida.
A luncheon at the Reitz Union
will follow the dedication.
Making addresses on the
inaugural theme during a 2 p.m.
symposium in the union
auditorium will be Dr. Elvis J.
Stahr Jr., president emeritus and
professor of law at Indiana
University, and Dr. Jack K.
Williams, vice president for
academic affairs for the
University of Tennessee System.
Dr. Frederick W. Conner, vice
president for academic affairs at
the University of Florida, will
preside at the symposium, with
Dr. Lester L. Hale, vice president
for student affairs, presiding at
the 6:30 p.m. pre-inaugural
dinner in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
Offering dinner greetings to
President OConnell will be Dr.
J. Wayne Reitz, the Universitys
fifth president, now director of
graduate programs with the U.S.
Office of Education; Dr. Harry
M. Philpott, president of Auburn
University and a former vice
president of the University of
Florida; the Rt. Rev. Msgr.
Jeremiah P. OMahoney, St.
Edwards Church in West Palm
Beach, OConnells hometown,
and Walter R. Lee Jr., president
of the Gainesville Area Chamber
of Commerce.
H.M.S. Pinafore by Gilbert
and Sullivan will be presented
for inaugural guests only by the
Universitys Department of
Music at 8:30 p.m. Monday in
the Constans Theatre.
The inaugural convocation,
wrapped in full academic regalia,
will begin at 9:30 a.m. with the
traditional processional. In the
grand march will be faculty
members, platform guests,
regents, Supreme Court justices,
all visiting presidents and the
Universitys Administrative
Council.
Chester H. Ferguson,
chairman of the Board of
Regents, will preside at the
convocation.

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UF PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL i
... first alumnus to assume UF presidency

Greeting President OConnell
will be Gov. Kirk; William OJE.
Henry of Bartow, president of
the University of Florida Alumni
Association; Dr. Raymond E.
Crist, graduate research
professor of geography, speaking
for the faculty, and Student
Body President Clyde M. Taylor
Jr.
OConnells inaugural address,
following his induction by
Ferguson, will relate his goals
and objectives for the
University.
Robert B. Mautz, chancellor
of the State University System,
will preside at the inaugural
luncheon, scheduled at 12:30
p.m. in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
On the program will be
Campbell Thomal, justice of the
Florida Supreme Court, of
which OConnell was a member
for 12 years; Floyd T. Christian,
state superintendent of public
instruction; U.S. Rep. Donald
Fuqua of the Second
Congressional District; Ralph D.
Turlington, speaker of the
Florida House of

Representatives; President John
S. Allen of the University of
South Florida, former acting
president of the University of
Florida; President Joseph W.
Fordyce of Santa Fe Junior
College here; Gainesville Mayor
Theodore E. Williams; Sidney
Martin, Alachua County
Commission chairman, and Mrs.
Williard E. Stone, University
Womens Club president.
The Universitys Mens Glee

8 8
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| INAUGURATION SCHEDULE!
| j
,jj 9.30 a.m. Inaugural Convocation: Florida Gymnasium
J 12:30 pm Luncheon: J. Wayne Reitz Union
I .0. §
4:00 6:00 p.m. Reception: President and Mrs. Stephen C.
I I
ft O'Connell's Home
ft n S
| 8:15 pm Concert University of Florida Chamber
$ : V
Orchestra, University Auditorium
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g 5
$ 5

Club will entertain during the
luncheon.
President and Mrs. OConnell
will host a reception at their
home from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday
for inaugural guests, university
faculty, staff and students and
local citizens.
The closing event will be a
University Chamber Orchestra
concert at 8:15 p.m. Tuesday in
University Auditorium. Edward
C. Troupin will conduct.



The Many Faces Os Stephen OConnell

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. NICK ARROYO
EDITORIAL
Tm Steve OConnell
Hi. Fm Steve OConnell.
The outstretched hand. The easy, almost boyish
grin. The twinkling eyes.
A probing question. A thoughful pause. A helpful
suggestion
And as the green of the leaves turned to brown at
the University of Florida in 1967, Steve OConnell
came home.
Home to his alma mater as president.
And he was glad to be here.
He left the stuffy halls of the stuffy administration
building. He walked, tie loosed and coat slung
carelessly over his shoulder, around the campus
under the autumn sun greeting students and:
Hi. Im Steve OConnell.
Today, Stephen Cornelius OConnell will be
inaugurated as the sixth president of the University of
Florida.
The road ahead, despite the twinkling eyes, despite
the quick smile, despite the friendly concern, will not
be smooth.
But few men would confront the challenge to come
as ably as will Stephen C. OConnell.
There are those who say the UFs new president is
insincere. Some say he is unconcerned. Others say he is
seeking higher public office. And still others say he will
harm the university much more than he will help it.
We think they are wrong and believe that the future
progress of this university under OConnells leadership
will smother their doubts.
We hasten to add that we do not always agree with
his decisions, nor do we adhere to all his philosophies on
the goals and operation of the university.
But make no mistake about it Steve OConnell is
dedicated to this university. He believes in this
university. Pervading all his decisions, regardless of
their momentary popularity, is a burning desire to
guide the UF to greatness.
Can any man be expected to give more?
IHI w ,
Ji&rraEffiafer

Tuwdy, Octobar 8, Th* Florida Alftgator,

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Page 3



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

Page 4

UFs No. 1 Salesman

Busy Day In The Life
Os President OConnell

\
Like the proverbial salesman
who lives out of a suitcase, the
modem day university president
has to adjust to a multitude of
cooks and often a hamburger
on the run.
The universitys No. 1
salesman as well as its top
administrator, hes in demand on
campus and off, in the state and
out and his schedule is so
rigorous that he often has
commitments months ahead.
Stephen C. OConnell, whose
daily diet of appointments was
more routine and predictable as
Supreme Court justice,
officially dedicates himself to
this type of schedule today
when he is inaugurated the sixth
UF president.
But OConnell, who never has
been a stranger to the
knife-and-fork club, apparently
seems to be holding up well after
a year on the presidential route.
A typical day might see the
president run through the rigors
of a half dozen morning
appointments, catch a luncheon,
dash back to clear his desk of
paper work and then head for
some distant Florida city to
address alumni or a civic group
on his favorite subject the
University of Florida.
OConnells executive
secretary, Mrs. Phyliss Durell,
cites a customary Tuesday
schedule: 8:30 a.m. to noon
executive committee to discuss
policy matters; lunch with
students at residence hall; 30
minutes with an administrator; 2
to 3:30 pjn. Administrative
Council, which advises' and
assists the president; a half-hour
with a second administrator;
meeting with city ahd county
commissioners.

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NICK ARROYO
O'CONNELL PONDERS STUDENT'S QUESTION
... in the Plaza of the Americas

Alligator

BACKGROUND
!
! REPORT \

If the Tuesday was typical,
OConnell was the one who
turned out the lights long after
the 5 p.m. departure time for
other co-workers.
Like all university presidents,
OConnell has many capable
assistants vice presidents,
aides, secretaries and a
receptionist all with their
hands full.
But certain tasks befall the
president. And certain persons
who come with business or
problems, or to visit, want only
the president. These may be
students, faculty, visiting
dignitaries, alumni, educators or
industrialists.
On one slow summer day he
welcomed a youth workshop,
met twice with deans, gave a gift
to a visiting dignitary, fulfilled a
long luncheon engagement, had
consecutive meetings with a
Division of Economic
Opportunity representative,
faculty member and student
newspaper editor and then
departed for Detroit.
As No. 1 salesman for the
university, the president must
spend considerable time on the
road. In a month he may make
five trips from a few hours to
several days in and out of the
state.
He represents the University
at the Board of Regents and
Council of Presidents meetings

in Florida each month and at the
annual meeting of the National
Association of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges.
And throughout the year, as
demand dictates, he may be in
Miami or Minnesota, Daytona or
the District of Columbia,
meeting with educators, alumni
or businessmen on behalf of the
University.
An ardent athletic booster,
OConnells face usually can be
found in the cheering crowd at a
Gator event. He attends all home
games and most of the
out-of-town
particularly football.
But the appointments and
trips dont alone tell the story.
Even with office help to screen
his calls and correspondence, the
number he answers personally is
tremendously large.
Not only that, but each
student or faculty member
elected to an office or gaining
some type of distinction receives
a letter of congratulations from
the president.
In one month recently,
OConnell directed letters to 400
students with straight A
averages, 165 letters to
legislators and about 500 others
on routine matters.
Special events like the annual
J. Hillis Miller Scholarship
Convocation, Homecoming,
Legislative Day, commencement,
football g.ues and now the
inauguration of Stephen C.
OConnell necessitate a high
volume of announcements,
invitations and other
correspondence from the
presidents office.
When you have a growing
University which is the largest in
the state and a center of
undergraduate, graduate and
continuing education, as well as
research, with more than 20,00
students and 10,000 employees
-and one president, its natural
to assume that the one president
is going to be a mighty busy
person.
And he is!

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NICK ARROYO
SHOWING VISITING DIGNITARIES AROUND CAMPUS
.. one of many duties (Here with Gov. Claude Kirk)

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O CONNELL MAKES POINT AT MEETING 1
... talking with chief administrators 1
NICK ARROYO
PRESIDENT STOPS TO TALK TO STUDENT
... Sarah Jane LaFrance in Reitz Union



Bird watching has something in common with
academic ceremonies. The knowledgable recognize
significance in the spots of color, but only a few
take the trouble to find out what the various hues
mean.
College and university ceremonies are rampant
with color, yet the people who attend these rites
usually go away with only the memory of long
black lines.
The following tips may help those watching the
inauguration of Stephen C. OConnell as UFs sixth
president.
When the academic procession starts the morning
of Oct. 8 in Florida Gymnasium, it will be easy to
pick the lawyer, doctor and librarian out of the
crowd. A glance at his gown, cap and hood will tell
his field and the extent of his education.
The bachelors gown has long, pointed sleeves
and two pleats on either side.
Next up the academic ladder is the masters gown
tfiich differs from the bachelors in its long,
crescent-shaped sleeves.
At the top of the academic heap is the doctor
who wears a gown with full-length velvet panels in
front. The panels are either black or the color of the
individuals department of learning.
It is the hood-that velvet drape over the back of

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FLORIDAS FIRST FAMILY
Standing at the door of the President's Mansion are, from left to right President O'Connell; Ann, 14;
Denise. 19: Martin. 16: Mrs. RitaO'Connell and Stephen, Jr. (Corky), 18.

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^CONNELL WITH KENNEDY

This memorable picture in the O'Connell scrapbook shows
President-O'Connell (left) with the late President John F. Kennedy,

Watch Colors Pick Out Professions

the gown-which usually gives the best clue to the
scholars profession. The color of the velvet band
.represents the field of learning, while ihe lining of
the hood symbolizes the official colors of the school
which awarded the degree.
There are special rules governing the usage of
caps, gowns and hoods. For example, the president
and members of the governing body of a college of
university may wear doctors gowns even if they do
not hold the degree. But their hoods may represent
only degrees actually held.
The mortarboard hat is worn at all times except
during prayer or when the national anthem is
played, and the tassel is draped over the left temple.
Caps and gowns have been used in many
American schools since colonial times, and by 1895,
the Intercollegiate Commission had prepared a code
for academic costume which was approved by 95
per cent of the American universities and colleges.
The system enables anyone attending an
academic function in this country to distinguish at a
glance the degree held and the university which
granted it.
Colors established by the American Council on
Education include white for arts, letters and
humanities; drab for business administration,
commerce and accountancy; copper for economics;

U.S. Sen. George Smathers and former University president J. Wayne
Reitz (right) at the 1958 Florida Blue Key banquet;

light blue.for education; orange for engineering;
brown for fine arts; russet for forestry; crimson for
journalism; purple for law; lemon for library
science; lilac 'for dentistry, and green for medicine.
Other designations are pink for music; apricot for
nursing; silver gray for oratory; olive green for
pharmacy; dark blue fpr philosophy; sage green for
physical education; peacock blue for public
administration, including foreign service;
gold-yellow for science; citron for social science,
and gray for veterinary science.
Each of the many different fields has its own
special color, ranging from maize for agriculture to
scarlet for theology or divinity. In some schools the
mortarboard tassel colors also connote the same
story as the velvet bands, while in others, black is
the color sos all graduates except doctors, who wear
gold.
At the UF, the lining of the hood has a blue
chevron on an orange ground to represent the
University colors.
The custom of wearing caps and gowns has
helped give both color and dignity to what always
has been an impressive ceremony.
Fpr the general public, the meaning is like the
vendor says at the sports events: You cant tell the
players without a program.

FOR MRS. OCONNELL

UFs Life
'lnteresting

Its exciting and busy, says
Mrs. Stephen C. OConnell about
her role as wife of UFs new
president.
. I especially enjoy living on
the campus...the students and
faculty are so interesting, said
the gracious and charming Mrs.
OConnell, who came with the
president last October to be the
first lady of Floridas largest
university.
All of the students whom I
have met have been -so nice and
gracious. I really dont think
they are much different than
students were when I attended
the University of Wisconsin,
she commented.
In comparing her present
position with being the wife of a
state supreme court justice, Mrs.
OConnell said that during the
days in Tallahassee she had no
schedule to follow.
When I got up in the
morning, I didnt have to do
anything in particular; I could
arrange my day pretty much as I

TwMtfay, October 8, The Florida Alligator.

pleased, she said.
Now my days are planned,
and I feel better. In the
mornings I feel full of vim and
vigor because I know 1 have
certain things to do, remarked
the soft-spoken Mrs. OConnell.
Life at UF hasnt been much
different than what she had
anticipated before assuming her
new role, Mrs. OConnell stated.
My husband and I had been
to the campus many times and
knew President and Mrs. J.
Wayne Reitz well, so we were
acquainted with the
responsibilities of the position
before we came, she said.
Mrs. OConnell thinks her
involvement in governmental
activities at Tallahassee helped
prepare her for her present role.
There was entertaining entertainingespecially
especially entertainingespecially during legislative
sessions-and trips to meetings
and conventions of the various
bar associations.
A self-described homebody,
Mrs. OConnell declared she had
no problems in adjusting to life
here. She describes Gainesville as
a very friendly and hospitable
community.
She said the two youngest
children had the most
adjustment difficulty since they
were only home during vacations
from boarding schools last year
and didnt have much time to
make new friends.
This year Denise, the oldest,
will attend Pensacola Junior
College; Stephen C. Jr., will be a
freshman at Emory University;
Martin Robert will attend a
Texas military school, and Ann
Maureen will be a student at
Westwood Junior High School
here.
Mrs. OConnell said the four
children were very pleased when
they learned their father was to
become president of UF.
She said President OConnell
is busier and works much harder
than when he was a member of
the judiciary, but that he now is
more relaxed and confident than
he was during his first few
months as president.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

BY OCONNELL

Frosh Beanie Traded
For Presidential Robes

Stephen C. OConnell, who
will be inaugurated as UF
president today, entered the
same university 34 years ago as a
freshman.
In the years between
graduation and inauguration, he
became an outstanding lawyer,
jurist and civic leader. But UF
faculty and alumni recall him as
one of the finest student leaders
in the history of the institution.
The man who will be invested
with the robes and trappings
dignifying the high office of
president learned the campus
traditions wearing an orange
beanie known as a rat cap.
An issue confronting the new
president last fall was the
currently popular student
demand for more rights and
freedoms. . such as no
required attendance at classes.
When OConnell entered UF,
there were nine specific rules
and duties enforced for
freshmen, in addition to the laws

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SWORN IN ASSUPREME COURT JUSTICE
... by Donald K. Carroll, former president of Florida Bar Association

UF Boasts Proud Heritage Os Leaders

History has shown when the tempo demands, the
UF manages to find a messiah to lead the way
around rough waters.
John Tigert, a Rohodes scholar, led the way
through the Depression and war. In the Universitys
most formative period, he strengthened student
government, general education and scholarship.
Dr. J. Hillis Miller came in with the post-war rush.
His leadership and public relations ability directed the
campus through the great growth and building boom
that erupted.
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz was the medicine needed to
acquire federal funds for research, graduate education
and the new construction required to give Florida a
first-rate center for science and medical education.
And now, with student and faculty unrest,
unpredictable growth ahead, funds in need and a good
public image vital, Stephen C. OConnell has been
called upon to be the institutions new leader.
It would be difficult to find an individual more
suitable than the man who is to be inaugurated as
sixth president of the UF today.
Courted from the Florida Supreme Court where he
was chief justice, OConnell has the legal background
to deal with the militants, while possessing a strong
sentiment and understanding for the problems and
needs of students.
The first native-born Floridian and first alumnus
ever to become president, OConnell has a rare gift of
speech and a fierce loyalty to the university.
His many supporters believe these are two tools
which will enable OConnell to become a
super-salesman for the university in the community,
in the state and around the nation.
Always an active alumnus, OConnell served as

of the student body.
Like other freshmen,
OConnell was required to wear
his rat cap except on Sunday
- until the beginning of the
Christmas holidays. He was
expected to speak to all fellow
students and faculty members
and to be able to name the deans
of all colleges on campus along
with the captains, managers and
coaches of all major sports
teams, in addition to student
body officials.
He was required to name
every building on campus and its
location; to attend all student
body pep meetings and parades,
and to sit in the cheering section
at all athletic events taking place
in Gainesville unless he had a
date.
In addition to earning degrees
in business administration and
law, and performing a number of
jobs to pay his college expenses,
OConnell became involved in
student politics. He was elected

president of the sophomore
class. L. K. Edwards of Irvine,
long-time legislator from Marion
County, was chosen
secretary-treasurer in the same
election.
OConnell was a winner
both in politics and in sports.
His offices included the
presidencies of the Newman
Club, organization of Catholic
students; Alpha Tau Omega
social fraternity; Florida Blue
Key leadership society, and the
UF student body, succeeding
current U.S. Sen. George
Smathers in the latter position.
He became captain of the
boxing team then classified a
major varsity sport and as a
senior middleweight he was
undefeated in dual matches.
Checking the variety of
OConnells campus jobs, it
appears he made certain he
would not miss his meals. One of
his first duties after he came to
the UF was at a boarding house
where meals were free if you got
six paying customers and
waited tables. He also worked
at the College Inn and later
the ATO fraternity
dining rooms.
Participating in the National
Youth Administration programs
( a Depression years federal
ai d-to-education project),
sports-minded OConnell worked
in the Universitys intramural
office making competition
pairings for the various sports
leagues.
And for a time, the man who
will be inaugurated as sixth
president of the UF held a job as
janitor in the campus post
office.

All i gator

BACKGROUND REPORT

president of the Alumni Association in 1966 and in
April, 1967, was awarded the Universitys
Distinguished Alumnus Award.
During OConnells university career, he was
president of the student body, was twice intramural
boxing champion, served as Gator Intercollegiate
boxing team captain and freshman coach, and was
president of Florida Blue Key leadership society, the
Newman Club, a Catholic student organization, and
Alpha Tau Omega social fraternity.
He was regimental commander of the Reserve
Officers Training Corps, Homecoming Gator Growl
chairman and was elected to the Universitys Hall of
Fame.
After earning degrees in the College of Business
Administration and the College of Law in 1940
OConnell practice law briefly in Fort Lauderdale
then served until 1946 in the Army Air Force, rising
to the rank of major. 6
OConnell returned to Fort Lauderdale, building a
reputation in public service and a law practice that
had grown greatly by 1955 when, at age 39, he was
appointed to the Florida Supreme Court.
He was active in his political party,in his service
and social club affiliations and in his duties as legal
counsel for the State Road Department and the
Florida State Racing Commission.

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While a justice, he was chairman of the Judicia
Council of Florida which, in 1959, drew widespreac
attention through his recommendations foi
modernizing the court system in Florida.
OConnell served 12 years on the Florida Supreme
Court before leaving as chief justice to become
president of the University of Florida.
Chester Furguson, chairman of the Board ol
Regents, in an address to the universitys scholarship
convocation last year, called OConnell a pragmatic
scholar.
This gentleman brings great dedication to youi
institution, he said. He is the first of its graduates tc
hold this high office. His leadership qualities
combined with his legal talents, his demonstrated
administrative and decision-making ability, his wanr
personality, his wit, and his ability to effectively
communicate with people, convinced the Board ol
Regents that he would make you an outstanding
president.
With a pledge to make the university great.
OCDnnell has devoted his energies in that direction
toward quality education, research and service
> responsive to the needs of the state.
Demonstrating himself as a leader with compassion
and understanding, he has worked to unite students,
faculty and administration.
A native of West Palm Beach, OConnell is one of
children. His brother, Phillip of West Palm
Beach, also a University graduate, is well-known as a
former- state attorney.
OConnell, who grew up in South Florida and was
graduated from West Palm Beach High School, is
married to the former Rita McTigue. They have four
children, Rita Denise, Stephen C. Jr., Martin Robert
and Ann Maureen.



Liberty Linda Casts Light On The Right

By PHYLLIS BRASCH
And
LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Write*
Are there Communists in key
positions of our Federal
government?
The Gainesville sponsor of
telephone instant editorial, Let
Freedom Ring, says yes.
I dont think there are
Communists in the Federal
government in Washington; I
know there are, says E. S.
Gocek, sponsor of the
GainesvjHe extension of Let
Freedom Ring.
Let Freedom Ring is a
telephone network organized by

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

BY NASAS BEGGS

Moon Landing
Seen In '69

The United States will land a man on the moon in 1969, believes
National Aeronautics and Space Administration official James M.
Beggs, who dedicated the UFs $1.2 million Space Sciences Research
Building Monday.
The dedication ceremony launched a two-day program of special
events honoring the inauguration of UF Pres. Stephen C. OConnell.
Beggs, who heads NASAs Office for Advanced Research and
Technology, said NASA has strong hopes of landing American
explorers on the moon before the end of this decade and I believe we

will.
* *
No Classes
Held During
Convocation
Classes will be suspended
today during second, third
and fourth periods for the
inaugural convocation in
Florida Gym at 9:30 ajn.
Students are invited to
attend the ceremonies in
which Stephen C. OConnell
will be inaugurated UFs sixth
president.
Gov. Claude Kirk, Board
of Regents Chairman Chester
Ferguson, University
Chancellor Robert B. Mautz
and many state officials will
be on hand for the program.

OConnell Disowns Revision View

UF Pres. Stephen C. OConnell said the pamphlet published
by three university professors on the proposed constitutional
revision was an expression of the professors opinion, and does
not reflect the official views of the university.
The university should not, has not, and will not take any
position on the merits of the proposed constitution, OConnell
said. Each student, faculty member or other member of the
university community has a right to do so, as all will agree they
should, he said. In tuni, each individual is alone responsible for
what he or she says and writes in support of his views.
The pamphlet was authored by Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the Department of Political Science; Dr. Clement H.
Donovan, chairman of the Department of Economics; and Dr.
Gladys M. Kammerer, professor of political science and director

Dr. William Campbell Douglass,
a Sarasota physician.
The network stretches from
Seattle to Boston and Miami to
Los Angeles. There are more
than 100 Let Freedom Ring
stations delivering tape recorded
anti-Communist messages by
telephones 24 hours a day.
The messages disseminate,
collect, and document
information from more than 100
different publications. It seeks
to bring facts to the American
public that they are not aware
of.
The news you hear on this
recording are facts taken directly

The
Florida Alligator

Beggs spoke as NASA prepared
to launch three men into earth
orbit this week for almost 11
days as part of the Apollo Seven
mission.
We plan to launch a total of
eight Saturn V-Apollo missions
before the end of next year, he*
said. No one can predict now,
of course, just when we will have
completed enough of these
important tests to be ready to
send our mission to the moon.
He expressed NASAs hopes
and his own beliefs for reaching
the goal set by President John F.
Kennedy in 1961.
However, he warned of
increasing competition from
Russia in the race for the moon.
Beggs said the Soviet Union is
devoting an increasing amount
of its total budget to space
exploration.
At the same time he
challenged the remarks of those
(SEE 'MOON' P.B)

ON PROPOSED CONSTITUTION

All ii^ator

i BACKGROUND REPORT

from over 100 different national
papers. Nobody can possibly
read 100 papers daily; so Let
Freedom Ring collects,
documents, and distributes these
facts for the public.
Facts included in this
organizations literature are:
There is a communistic
conspiracy in the American
government. Federally forced
school busing is an illegal system

Tuesday, October 8, 1968,

BA ft f 4 k jL
NICK ARROYO
DEAN L.E. GRINTER, BEGGS. O'CONNELL, AND FORMER PRESIDENT REITZ
.. .participated in ceremony

'Right To Criticize Held
In Symposium Speech

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Elvis J. Stahr, president
emeritus at' Indiana University,
defended student academic
freedom at Mondays inaugural
symposium at the Reitz Union
Auditorium.
Stahr addressed the half-filled
auditorium on the topic of The

of UF Public Administration Clearing Service, which published
the bulletin.
Over a 20-year period it has published 31 monographs
covering a number of public issues in Florida government. The
studies are made and published in the interest of an informed
electorate, OConnell said.
The first 40 pages of the pamphlet are devoted to a
clarification and explanatory analysis of the proposed
constitution. The authors express their personal evaluation and
opinions in the last four pages.
o
OConnell said that on the pamphlet is a statement reading:
The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the
authors, and not official views of the University.

of race mixing for social
experimentation. The civil rights
movement was the first major
specific action taken by the
communists in the United
States. There has been a
destructive barrage by the
Supreme Court to break down
the original framework of our
Federal republic, under the
leadership of Earl Warren.
Gocek explained that

Page 7

Function of the University in
the Modern World. Dr. Jack K.
Williams, vice president for
academic affairs for the
University of Tennessee also
spoke.
It hasnt been very long
since universities were defending
the rights of their most
controversial professors and

f r -
Liberty Linda,** the recorded
voice of Let Freedom Ring is
enabling more and more people
to wake up everyday and see the
light.*
Gocek, who is also Alachua
County Chairman of the Wallace
for president Campaign, sees no
difference between Nixon and
HHH. He added that if you
havent picked your man yet,
then you wont make up your
mind at all.
Affliated with Let Freedon
Ring for over five years, Gocek
has been threatened because of
his views. One alleged incident
involved a UF professor who
(SEE 'LIBERTY' P.B)

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily

students simply to exercise the
rights of other citizens to
express views, Stahr said.
These same- controversial
professors and students are
cursing universities because they
dont suppress views which are
on the other side of the
controversy, he said.
To me, Stahr said,
nothing is more important for
the future than restoring, and
keeping central and strong, the
freedom of our universities.
Stahr cited free exploration
and free debate as the principles
vital to a universitys existence.
The law is expected to
protect both and both can be
very helpful in the pursuit of
justice, he said.
He described academic
freedom as the right to question
and criticize.
It is the freedom to speak
and to listen, freedom to doubt,
to inquire and to debate, Stahr
said.
But academic freedom does
(SEE RIGHT' P.B)



Page 8

The Florid* Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

BY NASAS BEGGS

Moon landing Foreseen

J^WrfPAGESEVeTJ
who say we are heading into
hard times.
Beggs praised the type of
multidisciplinary research taking
place in the Universitys
five-story space sciences
structure, saying it is this kind of
approach that is necessary, not
only to solving space problems,
but social ones as well.
We cannot solve the
problems of hunger, or air and
water pollution, or crime, or any
other of our modem-day
dilemmas, without new

Liberty Linda Rings On Right

PAGE SEVE^|
threatened to picket Goceks
T.V. repair shop if he didnt stop
the telephone messages.
This is not a paid position,
Gocek said. About a half a
dozen people periodically
contributed financial assistance
towards the operation of the
telephone network and classified
ads placed in the Alligator and
Gainesville Sun.
Asked if elected government
officials could successfully
represent his views in federal
government, he answered, It
wouldnt do any good to send a
man of my opinions to
Washington as a representative
because I know the Communists
are in control.
Gocek said that he has
UF Degrees
21,588 Bachelors Degrees
were awarded by UF in the ten
year period between the 56-57
school year and the 66-67 school
year.
More degrees were awarded
by the College of Arts and
Sciences in the ten year period
between 56-57 and 66-67 than
any other college at UF.
five till nine
dining room only
99c Y
Xhawaiian/
S HAM >
J DINNER \
M Center cut ham \
\ steak broiled I
1 with Hawaiian t
/ pineapple, served \
\ with tossed salad, J
| and french fries w
1 a regular J
value
isr
2310 S.W. 13th Street 376-2696
1505 N.W. 13th Street 378-2481

approaches and new organizing
methods. Piecemeal attacks on
these problems simply will not
work.
The kind of innovative
thinking that is going on right
here at your university is in my
opinion one of the greatest tools
this nation has for solving the
human and social problems that
will beset us in the coming
years.
Beggs cited the changes
taking place in our
lifetime-communications and
weather satellites, the transistor,
the computer and the laser,

written many documented
letters to Washington explaining
his position. None of them have
been answered.
Asked if the Gainesville
extension held any group
discussion, he replied that at this

Ive got my interview set I read somewhere theyre solving Straight questionsstraight answers
between computer lab and econ rapid transit problems and they wont care if the
hurry up bus and helping explore the seas and bus is a little late
Mil be late for class outer space Get together with Alcoa:
wonder if Alcoa s doing anything and working with packaging
about traffic jams and automotive applications OCTOBER 15, 16
So when I go in
Ill tell it like it isfor me An Equal Opportunity Employer
and theyll tell it like it is A Plans for Progress Company
for them
12,
Change for the better /V I /V
with Alcoa UJMLL.U/A
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which require numerous major
adjustments in our lives.
And you in the universities
will be leading the way.

Helmet Law Enforcement
Will Be Strict, Say Police
All motor scooter and motorcycle drivers are required to
wear protective helmets by state law, UF Police said Monday.
The state statutes have been in effect since the beginning of
the fall term and will continue to be enforced on campus by
campus police and off-campus by Gainesville authorities, a UF
police said.
Police said they have encountered many violations ot the
laws in the past two weeks and will clamp down on drivers
without helmets.

time there were no organized
meetings as such. However,
Douglass would gladly address
any local group.
Come back anytime,
Gocek said. I can straighten out
anything for you.

"Right To Criticize ~
Upheld In Speech

not mean academic anarchy, he
said. It means freedom to

Loans Up To S4OO
Bu * f "iffi**,* Aate
Prompt Cauftem
MM MONEY ConfWiHl
HmMMMw Morion Financo Co.
376-5333
222 W. UnivmJty Av*

express opinions; it does not
mean freedom to impose them.
It is vital, too, Stahr said
to keep clear that intellects are
neither black, nor white, nor
yellow. Nor is an idea weighed
by its color.
Some criticize universities
and scholars for poking their
noses into public issues and
affairs that are none of their
business, Stahr agreed, while
others simultaneously criticize
them for being irrelevant,
impractical and uninvolved



I.D. PftOCPDUPF

Depository Policy Altered

Effective today, a student
whose certificate of registration
is tied up with a bloc seating
purchase, need only present the
picture I.D. for identification
purposes at the Student
Depository.
Joseph Hough, director of
finance and accounting, said the
depository would be flexible
even after the football season
has passed.

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FOOD OR SERVICE? NICK ARROYO
Sometimes the line to the Union Cafeteria runs well into the
student TV lounge across the hall. It's been observed that either the
food is good or the service is slow. It's hard to tell which.
|fllllll!llllllllllU^|
j SPECIAL NOTICE |
To all students and university personnel
j DISCOUNT j
12 Off Our Low-Low Prices I
5 FOOD TASTES MUCH BETTER AT B
ir 4*r it i
CAFETERIAS ,SST' T
* 11:30 AM 2:00 PM
fflff j 4:30 PM 8:00 PM
II GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER i
1212 North Main Street
(Just Four Iftnotes From Campus)
Ibisisisisisisisisisisismisisisisisisisi!

In a hardship case, we will
accept the picture I.D. and the
pass-book as identification if the
student does not have his
certificate of registration, he
said.
Hough said a student who
was hungry could be considered
a hardship case.
The policy change came after
six students issued formal

complaints abo u t the
requirement o to the Student
Government Ombudsman
program.
Bob Young, director of the
program, contacted William
Elmore, vice-president of
business afairs about the
problem encountered when
students have their certificates
of registration tied up getting
bloc seating football tickets.
Young cited six cases where
students were ungble to cash
personal and payroll checks, or
withdraw or deposit money
from their depository accounts.
One case reported concerned a
student who contacted the
offices of the dean of men, the
president, and the vice-president
of student affairs before he was
able to get a scholarship grant.
All were denied service
because they did not have their
certificate of registration.
Elmore, in a reply to Youngs
memorandum, defended the
policy of requesting the brown
card, saying it is a written
regulation pertaining to all
students using the depository.
He said the office of business
affairs has plans to develop a
special athletic event ticket I.D.
card in addition to the
certificate of registration card.

CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
* t c'.
jffami
2919 S. ft. Thirteenth Street' ( j
All-Electric Gainesville, Florida J
(904) 372-2200
TO ONE OF THE FINEST
MEN AND PRESIDENT A
UNIVERSITY COULD HAVE
CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR INAUGURATION DAY
from
THE EMPLOYEES
OF COUCHS INC.
608 N. MAIN ST.
N. CENTRAL FLORIDAS #1
DEALER SERVING THE NEEDS OF
THE UN IV. OF FLORIDA SINCE 1933
f*

I CREVASSES FLORIST
lifeh INC.
(Aa; WPROMPT DELIVERY
WIRED
KOT/ ANYWHERE fEj&ijmb
\||jy 2 LOCATIONS \|j|/
/!pwS\ west side east side
378-2517 I 376-2514 I
I 3409 W. UNIVERSITY AVF I I?niSSE HAWTHnnMF BOAII
S BRING COUPON^hbh^h
SPECIAL
SDAY ONLY
, #S| lUS DINNER
89'
Cole Slaw, Mashed
3ravy and Rolls
iititueku
r in. a s pa?, on. ¥
£ hidden
Y MARIANO SANDCU C
14 NW 13th St. 376-6472
14 NW 34tn St. 372-3649
COUPONj

Teaadey, Octobar 8, The Florida Alligator.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

, i'iViVi% IVlvX L
,# ....... r*
FOR SALE |
1967 Triumph-500cc, like new
condition, only 3000 miles, trailer
included. Call 376-4167 after 6:00.
(A-4t-12-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-12-p)
Vespa 90 for sale Scooter in good
condition. With helmet S6O. Call
Emery Swearingen between 7 and 10
pm 376-7014. Good student
transportation. (A-3t-12-p)
1967 Moto Guzzi 700 cc with large
saddlebags, windshield, driveshaft,
electric starter. This is the V7 seen in
cycle magazines. 376-0229.
(A 5t 9 p)
For Sale SCHWIN BICYCLE good
transportation, side baskets 26 in.
Call 378-5087. (A-3t-11-p)
Tasco telescope $35 Clarcon tape
recorder $25 Zenith portable stereo
$45 two 110 lb weight sets $lO each
nc77 sw radio brand new SSO
376-8155. (A-2t-11-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* w 10 o
I I I I in DDGDCIDOOC
v> IT'D IKS' 4 J H i/1
s I h? ;
£|B2* J 5 S 2
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a a a q a o'
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< < < < < 3
VI VI in Ut ul
. a, a
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Ma M M £ D
O_ O O
£2 £ s
a a a ao
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l fOR SALE
v
Air conditioner, Frigidaire, 4 months
old, 12,000 BTU, excellent
condition, $165. Call Dr. Coskuner
376-3211 ext 5541. (A-2t-11-p)
Zenith 14 inch portable TV in good
condition but must sacrifice for
studying time-only $35.00 at 216
NW 3 Ave or call 376-1005 after 1
pm. (A-11-st-p)
1967 Honda Super Hawk, excellent
condition. Many extras. Helmet
available. $495 Call before 10:30 am,
or after 5:30 pm. 378-3156.
(A-11-4t-p)
Sport coats slacks shirts from
Donigans. Size 39-40. Too small for
me--Need money fast. David
378-1922. (A-11-3t-p)
Coffee Table & end tables $9.50;
vacuum cleaner sls; sofa-bed $10;
misc. chairs $2; CB radio and other
items. Call 372-1508 after 5.
(A-11-2t-p)
BSA 1967 65occ excellent cond.
Helmet, tools & megaphones come
with it. Inquire at 309 S.W. 16 Ave.
Apt. 124Gatortown Apt. (A-11-4t-p)

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

Page 10

^2#V>r%*e* # e*****e* l *** ( C I # **M l# -*'%%************ *
FOR SALE
Custom Surfboard Hawaii AAA, blue
pigment. 4 mts. old. originally S2OO,
now $95. For a novice or adv. surfer.
Call Tom Eason 376-9208.
(A-11-3t-p)
Honda 90 1967 2300 miles runs like
new. Helmet included, $250 only,
1100 SW Bth Ave. Apt 207 after 12.
(A-10-3t-p)
Motorcycle Sears 50 excellent
condition hardly used best offer call
376-9217, 378-7358 ask for Vic.
(A-st-8-p)
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*A LAUGHING ..**
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* SWINGING! \
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Sidney PoStScr*
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IN COLOR
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**
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* ls y u warlt a picture That
Tscd, touching, tender and
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| FOR SALE |
!''.v...v.v.%%v.;.v.y.NV.v.sNN ;v/I% i'XvXvV.! 1 :'
1967 Solex motorbike excellent
condition with 1969 tag $125 or best
offer see at 202 N W 21 Terr, after
spm 378-3823. (A-st-8-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
23 Console TV 1966 Zenith.
Excellent condition. Best offer over
SIOO. Phone 378-1698. (Ast9 p)

erosa
JML j STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
f WED NlSlHt
LADIES DRINKS
I 19*
I DANCE TO THE MUSIC
I of RICHARD PARKER and
I the SWINGING WITNESSES
I WED. thru SAT. 9PM-2AM
I LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE
I 1 N.W. 10 AVE. Phone 378-1636
THIS WEEKS
COCKTAIL SPECIALS
ij MONDAY NIGHT
; COCKTAILS 29*
i| TUESDAY
i LADIES DRINKS 19*
I WEDNESDAY NIGHT
DOUBLES or the price of SINGLES!
j THURSDAY NIGHT
j FROZEN DACQUIRIS 59*
j ALIBI LOUNGE
3334 W. UNIV. AVE.

P *~a
Lhe our handy
mail in order
form.

*
I FOR SALE
Must sell' 1966 2 br. trailer
carpet, awning, nice park sajJS
Call 378-1122. (A-11-2t p) $3,40 -
196 7 Honda CBI6O anno
$425.00 or Best Offer V?
378-5411 M campus
vs
196 5 Honda 305 cc (D ream!
Excellent condition,
custom-made seat, saddle ha
windshield, helmet. $450 or h.*
offer. Call 376-8159 after 6:30 om
(A-st-10-r> pm



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

vX-v-viv;-:*:-:-:*:*:-:*:-!*;*;*v..v.
| FOR SALE
.%v.;.v;v;w:w*x*x<*xx*xx*xnv*v.vx\
Like new 12 gauge Remington pump,
will take best offer. Call Dave Swords
376-9198. (A-2t-10-p)
1962 Vespa 125, runs well, S6O or
best offer Call Jerry at 378-4732.
(A-st-8-p)
FOR RENT
Must sublet one bdr. apt. in Colonial
Manor. Pool, AC, only 100 yds. to
campus. Deposit already pd. Call
378-8481 after 5:30 p.m. (B-3t-11-p)
Furn upstair apt 2 BR, air cond wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt 2
BR air cond Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-3-ts-c)
Spacious 1-bedroom Fully Furnished
including washing machine. Within
walking distance to Univ. 1824 NW
3rd P. 372-3357, 378-0641.
(Bts9c)
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
sub-lease. Apt. 151 Colonial Manor.
Call 372-7111. (Bst7 p)
2 Bedroom-1 bath house for rent
livingroom-diningroom-kitchen livingroom-diningroom-kitchen-12x16
-12x16 livingroom-diningroom-kitchen-12x16 enclosed fla. room Sleeps 6
comfortably. Walking distance of
campus. $l5O/month Call 378-9813.
(B-st-6-p)
New 1 bedroom fully furnished with
A/C quiet, 3V2 miles from campus.
Prairie View Apts. Call 376-0292.
$102.00 per month. (B-3t-12-p)
WANTED
%* *
: &x*x*xx.v.v.-x*x*x*x*x-x*vwx*;*x*x:£
5 Passengers to fly in new Cessna 205
to Vanderbilt game. Inexpensive. Call
Wes Pittman at 378-5184 after 6 pm.
(C-41-12-P)
Person to share 7 room house with 2
men, cook light housekeeping,
private room. $25/mo & above 150
yds from campus phone 376-5923.
(C-lt-12-p)
Daily Passengers To And From Jax
Leave Jax at 7:30 am Gains. 3
Contact Helen Lundy 387-1055 Jax.
(C-3t-l 1-p) Jr
One coed roommate needed at Star
Lite Apts. Close to campus. SIOO per
quarter. Call 378-5205 after 4
p.m.(C-10-3t-p)
WANTED: Crash helmet for
occasional rider. Either adjustable or
around size seven, call Jim room 248
Fletcher after 7 pm 372-9388.
(C-3t-10-p)
Beginning folk guitar instructor
needed, with guitar to spare. Contact
Joy, 138 jennings Hall. 372-6381.
(C-2t-11-p)
Memberships are now available for
triangle flying club. Low cost flying
with premium equipment. Cherokee
180 with full gyro panel, dual
nav-com, aof, auto-pilot. Please call
378-2431 for further information.
(C-st-l 1-p)
Attractive co-ed to cook for four
male grad students. Call 372-2182
between 5 and 7 p.m. (C-st-l 1-p)

Pick Up
Hall of Fame
and
Whos Who Applications
Student Publications Office
J. Wayne Reitz Union
' .. j

1 WANTED 1
>:
>:>xx*x.nnn%%\^v:*x*x*x-x*x<*:.v.v;vxv:*:
One Female Roommate to share Ig.
apt. with one other girl 37.50 mo.
125 NW 10 st. apt. 5 Charlene.
(C-st-l 1-p)
Coed for 1 BR poolside Landmark,
ac, dishwasher, sauna bath, really
soundproofed for study. Come by
after 6 pm apt. 156 Call 378-1921.
(C-2t-l 1-p)
HELP WANTED f
£vK*X*X*X*X*VW'W X X X-X-X*V*X-V*X-V*VS
Waitress for night shift, must be 21
yrs. of age. Apply at LUMS
Restaurant 1621 SW 13th street.
(E-ts-a-c)
Nite Help from spm til closing. Pick
your nites. No experience necessary.
Apply at Burger Chef 715 N.W. 13th
St. (E-st-10-p)
Engineering student wanted for very
interesting part-time work. Send
resume to P O Box 13199,
Gainesville. (E-14t-8-c)
Secretary wanted tor the period Oct.
15 Nov. 25, No experience
necessary. Apply in Student
Publications office or Seminole office
after 3:30 p.m. (Etf Bnc)
AGENT wanted for room delivery of
the Florida Times Union in all
dormitories on campus-for further
information call 372-4451.
(E-10-3t-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50 for 1
hour session, must be native english
speaking and have normal hearing
please call Harriet Wilkerson, ext
2049. (E-st-11-c)
Electrical engineer wanted for
part-time work to assist inventor on
electronic research work. Send
resume to P O Box 968, Alachua,
Fla. (E-14t-8-c)
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
with the nation's top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
"* w.nrj
Models for commercial photography
write Liggett Enterprises PO Box
1011 Gainesville. (E-st-12-p)
AUTOS
' J
1964 Oldsmobiie Cutlass, good
condition, power steering, radio heat
bucket seats $750.00 Phone
372-7934. (G-6t-8-p)
1960 Corvair automatic transm.
Radio and heater. New paint for
$ 175.00 See at Pridgeons
Automotive & Body Work 12 sw
Deport Ave. 372-3480. (G-10-st-p)
Porsche for sale 59 Roadster 1600 N
In fine shape already inspected best
offer takes it call evenings 378-6540.
(G-st-12-p)
FUN CAR! 1966 Triumph TR-4A
IRS. Light blue with white top and
tonneau. A good car at a reasonable
price Call 372-1039. (G-st-12-p)

Tuesday, October 8, The Florida Alligator,

I AUTOS |
v.-.SvivX'X'X-X-X-r.SS'X'X-X'X'X'V.v.vJ'X'Xv
Corvette-1967 maroon coupe 390 hp
air cond power disc brakes-power
windows and steering AM-FM radio.
Good condition 372-7070 after 6.
(G-st-l 2-p)
67 Fury 111 convertible VB, factory
air, excellent condition. $2300. Call
378-6234 after 6. (G-10-3t-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph 650 recently
overhauled still on warranty, will
sacrifice. Call 372-9358 after 8 p.m.
(G-11-3t-p)
1963 Ford Fairlane 500 black and
white w. red int. 6 cyl. r & h very
good cond. best offer, call Ruben
378-6874. (G-st-11-p)
1964 Austin Healey. Excellent.
SISOO. 376-0563. (Gst9p)
1965 Shelby GT3SO. 289C1D.
4-speed, AC, full instruments,
competition suspension, 2-seat
model, new tires, new paint.
372-9474, ask for Susie, Room No.
16. (G 4t 9 p)
Rolls Royce styling and size.
Superbly maintained 1960 MK. IX
Jaguar. 4door, air cond. 400 miles
on new engine. Complete with bar.
3760201. (Gst4p)
64MGB clean & in good shape wire
wheels R&H $1295 378-6917 or see
at 301-6 Diamond Village.
(G-st-10-p)
PERSONAL
*'
Vour Personal Poster Headquarters,
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
has finally received its long-awaited
order of denim bellbottoms. Five
colors, most sizes, while they last
and for a paltry $6. If you dont wear
clothes, float in and check out the
selection of blacklites, posters,
incense, candles, roach clips, earrings
and other magnificents too numerous
to mention. The address is 10 SW 7th
St., just around the corner from
Santa Fe Junior College. (J6t9p)
SPECIAL NOTICE-The J. Wayne
Reitz Union has a few guest rooms
available for the weekend of Oct
12-14. Please call Guest Desk at
x 3486 or 372-3631. (J-12-3t-c)
L.S. Happy Belated Birthday October
6, Have a great last quarter B.S.
(J-12-lt-p)
Linda, (G. C. J. C. of P. C.) Where are
you? I forgot to get your address
Mon. L. M. 376-0612. (J-11-2t-p)
I Color by Deluxe l

Page 11

:-x*x*x-:-x-v.ssvx-x*.-x->x*x>x.nsv;-:*x : < :*>:
PERSONAL
Pi Beta Phi transfers on Campus
follow the arrow! Vour help is
needed. Please call 372-3193 soon!
(J-10-st-p)
>S^s*X*X-X*X*X-X.:.NN%W.V.V.v.v.V.v.v.^
SERVICES |
>; >
x.x.x.v. ;vx*x.xx x.v.w.ssv; : :*:*x-: : xv..*.
Beginning Bridge Lessons Tonight rm
400 Reitz Union 7:30 pm For
information and reservations call ext
2741, rm 310, Program Office.
(M-lt-12-p)
OIL PAINTING Lessons Tonight rm
c-4 REITZ UNION 7:30 p.m. For
information call ext 2741, rm 310,
Program Office. (M-lt-12-p)
SPECIAL: PAINT JOB $49.95
COME IN WHILE IT LASTS. 12 SW
DEPORT AVE. (M-3t-12-p)
Piano Lessons, beginners to third
grade. $2.50 half hour children,
$4.00 an hour adults. Call
372-1646 after 6:00 p.m. weekdays.
(M 5t 9p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, BUT youll
be glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 3784480. (Mts6c)
CHARM Charm Classes charm starts
tonite 8:00 pm, 118 J.W.R.U. call
ext 2741 or ask at Rm. 310 Give
everybody a break get charming.
(M-lt-1 2-p)
ALTERNATORS-GENERATORS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical
STARTERS-Electrical ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS-Electrical systems tested
repairs. Auto electric service--603 SE
Second Street 378-7330. (M-10-ts-c)
Ballroom Dancing Lessons tonight rm.
245 Monday 7:00 pm Reitz Unioiv
for information or reservations call
ext. 2741, rm 310, Program Office.
(M-lt-11-c)
I ; hjw. im st. mmti
BOX OFFICE OPEN 7:30
AT 8:00 ONLY
\Ki-M I'lvxi'iiK \n I wall I aviu.iii l'imliiLii' m
. /SsgisyaHS|\
PANAVISK IN ,,iMFIR(>C< link
ALSO AT 9:50

Applications being
accepted for
MANAGING
EDITOR
o
Yearbook experience
required
Apply 3-5 p.m. at
/
Room 330, Reitz Union

Um our handy
mail In ordor
form.

>': $
% $
>: $
:: : : :
i£ NEED ZIPPY g
jiji RESULTS? §
3
s .j i
£ :§
§ s
I I
V V
:: y
GATOR
I CLASSIFIEDS 1
.V
>:
x Sf
the most beautiful film
ever made.-Newsweek.
' THRO
Pl WED.
%&
Jiff 1 3-5-7-9



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

Page 12

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GAINESVILLE FLOR



_ f 1 I , Tuesday, October 8, The Florida Alligator, Page 13
.r QrV*'' n Ve *sity of
,t\S f ftrt x F FL O RIDA
V Ce <,,v,s, n
BAbfi*
We, the business community Grou nd F i^^HoP
00, 5,0 of the University City, w?is/i
fetas
to extend our heartiest
congratulations to
Stephen C. OConnell upon I^q
his inauguration as the sixth
I President of
I The University of Florida. # m
ra?
*****'
COUCHS
IDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION v v

Tuesday, October 8, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8, 1968

O ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL __
\|_/ --B_ J.Cb V 7 a,llcl NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
tJ
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
notices to public functions I) T T TT"7I IJT TT T* TjirTl ¥fV
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION | jl J |~jj | J j J | J J 1 I 1

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
INAUGURAL TELECAST:
University faculty, staff and
students unable to attend the
inauguration Tuesday (10/8)
morning may watch the
ceremony via closed circuit
television. The telecast, from
9:30 a.m. to noon, will be
shown in the following 14
locations: 207 Engineering;
Rooms 101, 109, 113 and 121
in Little Hall; Rooms 2 and 44
in McCarty Hall; Norman Hall
auditorium, and Rooms 222,
223, 225, 236,301 and 336 in
the Stadium. Regularly
scheduled second, third and
fourth period classes from 9:05
12:20 are being dismissed for
the occasion.
INAUGURAL ACTIVITIES:
President Stephen C. O'Connell
has cancelled second, third and
fourth period classes on
Tuesday, Oct. 8, so students,
faculty and staff may attend the
Inaugural Convocation.
Scholarship recipients are
particularly urged to be present
so they may be recognized at the
convocation.
Vice President Lester L. Hale
has announced that caps and
gowns may be picked up at the
bookstore Oct. 2-7, and may be
returned within 48 hours after
the convocation.
Faculty members are asked to
assemble in the Recreation
** Room of the Florida
Gymnasium (basement level) at
9:15 a.m. to prepare for the
processional. Members of the
Administrative Council will
march as a separate unit of the
faculty and be seated together
on the main floor.
INAUGURAL CONVOCATION
Tuesday, October 8
9:30 a.m. Processional begins,
Florida Gymnasium
4-6 p.m. Reception, the
President's home
8:15 p.m. University Chamber
Orchestra Concert, University
Auditorium
All faculty, staff, students
'' and spouses are invited to attend
the activities.

Low Interest Rates Still Available Jd|flWLfcA,
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance ---
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 8:00 cun. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION: Deadline date
is Tuesday, Oct. 8, for receipt in
Princeton, N.J., of application
for the GRE exam to be given
Saturday, Oct. 26. Applications
received after Oct. 8 are charged
a penalty fee of $3. No
applications for the Oct 26
exam will be received after Oct
11.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS:
Scholarships for Oxford
University for approximately
$3,200 per year for two to three
years. Must be male citizens of
at least junior standing between
the ages of 18-24 on Oct. 1,
1968. Apply to Professor A A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 23.
CPS 121 PROGRESS TEST will
be Thursday, Oct. 17 at 7
p.m. mi. CPS 121 students are
expected to take this test and
each must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
Students whose last name
begins with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D-E) to Little 113,121 or
125; (F) to Little 201,203,205
or 207; (G) to Peabody 101,
102,112 or 114; (H) to Peabody
201, 202, 205 or 208; (l-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
202, 205, 207 or 209; (L) to
Little 213, 215,217 or 219; (M)
to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, 237 or 239; (N-0) to
Anderson 104, 112 or 115;
(P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102; (R) to
Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
PRE-MED & PRE-DENTAL
STUDENTS: Please register with
the Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 3, Anderson Hall,
starting Monday, Sept. 30
through Oct 18. Be sure to
bring with you the full names of
all your instructors and the
course and section numbers.

FULBRIGHT GRANTS: Grants
for U.S. students who will have
at least a bachelor's degree by
fall, 1969, for one-year's study
or research abroad are available
in reduced numbers on a
competitive basis.
Information and applications are
available from G. A. Farris,
Campus Fulbright Adviser,
International Center, south of
Walker Auditorium.
HAWAII GRANTS: The
East-West Center is offering to
Americans full grants for
graduate study at the University
of Hawaii in the fields of Social
Sciences, Humanities, Pure and
Applied Sciences in areas
relating to Asia and the Pacific
area. Applications and additional
information may be obtained by
writing: Office of Student
Selection, Institute for Student
Interchange, East-West Center,
1777 East West Road*, Honolulu,
Hawaii 96822. Applications,
transcripts and GRE score for
entry in June or September,
1969, must be filed with the
center by Dec. 15,1968.
ORANGE & BLUE
DEADLINES: The bulletin will
appear twice weekly, on
Tuesdays and Fridays. All
notices must be received by 5
p.m. Friday for the Tuesday
publication, and 5 p.m.
Wednesday for the Friday
publication. Notices should be
in writing, signed by the person
submitting the notice and sent
to the Division of Information
Services, Building H., Campus.
Items for the Campus Calendar
should be sent to Public
Functions Office, Reitz Union.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
Grads unless indicated
otherwise.

OCT.B: Reynolds Metals Co.,
All majors.
MARTIN MARIETTA CORP.,
EE, ME, Physics, Math.
ROADWAY EXPRESS, INC.,
All Majors.
MAAS BROTHERS.
THOMAS J. UPTON, INC.,
business and non-technical.
DAVCO MANUFACTURING
CO., CE.
STAUFFER CHEMICAL CO.,
Chem, ChE, ME.
CANNING, WELLS & SALZER,
Acctg.
U.S. NAVAL ORDNANCE
LAB: ME, EE, AE, Chem.
GRAND UNION CO.
ARMOUR-DIAL, INC.
OSBORNE, HENNING & CO.,
Acctg.
ATLANTIC RICHFIELD CO.
summer employment.
ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL
CORP. all majors.
TENNESSEE VALLEY
AUTHORITY: Arch, CE, EE,
ME, IE, NE, Econ, Acctg, Math,
Law.
PROCTER & GAMBLE CO.
OCT. 9:
ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK,
All degrees, all majors.
FLUOR CORP. BBC, Chem. E,
ME.
RING, MAHONY & ARNER,
Acctg.
PENINSULAR LIFE
INSURANCE CO., BS, AB,
BBA, IM.
FLORIDA PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION, IE, EE, CE, ME,
Acctg.
F. W. WOOLWORTH.
J. A. JONES CONSTRUCTION
CO., BC, CE, ME.
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
Oct 9 and 10
SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO.,
all majors.
FLORIDA POWER CORP.
MONSANTO, ChE, ME, IE, EE,
Chem. also juniors for summer
employment.
OCT. 10
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
INCORPORATED.
CELOTEX CORP. ChE, Chem,
Physics, EE, ME.
CHARLESTON NAVAL
SHIPYARD, ChemE, CE, EE,
IE, ME, MTE, NE. juniors for
summer employment.

DOW CHEMICAL CO. All engr.
Acctg.
GULF OIL CORP., Bus, Ad,
Acctg, ChE, ME, EE.
DEPT. OF HOUSING &
URBAN DEVELOPMENT, CE,
juniors for summer employment.
PURE OIL CO.
LEGISLATIVE AUDITOR'S
OFFICE, Acctg,
SEMPER FIDELIS.
SOCIETY: The society will meet
Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m.
in Room 150 B, Reitz Union
(behind cafeteria on first floor).
All student Marines or those
interested in becoming Marines
are welcome. Guest speaker will
be Staff Sergeant Bill Carr,
USMC.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI, "The
Business Professionals", reminds
you that Oct. 6-12 is Fire
Prevention Week. Don't give the
local firemen more business than
they can handle.
The Association of Women
Students currently is accepting
applications for the offices of
first vice president, recording
secretary and freshman
representative. Applications are
available from all A.W.S.
representatives, the Interhall
Office (3rd floor Reitz Union)
or the Dean of Women's Office.
Applications must be returned
no later than Oct. 11. Elections
will be held Oct. 17.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST will be given Nov. 9,
1968, Feb. 8, 1969, April 12,
1969, and Aug. 2, 1969.
Registration forms and fees must
reach the Educational Testing
Service, Law School Admission
Test, Box 944, Princeton, N.J.
08540, at least three weeks
before the desired test
administration date. Forms may maybe
be maybe picked up at the Registrar's
Office and the College of Law.



S/one Age Would Result
If Wallace Wins: HHH

ERIE, Pa. (UPI) Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
resumed his presidential
campaign Monday with charges
Richard M. Nixon preached
political double-talk and George
Wallace stood for brute force at
home and catastrophic force
abroad.
Humphrey was greeted by
about 200 supporters on his
arrival at Erie International
Airport and then spoke before a
friendly crowd of about 10,000
in downtown Erie.
LBJ Plans
Public HHH
Endorsement
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Johnson will make a
nationwide radio address
Thursday night in behalf of the
Humphrey-Muskie ticket, the
White House said Monday.
It will be the Presidents first
speech in support of his vice
president although he has issued
statements endorsing
Humphreys bid to succeed him
in the White House.
The White House said the
President will speak for about 10
minutes at 7:45 p.m. EDT over
the National Broadcasting Co.
radio network.

II
Save Records
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UPI
NEWS
Brute force at home and
catastrophic force
abroadbetween them Gen.
LeMay says he would bomb
North Vietnam back to the
stone age and probably start
World War 111 in the process, and
George Wallace says he would
drive over demonstrators in his
car and probably unleash
violence and bloodshed here at
home. Humphrey told a rally.
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Humphrey also conceded he
still is running behind Richard
M. Nixon in his campaign for the
White House but we are moving
up fast.
In the last week Ive noticed
that more and more people are
getting fed up with Mr. Nixon
and Mr. George C. Wallace and
their tactics to win the
presidency, Humphrey said.
Meanwhile Republican vice
presidential candidate Spiro
Agnew told a lunch hour crowd
of about 1,500 persons Monday
the South cannot win with
George Wallace.
He said a vote for Wallace
would be a vote for Hubert
Humphrey.
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US. Supreme Court
Opens With Warren

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court opened its
1968-69 term Monday with
Chief Justice Earl Warren and his
would-be successor, Abe Fortas,
taking part in arguments on
whether George C. Wallace
should get on the presidential
ballot in Ohio.
Fortas and Warren joined

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Tuesday. October 8. 1968 The Florid* Atl^tnr

with the other justices in
questioning the attorney for
Wallace, the third party
candidate.
The court expanded its
customary brief opening-day
session to hear arguments in
support of Wallace ana a
related case involving the
Socialist Labor Party.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

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HOMECOMING CANDIDATES

UF's 1968 Homecoming Sweetheart contest is underway
with bathing suit and evening gown competition taking
place tonight at 7:30 in Constans Theater. Yesterday, the
34 contestants were judged on personality. The student
body will vote to select the queen from the three finalists
on October 17th. The new sweetheart will be announced at
Gator Growl November first.
Shown top, front row, left to right, are Martha
Johnstono, Barbara Goldfarb, Patricia Spence, Trish
Lasche, Wendy Mann and Margaret Gavin. Back row, left to
right, Jackie Pease, Linda Bennett, Candi Dodson, Peggy

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Pink, and Linda Edmunds.
Middle, front row, left to right, Barbara Banks, Pam
Pemberton, Palmira Kanosky, Donna Betts and Linda
Edwards. Back row, left to right, Janet Brooker, Kathi
Amlick, Carol Carswell, Mary Long, Pam Turner and Susan
Rogers.
Bottom, front row, left to right, Bonnie Helm, Jo
Young, Janet Manheim, Susan Englemann and Susie
Rountree. Back row, left to right, Barbara Smith, Carol
Copeland, Jane Daly, Faith Tulino, Randi Roehl, and Judy
Weiss. Not pictured is Patty Bohannon.

Grad Fellowships Offered |
Students who will receive their Bachelors Degree by June 1969
and are interested in careers in government can apply for fellowships
to one of three universities.
A twelve-month training period, including a three-month summer
internship with either a department of the state government in
Alabama, Kentucky, or Tennessee or with a federal agency in the
South is being offered by the universities of Alabama, Kentucky and
Tennessee.
Interested Students should write Coleman B. Ransome, educational
director, Southern Regional Training Program in Public
Administration, Drawer I, University, Alabama 35486.
Applicants must be American citizens.
/gx What's NEW at the
BOOKSTORE?
NEW THINK LANGUAGE VIS ED COURSES WITH CARDS
AND RECORDS: FRENCH GERMAN SPANISH
BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS NEW COOK BOOK
CHINA: THE ROOTS OF MADNESS White
ASPECTS OF ANTIQUITY Finley
UNLESS PEACE COMES Catder
THE PEOPLE SPECIALISTS
NO EASY VICTORIES Gardner
DAWN OF THE GODS Hawkes
THE EXECUTIONERS Seth
WE ARE ALSO PLEASED TO STOCK TITLES FROM THE
MULTI-VOLUME MODERN LIBRARY, AN UNEQUALLED
SELECTION OF QUALITY HARDBOUND BOOKS AT
PAPERBOUND PRICES.
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. 8:00 RM.
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Teachers come in all shapes
and sizes at the UF, The latest
dials like a telephone, speaks in
eight languages and costs about
SIOO,OOO.
Nearly 2,500 students will be
urged ,to talk back to the new
automated teachers this winter
at the university, says Dr. J.
Wayne Conner, chairman of the
universitys Department of
Foreign Languages.
He adds that the new
language laboratory system will
bring UF students very
efficient and convenient
laboratory equipment really
first rate facilities for the first
time.

Graduate School Enrollment
Records Unexpected Growth

Fears that graduate school
enrollment would be
substantially reduced by recent
draft deferment changes have
apparently not materialized
according to Robert A. Bryan,
assistant dean of the Graduate
School.
We expected to lose our
projected annual 10% increase,
Bryan said, and wind up this
fall with 2850 students. The
* actual enrollment is close to
2950, or a 5% growth over last
year.
In October, 1967, deferments
were abolished for graduate
studies in all fields but medicine
and dentistry except for those
students in their second year or
higher.
Low draft calls for summer
months lessened the effect of
the law change. Many reception
centers shut down in an
Budget Expenses
Nearly three percent of the
total expenditures of UF in
65-66 went for libraries and
museums. Over 30 per cent went
for organized research.

JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES
TROPHIES & ENGRAVING
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Dial-A-Lesson To Begin Next Quarter

The expenditure was
approved by the Board of
Regents in Tallahassee last week.
The new equipment is
expected to be ready for
installation within 60 days in
what was once the social room
of the old Florida Union, now
renovated for academic use as
part of the College of Arts and
Sciences. In the meantime, no
language laboratories will be
conducted. Dr. Conner terms
equipment formerly in use
insufficient and obsolete.
A new Dial Access system,
at a cost of SBB,OOO, is the
major expense in the new

economy drive during these
months, too, and so fewer
physical examinations were
given.
Though no great changes in
enrollment have affected this
university as of now, the severity
of the problem may just be
postponed until January, Dr.
Bryan said. The Czechoslovakian
invasion may mean NATO forces
will be built up. Many students

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FOR 2,500 LANGUAGE STUDENTS

program. This involves
laboratory equipment for 72
students at a sitting. Each
station includes a booth,
headset, microphone and
telephone-like dial.
A large console for a
supervisor will provide 200
taped lessons in eight languages
- all accessible to one or to all
students at a given time. Dial
Access is descriptive of the
simple process of dialing a code
number for a given language
lesson.
Dr. Conner reports taping and
editing the quarters lessons will
prevent operation, of the new

could be drafted who are in
school right now.
The registrars office, which
provides students with
information on draft laws, says
that it doesnt try to tell
students what to do about
beginning graduate school with
the possibility of being drafted
Each selective service board is
local and autonomous and so no
predictions can be made.

system until the winter quarter
begins in January. Then, any
language student may dial a
lesson at any hour of the day.
Each tape will run eight to 10
minutes.
The second phase of the new
program, costing $11,729, will
provide 15 remote controlled
recorders. Located in a separate
room, these stations will allow
students to compare daily
progress with the master tape.
Dr. Conner suggests the new
recorders, in addition to 15

Young Americans For Freedom
Meeting
DEBATE: Who Should Conservatives
: X Vote For?
DALE ANDERSON
(U. of Fla. Young Republicans President)
vs.
JIMMEY BAILEY
(Local Wallace Leader)
TUES. OCT. 8, 7:30 p.m Rm. 357, Union
Tuesday, October 15
explore an
engineering career
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Talk with Newport News On-Campus Career Con Consultant
sultant Consultant about engineering openings at worlds
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Our backlog of orders running for years ahead means
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IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAMBi OPENINGS
- Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuctoar Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
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See our representative
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Tuesday, October 15
Hell be at the Placement Office to answer questions,
discuss qualifications, take applications for fast action.
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Tuwday, October 8, The Florida ANigator,

similar machines purchased last
year with a SIO,OOO federal
grant, may be used to test a class
of 30 students and to increase
effectiveness of teacher training.
Languages available on tape
will be French, Russian, Spanish,
Portuguese, Italian, German,
Chinese and Swahili.
Dr. Conner predicts a large
library of language tapes in the
future, enabling a student to
review an entire year of ,
language classes.

Page 17



Page 18

! The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

REVIEWS
_j ~ - 4 i. *.'
;; j
l Elvira Madigan
By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Elvira Madigan is a story of idyllic love encroached upon by the
real world and subsequently defeated by it.
The movement from childish giddy pleasure to poverty and
self-hatred is handled well. Kowever, on the whole the film offers
little more than beautiful Swedish countryside and a very old and
_ story.
Elvira is played by a 17-year old Swedish schoolgirl. She is a
tightrope dancer wishing to get away from the crowds and the public
adoration and retreating with her lover, a professional soldier who has
deserted, to the country.
Scenes intending to show tenderness manage to be less than
passionate and the continuous giggling is annoying-rather than
conveying a child-like innocence.
The acting is fair, but not particularly good at any point. Actually,
it seems as though the producer had seen the total movie as being a
beautiful, romantic illusion, breathtaking via its exquisite scenery and
tender love scenes and tragic ending.
However, something went wrong and the end product is
heavy-handed, not nearly as sensitive as it could have been, and boring
at times.
But Oh that Swedish countryside!

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UFSTUDENTS
.. .at work in studies
Arf Students
To Exhibit
Jn New York
The UF Art Department has
been invited to display its work
Nov. 12 at .the Nordess Gallery
in New York. Fifteen students,
both seniors and graduates, will
exhibit their talent in areas
ranging from abstract paintings
to three dimensional sculptures.
This is their first major exhibit
this year, although many of the
art students have participated in
shows around the country
before.
Among the exhibitors are
Dominick, a graduate student
working on three dimensional
plexi-glass sculptures, Greg
Norton, also a three dimensional
artist who produces polyester
day-glow watermelons, Mike
a painter of
imaginative realism, Ron
Chesser, an artist in acrylic oil
and Jeff Dunn, who is at this
time working on affective
, paintings of wrecked cars.
The purpose of this exhibit is
to give the art students a chance
to be noticed by eminei.t people
in New York, and also to give
the public an idea of the creative
work actually being done in the
UF Art Department.
Males: 2 To 1
. There were approximately
two male students for every
female student at the UF last
fall.

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THEYRE EVERYWHERE!

Interested In Witchcraft ?

By CYNTHIA OBOLER
Alligator Staff Writer
So youve read Rosemarys
Baby, youve even seen the
movie, and youre wondering
what to do now. If youre
hesitant about looking for eleven
other people and a devil to form
a coven or starting your own
herb garden, you could read a
few more books dealing with
witchcraft.
Campus witchcraft is the
subject of Fritz Liebers novel,
Conjure Wife, an expose of
whats really behind university
policy. The charms described are
authentic, and the story should
manage to work up a shiver or
two in everyone but the most
sophisticated of grad students.
The people in Triple W
(witches, werewolves, and
N
HYING HAWKS, INC.
Flying club has
several openings in
1966 CESSNA 172
CALL 378-8046
or 376-4248

warlocks), edited by Rod
Sterling, are also far from the
kindly type. They cover almost
everything else, though,
including modem sophisticates
practicing witchcraft in suburbia
and, yes, even a very exclusive
sorority. For coeds theres a
story about a love potion that
worked...almost.
Fiction may make you
hungry for some solid facts, but
nothing too dry, please. If so,

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turn to the Encyclopedia of
Witchcraft and Demonology by
~ Rossell Hope Robbins. For good
reading of facts that may
surprise and surely will interest,
look under Sexual Relations
with Devils. Incredible.
A final caution: no matter
how gung-ho you are on
witchcraft, dont see
Conqueror Worm now playing
many of the less fastidious
drive-in movies.



The Fifth
Dimension

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Feature Writer
The Fifth Dimension is a rare
breed of musical talent that
combines all the elements of
contemporary rock music to
make a sound that, is a full
enhancement of their particular
and fascinating style.
FLORENCE LARUE
Our sound is The Fifth
Dimension sound. We like to
keep up with the times but we
dont want one particular bag,
On stage we have four
musicians, including our arranger
and conductor Rene DeKnight.
We never use backup otherwise
wed never get the same sound
on stage as we do on records.
This way we give a true
performance.
Miss Laue (who dislikes
being called Flo) said the
group has been asked to record
the soundtrack for an upcoming
motion picture but declined to
name it.
Changing the subject, this
interviewer asked her what she

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Byron Gilliam and Candy McCoy: "vibrant, exciting, fabulous..."
They danced for the first time with the Fifth Dimension and for a
college audience.
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"Would you like to fly in my beautiful balloon?" Florence Laue
has a dynamic voice capable of interpreting any mo or r

thought about race relations in
this country.
Miss Laue replied: I feel
. it s a shame people dislike one
another over something they
have no control over. If someone
has a different religion, he has
the freedom of choice and it
should be respected.
I also know if I wasnt an
entertainer there would be
places I wouldnt be accepted. I
dont look for phoniness, but its
going on. College crowds have
been warm and receptive and
theres never really been any
problem.
The group likes to play for
an audience that they can get
close to. We played the
Hollywood Bowl and everyone
seemed so far away.
Concerning the groups
performance for Vice President
Hubert Humphrey, Miss Laue
said, They paid for our
transportation, but we did the
show of our own free will.
The world of show business
for Miss Laue is a real world.
When someone says, Oh,
thats Florence, it is usually one
of my friends. I like it when

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PHOTOS BY NICK ARROYO

THE FIFTH DIMENSION: Pictured left'from
right, Florence Laue, Ron Towson, Billy Davis and
LaMonte McLemore. Not pictured is Marilyn

people say, Shes one of the
Fifth Dimension.
She believes in the
philosophy behind the record,
Go Where You Wanna Go.
She said, You have to believe in
it otherwise youre nowhere.
The costumes the group wore
were designed by Boyd Cloptan
of Beverly Hills.
CANDY MCCOY
Candy and her partner Byron
Gilliam are two dancers who are
traveling with the Fifth
Dimension. Candy said, This is
the first time weve danced with
them. We are trying to see how
the audience accepts us. Both
Byron and I dance at The
Factory which is an exclusive
discoteque.
LAMONTE MCLEMORE
LaMonte, the tall,
soft-spoken member of the
group said, We like to play
colleges where we can be with
people our own age. At
nightclubs, the people drink and
come for a good time.
He was asked what was meant
by the title Stoned Soul
Picnic.
LaMonte said that stoned
was a soul word that could
best be defined as very. The
term is not used the same way as
stoned meaning drunk.
He also said, the group likes
good music, from pop to
classical. The group has strange
tastes.
RON TOWNSON
He is the family man in the
group and according to Miss
Laue, is more or less settled.
He has two sons, Kyle and Kim.
When asked how his children
felt about his going on tour in
the U.S. and Europe, Ron said,
I told my elder son, whos 11,
that I am doing this to prepare
for their future. I like to spend
time at home with them and
miss them when traveling. Ive
taken them to Las Vegas, but
never on a long tour.
Since the group brings
together different songs, Ron
said, If we like it, it becomes
part of our act. Take a standard
like On Broadway. We keep it
in the show because the public
will recognize it.
In the show we do Hurry
Sundown which was not a big

seller, but the song said
something that had meaning.
When asked what kind of
show the group performs at
night clubs, Ron replied, We
dont change for anybody. We
do the same songs as we did on
stage.
About the popularity of their
records, he stated that Up, Up
and Away was a gold record
while Go Where You Wanna
Go sold 800,000 copies and is
still selling.
BILLY DAVIS
Billy is the energetic rock
man of the group as heard when
he sung Land of A Thousand
Dances.
He stated that most of their
music is supplied by Laura Nyro
and Jim Webb. When asked if
they ever got music from
Motown Davis replied, We
dont get nothing from
Motown.
Their next album will have
more soul which according to
Davis is the trend.
We do mostly pop with a
soul beat-the funky beat with
clean lyrics.
Davis said the group will be
performing on a future Phyllis
Diller Show where they will sing,
dance and do some skits.
Also scheduled is a spot on
the Jackie Gleason Show, Ed
Sullivan, Frank Sinatra Special,
Polly Bergen Special and

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and roll singer for the group. His versatility
for rhythm and blues, rock and roll, and ballads captured the
audience.

Tuesday, October 8, The Florida Alligator,

McCoo who was taken ill. The group is singing
"Stoned Soul Picnic."

Operation Entertainment.
Were going to be on tv so
much, Davis said, people will
think we have our own series.
They open December 19 at
Miamis Deauville Hotel for four
weeks.
This is the Fifth Dimension.
Magnificent as performers, they
are sincere, honest and friendly
people.
t f
mam.
Psychedelic dancing? Not
hardly. The camera took
multiple exposures of Byron
Gilliam as he danced and
demonstrated the popular
dances.

Page 19



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

Page 20

Fifth Dimension! Minus One) Performs

(EDITORS NOTE: A
freshmans first exposure to UF
campus entertainment is usually
a unique experience. This
freshman staff member records
her impressions in the following
review.)
By PAT CONE
Alligator Staff Writer
Last Thursday night at
Florida Gym, UF students were
entertained by an upcoming
popular group, the Fifth
Dimension. Their show included
a dance team who was making
their first appearance with the
"group.
Whats
Happening
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN DO YOU SOLEMNLY
SWEAR TO BE A TRUE
AMERICAN, VILLIFY
PS UE DO-INTELLECTUALS,
SQUELCH THOSE NASTY
COMMIES, BLOW A KISS TO
CHESTER .. Stephen C.
OConnell gets inaugurated as
President of UF today in the
Florida Gym at 9:30 a.m. Other
events in conjunction with this
i happening include:
Presidents Open House,
room 122 of the Reitz Union, 8
a.m. to 5 p.m.
lnauguration luncheon,
Union Ballroom, noon.
---Inaugural reception,
Presidents home, 4 to 6 p.m.
IN CHOOSING GROWLS
MOST GORGEOUS: The
Homecoming Sweetheart
Contest, sponsored by the
Florida Blue Key, gets under
way tonight in the Constans
Theater at 7:30. The Final
selection of the Homecoming
Sweetheart will be made by the
student body in the fall election.
The winner will be announced at
Gator Growl.
IN WELL, ITSH NOT SHO,
MUCH WHAT IT LOOKSH
LIKE, ASH WHAT YOU PUT
IN ER (HIC): The History of
the Americas Cup is the title
of a movie to be shown at
meeting of the Sailing
Club in room 361 of the Union
at 7:30.
IN REVERSE
BRAIN-DRAINS: The Mensa
members get a refill today at
noon when they have a lunch
meeting in the Union Cafeteria,
room 150.
IN THOSE WHO WONT
HAVE ANY TROUBLE
FINDING A LAWYER IF
THEY SHOULD WANT A
DIVORCE: The Law Dames
meet in the Box Car room of the
College of Law tonight at 8.
AND SPEAKING OF
DAMES: The Education Dames
* gather at the home of Mrs. Bert
Sharp, 1211 NW 36th St.,
tonight at 8.
*** IN SEEING RED: The
Young Americans for Freedom
* Club steps into room 357 of the
Union tonight at 7:30 pjn.
IN GREEK-LETTER
GOINGS-ON: Phi Eta Sigma
meets in rooms 362 and 363 of
the Union tonight at 7:30;
Alpha Lambda Delta gathers in
rooms 355 and 356 of the Union
at 7:30 p.m.; Pi Lambda Delta
comes together in Union room
" 150 B at 5:30 p.m.; and Phi Chi
Theta has a rush Party in the
Towers Recreation Room at
7:30 tonight.

The audience enjoyed the
dancing of Byron and Candy.
Using tape-recorded soul music,
they moved across the stage with
steps of modern jazz. Byron
stood out on the floor with his
assured smoothness and agility.
The Fifth Dimension came on
next with a selection of songs
ranging from their popular Up,
Up and Away to a few sounds
of soul. There is something very
unique about this groups sound.
They have a harmony that is not

/ Where have \
all the heroes gone? \
Ji. f
Bill 1f 1
A young woman cries out her agony to
The Brooklyn sky
As good citizens dim their lights
So they may watch unseen
The late show in the streets.
A pregnant mother is harassed by hoodlums
While spectators stand mutely by.
And the young men?
The young men stand aside
Too smart to get involved.
In the current lingo they "keep their cool".
Well, listen here
No great civilizations have been built
By men who kept their cool ...
No frontiers conquered
No revolutions waged
No brave new societies forged
By men who kept their cool.
All of mankind's shining achievements
Have been propelled into being
By hot-blooded young men, fired by an idea.
When the heroes take to me sidelines
Civilizations decline and disappear.
Right now this country needs heroes
To stick out their necks
For better schools
Better housing
Better jobs
Better government.
It's up to you to take it on.
You are our life insurance.
t Phoenix ||
\ Mutual I! /
\ LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Kg /
HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT f

M ISSING SINGER UNNOTICED

the usual Negro soul, but at the
same time not the Andy
Williams, Serendipity sound.
Despite many aggrevations
during the show, the group was
still able to maintain the
audiences interest. There are
five in the group, but one of the
female vocalists, Marilyn McCoo,
was sick in a Los Angeles
hospital from a cold she received
in London. Florence Laue thus
had to carry both parts. She
made only one noticeable

mistake. In the song, Pattern
People, she slurred over some
of the introduction.
During their song, Sweet
Blindness, the microphones
stopped working. The group
casually kidded with the
audience making jokes to pass
the time away. One person,
during the technical failure
asked, Whats going on, and a
performer replied, It sure isn t
sweet blindness.
Billy Davis, the soloist in a

few songs, stole the show. With
his fast moving steps, smile and
fantastic voice he captured the
audience.
At the end of the show, the
group went into the audience
and invited some people to the
stage to dance with them. This
idea parallels the philosophy one
member stated, We want to be
close to our audience.
The Fifth Dimension received
a standing ovation, thus making
it a rewarding evening.



Tigers Stay Alive; Blast Cards 5-3

DETROIT (UPI) Mickey
Lolich scattered nine hits and
veteran A1 Kaline drove in the
winning run with a seventh
inning bases loaded single Monday
to give the Detroit Tigers
another chance in the World
Series on a 5-3 triumph over the
National League champion St.
Louis Cardinals.
Lolich, clubbed for a two-run
homer by Orlando Cepeda in the
first inning, settled down and
held the Cardinals scoreless for
the last eight frames, allowing
only five hits over that stretch.
But it wasnt until the seventh
that the Tigers, who won 40
games in the seventh or later
during the American League
season, could put him in front.
Then Lolich started the rally
with a single off Cardinal starter
Nelson Briles. The blow finished

Box Score
St. Louis ab r h bi Detroit ab r h bi
Brock If 5 13 0 Mcliffe 2b 4 11 0
Javier 2b 4 0 2 0 Stanley ss 3 2 1 0
Flood cf 4 111 Kaline rs 4 0 2 2
Cepeda lb 4 11 2 Cash 3b 2 0 2 2
Shannon 3b4 0 0 0 Horton If 4 1 10
McCarver c 3 0 1 0 Northrup cf 3 Oil
Davis rs 3 0 0 0 Freehan c 4 0 0 0
Gagliano phi 0 10 Wert 3b 3 0 0 0
Maxvill ss 3 0 0 0 Lolich p 4 11 0
Spiezio ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 315 9 5
Briiesp 2 0 0 0 St Louis 000 000 000-3
Mans ph 1 0 0 0 1$
Totals 35 3 9 3 Detroit 000 000 00x-5

U F Hosts Ski Meet

The University of Florida is
hosting its 4th semiannual
invitational water ski
tournement at Lake Wauburg
Oct. 26.
i
Five skiers will participate
from each school entering and
only the top four in each event
will score points. The schools
entering have not been
determined as of yet but an
overall trophy will be given to
the team with the highest total
number of points. Trophies will
also be awarded to the first three
finishers in each event.
Events in the meet include:
mens and womens slalom, mens
and womens tricks, and mens
and womens jumping.
All skiers who are currently
not participating with the Gator
Ski Club are invited to contact
the intramural department to see
about working with the team.
The Gators have been touted for
the last several years as having
KISER OFFICE EQUIPMENT
OCTOBER SPECIAL
42 MANUAL TYPEWRITERS
(ALL-MAKES)
tECONDITIONED&GUARANTEED
FROM $45 to $95
20% DOWN
BAL. IN 6 PAYMENTS
NO FINANCE CHARGES
ADDED
604 N. MAIN ST. 372-9607

ON TO ST. LOUIS

Briles and left-hander Joe
Hoerner relieved, giving up a
single to Dick McAuliffe before
walking Mickey Stanley
intentionally to fill the bases.
That brought up Kaline, and
he swung viciously and missed
the first pitch. On the next,
though, he lined a single into
center to score both Lolich and
McAuliffe and put Stanley on
third.
Norm Cash followed with a
single to drive in Stanley and ice
the decision, Detroits second
victory against three for St.
Louis. The victory meant that
the sixth Series game will be
played Wednesday in the
Cardinals Busch Stadium with
either Earl Wilson or Joe Sparma
going for Detroit and Ray
Washburn for St. Louis.

one of the finest ski teams in the
nation.
Participation in the Skiing
Club, however, is not limited to
experts. Novices and beginners
are invited to enjoy the thrills of
skiing and will be helped along
by experienced members of the
team.

/ ALL DAY? \
/TAKE A BREAK! \
M CHIC N' FRIES 59< %
mK 2 pieces of Chicken, Crispy French Fries
# r A COUNTRY DINNER . 89* m
m 3 Pieces of Chicken, French Fries, Roll and Honey. V
! jO* BUCKET Ul ) 3.59 H
| BARREL Us.) 4.89 I
I BARN I
2029 N.W. 13th St. Across From Gainesville High School

Detroits first two runs came
in the fourth when Stanley
tripled and scored on Cashs
sacrifice fly and Willie Horton
tripled and scored on Jim
Northrups single.

Why would Bic torment
this dazzling beauty?

To introduce j|
the most elegant
| fiS Kk Expensive new
campus. Bi< Clic* for
hi. l.irtiiri
In
VSKBKmf \ w | >. |
Only Bic would dare to torment a beauty like this. Not the girl...
the pen she's holding. It's the new luxury model Bic Clic...designed
for scholarship athletes, lucky card players and other rich campus
socialites who can afford the expensive 49-cent price.
But don't let those delicate good looks fool you. Despite hor horrible
rible horrible punishment by mad scientists, the elegant Bic Clic still wrote
first time, every time.
Everything you want in a fine pen, you'll find in the new Bic
Clic. It's retractable. Refillable. Comes in 8 barrel colors. And like
all Bic pens, writes first time, every time...no matter what devilish
abuse sadistic students devise for it.
Woterman-Bic Pen Corporation, Milford, Connecticut 06460

All of the Cardinal runs came
in the first. Lou Brock opened
with a double and scored on
Curt Floods single, and Flood
was on base when Cepeda
homered.
The loss went to Hoemer.

Tuesday, October 8, The Florida Alligator,

Read The
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
-

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

Baby Gators Swallow
Auburn Tigers 54-17

By BILL KING
Alligator Sports Writer
The Baby Gators have a Tiger
in their tank: an Auburn Tiger
that is. The UF Freshmen
exploded for 41 points in the
first half and rolled to a 54-17
final score.
. The opening quarter was a
see-saw ball control fight. The

'it*"''*"
Xf< v % A??-,-/.- A.^. >£: '<&> s
Be life IHiHIKHIWHB
" villi
CARLOS ALVAREZ ON THE RUN NICK ARROYO
.. .sets up Gator touchdown
... %£M_ >j y
V -*' M fl
4 \ JBImSHI. WMHHVfHHHHHHV J^iljj^
GETZEN KICK BLOCKED NICK ARROYO
.. .by Auburn's Hall Mallot (71)

Tuesday STEAK SPECIAL
S-9P.M.
LONPON BROIL STEAK
SERVED WITH
CHOICE OF POTATOES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER
W w<
1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
'/, BLOCK FROM CAMPUS J

Tigers scored first with a 22 yard
field goal. With just over three
minutes to play Tommy
Durrance broke over the middle
for the first of eight Gator
touchdowns.
Starting on their own 29 yard
line, the Gators scored again in

five plays. Carlos Alvarez set up
the score receiving a 34 yard
pass from John Reaves.
Durrance blasted in from eight
yards out on the last play of the
first quarter.
Revenging last years licking
of 31-0, Durrance took
advantage of openings in the
Auburn line to rack up 164
yards rushing.
The Baby Gators put the
game out of reach in the second
quarter. The Tigers again scored
first, but UF put 27 points on
the scoreboard controlling the
ball most of the quarter. Gary
Kadric intercepted a pass and
went 27 yards for a TD. Mike
Rich closed the half bulling over
the middle for six points.
Reaves and Schnebly both
found receivers open all
afternoon. Alvarez, a favorite
target, caught nine passes for
194 yards and one TD. Andy
Cheney supplied the counter
punch receiving six passes for
135 yards.
Auburn slowed up the Gator
scoring punch by controlling the
ball nearly all the third quarter.
The freshmen defense was
content to let the clock tick
away. The Baby Gators
frustrated the two long Tiger
drives. Auburn was stopped cold
twice inside the Florida twenty
and held scoreless.
UF displayed their offensive
talents again ip the fourth
quarter. Bill Dowdy caught a 14
yard scoring pass capping a 70
yard drive.
Bob Harrell and Mike Dwyer
stopped Pat Sullivan, the
Auburn quarterback consistently
in the last period.
With less than three minutes
left in the game the Gators took
advantage of two costly Auburn
penalties to put the score over
50.
In nine plays UF moved the
ball 90 yards for the final TD.
Durrance did the honors from
three yards out with less than
one minute left.
The FSU Freshmen visit
Gainesville in two weeks in the
year of the Baby Gator.

Gafor Ray

Was that a genuine fleaflicker play you tried in the fourth quarter?
I might have been out of school for a few years, but it looked like
McTheny was about to shove the ball over to Smith. You wore
kidding werent you?
No, we werent kidding. That was the fleaflicker and had McTheny
been able to get the shovel pass away it likely would have been six
points.
Mississippi State made frequent use of a halfback pass, and they
seemed to pick up consistently long yardage with it. Were we keyed in
on that kind of a situation?
No, we werent, were we?
How come you didnt give Rentz a chance to work with the first
unit out there? He got in for one lousy series with the second team,
and only came out after that to hold for kicks. Thanks!~A Rentz
Fan.
Let me say first that Im a Rentz fan, too. Im a fan of the entire
Fightin Gator team. Im proud of all of them. Im always concerned
when boys on the varsity do not get to play or play as much as you
would like to see them play. The first reason we stayed with Eckdahl
as much as we did was he was moving the football team better than
we have had it moved all year. The second was the game was in doubt
until midway of the final quarter and we needed to stay with the unit
which was moving the ball. Rentz has played some great and exciting
football for Florida and I have every confidence we will do a lot more
of the same the remainder of the season. You have picked a fine boy
and an outstanding athlete to be a fan of and rest assured lies as
valuable a member of this football team as we have got.
THE GENTLEMANS SHIRT
\ < j digflj ... M
I Collegiately" Correct... I
For Fall 1968: Sero offers a choice of two I
I of Americas most celebrated campus collar 1
I models the Purist button-down and the 1
I new, distinctive Bristol. Deftly tailored I
I with trimly tapered body lines in a host 1
of handsome solid colourings, stripings and 1
I checks, many exclusive with Sero. Both 1
I models come in fr ne -combed 100% cotton or I
B Copyright by S*ro of Nw Haven, Inc. 1964 1
tHmbersttp
Carolyn Plaza 1620 West University



An Upset Week In The South SEC

By DAVfb M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Ole Miss finally
beat Alabama after 58 years
Saturday but some Crimson Tide
fans arent convinced that the
Rebels 10-8 margin is a true
indication of how the two
Southern grid giants compare.
After all, the game had been
billed as a duel between two
impressive sophomore
quarterbacks Archie Manning
of Ole Miss and Scott Hunter of
Alabama. And the Bama fans
want it pointed out that Hunter
never got to play.
Hunter, it was revealed after
Saturdays grueling contest at
Jackson, had been injured in the
previous weeks game with
Southern Mississippi. Alabama
coach Paul Bryant, who kept the
injury secret, said the
sophomore was ruled out of the
game just before kickoff on a
doctors recommendation.
However, Bryant doesnt
want to use Hunters absence as
an alibi. He insists Ole Miss
earned its first win over Alabama
since 1910 the Crimson Tide
having won 16 and tied one of
the 17 intervening contests.
Ole Miss deserves to win for
several reasons, Bryant said.
They had better coaching and
better conditioning and wanted
it more than we did.
Manning didnt have an
especially outstanding afternoon
but he threw a 6-yard pass to
Hank Shows for the Rebels
game winning, second period
touchdown, a touchdown he set
up with a 40-yard pass.
Alabama, in danger of being
shut out for the first time since
1957, scored in the closing
seconds when Mike Hall blocked
a punt.
The victory by the 20th
ranked Rebels over the
llth-ranked Crimson Tide
highlighted one of the wildest
Saturdays of college football
were likely to see in this region.
Georgia, down 20-7, stormed
back to edge South Carolina
21-20; Tampa kicked a
last-second field goal to upset
Tulane 17-14; North Carolina
gambled on a two-point
conversion in the fading
Ole Miss
Leads SEC,
Florida Third
SEC Standings
WLTWLT
Mississippi 2 0 0 3 00
Auburn 2 0 0 2 1 0
FLORIDA 10 0 3 0 0
Georgia 0 0 1 2 0 1
Tennessee 0 0 1 2 0 0;
Lou. State 00 0 3 0 0
Vanderbilt 0 00 2 1 0
Alabama 0 10 2 10
Kentucky 0 2 0 1 2 0
Miss. State 0 20 0 3 0
Independents
W L T
Tampa 3 0 0
Fla. State 2 1 0
Ga. Tech 2 10
Miami 2 10
Southern Miss. 2 10
West Va. 2 10
Va. Tech 12 0
Tulane 0 3 0

moments to upset Vanderbilt
8-7, Florida State upended
Texas A &M 20-14, and Georgia
Tech had to come from behind
in the final period to beat
Clemson 24-21.
The rest of the action went
pretty much according to form
although some of the scores
were a surprise.
Miami lost at 2nd ranked
Southern Cal 28-3; Auburn beat
Kentucky 26-7;' Florida beat
Mississippi State 31-14;
Louisiana State trounced Baylor
48-16; Tennessee crushed Rice
52-0; Southern Mississippi

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BAMA. GREENIES LOSE

massacred East Carolina 65-0;
Virginia Tech lost to Kansas
State 34-19; and Memphis State,
the Souths gift to the Missouri
Valley Conference, beat MVC
defending champion North
Texas State 30-12.
This coming weeks headliner
will be at Athens, Ga., where
Georgia will be lost to Ole Miss.
Other action finds Vanderbilt at
Alabama, Aubrun at Clemson,
Tulane at Florida, Oregon State
at Kentucky, LSU at Miami
Friday night, Southern Miss at
Mississippi State and Tennessee
at Georgia Tech.

Sophomore quarterback Mike
Cavan, UPls offense player of
the week in the SEC last week,
passed to speedy Kent Lawrence
for the late-fourth period
touchdown that brought Georgia
from behind after the Bulldogs
had trailed from the opening
minutes.
Bill Cappleman, making his
first start, threw two touchdown
passes to lead Florida State over
the defending Southwest
Conference champs.
Larry Good completed 14 of
24 passes for 232 yards and two

Tuesday, October 8, The Florkfe Alligator,

touchdowns to hand Georgia
Tech its 10th straight victory
over Clemson.
Bubba Wyche got Tennessee
off and runing to its biggest
margin in eight years; Auburns
John Riley set a new
Southeastern Conference record
by kicking four field goals
against Kentucky; and splitbacks
Maurice Lelanc and Jim West
scored two touchdowns each for
LSU.
And, for the record, that
65-point nightmare was the
worst beating East Carolina has
taken in the past 36 season.

Page 23



Page 24

\. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 8,1968

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A Great University

1
PACEMAKER AWARD

I
- *** - -.; H


The Florida Alligator
- ~.- flB
-: I
' I Takes strong editorial positions. I
Kxeelient coverage of campus events. Interesting features, I
I lneluding the Advice and Dissent letters column.
--- ; V :
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and a pretty damn good newspaper too

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A Great President