Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 7

New Council Rivals'Action,
'ConcernedWith Conference

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writar
The newly created Action/Study Council has released a position
paper proposing a thorough revision of the present registration
procedures and the University Record.
The council is composed of administration, faculty, graduate and
undergraduate students who became concerned with problems of the
Action Conference.
Several members thoughts things werent going as well as possible
in the conference, Action/Study Council member Dr. Stephen T.
Margulis, assistant professor of the Department of Psychology said.
We have found we are making more progress in one week than the

First 'Action
Meeting Today
The UF Action
Conference, created last
spring to search for
meaningful answers to critical
problems besetting the UF,
meets today at 3:30 pjn. in
room 349 of the Reitz Union.
Todays meeting is the
first of the fall quarter for the
Conference, made up of 25
members each from the
student body, faculty, and
administration.
Several recommendations
have already been made by
the Action Conference,
covering four froad areas:
discrimination to minorities,
freedom of speech, academic
standards, and orientation
and counseling.
Injured Coed
Hospitalized
A UF coed injured Saturday
when an explosive was thrown
onto her lap will undergo minor
surgery Thursday or Friday.
Jane Fowles, 3PE, was riding
past the post-game
demonstration on 13th Ave. in
front of the ATO Fraternity
House when someone in the
crowd threw an explosive into
the car.
Miss Fowles was taken to
Alachua General Hospital and
transferred to the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center where she was
treated and released.
Monday Miss Fowles was
confined to the infirmary with
what a spokesman called a
good size wound in her left thigh
and her thumb.
The spokesman indicated
Miss Fowles would be
hospitalized in the Infirmary
until the end of the week when
she will be transferred to the
health center for the surgery.
The Gainesville Police
Department said Monday they
had no knowledge of the
incident, and the University
Police Department said they had
no jurisdiction since the accident
occurred off campus.

The
Florida Alligator

Action Conference will in ten
years, he said.
Unhappy with the existing
state of affairs, the
Action/Study Council plans this
to be the first of a number of
position papers, Margulis said.
Faculty and course evaluation
are the two main points of the
paper, initially drafted by
Margulis. With copies sent to all
major administrative positions,
the paper suggests students
should be allowed to comment
on whether a teacher is doing his
job and on the value of the
course.
We regard faculty evaluation
as a means to an end, Margulis
said.
Psychology and Education
departments could compose the
questions, he added. The
question is whether the teachers
would permit it.
There are points for and
against having students sign
these questionnaires, Margulis
said. The answer may lay in
(SEE 'COUNCIL/ P. 2)

Humphrey Would Halt Bombing,
Let UN Supervise Withdrawal

SALT LAKE CITY (UPI)
Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey said Monday he
would be willing to stop the
bombing of North Vietnam as a
move toward peace if elected
president.
Humphrey told a nationwide
I peace
believe it could
HUMPHREY iggj tQ success
in the negotiations and a shorter
war. This would be the best
protection for our troops.
Humphrey repeated,
however, an earlier statement
that neither he nor anyone else

SLOWNESS CITED

University of Florida, Gainesville

^x^-x-xox-x-x-x-xox-x-x-x-x-xox^wxwMsviw.w.^wwwsvtvrewwwww^
| Hollis Protests Sikes (
1 'Hippie Leftist Label j
Action Conference member i*
Jim Hollis, protesting $
interference from the outside"
had his full beard shaved off |
I Hollis, SEG, was protesting |
the resignation of Conference $
§ BEFORE Chairman Maj. Russell Ramsey. |
jlW^
* Ramsey resigned after U.S.
Rep. Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) ordered
* an Army investigation of the
§ ill Conference. Sikes said he
received some letters calling the
$ I T Conference "hippie-oriented" §
and having "leftist leanings." $
;j: DURING l
$
"Since I had the most
MT 'hippie-like' beard on the
\ Ur...... '' Bp Conference," Hollis said, "I :jj
figured I'd shave to show it
fj wasn't really 'hippie-oriented.'
i mmKm The conference meets again
AFTER Tuesday, minus one beard.
$ I
SJC*>IMiX*>M*K*S.M.:*V.?AWA.X.W.V.r.X.W.X.X.X.X-X.X-X.X*X*X*X*X*X*:C.'

had control over the Vietnam
War while President Johnson
remained in office.
Discussing his proposal if
elected president, Humphrey
said in weighing that risk
and before taking action I
would place key importance op
evidence direct or indirect, by
deed or word of Communist
willingness to restore the
Demilitarized zone between
North and South Vietnam.
Humphrey also said he would
take a second step which would
involve the risk that the South
Vietnamese would meet the
obligations they say they are
now ready to assume in their
own self defense."
Senate Meeting
The Student Senate will
meet tonight at 7 in room
349 of the Reitz Union.

Furthermore, the Democratic
presidential contender said he
would sit down with South
Vietnamese leaders to set a
specific timetable by which
American forces could be
systematically reduced while
South Vietnamese forces took
over more and more of the
burden.
I would propose once more
an immediate cease fire with
United Nations or other
international supervision and
supervised withdrawal of all
foreign forces from South
Vietnam, he said.
In what appeared to be a
sharp break with administration
policies. Humphrey said, I
believe all of these steps could
lead to an honorable and lasting
settlement serving both our own
national interest and the
interests of the other nations of
Southeast Asia."

America's
Number I
College
Deity

Tuesday, October 1, 1968

SDS Seeks
UF Charter,
Recognition
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writar
The activist Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS) is
applying to the UF
administration for a charter,
which would mean official UF
recognition for the group.
However, SDS leaders predict
some trouble in winning a
charter, which must be granted
by the 10-member Committee
on Student Organizations and
Social Affairs. Committee
members are appointed by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
Off-hand, Id say we have a
50-50 chance, SDS chairman
Ed Freeman said. It all depends
on the committee members. And
President OCojinell could veto
their decision if he wanted to.
Another member, Laura
Geisar, cited as a stumbling block
some SDS members
unfriendly dealings with the
administration. SDS is seeking a
charter mainly because the
group would then be entitled to
use UF facilities, Freeman said.
Also, a chartered organization
might be more attractive to
potential members, Miss Geisar
said.
Though a chartered SDS
would be able to apply to
Student Government for money,
r reeman said, it is unlikely
.hat SDS would do so.
SDS organizers picked up an
application last week from Bill
Cross, director of student
activities. They are to submit to
Cross a constitution and by-laws,
within 30 days.
The organization must have
at least 20 members who are
full-time UF students, Cross
said. Freeman told the Alligator
Monday that 30 people
definitely will be joining, with a
possible 50 member total.
After SDS submits its
application to Cross, he will
study it before handing it over
to the student organizations
committee.
Dr. Vincent McGuire,
prose ssor of secondary
education, is chairman of the
committee. He could not be
reached for comment at
press time.
SDS has been an off-campus
organization at the UF since
1965.
UF Ranked 4th,
10th In Country
UF football team advanced in
both wire services rankings this
week.
The UPI moved the Gators
from 14th to 10th and the AP
raised the Gators from sth to
4th after a 9-3 win over FSU
last weekend.
The UPI voting is done by a
board of college coaches, but the
AP ranking is the work of
national sports writers.



Page 2

Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 1.1968

FORWARD-UNITED-FIRST

Shepherd Lauds Merger

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Student Body
President Charles Shepherd has
emerged from the latest Student
Government melee applauding
the merger of United-First and
some members of Forward
Party, although claiming to have
had no part in negotiations
for their coalition.
In the long run this merger

New Movement Sets
Dorm Conventions

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
Nominating conventions
designed to let students choose
their own candidates for the
November elections will be held
in seven living areas Wednesday
night.
The New Movement, UFs
newest political party, will hold
the conventions to allow
students for the first time, in
recent history to become
involved in student activities.
The new party was formed
after members of Forward Party
joined forces with United First
party to form a political alliance
allegedly controlling nn
estimated 4,000 student votes.
The conventions will be
informal meetings in the dorm
areas where members of each
area select candidates for the
forty student senate seats and
eight Union Board posts,
according to Dwight Rogers,
Chairman of the New Movement
Party.
Individual conventions will be
held in Broward Hall basement
for residents of Rawlings and
Broward dormitories, and in the
Hume Hall recreation room for
both Hume and Graham
residents.
Students living in Jennings
are scheduled to meet in the
dorms basement and Murphree
area residents meet in the west
side of the main cafeteria for the

REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP
GROUND FLOOR J.WAYNE REITZ UNION
Why You Should Patronize the Campus Barber Shop
1. Ultra modem designed barber shop with eight
professionally qualified barbers.
2. Gainesville's only barber shop with three professionally
trained Hair Stylists.
3. Professional hair styling, razor cuts, hair straightening,
regular hair cuts and manicures with the best products
on the market.
4. We set aside a part of our profit for sponsoring
entertainment for the students at the university.
For The Utmost In Personal Grooming,
Visit Your Campus Barber Shop
8 5:30 Mon thru Fri
9 4:00 Saturday
v
GUARANTEED SATISFACTION
OR YOUR MONEY BACK
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Fteltz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601 The Alligator Is entered
aa second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
Tbe Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

is going to be the only way you
can continue the cooperation
between the executive and
legislative branches operating
last year, Shepherd said.
Ive seen politics work on
this campus for many years, he
said. Ive always been opposed
to fraternity jumping. When I
ran for president it was on this
premise.
This time, however, I have to

nominating session.
The meeting for Tolbert
residents will be held in South
Halls recreation room, and the
meeting for Yulee Hall will be
held in the dorms basement.
Residents of both Tower A
and Tower B will meet in the
social recreation room in the
Commons Building.
Roger said the conventions
will be held only if the
reapportionment bill now before
the Student Senate passes to tonight.
night. tonight.
The bill will determine the
number of students each
convention can nominate.
If the bill passes, the
Murphree and Hume Hall
conventions can nominate three
students for seats, while the
Tolbert, Towers, and Broward
' ft
meeting will nominate two.
Jennings and Yulee areas will
each have one nominee to place
on the N,ew Movement ticket.
After the nominations, each
nominee must qualify in the
Treasurers office by Friday.
Students on the ticket must be
residents of the nominating area,
have a 2.0 average and pay a $5
qualifying fee.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pd. poi. adv.)

concede that I agree with the
jump because of the policy
considerations involved. This is
the first time a political party
has divided because of Student
Government policies and not
just politics. he said.
Shepherd said one cause of
the split in Forward party was
some of the leaders were
demanding the members cease
cooperating with Taylor
(student body president)
because he was looking too
good.
He named Honor Court
Chancellor Pete Zinober and
Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett.
My assessment of this
so-called New Movement Party
is that expediency is their
by-word. Im not able to believe
how Steve Hull (New Movement
head), who has been the biggest
critic of Forward party, could
now place himself in the
position of actually running on
their ticket, Shepherd said.
These are the same people
he scathed editorially day after
day when he was head of the
Alligator, Shepherd said.
As for Callahan (Hulls
campaign manager) his political
expediency is well known in
student government, Shepherd
said.
Contrived party was a
farce, Shepherd said. This is
no surprise to anyone. Callahan
sold it down the river during the
second run-offs.

r ______
ANNOUNCING
the fall opening of I
The Arredondo Room
'>*... T ;
fourth floor J. Wayne Reitz Union
Open 5 days weekly
Moderate prices
Attentive service
Lunch 11:30- 2:00
Dinner 5:30- 8:00
* F 1
Gala Buffet 11:302:00
before every home game
----- ~
Meal Plans may be used
*

New Council
Rivals [Action

having the student sign just his
grade point average.
This material would be
comprised in a catalog and made
available to incoming students
prior to registration.
It is hoped that evaluations
will take place quarterly and will
be published annually, the
position paper reports.
The paper suggests individual
registration be initiated to
permit the student and teacher
to exchange information
concerning course content,
reading, testing, and the level of
sophistication of the course.
If a man is responsible for
teaching a course, he is
responsible from beginning to
end, Marguiis said. He proposed
teachers be available in their
offices during the entire
registration process.
The position paper
recommends annual registration,
in contrast to quarterly
registration, be optional.
To facilitate registration, the
2,730 Degrees
During the school year
1966-67 2,730 Bachelor degrees
were awarded by the UF. Also
awarded during the year were
860 masters degrees and 155
Ph.d. degrees.

paper suggests one or more
centralized locations be set up
on campus for recording closed
sections. Each department can
have a continuous and
immediate tally of open and
closed sections, Marguiis said.
The report states that
undergraduates need or desire
personal contact with faculty
members. It suggests contact
could be stimulated by
departmental programming.
A revised and extended
University Record is
recommended by the
Action/Study Council. The
University Record is a review of
courses and course content.
It needs a thorough
rewriting, Marguiis said. There
is a lot of material it doesn't
have.
We will follow up the
actions this paper brings about,
he said. We are interested in
seeing if people initiate some of
our points or come up with
something better.
We hope Dean Harry Sisler
(Arts and Sciences) will be our
most interested listener, he
said. Sisler sent notes to faculty
members asking for suggestions.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pd. pol. adv.)



By PAT McOERMOTT
Alligator Staff Writer
. The power structure in the
U.S. is moving toward an
ultimate police state, Dr.
Kenneth Megill said at an open
meeting in the Reitz Union
Friday night.
Guest speaker of the campus
chapter of the American Civil
Liberties Union, Megill
addressed 100 people on a
personal study of the student
movement, East and West.
Megill, UF professor of
philosophy, has recently
returned from Hungary.
Speaking strictly as an
individual autonomous of any
organization including ACLU,
Megill discussed the student
movement in the U.S., and the
function that the ACLU will be
playing.
His explanation for the
increasing disturbance was that
traditional issues are now the
radical issues because there has
developed a stronger opposition
to change in the power
structures.
It looks like the time of
open oppressio n is
coming... and ACLU will be
one of the most influential
organizations in the fight against
open oppression, he said.
He commented that the
biggest advance the student
movement has made is that it is
now being taken seriously.
Prominent
Newscaster
To Speak
Walter Cronkite, managing
editor, Columbia Broadcasting
System, will be on the UF
campus, Feb. 8, to participate in
the Accent 69 symposium,
Dimensions of Freedom.
Cronkite. who appears
nightly on News
With Walter Cronkite, will
speak on the objective role of
the news media. He was chosen
bv the Speakers Committee for
Accent because lie knows what
is happening today and has seen
both sides, according to Jeff
Weil, committee chairman.
Accent 69 will include
lectures and discussions designed
to bring to the UF the men and
ideas behind the issues of today.
The goal of the program is total
student involvement. Included in
the series will be informal
discussions, documentary films
and a road show sponsored by
the Student Government
Association. All events will be
open to the student body.
Dimensions of Freedom"
was chosen as the 19(>9 theme
because it is prevalent to these
times of civil unrest which
prompt the question whether
freedom is a right or privilege.
This is Where Good
Service Starts!
Specialist in repairs of
fjTHUMPH
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in North
Central F lorida
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY
372-4372

ACLU Speaker Predicts Police State

The movement is being
recognized because people are
attacking it, Megill said.
Megill explained that
although more people are now
aware of a need for changes
within the society, no one
knows how to begin.
Its no longer a matter of
saying I dont like it, its
proposing solutions, he said. He
admitted his sojourn in Hungary
has had a marked influence on
his attitude toward the student
movement in general.
The movement is an
international movement in that
there is a common sense of the
rejection of the social order and
a sense of looking for away
out, he added.
In Hungary, he explained,
there is a striving for some sort
of democratic socialistic order.

&UOG UG WELCOMES
Uof F. STUDENTS and FACULTY
to OPEN HOUSE
October

Come in and see our fabulous new fashions :
FREE 2pr. May Queen Hose with your initial purchase
Coffee and doughnuts will be served.
I '&Uegm UNIVERSITY BLVD. near U. of F.

'OPPRESSION IS COMING*

The West and the East have
a mutual interest in the status
quo, Megill said. Everyone
here hates the Communists,
everyone there hates the
Capitalists, and the balance is
maintained.
Megill emphasized a need to
rediscover the Communist
movement that took place in
Hungary after WW 11. He
admitted although some of the
results of that movement were
not desirable, Hungary did profit
immensely.
He pointed out that the old
class order was destroyed,
democratization took hold and
for the First time Hungary was a
part of the world market.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pd. pol. ,dv )

Megill went on to discuss the
student movements in France,
Hungary, Yugoslavia and his
own experiences with the
movement in Eastern Europe.
The movement is only at the
beginning, Megill said. There
is going to be a lot more going
on in the next few years. He
pointed out that the number of
radicals will increase as people
become more dissatisfied with
the present system.
Although the U.S. is fast

Institute of Judaic Studies
Elementary and Intermediate Hebrew
Conversational Hebrew
Jewish Philosophy and History
HILLEL FOUNDATION
16 N.W. 18th Street
Classes start Tuesday, October 15 8:00P.M.

Tuesday, October 1,1968, The Ftoride Alligator,

approaching an open oppression
system, MegilJ pointed out it has
still preserved many basic
freedoms, largely due to the
services of such groups as ACLU.
I'm happy to be back in the
land of the free, MegiU said.
The campus chapter of ACLU
is a student branch of the
national organization. Its
purpose is to defend the civil
liberties of individuals and
educate the students of their
rights under the constitution.

Page 3



Page 4

, Th Florida Alligator. Tuesday, October 1,1968

Fulbright Makes Proposal
To Nominate Goldberg

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
J. William Fulbright called on
President Johnson Monday to
break the Senate's impasse on
the nomination of Abe Fortas as
chief justice by withdrawing
Fortas' name and proposing
former Justice Arthur J.
Goldberg instead.
Despite the charge-heard
again Monday in the Senates
filibuster-that Earl Warren
decided to retire now in order to
keejp Richard M. Nixon from
selecting the next chief justice,
Fulbright said he felt the Senate
would vote to confirm Goldberg.
Mr. Goldberg is a very
superior man..., Fulbright said.
Besides, I think that on moral
grounds, Mr. Goldberg deserves
the appointment.
Red Troops
Batter
Green Berets
SAIGON (UPI) Communist
troops surrounding the Green
Beret outpost at Thuong Due 30
miles southwest of Dan Nang
hoisted the North Vietnamese
flag over a nearby village
Monday and battered an allied
column trying to lift a three-day
siege of the vitsl camp.
At stake in the major battle
was control of the An Hoa
Valley, an infiltration route
which Communist commanders
have used to funnel supplies
toward Da Nang for a possible
full-scale attack on South
Vietnams second largest city.
There was no report of allied
losses, but Communist gunners
shot down a U.S. helicopter in
the area Sunday, killing all five
men aboard.
Nearby, South Vietnamese
troops found a six-barrel
launcher for Russian-made 122
mm rockets, one of the most
powerful weapons in the
Communist arsenal.
The USS New Jersey, only
active battleship in the world,
joined the Vietnam war Monday,
firing a barrage of its 16-inch
shells 14 miles inside North
Vietnam from its station in the
South China Sea. Spotter pilots
reported heavy damage from the
bombardment.
The New Jerseys targets were
gun positions and ammunition
bunkers just above the
Demilitarized Zone.
Call in News Stories
y 6 Ext 2832

CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
I
GJwtglmccd
2919 S. W. Thirteenth Street j
4U Electric Gainesville, Florida J
(904) 372-2200
f>

UPI
NEWS
Fulbright and Sen. William B.
Spong, D-Va., disclosed their
intentions of voting against
cutting off the filibuster when
the issue arises at 1 pjn. EDT
Tuesday.
Senate Democratic Leader

Newspaper Chain
Endorses Nixon

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Scripps-Howard newspapers
today endorsed Richard M.
Nixon for President.
An editorial appearing in the
17 newspapers in the group said
the Scripps-Howard editors see
no other real choice in 1968
than Nixon, the Republican
nominee.
They believe he offers more
hope, on more counts, than
Hubert Humphrey and that
George Wallace offers no hope at
all, the editorial said.
The country is ripe, and

/\ a x
S "** I v.RfiwjTr
USE MO HOOKS I Acwt
Kj JtTO XrA P6./VC.H
**lSs* U w Pops.
flRB
JESS | "T'&mitT 2.50
J 9WKAT SrttT £i. 75
INCI.UOU OtStCM < **-*- KL-'>
tMCLOSt. C-VC_ R. NV.O. StMCs Tt> J
INTORV QooOS
P-o. Box SOiJL
CCCARWA.TS.R., FLOAVOA

Mike Mansfield said he was
determined to proceed with the
test vote despite indications it
might fall short a
majority-and far short of the
two-thirds majority required to
silence a filibuster through
cloture. He said a second vote on
cloture would be taken
Thursday or Friday.
Mansfield did not say what
move he would make if the
filibuster survived this
test. Meantime, Warren,
observing the 15th anniversary
of his appointment to the court,
said he would be on the bench
when the court opens its fall
session Oct. 7.

apparently eager, for change.
Historically, change in
Washington has been profitable.
We think this year it is unusually
necessary. Only Richard Nixon
can bring such a change in
orderly fashion.
Degrees Increase
In the last ten years, the
number of Bachelor degrees
awarded has increased by more
than 1200. During 1957, there
were 1502 degrees granted,
while in 1967 there were 2730.

Nix on, Humphrey
Both Claim South

ATLANTA (UPI) Richard
Nixon and Hubert Humphrey,
appearing in a television
interview Monday, both said
they expected to fare well in the
South in November, and both
have put Georgia in their
column.
Nixon, who said his biggest
opponent in the South will be
George Wallace and not
Humphrey, predicted he would
do well in Georgia, in view of
the shift of some of the top
Georgia Democrats to the
Republican column in recent
weeks.
Vice-President Hubert H.
Humphrey said he expects to
carry Georgia and North
Carolina.
Humphrey conceded today
that if the election were held
now Richard M. Nixon would
win the presidency. We would
not have a prayer, he said.
Humphrey said today he
would lay Richard M. Nixons

SPORTSCAB
OWNERS
TAKE NOTICE
3 /y /(H
/ /#/d>
ji /A
*
minor
TUNEUP SPECIAL
ON MOST
4-Cyl. Engines
Special Includes
POINTS & CONDENSER
Check Os TIMING
CARBURETOR ADJUSTMENT
VALUE ADJUSTMENT
COMPRESSION CHECK
All For The Unheard
Os Price Os (F/C £A
(plus parts, if needed)
SPECIAL GOOD THIS WEEK ONLY
PINNA performance
MOTORS INC.
615 n.main sr 378-1668

record on the line tonight in a
major foreign policy speech.
Meanwhile, George C. Wallace
rode through cheers and a
shower of confetti down
Chicagos packed State Street
today in a rousing start of a
major effort to woo and win the
blue collar vote of the North.
Police estimated that about
300,000 persons saw Wallace as
his black open top convertible,
ringed with Secret Service men,
moved slowly through the heart
of the loop.
The turnout was impressive,
but fell short of the estimated
400,000 who cheered Richard
M. Nixon when he led a similar
motorcade through the loop
earlier this month.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Po pul ,l(lv.)



Nevill Chosen
Engineering Head

Dr. Gale Erwin Nevill Jr., 34,
is the newly named chairman of
the UFs Department of
Engineering Science and
Mechanics, effective Oct. 1.
He became acting chairman
of the department in July, 1967.
Dr. Nevill has a strong
background and practical
experience in industry and
related research. Before coming
to the UF in 1964 as associate
professor, he spent four years
with Southwest Research
Institute at San Antonio, Tex.,
as senior research engineer.
He also had industrial
experience with General Electric
Co. in Schenectady, N.Y.;
Humble Oil Co., Houston, Tex.,
and other firms.
After receiving two
undergraduate degrees from Rice
University Dr. Nevill earned a
master of science in mechanical
engineering from Rice in 1957
and his Ph.D. at Stanford
University in 1961.
His fields of interest range
from solid mechanics, modeling
theory, wave propagation and
heat transfer to hunting, fishing
and water skiing.
Whats
Happening
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN SEA AND SKY: The
Gator Ski Club gathers in room
C 4 of the Reitz Union tonight
at 7:30; and the Arnold Air
Society musters in the AFROTC
Library for a smoker at the same
time.
The Air Society smoker will
be for all interested AFROTC
POC cadets. The 1505 uniform
should be worn (whatever that
is).
IN BLOWING YOUR OWN
HORN: The UF Chamber
Orchestra will give an Inaugural
concert in the Union
Auditorium tonight at 8:15.
Oboeist Earl Grath will be
featured.
In IF SMOKEY ONLY
KNEW. .: The Forestry Club
will have (of all things!) a
smoker in room 362 of the
Union at 7:30 tonight.
AND SPEAKING OF CLUBS
CONCERNED WITH TREES:
The Citrus Club will come
together in room 349 of the
Union tonight at 7:30.
IN THE HATED CURVE
SMASHERS: Mensa meets
tonight in room 357 of the
Union at 8 p.m. All interested
are invited.
IN UFS HIPPIE
ORGANIZATION OR,
THOSE WHO ARE GETTING
COMPLETELY SIKED OUT:
The Action Conference meets in
room 349 of the Union today at
3:30 pjn.
IN THOSE CONCERNED
WITH HIGHER THINGS: A
High Holy Day service will be
held in the Medical Science
Building Auditorium at 7
tonight; and the Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship will meet in
room 316 of the Union at the
same time.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pd. pot. adv.)

~ > . -
J 9
gm M
. . new chairman
A native of Houston, Dr.
Nevill has conducted
independent and
grant-supported research at the
university and has a patent on a
high pressure valve used in the
oil industry.
The elected advisor of Sigma
Tau honorary engineering
fraternity at the uriversity and a
registered engineer, Dr. Nevill
belongs to numerous
professional organizations,
including the American Society
of Mechanical Engineers and the
New York Academy of Sciences.

NORTHCENTRAL FLORIDA'S
S* ...r -vl
EXTENDS A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
We invite you to come in and get acquainted and look over our fine selection of BRAND
NAME MERCHANDISE!
-APPROVED and REQUIRED PHYSICAL EDUCATION
CLOTHING FOR MEN and WOMEN
MEN WOMEN
GYM SHORTS BHtMUDAS
TEE SHIRTS JAMAICAS
SHOES-SOCKS BLOUSES
SUPPORTERS SWEAT SHIRTS AND PANTS
SWEAT SHIRTS AND PANTS
HANDBALLS, HANDBAU GLOVES, TRAMPOUNE SLIPPERS AND HAND GUARDS
ALSO COMPLETE
GOLF-BASKETBALL-TENNIS-FOOTBALL-HUNTING
FISHING-WATER SPORTS AND ARCHERY DEPARTMENTS
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING
24 HOUR SERVICE
"'""""FRATERNITY and SORORITY OUTFITTERS
JERSEYS Cr UNIFORMS LETTERED AND NUMBERED
TROPHIES ENGRAVED ON THE SPOT
JIMMIE IKIES Sporting Goods
Northcentral Florida's Sporting Goods Headquarters
i .
1113 West University Ave. One Clock East of Campus 372-8212

Jewish r Day Os Atonement 9
Begins At Sundown Tonight

Tonight is the beginning of
Yom Kippur, the Day of
Atonement, and the holiest day
of the Jewish calendar year.
Yom Kippur begins at
sundown, or approximately 7
p.m., and ends tomorrow at the
same time. The observant Jew
will abstain from all food or
drink and spend much of this
time in a holy atmosphere.
The evening starts with the
Kol Nidre, a melodious prayer of
unknown origin. It asks God to
forgive the person who is
praying for the sins which he has
knowingly committed and also
those of which he was unaware.
This atmosphere of asking
forgiveness is to pervade the
person for the entire day.
There are two services for
students tonight at the Medical
Center auditorium. The 7 p.m.
service is traditional, and the
service at 9 pjn. is reform.
Services begin Wednesday at

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pd. pol. adv.)

9:30 a.m.
The services purpose is to
reaffirm the individuals faith in
God, and causes the worshiper
to look inside himself. This, the

MHMHMBBBRING COUPONhmm
[ SPECIAL
| SHRIMP Friday Only I
I DINNER 99*
I REG. $1.35 Coupon I
Kentucky I
Tried Ikilkeii
* IVIUURAMOIANDCtS
IN4 £
I 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 1
2 Locations 4 Su I
Lhhbring COUPONHHmJ

Tuwdiy, Octotof 1,1968, Th Florida A Hint or.

Jewish Day of Atonement, makes
the individual aware of his place
in the universe; the imperfection
of humanity, and the constant
force of God.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 1,1968

Four Top*
To Headline
Fall Frolics
The Inter-Fraternity Council
(IFC) announced Monday the
Four Tops will headline
activities for Fall Frolics, Oct.
25.
Because of fire hazard
regulations, the $5 a couple
tickets will be limited for seating
in the Florida gym.
The Four Tops will be
appearing after recent television
annearanras

New Student Power Look

Theres a new variety of
student power loose in
Tallahassees legislative halls.
Call it a legislative internship,
says Dr. Roy L. Lassiter,
associate dean of academic
affairs at the UF.
The legislative internship
program is being tried this fall
for the first time in Florida,
according to Lassiter. He terms
the cooperative venture of the
Legislature and participating
students, colleges and
universities a big bargain for all
concerned.
Lassiter explains the
internship agreement will supply
graduate student power to the
Legislature, and experience
and educational expenses for the
students selected.
As a result, he says, the state
will obtain badly needed studies
for an expenditure far below
that required for professional
consultants.
Students will receive thesis
material, money and exposure to
government agencies, he adds.
This year nine legislative
interns, nominated by their
universities, are on the job with
legislative committees. At the
same time, they attend classes at
Florida State, under the State
University Systems Traveling
Scholar program.
The experimental plan was
proposed by Senate Bill 150
during the regular 1967
legislative session. It requires no
special appropriation, says
Lassiter, explaining that student
salaries will be paid by the
legislative committees using
student services.
AUF doctoral student and
eight FSU students comprise the
first class of interns. In the
future, any four-year institution
in Florida will be eligible to
nominate interns, advises
Lassiter, a member of the
Sponsoring Committee for
Legislative Staff Internships,
which administers the new
program.
He remarks, Florida State
University students have the
advantage of proximity in the
programs first year. But he
predicts, In the future, the
University of Florida will get its
share of interns.
Research Funds
A total of $17,307,041 was
spent on organized research
during the school year 1965-66.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Pel. 'pol. ariv.)

DROPOUTS
/ rrsTHEiAwV
( OF NATURE, I

~BY LEGISLATIVE INTERNING*

David E. Lycan, 29, is the
universitys first legislative intern
and the first UF student to use
the Traveling Scholar program.
He will receive a $6,000 grant
from the Legislature while
preparing a study of capital
outlay for higher education in
Florida for the Higher Education
Committee of the Legislative
Council.
The same study would
require a professional economist
at a salary of $15,000 to
SIB,OOO without the internship
program, says Lassiter.
Lycan is enrolled in the
doctoral program of the UFs
Department of Economics. He
completed his MA. degree in
public finance in April, 1967, at
the university. Lycan received
his BA. degree in economics
from Yale University.
In following years the
internship program will receive

WELCOME
ALL NEW A TRANSFER
STUDENTS
CIRCLE K
Invites All Male
Students To Attend Our Smoker
REFRESHMENTS
7:30 P.M. Oct. 2 Room 150-D Reitz Union
I TUESDAY SPECIAL |
I S-Sf.M. I
I 14 SHRIMP in 9 Basket I
I + FRENCH FRIES I
I FREE-large Bowl of I
I COIE SLAW I
I Al*o, hot rolls and bailor. I
I All FOR: 99* I
| WONDER |
| HOXJSEi |
I RESTAURANT I
I LOOK FOR 99< SPECIALS MON. FRI. I

x / THE BIG- A
/ PEVOUR. \
_ V THE LITTLE. J
fr
IMt Win Mm. he

additional funds from an
American Political Science
Foundation grant, reports
Lassiter. The current program is
identified as the post postbaccalaureate
baccalaureate postbaccalaureate program. The
second phase will be for students
of political science.
Sen. Lawton Chiles of
Lakeland is chairman of the
Sponsoring Committee for
Legislative Staff Internships.
Other committee members, in
addition to Lassiter, are: Dr.
Elston Roady, FSU; Sen. George
Hollahan Jr., Dade County; Sen.
Edmond J. Gong, Dade County;
Rep. William C. Andrews,
Alachua County; Rep. Donald L.
Tucker, Leon County; Dr.
Donald A. Clare, Florida
Atlantic University; Dr. Anne E.
Kelley, University of South
Florida, and Dr. Virgil Shipley,
University of Miami.

B Y HOWARD

UF Aims For $55,500
United Fund Collection

UF kicks off its campaign to
raise $55,500 for community
welfare today as part of the
annual United Fund drive on
campus.
Noting the total community
goal is $254,326, Dr. George
Harper, chairman of the
Universitys Department of
English and campus chairman,
said: We feel that a $55,500
goal for the University is a fair
total.
This goal represents a little
over $13,000 more than we
raised last year, he said.
The Universitys Health
Center, which conducts its own
drive as part of the overall

HAVE YOU PRICED
QUALITY LATELY ?
THE BEST COSTS
LESS IF YOU BUY
YOUR FROM
JfouiH COUCH'S
HANDCRAFTED
12'POKIME TV
DIAG 74 SQ IN PICTURE §
1 The BERKELEY Z 1305
The Companion Series
SHOP US-GET OUR
LOW LOW PRICE.
GAINESVILLES OLDEST AND
COMPLETE ZENITH DEALER
THE HOME OF ALL 5
SELECTION-PRICE-SERVICE
TERMS AND QUALITY
mi 608 N. Main St.
PH 376-7171
OPEN TO 9 P.M. FRIDAY

University campaign, has set its
sights on an SIB,OOO goal-a 25
per cent increase over last year.
Michael R. Schwartz, assistant
director of Shands Teaching
Hospital, is chairman of the
Health Center Division.
Team captains, assigned for
each department within the
University, will handle the
contributions of each unit.

NEW
MOVEMENT
(Ill tJ >1 .I< < V



_ < | ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
Jl NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
vyl ClllgC and
BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, October 1
Action Conference, 349 Union,
3:30 p.m.
Program Office, Bridge Lessons,
150 C, 7:00 p.m.
High Holy Day Service, MSB
Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Gator Ski Club, C-4 Union,7:3o
Sailing Club Movie, Union 347,
"America's Cup-1967," 8:00
p.m.
Mensa, Meeting, 357 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Faculty Concert, U.F. Chamber
Orch., Inaugural Concert,
Earl Groth, Oboe, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Phi Mu Alpha, 121 Union, 9:30
p.m.
Wednesday, October 2
High Holy Day Service, MSB
Aud., 9:00 a.m.
Florida Players, Meeting,
Constans Theatre, 6:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
355 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Circle K International, Meeting,
150 D Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Society,
Meeting, 363 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Veterans Club, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Insurance Society, U. of F.
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:30
p.m.
Panhellenic Council, 347, 361
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Young Republicans, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, October 3
Mortar Board Meeting, 347
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Program Office, Spanish
Conversation, 150 B, 12:00
noon
Kappa Psi, Football Movies, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization,
357 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi, regular
meeting, 363 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Student Government
Productions: sth
DIMENSION, Fla. Gym, 8:00
p.m.
Sigma Xi Annual Lecture, Dr.
Kurt Muhlethaler, McCarty
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Student Democratic Society,
361 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Young Republican Club, 118
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Football Films, FSU vs. U. of
Fla., 2 showings. Union Aud.,
8:00 p.m. and 8:45 p.m.

Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance --
Reduced rates available for new" car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement.
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Avenue ot the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 qjn. 3:30 p.w. Monday through Friday

Friday, October 4
Football Films, FSU vs. U. of
Fla., 150 C Union, 12:00
noon
Muslim Students Meeting, 122
Union, 12:30p.m.
Alumni Reunion Reception, E.
Gallery Union, 6:00 p.m.
Chess Club, Registration, 118
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Alumni Reunion Banquet,
Ballroom A, 233 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Fencing Club, Fla Gym
Basement Rec. Room, 7:00
p.m.
Union Movies, Union Aud., "A
Patch of Blue", 7:00 p.m. &
9:15 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing,
Intramural Office, Fla. Gym,
8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "The Kidz",
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
INTRAMURALS: All male
students interested in playing for
the Baptist Student Union
intramurals, please sign up at the
Baptist Student Union by Oct.
5.
RELIGION-IN-LIFE
COMMITTEE: All those
interested in working with the
Religion-in-Life Committee
please pick up applications in
the Department of Religion on
the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB: Club
will meet Wednesday, Oct. 2, in
Room 125 of the Arts and
Sciences Building (old Florida
Union). There will be coffee at 7
p.m. and the program, "Student
Meets Savage," at 7:30 p.m. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
ORANGE & BLUE
DEADLINES: The bulletin wll
appear twice weekly, on
Tuesdays and Fridays. All
notices must be received by 5
p.m. Friday for the Tuesday
publication, and 5 p.m.
Wednesday for the Friday
publication. Notices should be
in writing, signed by the person
submitting the notice and sent
to the Division of Information
Services, Building H., Campus.
Items for the Campus Calendar
should be sent to Public
Functions Office, Reitz Union.

Administrative Notices
... . i

FORUMS COMMITTEE: The
Forums Committee for the
Union Board for Student
Activities has openings for five
committee members and one
secretary. Applications may be
made in Room 310 of the Reitz
Union and interviews will be
held Sept. 30, Oct. 1 and Oct. 2,
from 3:30-5 p.m.
HAWAII GRANTS: The
East-West Center is offering to
Americans full grants for
graduate study at the University
of Hawaii in the fields of Social
Sciences, Humanities, Pure and
Applied Sciences in areas
relating to Asia and the Pacific
area. Applications and additional
information may be obtained by
writing: Office of Student
Selection, Institute for Student
Interchange, East-West Center,
1777 East West Road, Honolulu,
Hawaii 96822. Applications,
transcripts and GRE score for
entry in June or September,
1969, must be filed with the
center by Dec. 15,1968.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS:
Scholarships for Oxford
University for approximately
$3,200 per year for two to three
years. Must be male citizens of
at least junior standing between
the ages of 18-24 on Oct. 1,
1968. Apply to Professor A A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 23.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Students must be registered with
the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date in Room G-22
in the Reitz Union. All
companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June
graduates unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 2: J. B. IVEY & CO.
Executive Development
program, business and other
non-technical majors.

FULBRIGHT GRANTS: Grants
for U.S. students who wll have
at least a bachelor's degree by
fall, 1969, for one-year's study
or research abroad are available
in reduced numbers on a
competitive basis.
Information and applications are
available from G. A. Farris,
Campus Fulbright Adviser,
International Center, south of
Walker Auditorium.
PRE-MED & PRE-DENTAL
STUDENTS: Please register with
the Pre-Professional Counseling
Office, Room 3, Anderson Hall,
starting Monday, Sept. 30
through Oct. 18. Be sure to
bring with you the full names of
all your instructors and the
course and section numbers.
ROTC FRESHMEN: Orientation
will be conducted 1430 hours,
Oct. 2-3 at McCarty Auditorium.
DMS Presentation will be held at
1535 hours Oct. 2-3 at McCarty
Auditorium.
. (
STATE SCHOLARSHIP
EXAMS: 1968 State General
Teaching, Nursing and
Exceptional Child Teaching
Scholarship examinations will be
given at 8 a.m. Oct. 15, at the
Florida State Armory (Army),
1125 NE Eighth Ave.
Applications may be obtained in
Room 124 Norman Hall.
FLORIDA QUARTERLY: All
students interested in joining the
staff of the Florida Quarterly,
the student-edited periodical of
arts, letters, and ideas, are asked
to attend an organizational
meeting at 7:30 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 29, in Room 336 of the
Student Publications Suite in the
Reitz Union. The history,
objectives and future plans of
the Quarterly will be explained
at that time and students will
have an opportunity to talk with
and question current staff
members. There are openings in
business, production, advertising
and circulation, as well as in the
editorial department.

Tuesday, October 1,1968,The Florida Alligator,

INAUGURAL ACTIVITIES:
President Stephen C. O'Connell
has cancelled second, third and
fourth period classes on
Tuesday, Oct. 8, so students,
faculty and staff may attend the
Inaugural Convocation.
Scholarship recipients are
particularly urged to be present
so they may be recognized at the
convocation.
Vice President Lester L. Hale
has announced that caps and
gowns may be picked up at the
bookstore Oct. 2-7, and may be
returned within 48 hours after
the convocation.
Faculty members are asked to
assemble in the Recreation
Room of the Florida
Gymnasium (basement level) at
9:15 a.m. to prepare for the
processional. Members of the
Administrative Council will
march as a separate unit of the
faculty and be seated together
on the main floor.
PRE-INAUGURAL PROGRAM
Sunday, October 6
7 p.m. Lecture, "A University
Collects," University Gallery
Auditorium 8 p.m. Reception
and opening of exhibit,
"University of Florida
Collection/Selection,"
University Gallery.
Monday, October 7
10:30 a.m. - Dedication of
Space Sciences Research
Building, Arthur I.
Bless Auditorium
2 p.m. Symposium, "The
Function of the University in
the Modem World,"
Reitz Union Auditorium.
INAUGURAL CONVOCATION
Tuesday, October 8
9:30 a.m. Processional begins,
Florida Gymnasium
4-6 p.m. Reception, the
President Vhome
8:15 p.m. University Chamber
Orchestra Concert, University
Auditorium
All faculty, staff, students
and spouses are invited to attend
the activities.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 1,1968

Page 8

-..-..^ik.^.'.;fifv V Jt*" I \\i \
r" : 'Â¥. : *&''*! : -i*^".S^'.-.v,,'**'''. : -
ir i X j!* ~~ v
.<*"w y' x. ...,n>i \ / *'* -^
aT ,A ~ s -''r*?>-- .^ !e . '. V^T"'
A -v m - v. _. 1..-'-'
fi t* t M 4 ~ *^B|Bhl. ->'
-." /'S*' p
'v ;***.
j'vm
J^^kUb^EE^^^b* n i. 4^m
isjni
I ," Jw-- m C
f 1 1 |^^^JCP V 'Jfc r -V li^m
Humphrey Is Soft On Communism! Humphrey Is Soft On Communism!
EDITORIAL

Assist Accent Program

With the announcement Monday that
CBS news commentator Walter Cronkite has
accepted an invitation to speak at the Accent
symposium next February, it appears that
the Accent committee is well on its way to a
banner year for the program.
The brainchild of former Student Body
President Charles Shepherd, the program
began two years ago on a highly promising
note, headlined by Richard Nixon, James
Farmer and many other famous names.
But the annual symposium, designed to
bring intellectual and political leaders to UF
to discuss vital issues, slid downhill a little
last year.
The program was ill-planned and drew

The Alligator Inquizitor

By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Alligator Columnist
Good morning. I wanted to
do todays trivia in braille, but
the editor wouldnt let me. He
said it would make too good an
impression. I tried to ignore him.
1. What were the names of
the four parties running against
each other in last years SG
elections?
2. What was the famous
name of the benefactor in the
television program THE

MILLIONAIRE?
3. Who was nominated 3
times by the Democrats for the
Presidency and during his
campaigns managed to draw the
greatest crowds ever assembled
to hear a candidate-yet three
times met defeat on election
day?
4. What is the meaning of:
a.Ecology b.Etymology
c.Entomology
5. What play is this curtain
line from?: I made the last

little enthusiasm from students.
This year, however, promises to be
different.
The Accent speakers committee has
contacted literally hundreds of Americas
movers and doers and has received several
tentative acceptances.
But to insure its success, Accent needs
money
The Student Senate will consider a request
tonight for an additional $2,000.
We suggest that the Senate grant the
request, for in the final analysis, it will be
$2,000 well spent on the universitys
national reputation as an institution of great
ideas.

payment on the house today.
Today, dear. And therell be
nobody home. Were free and
clear. Were free. We're
free... Were free...
6. Who sang the song, Hey,
hey were the Monkees?
Yesterdays answers: l.Cleo
2.Shepherd, Grissom, Glenn
3. France, Mexico (Spanish)
Russia, Japan, Denmark, Greece,
Italy, England. 4.Britain and
China 5.9
Blow someones mind today.

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
f t\&\ is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
rftt&lMiUUA/ Managing Editor
Ml Raul Ramirez James Cook
vAwX/UCM Executive Editor News Editor

EDITORIAL
Fresh Air
Although the political winds on campus have been less
than fragrant of late, there is an occasional breath of fresh
air.
Take for example the idea of UFs newest political group
to hold nominating conventions to select candidates for the
40 Senate seats up for grabs in the Oct. 17 elections.
The New Movement, either because of a lack of time to
organize a slate or because of a sincere desire to introduce
participatory democracy on campus, decided to conduct
conventions in every dorm area
The idea is to allow students to nominate their own
representatives rather than having political bosses handpick
political lackies.
As presently planned by the New Movement, the idea is a
long way from perfection. But, nonetheless, the idea itself
has merit and should be more thoroughly considered for the
election next spring.
On the other side of the political fence, the new coalition
of United-First party with Forward party dissidents now
dubiously dubbed the Super-party has more than just a
little going for it.
Student Body President Clyde Taylors administration,
with the help of Forward party since the winter election,
has amassed an impressive record.
And if all goes as planned, the future holds even more
advances for students and reforms for Student Government
under Taylors and others leadership.
An excellent recent example of Taylors effectiveness was
the Board of Regents decision last weekend to adopt
sweeping policy revisions recommended by the Council of
Student Body Presidents.
Certainly, Taylor was not alone in drawing up the
revisions, but he played a key role in selling the liberalized
policies to the regents.
That alone is quite an achievement. And Taylors
administration can rightfully claim many other advances,
such as autonomy for student publications and the
Ratskeller, to name only two.
Its nice to take a deep breath now and then, and be
invigorated by untainted air.
And despite their political wheeling and dealing and their
power politics, the two political -factions offer and
continue to offer, if they so desire the fresher scent of
effective leadership and meaningful service.
Now See Here Mr. Stokely Who-Ever-You-Are..."
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorid, Business, Advertising offices in Room 33), ftwu Union. Phone
Ext. 2832
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.



The Fifth Column*

Whats That You Say, Miss America

A couple of weeks ago I watched the Miss
America contest, (along with 60 million other
Americans, NBC proudly informed me) and for
some inexplicable reason the program left me
feeling uneasy and somewhat depressed.
This was unusual because in the past the show
was always good for a gas-a lot of gross comments
and some ribald but not unkind hooting. I tried to
get into it again this year, tried to dig the pure
schmaltzy show biz of Bert Parks, the tremulous
smiles of the finalists (Im so sincere.), the Miss
Congeniality award that always seems to go to
whichever girl is the most conspicuous in her
minority descent,.be it Japanese, Hawaiian, or as it
was this year, to a Mexican-American. I tried, but
somehow it wasnt there this year, and Ive been
wondering why.
Looking bade now, I think the thing that was so
enjoyable about it all in the past, the characteristic
that makes the Miss America contest so camp is its
inevitable predictability. The winner would always
have a double first name and a boy-friend in med
school, she would always cry upon winning, and
Bess Meyerson would always look both sympathetic
and jealous at the same time.
And I think that subconsciously this has been the

OPEN FORUM:
jAmukml V'lM&t
There is no hope for the complacent man.
X ' I. .

Ruling On Signs Not

-
I*,;;:- :
:>'>fft irafcMwMawit clwaww^^S^mSgwy^feii.
*
|
.-.' 1 > : '. |
'?-
Even the door on the
Information booth across from
the Hub is not immune to the
poster craze.

****
fiK
mm : I
3113 J (
'*' -"11 B | 'M
.-; ;
milw'- jfe|Jf
University Glee Club advertises for members on a tree and its all
right..

A UF sophomore was
arrested on Aug. 9 for placing
signs on buddings around the
campus without permission.
La von Louis Gentry was stopped
twice by the Campus police and
the second time he was charged
with defacing a campus building.
An Alligator photographer
found several examples of the
same violation. In fact, one sign
-jus placed on the
air-conditioning building that
serves Little Halljust 50 feet
from the spot where Gentry was
arrested.
>

attraction of this show; that no matter how bad the
news, how many the wars, how wild the new
generation, we always had Bert Parks and the
current Miss America to reassure us, to re-stipulate
that America is still the land of good, pure and
plenty, cause gee, look at all these glowing
noxzema examples of Americana, and of course,
they represent the mainstream of our American
youth.
Oh really?
Its hard for me to believe that after Chicago.
Its hard for me to believe that after hearing Miss
Massachusetts answer to her final question: What
do you plan to do specifically to improve race
relations in America? Answer: Well, Ill um,
um,...(finally, inspiration), LOVE is the answer!
Eyes glistening with tears, tremulous lower lip,
Gawdawmighty she must be kidding, I thought.)
But she wasnt^
And thats the hang-up. These women were no
more your typical girl-next-door than a Playboy
fold-out is. All you have to do is look at the four to
eight months of training these girls go through after
winning their local titles to realize that this final
consumer package in no way resembles the
Be tty-Jean Smith who started out a year ago by
winning the Miss Greater Metropolitan Greensboro
title.

Always
I-
Enforced
Photos
By Nick Arroyo

URNRMBf g rmifimM&L^ MMW I i§M
t m JIMMIE!! i fmmm
1/ jf) 1 § r .
ffifty// j JM f \jt -1 ftftftdp VMtJ n I. ft* M
f f if Aft fin (1 I
M /is&iaak, h@M3bmm m
mm /7/JHftL mm*'-
Ev?r
1 // / m wmM.
I §w?
BJ/ / / Hf IB
Karate Club has a campaign poster placed on a wall only 50 feet from
the spot where a UF student was arrested for placing a notice
advertising for the Students for a Democratic Society.

And after all this I realized why I was depressed.
I had just finished watching my third convention of
the year, and it was as disappointing, as absurd, as
out of touch and unrealistic as the first two. These
kids were what the middle-class, middle-aged
sponsors and pushers of the show wanted them to
be; they had all been successfully programmed to
feed back the right words at the right time and they
were fooling themselves and the audience, just like
Hubert Humphrey and Richard Nixon.
For one doesnt have to be a Marshall McCluhan
to realize that our country is going through some
drastic changes, changes that will continue,
drastically, for the next four years no matter who is
elected president.
But as long as this country continues to kid
itself-whether via the pap and froth of a Miss
America contest, or die obtuse generalities and
subtle racism of a Republican Convention, or the
police state style of law n order of Chicago-as long
as this country continues to baby itself in this
manner then it is just going to take that much more
time before we get down to solving what really ails
this country.
And one doesnt have to be a lUC freshman to
know that were running out of time.

More Boring Talks
From "Showmen

MR. EDITOR:
I am not looking forward to
another academic year at
Florida. I have faced barrages of
boring history lectures that have
forced me to sleep and never
once raising any intellectual
fervor. Once again, I face the
task of note taking an pure
memorization for the purpose of
passing a midterm and final
exam. Lets not kid ourselves-the
professor who believes his words
of wisdom are reaching sincere,
attentive ears is mistaken. I have
reached the frustrating point in
which I listen to the professor
and take notes for the sole
purpose of passing his course. I
will forget most of what I will
have to memorize, but I will
always have the books to refer
to-and surely the professors
notes will not have been kept.
The UF and many other
universities openly stress the

Tuday, Octobwr \, Tgg, Ttw fjorjtfr AHfrter,

By Jason Straight)

qualities of good teaching, while
professors are continually
selected and promoted on the
basis of research and
publication.
I would like to conclude my
letter with a quote from Paul
Woodring, an' editor for the
Saturday Review: Every
university harbors some
professors who are unfamiliar
with any teaching technique
except the straight lecture, and
though a good lecture can be
stimulating to student thought,
the need for the lecture as a
means for disseminating factual
information was outmoded some
four centuries ago by the
invention of movable type.
I would wish all professors
would heed this message and act
accordingly. Then, perhaps, this
coming academic year will be a
little interesting and productive
for all of us- students and
professors.
BRYANT MARTIN, 4ED
Fewer Trees
MR. EDITOR:
My first class this week was in
McCarty Hall, and I leisurely
drove up about five minutes
before class, expecting I would
have no problem parking in the
lot next to the Union. That was
a joke. I finally got to my class
almost twenty minutes after the
bell. I ended up parking on the
side of the road next to the
sewage treatment plant. I fully
expected a ticket when I
returned, but was lucky.
After reading the account in
the Alligator, I was mystified as
to the reason for landscaping
the area rather than paving it.
Surely if the students,
generally known as a radical
bunch of complainers, and the
Director of the Union, part of
the Administration, actually
agree that parking is very
inadequate, that would be just
cause to consider paving the area
for parking.
TOM SPAIN, 3JM

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR* SALE | |
Girls- Free color catalog showing ovar
500 styles of 14kt Gold Piarcad
pairings, 25% to 50% balow retail.
Sand 25 cants for postage and
handling to DIMAR, Kendall P.O.
Box 531, Miami Fla. (A stp)
Allstate crusair motorscooter 1965
motor in excellent condition SIOO.OO
Contact Johnson Sigma Alpha
Epsilon House. (A-35-sp)
1960 VW-Runs wall-body
Good-6350. Also 1968 RCA Tv-12
inch-B&W Portable-4 mts old-675.
Finally A 12,000 BtuFrlgklare
conditioner 4 mts old excellent
cond. $165 Call Dr. Coskuner
376-3211 ext. 5541.
Cycle for sale 1967 Triumph 650
excellent condition. Call Ralph
378-4311. (A-3t-sp)
SCHWINN RUN-A-BOUT. Bicycle
with basket, chain, lock. Like new.
was SBO.OO Call 376-5531 after 5.
(A-13t-5-p)
250 cc Honda Scrambler, one owner,
sunburst gold, completely stock. In
mint condition, motor just broken in,
$475. Call 3783724 after 5.
(A 5t 4 p)
Honda S-90. Only 4,200 mi. and in
Great condition. Helmet Inc.
Call Chip between 5 and 7 at
378-7733. The Frist $200.00 takes it.

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* w M * r>
I I lI I|-"1 £
i I assn
=- s >
L <0
mm a ao
o ao
_ z
mmmmm __
Q
>
Ul A b> N> t-
s S & & & 8 5
<<< < < 3
V* M
. fti £ H
m 3 * 2 a
gagg & O
I .
a a a
8 8 8 £
82 § Z
-- __ 3 3
mmmm rP #4
SO
i n > I S 3g § |
2 m m
m
ui r*
mmrnrnm irnmmmm rnmmmm
mmmmmm mmmm mmmm mrnmmm
mmmmmm rnmmmm mm
mmmmm rnmmmmm mmmmmm
- M UI
>
-H
r -oo
S 5
l i r
i n r
V
am^^mm

| FOR SALE |
Air Conditioner, G.E., 1 yr. old,
8,500 BTU. Great for small living
room or large bedroom, $165. Call
Bill at 3789577 or come to 710 SW
16th Ave., Apt. 104. (A st6p)
FRIGIDAIRE AIR CONDITIONER,
(the best model), 15,000 BTU,
approx. 1 yr. old, excellent
condition. $l6O. Call 3763211,
Ext. 5706, after 5 p.m. 3723956.
(A3t6p)
Attractive 10 x 46 1962 trailer, Air
Cond., utility room, awning, choice
site, $2595. Available now.
378--7012 or 3766982.
(A3t 6 p)
4-BEDROOM, 2 bath, plus five
rooms. Excellent family house, NW
location, large lot S3OOO equity or
terms $17300 balance 5% interest.
3725765. (A2t 6p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
Honda S 90 1966 3,000 miles
excellent condition helmet & mirror
Included only $250 contact Mickey
Ross TEP house 372-9479 If gone
leave message. (A-3-st-p

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 1,1968

vx.v.-.vx%vx-x-x-x-x-x.v.-.v".-x-x-x-x-x-v.v.
1 FOR SALE
9 .. ft
vv.v.w:-w:-:->x<.;.x.x->x-x-x-v-v.v.w.-.
CHEAP!! Two beds with box springs.
3787197 after 8 p.m. (A3t6- p)
CYLINDER TOP DESK, tables, odd
& sets chairs, wicker chairs & table,
chest drawers, dresser, bookcase,
antiques. 6110 SW 13th 9530,
closed Sun. (A3t 6 p)
GIBSON FALCON AMPLIFIER
with reverberation, 12 speaker &
tremolo, including foot switch
control and cover- Excellent
condition! $75.00, 3764905 after
5:00 p.m. (A3t 6 p)
National full keyboard manual
adding machine in good condition.
Add, subtract, repeat, total, subtotal.
S4O. Call 3764232 after 6 p.m.
(A3t-6p)
1966 TR6 CYCLE S6OO. Call
3781776 after 5:30 and weekends.
(A 5t 6 p)
Miranda Sensorex single lens reflex
camera, brand new. Paid $250, will
sell for $225. Call 3787188 after
8:30 p.m. (A3t6p)
Delco Stereo Tape 8 Track.
Originally in new 68 car will sell for
$65. Phone 376-1631 Room no. 701.
(A-st-7-p)
Suzuki 80 cc, 1965 excellent
condition $175 or best offer, Helmet
included call 378-3025. (A-lt-7-p)
68 Honda 50, Driven only by a girl,
low mileage well kept, Helmet, tools,
included, $l7O, 378-0650 after 5.
(A-3t-7-p)
latTooonly^^
Paramount Pictures Resents
a William Castle production
"W*
Paramount Picture SMA
2nd FEATURE AT 10:35
QohT*"\M\
police?%
* Inspector Clouseau h Back!
f ei l \
* LAUGHING... \
/ LOVING...
/ SWINGING! \
' -AS NEVER BEFORE!!
FoUhCi
F r HURRY!!
**? ENDS THURS. I
IPTTTiQS
ELIZABETH WLOR I
SutKMttd RICHARD BURTON $
1

jeS'e-e-eV.-.VAXeteXe^yWV^W'WwSWeSe'eVe*^
v -*
FOR SALE |
-;..........y;.;-;.;.;-X-:.M<-X-ySfWWWSWCSWWY/
LOFTY pile, free from soil Is the
carpet cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowery Furniture Co. (A-lt-7-e)
1966 Honda s-50 Excellent
condition, new tire, new license,
helmet, tools, and manual. Call Frank
5:30-7:00 pm 376-0612 $135.00.
(A*3t-7-p)
Draperies-Drap. mat. Swinging
curtain rods dress mat. Buttons
imported laces furs blankets kitchen
uten. clothes size 9-18 Gas heater
376-9698. (A-st-7-p)
1966 Honda S-90 Good condition
Only 3600 miles Call 376-0852 Or
Inquire at 966 S.W. 16th Ave.
(A-3t-7-p)
1965 Honda 590 low mileage fair
condition SIOO. Like new 12 gauge
Remington pump, will take best
offer. Call Dave Swords 372-9198.
(A-2t-7-p)
Honda Sports 50 1966 4-speed
Perfect Condition $l5O. Call
378-8688 After 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-7-p)
1965 Honda Sport 50, Helmet, Cover
tool kit. Handbook. 372-8157 Paul
Ross, After 6 pm $125.00. (A-st-5-p)

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
ms MICHAEL CAIWE
GHHUDtt BUU-EHC i I \..
WAHETTE HEWHAH IN BRYAN FORBES I
1:30.3:30.5:35.7:40.9:45 f \ VLAIIIALL
V I l # \ COLOR by OE LUXE J
Suppwtod For Mturt Mmncm i Jh *r
Tomovcwr N
j^| j?
Charlie Salt and Christopher Pepper held thP
fate of the world in their hands-and dropped it!
s OitA KIR
pars jrjA uwnn
COLOR by Deluxe 11

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

CLASSIFIEDS
Continued On
Page 11
j 3:30 1700 JyfcA
j
.. llliw
I;:; MARTIN
I ROBERT
MITCH UM
amm In
9 Technicolor I
I CARP I
I STDS
I 1 "' S?tMMmhwl



GATOR
CLASSIFIED

FOR RENT
S..y.vx x*x*x ,i >wx*x*x x-x*x xx*xx*x*x.x>
Apartment to sub-lease, apt. 151
Colonial Manor. Call 372-7111.
(B-st-7-p)
Furn upstair apt 2 BR, air cond wall
to wall carpet. Furn downstairs apt 2
BR air cond Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-3-ts-C)
WANTED
W.WW.^WX-XW^WM.WW'XS
Female Roomates
$25.00/mo. /person. 125 N.W. 10 st.
Apt. 2 Charlene. (C-sts-p)
Fourth female roommate for two
bedroom Camelot Apts. Poolside
sauna baths. Call Diane 378*8068.
(c-3-4t-p)
WANTED: Used 120 twin lens reflex
camera. Call Judy, 376 5449.
(C 4t 4 p)
Daily Passengers To and from Jax
Leave Jax at 7:30 a.m. Gains. 3
Contact Helen Lundy 3781055 Jax.
(c-3t-5 p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
new, one bedroom apt. on SE 4th
Ave. SSO a month. Call 3783184.
(C3t6p)
2 COEDS to share large, 3-bedroom
home just off Univ. Ave. Rides no
problem. Own landlord. Call
3783789 after 5. Will return calls.
(C 5t 6 p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for Apt. 28, Colonial Manor. Call
Jane 376-1571. (C st-6-p)
*
LOOKING for someone to drive tr 4
sport scar from New York to
Gainesville any time within next 2
weeks. All expenses paid. Call Rene
Lemarchand Ext. 2708 or 376-1363.
(C-3t-7-p)
Relatively mature male roommate for
Landmark Phase 2 Apt. $45 mo. with
all Landmark extras. Call Terry after
7 P.M. 378-0674. (C-3t-7-p)
Female to share 2br modern trailer
with senior girl. Private room 50 mo.
Andrews&Connell Mobileer lot 32.
378-5850 early evenings. (C-st-5-p)
::;:.:.%vx-x*x >:*x-xxsvx-:-:-x >xX*x*:x:^
HELP WANTED
X >}
(Xvxv:*x*x"xx*x x-: # :*x x x x x'x*x*xxvv:r
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
,with the nation's top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
(E-l-tf-nc)
WANTED male subjects age 1825
for voice experiment. IF accepted
$6.00 for task. Call R. H. Colton,
3785738, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. daily.
(E 3t6p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
ext. 2049. (El-Bt-c)
WANTED Male or Female curb
attendant. Apply 2310 SW 13th St.
or 1505 NW 13th St. JERRYS.
(E-2-10t-c)
Female: Various openings for cashier,
& waitress duties. Day or evening.
Good pay. Apply Kings Food Host
1430 SW 13 or 1802 W Univ. Ave.
(E-ts-5-c)
MALE:Various openings for carhop,
grill & cashier. Good pay Appjy King
Food Host 1430 SW 13 or 1802 W
Univ Ave. (E;-tf-5-c)
-furses-University of Florida has full
time and part time positions open in
all clinical and research areas;
Licensed Practical nurses $4,300,
registered nurses $6,000. shift
differential and liberal fringe
benefits, equal opportunity
employer. Telephone 376-3261 ext
2102 for interview. (E-4t-7-c)
p art time workers needed on
afternoons Saturdays. 1.50 hr. Call
378-5979 between 7-9 pm only.
(E-2t-7-p)
| AUTOS
...
TR3. Rebuilt engine, good tires.
Runs, but needs lots of work and
love. $65. 2014 NE 7 St. 3785295.
(G 5t 4p)

autos
Jaguar xk isu o vx>nv. 1959 or Fiat
850 Coupe 1967 Will sell either, see
Pat Day in Games Area or call
376-2998 sat/Sun/eve. (G-3t-5-p)
Rolls Royce styling and size.
Superbly maintained 1960 MK. IX
Jaguar. 4door, air cond. 400 miles
on new engine. Complete with bar.
3760201. (Gst4p)
1964 Volvo 1800 S. 41,000 miles,
showroom condition. SIBSO. Call
3787441. (Gst4p)
1958 Ford Fairtane, V-8, automatic,
new tires, radiator, tuneup, less than
60,000 miles, must sell best
reasonable offer. Call 472-2541.
(G-3t-5-p)
61 Rambler American, automatic
Transm. Radio. Very Good
Condition $275. Call 372-3110.
(G-3st-p)
VOLKSWAGEN BUS 1966. Clean,
new tires. Sound mechanically, good
family car. Spacious. SI4OO.
372 7925. Call anytime.
(G6t 6p)
Red Impala Convertible 1965 new
.Transmission Radio & Heater Call
3763261 x 2636. After 5:30 376724
SI2OO or Best Offer. (A-3-stp)
For sale 1965 Porsche 3565 C good
condition inside and out. Call
378-0696. (G-st-5-p)
1966 Mustang, 6cylinder, Radio,
heater, standard shift, new paint,
inspected, excellent condition, new
tires, $2.,295. or best offer, 376050
stud. (G-st-5-p)
65 RAMBLER Wagon Classic 550
6cyl, std shift, radio, excellent
condition. SBOO Call 378-0620 after
6pm or anytime weekends. (G-3t-7-p)
1966 Buick Opel, sporty model,
radio, AC, stereo tape, very good
tires, yellow, must sell SI4BO call
between spm-7pm 378-4539.
(G-3t-7-p)
ff.WAWw:o:ov.v.v.v.v.'.'.v.v.'.v.v.':',v<>>j
PERSONAL
* >
Av^va'.:o:av.v.v.v.v.vav. > .w. i ;*:o: :*>,
Bruce: Am staying in North Dakota,
Box 155, Stanton, you helped much.
Thanks, Ginger (J-st-5-p)
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS
your personal Headquarters for
posters blacklites, flourescent paint,
incense & burners, and something
DIFFERENT in mens and women's
clothing. 10SM 7th St. (Just around
the corner from Santa Fe Junior
college). (J-3-3t-c)
Whoever hit a 1965 Mustang at the \
light on 13th and Archer Rd. about
1:30 Wed., Sept. 25, please contact
Pat at 3724032. The trunk will not
open. (J2t6 p)
Geoff: I miss you and luv you very
much. Remember the future is
ours-your special angel-Jen. (J-lt-7-p)
Were doing an educational research
project on hippies. Any information
appreciated. Call 378-7104 or
378-8070. (J-lt-7-p)
Girl wanted to cook for four pleasant
people in exchange for good food
and good music peace 376-7402.
(J-3t-7-p)
| LOST & FOUND f
I':*X*t*XX*!tWV.V*X.!iW*?VAViVXVX*X*X*X*X
Lost wallet, old Library. Please, if
found, keep money, return IDs, etc.
No questions asked. 3786042,
Williamsburg Apts., No. 28, Bob
Russo. (L3t4 p)
Reward for the return of wallet must
have IDs call 378-6349 or return to
Architects ul Office. (L-2t-7-p)
.;.;.;.:.x.X.X.XX>X*X*XXW.W.V.v.*.v.v.*.V.y
,y t
SERVICES
&x.x*x*sv; x x x x*x*xx*xwv;*.v.v.*.v.v.v%
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, BUT youll
be glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-ts6-c)
.
FIGURES, graphs, illustrations, for
dissertations, articles, slides, etc.
Nancy McClelland, Professional
Graphic Artist. 378-4260. (M-4t-3-p)
THE TEDDY BEAR NURSERY will
be open for Florida football games.
Hours of operation will be 7:00 a.m.
until 6oo p.m. Night service for aH
home games. Contact
at 376-0917 or 3724021 for
reservations. (M2t 4 p)

GUS MUSTEILIER

Eckdahl Gets Nod
Aaainst Miss. State

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
In an effort to bolster
Floridas sagging offense, Head
Coach Ray Graves yesterday
announced that Jackie Eckdahl
has been moved to first string
quarterback, replacing Larry
Rentz.
Temporarily, at least, this
means that Eckdahl will start at
the quarterback position. No
announcement has been made as
to whether Rentz will take up
the flanker position he left a
year ago.
However, Rentz said earlier
yesterday afternoon that he has
not worked out at the flanker

jdt 1^
1 .J 9m.
mm Wk;
ML
WS$Mk
JKr#
WMt' ?a..v
. : vv. MiiilHiiik < Wmm
. ' %
. jC 1
fcjlljr i
la] \t MM
. i m m 1 j jm
a. m <- m M Q&y/ JH
1 i U
ilffHlP' M
/a //tf .Jg
I I |
JACKIE ECKDAHL N'CKARROVO
. .can he make the team move?

spot this year.
Graves made the
announcement at a 3 P.M. player
meeting. He had hinted earlier
that a major decision concerning
the quarterback position would
be made on Monday.
Floridas major problem
centers around the absence of a
passing attack. Keeping the
offense on the ground has been
costly in terms of total yardage.
Even with both Tom Christian
and Larry Smith staying healthy,
UF cannot expect to thrust the
brunt of an Auburn or Miami
line on these two players for an
entire game.
It is here that Eckdahl holds

Tuaaday. October 1,1968. The Florida Alligator,

the key to a UF offense.
Eckdahl is the more versatile of
the quarterbacks, as he has the
speed and agility to run with the
ball. Rentz has found little
success in gaining yardage when
a receiver is not open.
Florida has failed to generate
sufficient offensive punch to
score any impressive victories so
far this year. In two starts, the
Gators have crossed the goal line
only four times. Total offense
has been under 400 yards.
Certainly, a part of the low
measure of success can be
attributed to rough defenses on
the part of Air Force and
Florida State. Air Force this
weekend upset potent Wyoming,
holding them to yardage
comparable to that of Florida
two weeks earlier.
Still, Florida has yet to
demonstrate a realistic passing
attack. Rentz, who last year
distinguished himself on his
accuracy to Richard Trapp, has
passed little this year.
Graves has tried to put the
blame on the other team's
defense said Rentz, but you
know that cant be the whole
story. Ive been trying to stay in
the pocket too long, and there
just isnt time to hesitate once
youre there.
Although Graves would not
commit himself on the future of
Rentz, he declined to name
Harold Peacock to back up
Eckdahl. This probably can be
interpreted as a boost for Rentz
retaining his spot as quarterback.
The decision will be effective
only for the Mississippi State
game. No comment was made as
to whether the move is
permanent.
This weekends game should
determine the final decision for
the quarterback job. Mississippi
State has an 0-2 record going
into the game, with an injury
plagued squad.
Should Graves decide to use
both Eckdahl and Rentz as
quarterbacks, both should see
sufficient action to decide in
Graves mind which one has; the
potential to carry the team to an
undefeated season.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 1, 1968

What changes in UF strategy were used in the second quarter
between your first scoring effort (the field goal) inside the FSU 30,
and the second drive which averaged four yards per carry?
First drive we attempted to operate from our normal offensive set
with a split end and a flanker. This drive stalled and we were fortunate
to get a 30-yard field goal by Jack Youngblood. The next opportunity
we decided to try and beat their line physically. We played two tight
ends, Jim Yarbrough and George Dean, took the split end out and ran
right at them with Larry Smith and Tom Christian.
Tommy Warren picked up 34 yards in the second quarter on a
single pass. He appeared to be all alone. What happened?
Actually, this was a perfectly defensed play by David Ghesquiere
and Steve Tannen, both of whom were right with Warren. The credit
goes to Warren, who made the most outstanding single offensive effort
of the day and made a great catch. Had hb not come up with the ball
it is likely Tannen would have intercepted.
What was your strategy in the alternating of Rentz and Eckdahl?
Was this planned or did it just happen?
This was planned. We felt that one or the other must prove he is
No. 1 during actual game competition. Both moved the team well last
season and started the fall virtually even although Rentz had played
more. Eckdahl will start Saturday against Mississippi State.
What was the change of heart in suddenly being interested in that
final touchdown effort of the game at the tail end. It appeared that at
first you were going to let the clock run out, then you called time
with two seconds to go.
There was no change of heart. On second down they didnt call
time out on the field so we sent a sub in on the next play to call time
out and try to score again.
The final plunge at the end of the game for a TD seemed
reminescent of last year when FSU did the same to us. Any revenge
intended?
You said it, I didnt. Actually, we had a wonderful go-for-two play
planned for the extra point.

Intramural Deadline
For Football Coming

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Dorms and independents are
reminded that the deadline to
sign up a team is approaching
rapidly. Deadlines are necessary
in order that a schedule of games
can be formalized and finalized.
The deadline for independent
basketball is Wednesday,
October 2 at 5:00 P.M. and at
this time most of the teams
entered are from the various
organizations on campus.
Almost no grass roots teams
have More people are
urged to start a team of their
own.
Dormitories have been slow
to enter their teams in dorm
football and section
representatives are asked to
contact the intramural
department to enter their teams.
The deadline for the dormitories
is Thursday, October 3, at 12
noon. All entries should be made
at the intramural office room
229 Fla. Gym or by phone,
376-3261, ext. 2912.
Independent action will begin
Oct. 9 and dorm action on Oct.
8.
Fraternity swimming is
scheduled to start this Monday
and spectators can be prepared
for some fireworks. All old
records established many years
ago should fall as almost every
fraternity has at least one or two
swimmers who swam on some
college or high school team at
one time or another.
Swimmers who are currently
participating in freshman or
varsity swimming may not
participate in this meet. Anyone
who was on scholarship last year
or received a freshman numeral

Ask
Gator Ray

last year may not swim in the
meet regardless of their current
status.
Swimmers who reach the
finals in more than one event
better be prepared for a rough
time as the finals will offer little
opportunity for rest as there are
only six events.
Prognostigator
Albert Proves
Others W rong
Albert the Alligator, the
worlds only football forecasting
reptile confounded the
prognosticators this weekend
with a .787 average; some .040
to .100 higher than AP, UPI, or
Harmon forecasting systems.
Alberts better percentage
came as a result of predicting
two games that everyone else
missed Florida over FSU, and
Air Force over Wyoming. Both
could be attributed to first hand
knowledge of the winning team.
Alberts three misses came at
the hands of Notre Dame
Purdue, Texas Texas Tech, and
Minnesota Nebraska. Each was
also missed by the rating
services.
Alberts column will appear
each Thursday the end
of the quarter.
Georgia Works
ATHENS, Ga. (UPI)
Coach Vince Dooley ordered his
Georgia Bulldogs under the
lights Monday night to begin
practice for their first night
game of the season a
Saturday clash at South
Carolina.
Linebacker Happy Dicks has
a knee infection and may miss
the South Carolina game

we care
mX X HHr SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS I
\3r GROUND Q
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNS Q I
Two Convenient Locations m H 111 1C
601 S.W. 2 Ave. VfIWVIX Lb. I
11 "0 N r 'b Aye.
SUPER RIGHT f\ f\f\ I
CANNED HAM 4lb, $2.77
SULTANA (ALL VARIETIES) I
FROZEN DINNERS 2/69 *1
II
G' I CANNED MEAT AND II
lL -A I VEGETABLE II
m SALE
D v> Jpmsu 4/49$
APPLES 194 sausage" 4?99< I
HrrLtJ SLOPPY 15 1/2 OZ.
WASHINGTON BARTLETT I JOE (PORK) 59$||
PEARS Lb 25< sloppy II
JOE (BEEF) 59<||
JUICY GARDEN FRESH Lb. I rni new rnnuAlnn ||
TOMATOES3S* ? sm |
I w y i golden corn 4/004 11
FRESH SWEET TEXAS 2 Lb.BAG I WHOLE KERNEL" 07 II
CARROTS 23< UIT ^2**l
|| TOMATO a /a. f\f\ II
ROUND WHITE EASTERN 10 Lb bag I JUICE 3/51.00 |
POTATOES 494 ll t pvtC PtK 1
COFFEE 'l9 I
BEANS 2 /35t I
JANE PARKER WHITE ann page smooth or krunchy
BREAD ;:r4/99<"umV V 63 < I
ANN PAGE SPARKLE
JANE PARKER BROWNNSERVE Tllkl 30z. 4 /1
_ __ gelatin
KV/LLOBUY2GETIFREE2VC GELATIN boz2/29<|
JANE PARKER BLACKBERRY ann page red I
PIE 39t BEANS iz 3/SI.OO I
ANN PAGE RED KIDNEY I
JANE PARKER LEMON ___ BEANS 4, * 3/SI.OO I
nir OQi ANN PAGE
rIC PORK & BEANS I
1 PLAIN,SUGAR OR 4ioz. 3/Si 00 I
CINNAMON 120Z.PKG.
DONUTS 2/49 BOX I