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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
$25 Tuition Hike Urged

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 4 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, September 26, 1968

ALRIGHT ALREADY!"
Many Gainesville
Landlords Promise
'Non-Discrimination 1

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF professor is forced to
leave an apartment complex by
an angry landlord.
Two UF students are refused
housing and spend the first week
of classes sleeping in their car.
These scenes, hopefully, will
not be repeated this year
because of the 1968 Civil Rights
Act and the Universitys new
non-discrimination policy for
all approved student housing.
Gainesville apartment owners
wei mailed forms this summer
by UFs Off-Campus Housing
office asking them to comply
with the act atjd the new policy.
Around 1,200 forms were
mailed and 35 per cent have
been returned.
These forms represented
between 10,000 and 12,000
dwelling units, said Mrs
Andrea Hudson, off-campus
housing counselor. And with
but a few exceptions, weve had
surprising cooperation.
The reasons more of the
forms have not been returned
already is because they were
delayed in mailing, and because
no cut-off date was set for
returning them£ Mrs. Hudson
said
Os the 35 per cent returned,
the majority have responded
favorably, she said.

America's Number 1 College Daily

Letters will be sent to the
people who have failed to return
their forms, advising them
of the deadline and the action
that will be taken if they failed
to return them by this date, Mrs.
Hudson said.
There have bee n a few
people who have personally and
vehemently opposed this but
only a few, Mrs. Hudson said.

Speaker Screening Ended

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
A recommendation to eliminate faculty
screening of campus speakers was approved by
the Faculty Senate Wednesday night and
forwarded to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell for approval.
The Public Functions and Lectures
Committee, consisting of 25 members taken
from faculty, students and administrators,
presently screens all speakers.
Speakers will still be subject to university
and city laws regarding civil disorders, Dr. Roy
L. Lassiter, Jr. Senate member, said.
The sponsoring group on campus must
inform the speaker of his responsibility not to
incite a riot, he said.
Dr. Manning Dauer, chairman of the
5-member committee which made the
recommendation, said the sponsoring group
must also prove fiscal responsibility to the

Taylor Asks
Loan Increase

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor demanded
Wednesday that part of the $25
tuition increase that may go into
effect next Fall be reverted back
to UF students in the form of
loan funds and increased funds
for activities
If we are going to have to
carry this state in regards to its
pathetic educational system,
Taylor said, wed damn sure
best be allocated some portion
of this hike for the students
priority needs.
Taylor proposed at least $5,
if not more, of the $25 must be
earmarked for special loans for
those many students who will
not be able to meet the increase
on their own.
He added at least $2 of the
tuition increase should be
allocated for the universitys
student activity fee.
Our state leaders will be
making a serious error if they
fail to allocate to these two
areas, Taylor said.
While labeling the possible
increase in fees as most
unfortunate,Taylor would not
say if he was to actively oppose
the tuition hike.
Quite frankly, he said, if
there is to be any concerted
action by university students in
regards to this proposed hike, it
must be on a state-wide basis.
Taylor said he was to meet
with the state-wide Council of

SENATE PASSES PROPOSAL

Lectures Committee if they plan to pay their
speaker.
Reservations must be made for any of the
Universitys closed facilities, although the open
spaces, such as the Plaza of the Americas, are
always available, Dauer said.
The decision resulted from last years
controversy over the invitation extended to
Adam Clayton Powell to speak on campus.
In other action, the Senate approved the
addition of the Bachelors of Music and Music
Education degrees. The recommendation has
been sent to the Board of Regents for approval
The Senate also voted to allow ballotting for
the elected members to be conducted through
the mail.
The Senate is composed of all full UF
professors, the administrative council, and 50
elected assistant and associate professors.
This enable those associate and assistant
professors who are out of town or in class to
vote, Lassiter said.

See Editorial Page 8
By DAVE REDDICK
Assistant Executive Editor
UF students can expect to pay an additional $25 in
tuition per quarter beginning next September, State
University System Chancellor Robert Mautz said
Wednesday.
Students from Florida may be charged $l5O while
out-of-state students billed $350.

fr : 4sj§
.. SB jB
CLYDE TAYLOR
.. .more money
Student Body Presidents (CSBP)
and the Board of Regents
Friday.
Hopefully, he said, a few
more facts will be made known
concerning the hike and
discussed then.
I want to find out how the
CSBP members feel towards the
hike, as well as any planned
action, he said, noting the
Regents recommendation still
must be approved by the
legislature.
INSIDE
EDITORIALS 8
LETTERS 9
FEATURES .15
ENTERTAINMENT. . .16
SPORTS 17

The Board approved a
recommendation to die state
legislature at a Sept. 13 meeting
in Tampa. The legislature
traditionally approves the
recommendation, Mautz sud.
The budget of the university
system is built around a
proposed fee, Mautz said, and
we had to establish that fee.
Student fees will make up a
smaller percentage of the total
money coming into the
universities, Mautz said.
As of right now, Mautz
said, students bear 29 per cent
of the cost of operating the
university system. The cost is
increasing to such an extent that
even with the increased fee, they
would bear only 21 per cent.
Furthermore, part of the
increase is going to be set aside
for scholarship funds to help
those students who might not be
able to meet those fees, Mautz
continued.
Out of the increase, Mautz
said, about $500,000 will go to
the scholarship fund.
If the funds were added to
matching federal monies, Mautz
explained, as much as $5 million
could be made available to
qualified students.
Mautz said the total amount
needed to run the university
system was $285.6 million. Os
this, over S2OO million will come
from taxes.
Were loading the taxpayer
with a higher percentage of the
cost (of running a university)
even with this increase, he said.
Mautz cited all facets of
running a university; wages,
buildings and equipment as
leading to the increased budget.
I worked with student
leaders in this matter, he said,
its not something weve
suddenly dreamed up.
Mautz said he had met with
the council of student affairs,
part of the administrative
structure of the university
system.

5 *' v, £m
-UiS
k
.. ; :
SI
DR. MANNING OAUEFT
.. .show responsibility



Page 2

\ Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26. 1968

- f- y ltJiw,,, " f W7"
NICK ARROYO
'SURVIVAL TURNOUT LIGHT

Operation Student Survival, designed to acquaint
new UF students to the university, had a
disappointing turnout at the first session Tuesday
night in Graham Area.
Less than 50 students showed for the meeting
with city and student leaders to discuss ways new

SG Productions Takes
Place Os Lyceum Council

The UF Lyceum Council is
no more.
The Council, established 20
years ago, has been replaced by
UF Coed
Assaulted
A UF coed was assaulted
Tuesday night while walking to
her 16th ave. apartment after an
evening class.
The coed was attacked by a
young man as she passed under
the railroad tressel over 13th
Street.
Police reported the man
grabbed the coed and yelled
obscenities while holding her.
The coed broke loose and ran
screaming south on 13th street,
police reported, and the assailant
fled on foot towards campus.
The coed later identified her
attacker as a young white male,
approximately 20 years old,
about five feet nine inches tall,
150 lbs. and wearing a yellow
checked sports shirt and dark
trousers.

[ REITZ UNION BOWLING LEAGUES
I WILL BEGIN OCTOBER 7.
All parties interested in league bowling
I who have not received application forms j
may stop by the Games Area and fill one out.
I ALL APPLICATIONS MUST
[ BE IN BY OCTOBER 1.
| GAMES AREA
j GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION j
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
sad la published flee tinea weekly except daring June, July and August when It Is published
sees 1-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official optaloes of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reits
Union Midlag, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator la entered
as ascond class matter at the United States Hast Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate it SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements aad to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising JSsnager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not bo rosponsMe Cor more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ran several times Notices tor correction most be given before next Insertion.

Student Government
Productions an organization
created to assume and
improve the past Lyceum
Council responsibilities.
Following campus elections
last spring, Student Body
President Clyde Taylor ordered
an investigation of the council to
secure the consolidation of
Union Board activities. .and
eliminate duplication of
activities.
One the major problems of
the council, Taylor said, was the
power held by an appointed
business manager whose term
could continue indefinitely.
The mishandling of
complimentary tickets caused
the council to lose money
several times, Taylor said.
Striving for a program run
by and for students which will
encompass all phase of cultural
interest, he expressed hopes to
eliminate the above problems.
SG Productions are under the
supervision of a five-man
committee SG president,
Yice-president, treasurer, senate

people can become involved in activities on the
campus and in the community.
Another session was scheduled at Hume Hall last
night, and another will be held tonight at Jennings
and Broward Halls.

majority floor leader, and the
secretary of budget and finance.
Taylor stressed the election
of a chairman as an important
goal. The chairman is to assume
most of the powers of the
formerly appointed business
manager.
An advisory board, drawn
from all phases of UF, is being
organized to select the type of
entertainment to be presented.
This will give the student a
chance to participatedirectly or
indirectly in the- choice of
events, Taylor said.
Beginning with an SB,OOO
budget cut and a $6,000 deficit
carry-over, the President
admitted the new system will be
working in a tight budget.
The Fifth Dimension
highlights the beginning of SG
Productions with an Oct. 3 UF
performance.

t STILL LOOKING
For An Apartment
Youll Find Find*
* Find* Handball Courts
* Stocked Lake
0 Gigantic Swimming Pool
0 Large-Roomy Apartments
* Separate Buildings
For Students
* Shuttle Bus
* Expert'Maintainence
* Individual Heat/Air
* Bedroom Apartments
I * 6 s

Mautz Proposals
May Be Shelved

TALLAHASSEE, (UPI)
A set of revised rules to loosen
the control of state universities
over students praised as a
step forward by University
Chancellor Robert Mautz and a
top student spokesman will
go to the Board of Regents for
approval Friday.
But Regents Chairman
Chester Ferguson indicated he
may refer the proposal to a
committee rather than ask the
regents to act on it immediately.
They will get some action
on it, but whether it wil be
Sept. 27 or at some later
meeting is not known,
Ferguson said.
Mautz announced the policy
revisions at a news conference,
describing them as less
paternalistic and an attempt
to treat students as mature,
responsible citizens. He said the
old in loco parentis
philosophy of the university
assuming parental
responsibilities was
minimized.
Lyman Fletcher, president of
the Florida State University
student body and the Council of
Student Body Presidents, said
the revisions were a
compromise with what the
council recommended last
spring.
Thie revisions would permit
recognized campus organizations
to invite controversial speakers

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BBB aps
ROBERT MAUTZ
.. .loosen control
to the campus unless the
university president decided a
particular speaker posed a clear
and present threat of inciting
violence, Mautz said.
A similar policy on campus
speakers was announced
Wednesday Florida State
President John Champion.
Student governments would
be greatly strengthened in the
revised rules, with authorization
to initiate the allocation of
student activity funds and
student social regulations and
have the prerogative to act in
other areas of student interest
as long as its actions were not
prohibited by university or
regents regulations.



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Thursday, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

\, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

Smothers, Holland Speak
At FBK Annual Banquet

Florida Blue Key, mens
leadership fraternity at the UF,
will dedicate its 1968
Homecoming banquet to retiring
U.S. Sen. George Smathers.
Manny James, Hue Key
chairman for Homecoming
weekend activities Nov. 1-2, also
announced Wednesday that Sen.
Spessard Holland will be
banquet speaker.
James said it marks the first
time the annual affair started
in 1929 will be held in honor
of an individual.
The banquet is scheduled
Nov. 1 from 4:45 to 7:15 pm.
on the main floor oTthe Florida
Gymnasium.
With Smathers and Holland
the two principals involved, the
Blue Key banquet will have and
all-Florida flavor. Both men also
are graduates and former student
Muskie Booed
WASHINGTON, Pa. (UPI)
A group of Washington and
Jefferson College students
forced Sen. Edmund Muskie to
interrupt a speech here
Wednesday by continuously
booing him and chanting stop
the war.
Terming their action
discourteous and contemptible,
the Democratic vice presidential
nominee told the students to
select a spokesman to mount the
speaking platform in front of the
county courthouse and address
the audience for 10 minutes.

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jUIf -j. '^y^xv
SMATHERS
...honored
body presidents of the UF.
Holland was the first student
body president in 1916, and
Smathers held the office in
1937-38, preceding UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Elected to the Senate in 1950
after two terms in the U.S.
House of Representatives,
Smathers is second-ranking
member of the Senate Finance
Committee, the major
tax-writing committee, and a
member of the Joint Committee
on Internal Revenue Taxation.
Holland has served
continuously since 1946 and
now is considered one of the
most influential leaders in the
U.S. Senate.
A native of Bartow and
former Florida governor
(1941-45), he is the first native

jgjUjjft -&Sji
JJ I
...to speak
born Floridian to serve both as
governor and U.S. senator.
Hollands long career includes
service on many important
senate committees and
subcommittees. He now serves
on the powerful appropriations
committee and the committees
on agriculture and forestry and
aeronautics and space sciences.

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TO. BQOZTER BAGS, P.O, BOX 1144, SARASOTA. FLA.

Last SG 'Survival
Scheduled Tonight

The last of three Operation
Survival programs sponsored by
student government will be held
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Broward
Hall.
Clyde Taylor, student body
president, described the program
as a sort of off the cuff
orientation to acquaint
students with the university and
City of Gainesville.
Guest speakers will include
city commissioner Perry
McGriff, Lt. Ed Conerly of the
Gainesville police force,
Executive Director of Alumni
William Watson, and Mike
Resnick of the Task Force on
Counseling, as well as
representatives from various
activities on campus
Bruce Harlan, chairman of
the program, stressed the
informality of Operation
Survival where students will have
a chance to ask questions of all
representatives present while
free coffee and doughnuts are

OFF THE CUFF

served.
The topics covered fall into
two main categories: free
services that students can take
advantage of, and several
projects which need student studentvolunteers
volunteers studentvolunteers both on and off
campus.
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WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer /
IN UNFRIENDLY REMINDERS: Now look here! I asked all you
s%%&f!!*t&&! people in all those rotten SS&!tt !&%*s!!! campus
oriented clubs and organizations to hand in information to be printed
in this column. But did you? Hah!
Whats the matter, anyway? Do you think I like writing this stupid
column? Do you think I enjoy spending all my free time in the same
office with Harold Aldrich, the demagogue, and Raul Ramirez, the
foreigner? NO!
So, look lm sacrificing for you guys; lets see something in
return. Send those cards and letters about campus happenings to the
Alligator office, third floor, X Wayne Reitz Union. Get them in by 4
p.m. at least 24 hours before theyre to be published.
Or else.
IN HITTING THE DRINK: No, not the fraternity version. This is
the Gator Ski Club version, and it consists of first having an
organizational meeting before plunging into anything. This meeting
will be tonight at 7:30 in room C-4 of the Union.
Among the programs to be organized at this organizational meeting
are the plans for this falls skiing program and for the clubs biggest
splash, the 4th semiannual Intercollegiate Skiing Tournament
tentatively scheduled for October 26.
All interested are urged to attend.
AND SPEAKING OF THE DRINK: The Gator Sailing Club meets
tonight at 7 in room 347 of the Union to show a movie titled: Seas
and Sails. Admission is free.
IN GIRLS GROUPS: The Association of Women Students meets
tonight in room 361 and 362 of the Union at 7:30; and {
Rush continues in rooms 346, 349,357, and 363 from 7 till 9 tonight.
IN ANOTHER GREAT MOVIE FLAMING JETS,
STARRING LARRY RENTZ AND GATOR RAY, WITH A WALK
ON BY SOME GUY NAMED SMITH: The Alachua County
Quarterback Club presents (tah-dah) the film of the UF-Air Force
game tonight in the Union Auditorium at 8.
IN ROSES ARE RED, VIOLETS ARE BLUE, HERE I AM, AT
FLORIDA U.: The Program office of the Union presents Modem
Poetry readings in rooms 122 and 123 of the Union at 4:40 p.m.
IN THOSE WHO DONT CARE FOR MEDICARE: The Christi ;n
Science Organization has a testimony meeting tonight at 7 in Union
room 357.
I

Response To Coed
Dorms High At UF

Coed dorms are in this
year at UF. Os 10 living areas at
the UF, only Murphree,
Rawlings, and Broward are
non-coed.
Student response since the
first coed dorm, Graham in
1962, has been good, said Dave
DeCoster, assistant to the
director of housing.
DoCoster said that coed
housing has become the most
popular choice of UF students.
The main difficu'y that has

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coed is converting facilities to
accomodate the opposite sex,
said DeCoster.
At Jennings, Jon Goldstein,
one of the two counselors, said,
We are trying to get away from
the dorm as just a place to sleep
and study.
There is a much more
relaxed atmosphere at Jennings
this quarter than there was at
Murphree where I worked last
year, said Mark Carlson.

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Thursday, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

Page 6

Fashion Mag
Holds Contest
For UF Coeds
Mademoiselle Magazines
College Competition Editor,
Miss Susan Diemar, will be on
campus to address all interested
UF co-eds on the 1968
Mademoiselle College Board
Competition.
Miss Diemar wll speak
Friday, September 27 at 4 p.m.
in Room 349 of the J. Wayne
Reitz Union.
The College Board
Competition is designed for
women primarily interested in a
publishing career including the
fields of writing, editing, layout,
illustration, fashion and beauty
promotion, merchandising, and
advertising.
The 20 winners are guests of
Mademoiselle in New York
during June 1969 to act as
salaried Guest Editors
Guest Editors help to edit the
magazines August college issue
and receive priority
consideration for permanent
jobs with Mademoiselle and
other Conde Nast publications.
This years Guest Editors
including UF student Becky
Hollingsworth, were sent to
Mexico as a special assignment.
Mademoiselle College Board
Competition is one of five
annual contests open to college
women. They include fiction,
poetry, art, and photography
competitions. Winners of these
contests will have their work
published in the 1969 August
issue of Mademoiselle and be
given cadi prizes.
13 injured
During Blast
BELGRADE (UPI) An
explosion,, apparently from a
time bomb, blasted Belgrades
central railway station early
Wednesday, injuring 13 persons.
The blast shattered walls and
windows in the stations main
cloak room and hurled suitcases
over nearby train platforms. It
was the fifth bombing in the
Yugoslav capital in four months
and police suspect anti-Tito
terrorist groups.
At your
newsstand
NOW
Atlantic
Andre Mnlrnux
i Pari Two front Anti-Memoirs
The War Against
The Young
Richard Poirier ji
Plus Comments from the Combatants !;
A Special Section
It* a real war, says Richard
Poirier, our man at the front,
and it threatens the destruction
of our best natural resource,
the rebelliousness and hopeful hopefulness
ness hopefulness of our young.
Why were against the big biggees,
gees, biggees, and other voices from
the battlefield.
... and Nicholas von Hoffman
describes the puzzlement of
the class of '43.
.. ...

DROPOUTS

SAN 17 Y/ | \i / 1, f/'* > 11)
fs \
C I Vef by UlMicd feetv* Syndkee, Inc.

Fortas Filibuster Begins Today

WASHINGTON (UPI)
The Senate began a filibuster
unprecedented in its history
Wednesday against Abe Fortas
nomination to be chief justice of
the United States, with no sign
when if ever it might
come to a vote.
All other legislative business,
including a $71.9 billion defense
appropriations bill containing
funds for the Vietnam War, was
swept aside for the long-awaited
political attack by conservative
Republicans and Southern
Democrats on President
Johnsons choice of an old
friend and confidant to suceed
Earl Warren.
At the outset, Senate
Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield signaled perhaps the
weakest link in the Fortas
defense, and opponents of the
nomination were quick to
pounce on it.
Rejecting all other charges
against Fortas, Mansfield
remarked it was unfortunatp
that the associate justice
accepted $15,000 in law school
lecture fees contributed by
business executives who might
some day be involved in a case
before the Supremei Court.
Sen. Robert P. Griffin of
Michigan, leader of the GOP

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NO SIGN OF VOTE

critics, called it the main issue
of the debate, one that gave an
appearance of impropriety.
Armed with a 50-page speech,
Griffin also assailed the close ties
Fortas maintained with the
President after he was appointed
to the court, and his refusal to
answer questions raised by
Alligator
v Lab Meeting
There will be a meeting for all
students interested in working
on production for the Alligator
at 6:00 p.m. today.
The meeting will be held in
the Production Lab on the Reitz
Union third floor. Work days
and times will be assigned.
All students who have made
application and others wanting
to work should attend.
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reports that seemed to
contradict Fortas previous
testimony before the Senate
judiciary committee.
The Senate is not a rubber
stamp, Griffin declared. But he
said it was asked to rubber
stamp a nomination which
rewards an old friend a
nomination based on an
unprecented conditional

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resignation which has all the
appearances of political
manipulation at the highest
levels of the other branches of
government.
Sign
ST. LOUIS (UPI) The
sign on a car wash place here
reads: Bureau of Internal
Residue.



IN COLLEGE PLAY

'Peter Pan Goes Nude

MADISON, Wis. (UPI) A
nude coed called it beautiful. A
drama student said it was
tasteful. But it folded after one
performance.
It was Peter Pan, James M.
Barries classic for children. With
an Adults Only tag.
The University of Wisconsins
experimental theater production

Reitz Union Loses
Major Parking Area

The area south of the
Reitz Unions Constans
Theater has been permanently
closed to cars, according to
W. E. Rion, union director.
It was never supposed to
be a parking lot, Rion said
Tuesday.
The sandy, unpaved area
has served as the unions
major parking lot since its
opening in June, 1967,
because there was no other
space available, Rion
explained.
Now the land is scheduled
for general landscaping by the
campus planning and
development committee, he
said.
A large number of scraped
fenders, and cars blocking the
service entrance to the theater
by haphazzard parking were
the major problems
encountered in the lot last
year, Rion said.
C. C. Greene, director of
the physical plant division,
said work will begin in the
landscaping program
immediately, in the next few
days.
FSU Game
Films Shown
The first of 10 film showings
of UF football game highlights is
scheduled for 8 tonight in the
Reitz Union Auditorium.
Grid contests to be featured
this fall include tonights
screening of the 23-20 win over
the Air Force Academy at
Tampa last Saturday and other
Florida games with Florida State
(Oct. 3); Mississippi State (Oct.
10); Tulane (Oct. 17); North
Carolina (Oct. 24); Vanderbilt
(Oct. 31); Auburn (Nov. 7);
Georgia (Nov. 14); Kentucky
(Nov. 21); and Miami (Dec.s).
All showings are open to the
public without charge.

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closed Tuesday because it
dressed up the musical with six
coeds indie altogether.
But perhaps the show will go
on again.
Student Union officials were
trying to decide if it should be
shown again to faculty and
lawyersand perhaps even
university President Fred

There wont be any
obvious work going on because
there is much that has to be
done grading and improving the
soil, Green said
The parking lot in front of
the Union was opened this
summer, but Rion said he didnt
feel the space was adequate..
It holds 120-130 cars. Even
if there were 13,00 spaces it
wouldnt be enough, he said.
If oily the people who use the
Union park there, it should be
0.K. he added. But the
problem arises when people who
arent using the Union park
there.

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Harrington- to decide if the play
is aesthetic.
If they go along with Union
theater program director William
Dawsons judgment that its
not nudity for nuditys sake,
the play may continue.
The play portrays the
ferocious Captain Hook and his
pirates as policemen. The nude
coeds represent innocence.
The girls appear in other scenes,
clothed,.
Dawson admitted he hadnt
seen the production, but one of
his assistants had reviewed it.
He told me it is not obscene
or erotic, Dawson said. He
said it was quite tastefully done.
These are students and we give
them a certain amount of
latitude.
The only gripe was a minor
one from a university official
who did not see the play, and
asked not to be identified.
I dont think anyone
realized there was nudity in
this, he said. If I knew. Id
have been there.
Patty's Next
HOLLYWOOD (UPl)Pat (UPl)Patty
ty (UPl)Patty Dukes next picture will be
Me, Natale, to be directed
by Fred Coe. v

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Thursday, Ssptambsr 28, 1908, Ths F lor ids AlHpstor,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

* 1 ;_ 4M m % m {S^
*7 w/// announce my vice president shortly

Naked Edge*

Imagine Them Praying

We ran into a friend of ours the other day and
asked about his choice for the White House.
Os George. Os George gonna cut the nigger off.
Its about time, too. Cause, if he dont, they gonna
get so much, the next thing you know, one of *um
be down takin my job at the service station. Or
winking at my wife.
And Ive even heard they want to go to our
churches and pray-imagine that-them praying to a
white God. Well Im not gonna stand for it. I'm
gonna stand up for America 'cause OP George is
gonna stand up for me. He stands for all America.
He stands up for the good, the Christian, the honest
and the white.
Hull? No, he's not a racist. A vote for OP George
is a vote for law and order. It's time we put a stop
to all the bearded and dirty rabble in the streets. It's
time we took protest off the streets of America and
put it back where it belongs-in Russia. Those
protestors are just commie infested, anyway. The

s
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
A fond good mornin to
you. If youve been feeling low
lately, l hope it's been "in private.
I know it's safe to say
something like that because it's
early Thursday morning, a time
of little deep thinking. So here's
some easy ones:
1. What is a clavier? And
who composed THH
WELL-TEMPERED CLAVIER?

Time For Thinkina

2. Can you name three of the
four countries with which Israel
has common borders?
3. One of the most brutal
murders of the decade was the
murder of a-family by two men,
a murder which formed the basis
for the book, IN COLD BLOOD.
What was the family's last name?
4. What musical play was
based on Shaw's ARMS AND
THE MAN?
5. In reports of racing one

commies want America so they can have our
freeways, our football, our cocktail parties, our
hoods and our CIA.
And speaking of intelligence, the
psuedo-intellectuals think they know everything.
They dont know nothing. We need to get back to
the fundamentals in this country-like, third grade
educations. They wont even let us pray in our
schools-just 'cause some foreigners might be
offended.
Well, its time we gave America back to the
Americans.
It bums me up. We got people on drugs, believing
in free love and things like that. It's time we put
some heads in acid and not the other way around.
Yes sir! OP George is standing up for America.
He's got all the answers we need.
Os course, we kinda wish he knew what the
questions were.

Inquiziton

By Don Avery

often reads the word furlong.
What is a furlong?
6. What do the Everly
Brothers have in common?
Here arc yesterday's answers:
1. Louis Washkanski
2. DIVINA COMMEDIA by
Dante Alighieri 3. Whirl-away,
Count Fleet. Assault, and
Citation -- Kentucky Derby,
Prcakncss, Belmont Stakes
-Lr Margaret Chase Smith
5. Venice, Rome, Istanbul.
, Remove a blemish today.

The Florida Alligator
#'Th price of freedom
is die exercke of reqporaibMty.
Harold Aldrich ..
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
PftCAlwtto Managing Editor
Ml Raul Ramirez James Cook
AtMim Executive Editor News Editor
EDITORIALS
$25 A Burden
The news Wednesday that the Board of Regents voted at
its Sept. 13 meeting to increase tuition initially dismayed us.
For one thing, the fact that the regents apparently opted
not to make the decision public is, in our judgement,
deplorable. Closed door decisions affecting 60,000 students
of Florida should not happen.
And the decision itself was unsettling.
But Chancellor Robert B. Mautz, former UF vice
president for academic affairs, helped clear the air a little in
a telephone interview.
Mautz pointed out that the regents had been discussing
the hike for several months and that skyrocketing costs
necessitated the increase.
He noted that in the current biennium, student tuition
provides 29 per cent of the costs of running Floridas
universities.
But in the next biennium, when the tuition will rise,
students will carry 21 per cent of the total burden.
The major expense of education in Florida will still rest
on the shoulders of the taxpayers.
But thats little consolation for the thousands of students
who are funding their own education, who are scraping
through college on two meals a day, who havent bought
new clothes in months.
To them and there are thousands s2s more each
quarter may spell the difference between having a chance
for higher education or being a drop in the flood of high
school graduates in the unskilled labor market.
To deny them a chance would be a travesty.
If, therefore, the tuition hike is indeed a necessity, as the
chancellor assures us, then extensive provisions should be
made to insure that the hike does not disenfranchise
Floridas less wealthy students.
Specifically, a portion of the extra $25 per student per
quarter should be set aside for loan resources. By applying
matching federal funds, even if only $5 per student were
slated for loan funds, there would be sufficient monies
available to guarantee an education to those who might
otherwise be denied the chance.
Only then can the pill of this necessary burden be
reluctantly swallowed.
Open The Office
As a duty to the student, Registrar Richard Whitehead
says his office is closed every day from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
By closing at noon, we are able to stay open later in the
afternoon. I couldnt agree to shutting the door in the
students faces.
But, he s doing that now by closing the doors for one and
a half hours during the time of day when the most students
are on campus.
A large portion of the traffic in the Registrars office
concerns picking up and leaving various forms, applications
and publications draft deferment forms, graduate school
applications, catalogues, change of address cards, etc.
These materials are locked in the office during the lunch
break.
If one clerk or receptionist took her lunch break at a
different time the office could remain open to handle these
simple matters. Students who need to see someone with
higher authority could make an appointment then to do so.
With many students complaining of the red tape and
bureaucracy connected with the university, keeping one of
the most student-oriented offices during the peak hours of
the day an important step on the universitys road
toward better student service.



OPEN FORUM:

republicans

Miami Was The Same;
She Bailed Over Too

By STEPHEN J. ROBITAILLE
Miami, like so many other American cities has a
recipe for instant riots.
Simply add a large amount of Negro poor to one
small container, and heat to simmer.
Only problem is that this concoction, which is
not uniquely American, is easily overdone. Very
often, as seen this summer in Miami, Instant Slum
boils over and you have Instant Riot.
This writer visited the Liberty City area of North
Miami after the early August incidents had
somewhat cooled down. But like any good cook
knows, once youve cooked the goose, you cant
uncook the goose. And this is the pathetic truth
which.l witnessed in my walk through the Negro
district.
Fear for my own personal safety was soon
forgotten when I realized the eagerness of my black
neighbors to discuss what had happened just a few
weeks before. There were the silent ones, the
suspicious. But mostly there was a need, almost a
passionate one, to express their sorrow, their fears,
their warnings.
One old woman, a familiar sight to most Negro
districts in her rocking chair on the front porch of a
ram-shackle home, seemed to stare in the distance as
she recountcred for me the horror she had
witnessed.
Most of us dont want trouble, all we want is
help.
It was a simple statement, almost a plea. Except
that it was marked with the sign of pessimism which
has left so many of the poor in a painfully
uncomfortable position.
Some of the younger Negroes spoke with a more
energetic tongue. Not all were violent.
I'm gonna fight to get me a better place to
live, said one young Negro boy, but I aint gonna
throw no bombs, or bum down the house I got
now.
What is truly unfortunate is that so many of the
more understanding of the Negro youths are labeled
as Uncle Toms' by their peers. It is this very fact
that indicates that the generation gaps in our society
often exist within similar gemeations.

Less Space
Mr. Editor:
I presume that the students
have noticed the NO PARKING
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF
GAINESVILE signs.
Each year there is less and
less space tor students to park. I
wonder who stays awake nights
thinking of these diabolical
annoyances'.
It is past time some
administrative committee tried
to find parking for students or
give just cause why decals must
be bought for cars that cant get
near the campus..
FRANCES WILLIAMS..PE
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

y\(wia ml 'QiaamE

"There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

PLATFORM

Miamians, those who had managed to remain
isolated from the slum situation in their
comriuiriity, were shocked to find such unrest and
violence in their city. This is both the pity and the
problem. It is the pity of our nation that we arc
indeed so divided, and it is the problem which must
be solved if we are to continue to exist.
The situation in Miami hasn't changed radically
since the Negro community has been made aware to
a great many Miamians who somehow and for so
long had avoided any direct commitment to its
solution.
The philosophies and solutions vary widely. But
most would agree that a change of some kind is
needed. A regeneration must take place in our
society. A regeneration of the basic ideals and
principals which have been the starting point, the
building blocks of so many earlier civilizations. For
in away, our new awareness of ourselves have made
us a new society. Together with the rapid
technological changes witnessed in our era, we have
entered a new age, with new problems. This process
of regeneration, if it is to take place must be
encouraged by a free thinking people.
In other words our words our problem is not a
generation gap. Age has nothing todo with poverty
and other areas of moral commitment.
Our problem is a regeneration gap. A gap
between those in our society who reftise for a
multitude of reasons to change their way of
thinking and acting. A gap which exists between
three major groups within our society. First, those
who refuse to change their way of thinking and
acting. Secondly, those who seek change in a
positive way, without destroying part of the good as
they work to eliminate the bad. And the third
group, those whose passions are so strong that they
are quickly destroying their causes as quickly as
they conceive them.
Until these three groups, all bent on a
regeneration of our society, get together, we will
continue to share a feeling of unrest.,like those
found in Liberty City and here in Gainesville
Simple remedies, might be easy to cook up, but
they soon grow bitter to the taste. Too many cooks
can't spoil the recipe for understanding and
brotherhood. That is, not as long as we hope to eat
at the same table.

democrats
Daleys Show Hurt
Everyone Involved

By ROBERT BENNETT
In spite of the general uproar,
youve got to admit that the
Chicago Democratic Convention
was conducted with a certain
amount of Mephistophelean
class.
And Mayor Richard Daley,
in spite of his detractors
emerged as the unrivaled star of
the show. Not even Lyndon
Johnson ever .managed to make
the happy little Vice President
seem quite so irrelevant or
impotent.
For the misbegotten
convention in Chicago wasnt
really for the benefit of the
Democratic Party. It was run by
and for the Daley political
machine.
Merely wearing an HHH
button was not any assurance
against a delegate being
trunchioned. The only
protection was being a Daley
hack.
Perhaps the most revealing
insight into the true nature of
things occured on the last night.
The Chairman of the New
Hampshire Delegation. David
Hoeh. had become curious about
the credential machines into
which the delegates had to
submit their plastic dogtags for
validation.
If the green light went on.
you were in. if the red light did.
you got busted. Hoeh stuck a
plain plastic credit Card into the
slot. This sophisticated ploy was
rewarded with a green light!
Hoeh let the excitement of
his discovery get the better of
him, and as he ran to get some
newsmen to witness this
electronic anomaly, he shouted
Its a phoney! The machine is a
phoney!
The place was crawling with
security men by the time Hoeh
and his witnesses returned and
so Hoeh was captured before he
could violate the machine again.
And when the officials saw that

Thursday, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

the credit card in question was a
Dartmouth College I.D. card, it
was curtains for Chairman Hoeh.
Thus it was. with only a few
pauses to knee and choke the
screaming Hoeh. that the
Chairman of the New Hampshire
Delegation was taken to the 9th
precinct station from which he
was later released without
charge.
Hoehs credential card was
plainly visible during the whole
affair and the protests of
onlookers were met only with
the justifacation of. Hes a
tr ou blemaker! He's a
troublemaker!
Hoeh had just discovered how
Mayor Daley had been treating
his guests, the cream of the
Democratic Party, like a bunch
of superstitious stoneage
aborigines for the last four days.
That is, Tell the suckers that
the precautions are for their own
protection.
Use a bogus machine to lull
them into a feeling of
confidence. Then surreptitiously
slip spies onto the floor to"
shadow and intimidate both
newsmen and delegates.
If this be farfetched, consider
the press releases which outlined
the security precautions taken
beneath the podium, within the
hall itself. There a series of false
EXIT signs, dead-end
passageways, and curtains which
hid only blank walls, made a
labyrinth so complex that the
Democratic National Committee
could boast that only those
personally briefed or led through
by a security guard will ever find
their way to a microphone.
In that sort of supercharged'
atmosphere, little wonder that
the various factions and
candidates found it impossible
to compromise and find middle
ground. If the Democratic Party
is indeed fatally split, then the
bullet-headed little mayor of
Chicago may be thought of as
the fatal wedge.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

Mk
B fIWMHBHBHBkBIBHMhBMIRMi m
FAMILY CREMES....4/sl. fTlnfTn7iH
DIET BREAD 2/49 uAliif&US
WIENER BUNS 19
DUNKIN STIX 29
I J I II I \ 14
4 wr I
Medium CREST Regulor
TOOTHPASTE....... 29
Medium CREST Mint
TOOTHPASTE. m. hp superbrand DEODORANT... 69 MARGARINE R/ $ 1
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEDPRICES GOOD THRU SEPT Bg l# MBIMBB IB SB BB § #
WINN 01X18 BTORU, INC COPYRIBHT 1808
paper towels 3/si.
peaches 4/si.
FRUIT DRINKS 4/sl.
LIMA BEANS 5/sl.
GARDEN PEAS 5/sl.
tIJaJ DETERGENT 3/sl.
CIGARETTES .:;$2.99
Evaporated Milk7/sl.
Peanut Butter 79* B j 111 II !BLV I'M
Grape Jelly 2/49* WBBBj^^HIB
No 303 Con THRIFTY MAID
Bartlett Pears...3/89* BflHiHflH^^BN^W
Corned Beef 2/89* l]3l j Jin 3 1 1 Ryfl
Whole Chicken 89* mmmggmmmjgg^
Sox. THR.ETY MA.P < ... WII SBU.V 4 BETTY CROCKER
Green Beans 10*CAKEMIX3/SI.TISSUE... S/sl.
Peanut Butter Cups49* TISSUE... 4/sl. CHIPS :...3/sl.
BOLD . G.ont 89* Regulor Sue 39* King Site DEODORANT PINK or WHITE
Detergent 1 M£DIU Safeguard Soap 2/43* j^pllijSWMUUUUUUip^^^^uiiiiiiuUuufw
Gon. OXYOOL Lava boap UQUID 2201 *"<>** j I1 I B TOP VALUE STAMPS flaflY foLXXJfiKSc I
. Detergent .89* 0/9Q Detergent .... 83* jfgf f |
Cascade Detergent 77* " Detergent 87* iffy-
Fabric Softener ... 83* Detergent Detergent .... 89* mSrST if i
Comet Cleanser . 19* J/ ' Detergent ] 4? i^UrTTO4.4*.il!W|^^^ i nJ



HM v
USDA CHOICE WD BRAND CORN EEP OVEN Rf AOY 17 CARVI KIR
M ROAST. J-.98*
USDA CHOICE WD BRAND-CORN FED CHUCIC ROAST OR
m STEAK ...:59<
~ Ajf m SlTtfly USDA CHOtCEro TRAMrrORfTTf PRO! IN|VBC)Nr THOIIU)TT-
St ROAST...J-.79*
SB R0A5T.....69*
w 0 brand beef LEAN SHORT
tIIPRIRS 49<
I^ 1 IIIPhIT WI) BRAND BEEF PI ATE
COTTAGE CHEESE 2' 59' 6 STEW 3 99*
4oi. KRAFT SUCtD NATURAL AGED SWISS 4oi BORDENS SLICED MUENSTER W D BRAND LEAN GROUND
CHEESE 53' CHEESE 47' IBEH BEEF... 5 *1
CHEESE .69' BISCUITS S>/Al<
black hawk T | H 1 | I | Wfj H
SLICED BACON :65'
BOLOGNA 49* STICKS 99*
FRANKS 45' HAMS 74'MffllfflfilHEWRW^^W^M
ROAST 49' TURKEY 3/SI.MIXBBIEEII3S9NHRH
STEAK 59' FILLET 39*utlAim1MJ.Utl I H
QUANTITY GOOD
WIMN OtXIK TOMCS. INC COPVMIMMT '
harvest
if FRESH
JM p M BAKING
US Vent Vu ALL PURPOSE
n s No I GEORGIA red
U.S. No. I YEUOW MUD & SWEET
a* m;w *A.m**~ ~*m Onions 3 29 < Rutabagas 10*
Orange Juice 0/ 1. Cdery2/3T Drink 3/sl.
PEPPERIDGE FARMS AU FIAVORS on Rich'S
u I mima i*t* ;.hot bhab... 49 shrimp chunkees...si.99
Bee# Burger* Chee*e Feed \W&M m \ t£-Jitf!*!2 /A ooea W .>
.r: ' RI9 ~rzz?-z Ki rrj~~z s DIET BAR. 2/Sle PERCH FILLET 39*
n 1 Ts f YlfTf> g u/ MORTON [IIiyjgSBRB& iUlii/tkswhsS^ i BjMT PIES 5/sl. POTATOES 5 £> 89*
Imm kux mM wE~ mm ~a&r i blueberry muffins... 39 MAkGiutiNE 39
ikgPJlf GOOD H.u.i.r 2. HM-MU good th.o im 2. i iwffJM oood tm.u kh 2. ; 5*5^ I tL£LSAIU _____ _. SWANSON CHICKEN SWISS STEAK O. CHOPPED SIRLOIN
i.r.,.2 J: COFFEE CAKE 79 MEAT DINNERS... .....59*

Thursday, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida Adaptor, Thursday, Soptember 26, 196

Page 12

e P^ ace to g 0...
H JIO f r good things to eat!
. ; Mt fl mt'*M ray^^MlC^^^^Hl
1 i l|' "Ik* ka
130 N. W. 6th ST. in GAINESVILLE
.' : r
mjvroMMmf
1 1 DRAWING WILL BE
| \ 111 MONDAY, OCT. 7th -^B
I If 11 DRAWING TICKETS WILL
STORE ONIY *A^^S|^^r
3T Other Free Prizes...
k ( HN) B WHAMS U WARMING TRAYS IU GIFT CERTIFICATES
.
Ihi "f JAt KAN OalFh, GOLD KING l, Pfc t IAT-RITI
IllrTlh T DOG FOOD ONION RINGS BOLOGNA
2^li < UQUID J"< * JAN.JIDI lAb. Pkf. FALMFTTO FARMS
LSSTjmiB detergent hushpuppies pimento cheese
I Nil JAW MACARONI SHRIMP CREOLE w &ZtfSZ!%r
J 1 I 1 J CHEESE & TOMATO PIZZA FREE!
B A J t.n.t. HOUSE A GARDEN 5-m. Pkf. dovynyflaki *
Uit UT BUG BOMB WAFFLES SAUSAGE .7. GET 6^ D pKG. G I
- ' ... ;- --/ FICKLE Ei PIMENTO LOAF FREE!



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

w.-
FOR SALE
S ¥
Like-new $350. 32 6HP rider
mower bought May 1 only $250 am
getting tractor. Call 376-9786 to
arrange to see and try. (A-l-stp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
gun DEALER. MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)
Fender Baseman Amp exc. condition
Top and Bottom $l5O. Call
378-7810 Or Come By apt. No. 62
French Quarter After 6:00 p.m.
(A 4t-l-p)
For Sale Honda S- 90, 1966. Call
378-8893 any time after 4:30 p.m.
ask for Joe. (A-3-3t-p)
1966 Suzuki -80 cc Excellent
Condition! oftly 3,000 miles of under
30 mph. Just S2OO call 376-4962.
(A-3-2t-p)
Honda S 90 1966 3,000 miles
excellent condition helmet & mirror
included only $250 contact Mickey
Ross TEP house 372-9479 if gone
leave message. (A-3-st-p
MILLIONS of rugs have been cleaned
with Blue Lustre. Its America's
finest. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-2t-4-c)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredAiinimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the/4otal by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
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FOR SALE
250 cc Honda Scrambler, one owner
sunburst gold, completely stock. In
mint condition, motor just broken in,
sa"5 a 378 3724 after 5.
(Ast4p)
HOME INCIDENTALS, various items
for home use. Kitchen utensils,
settmg for eight to twelve. Inquire
3729283, Bob Bartusch, Rm. 19
attn. Flavets. (A2t4p)
Honda 50. 1966. Very good shape.
Automatic clutch. SIOO. or best
offer. Call Lou Tally, Rm. 320 North
Hall. 3769205, leave message.
(A 3t4 p) y
FOR RENT
Furn up stair apt 2 BR for 4, air cond
wall to wall carpet. Furn downstairs
apt 2 BR for 4 air cond Call after
5:30 3787845 (B-3-ts-C)
WANTED
WANTED: Used 120 twin lens reflex
camera. Call Judy, 3765449.
(C4t 4p)
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED at
Village Park Apt. Call 376-9529.
(C 3t 4 p)

WANTED |
Female roommate wanted Two
bedroom upstairs apartment, $38.75
& utilities a month. Three blocks
from campus. 378-3238 620 SW 10
St. (C-l-st-p)
Wanted desperately! two tickets FSU
game, willing to pay cost or better
Call Towers A ask for Judy room
1003(C3-3t-p)
WANTED: Attractive coed to cook
dinner for 4 handsome bachelors.
Meals included. Call Mike or Andy.
3787997 after 5 p.m. (C3t4 p)
Despa rately need 4 female
roommates you live with us at
Summit House or we will live wiih
you Call 376-9925. (C-33t-p)
Roommate wanted 2br large apt. S4O
per month at 4308V2 rear top NW 6st.
call Eddie at 3726177 or go by apt.
after 6:00 p.m. (C-3-2t-p)
roommate for 2 br. duplex apt. quiet
clean 2V2 mi. e campus, prefer liberal
over 21. $37.50 mo. private room
372-4433 for information.
(C-33t p)
Wanted one female roommate for
two bedroom Village Park apartment.
Inquire at apartment 83 Village Park.
(C-2t-3-p)
MALE ROOMMATE to share trailer.
2 bedrooms, $55 a month. Archer
Rd. 378-9083. (C2t4-p)
ONE COOK for four seniors. Inquire
at Frederick Gardens Apartments,
Apartment 77, after 5:30 p.m.
(C 3t 4p)
TICKETS FOR FSU GAME. CaH Phil
After 6 at 378-0229. Need 2 tickets.
Will Pay Well. (C2t-4p)
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Apartment
64, Colonial Manor, Ask for Louie.
(C2t 4-p)
HELP WANTED
x g
2 male & Students preferbly married,
must be over 21 part time work
Apply Woody's Sandwich Shop 3458
W. Univ. ave between 3&5 p.m.
(E-3-3t-p)
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
with the nations top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
(E-l-tf-nc)
PART TIME DRAFTSMAN. 4th or
sth year Architectural student. Call
Norwood Hope, 376-5301. (E-2-st-p)
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman, part time.
Discount Privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-2-st-c)
WANTED Male or Female curb
attendant. Apply 2310 SW 13th St.
or 1505 NW 13th St. JERRYS.
(E-2-10t-c)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
ext. 2049. (El-Bt-c)
Psychiatric Research needs males
over 21 yrs. old. 35 mins, time for
$2.00. Call Pat 376-3211, ext. 5706
or 378-5671 If after 5 p.m. (E-3-3t-p)
ALAN BATES. ~
DEAN 1
I 1 ' MARTIN
I AIMHiH
ROBERT
MTTCRUM
MM
m Technicolor H
I CARO I
STUD I
PUMiMMj

Thursday, Saptember 26, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

V~~ HIIUiKWL-MliiW
I I I
ENDS iimtCDl line' color -1:30 3:30 \
INItKLUut 5:36-7:40-9:40
MKWICJUNEPKESIimi J
wSmSjii 1
is /
dt 5
SHflf Bpp mK>
m. w.
20th Century-Fox presents ? ;i:^|
GHWAMNAmUiI-EMCPOIfFMAN i|l
mtimtMiiiiNMFwt; Mr
COLOR by Deluxe [Tuooesteo for mature audiences |
SHOWN AT: 1:30.3:30. 5:35.7:40.9:45 /
WtOT 7 75$£ak\
?S
JM i CXRJUHRLE
I
liMwSw The Hell with Heroes'
I -> f 'i inTtCHNICOIOB
>xc*aooo(>3MoiQogccMfr>;-:-:->>:-:<:':->:-::vAW:v^..v..v%w.vw. .v.*.v. w.v
Sidney Fritter I
laughing and loving in I
Ol#9nfA] %0 INCOLOR I
IwiiTwTiNr st.KmtA
Ends tonight
1 ] "Prudence and the Pill"

I WlwUywCIU PANAVisior United irhstij
LT TAYLOR ~l
IA BURTON
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
sinceCot on a Hoi

Page 13



CLASSIFIEDS

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26. 1968

Page 14

Â¥ 3
AUTOS $
Red Impala Convertible 1965 new
Transmission Radio & Heater Call
3763261 x 2636. After 5:30 376724
SI2OO or Best Offer. (G-3-5t p)
CORVAIR MONZA CONV. 1966.
4-speed. Ex. condition. $1200.00.
372-9689. (G-3t-2-p)
' v<
61 Rambler American, automatic
Transm. Radio. Very Good
Condition $275. Call 372-3110.
(G-3 st-p)
1956 Morris Minor. Good tires.
Engine runs good. SIOO. E. S. Priem,
Ext. 3414, 372=4509. (G3t~4p)
TR3. Rebuilt engine, good tires.
Runs, but needs lots of work and
love. $65. 2014 NE 7 St. 3785295.
(G st4p)
1964 Volvo 1800 S. 41,000 miles,
showroom condition. SIBSO. Call
3787441. (Gst4p)
Rolls Royce styling and size.
Superbly maintained 1960 MK. IX
Jaguar. 4door, air cond. 400 miles
on new engine. Complete with bar.
3760201. (Gst4p)
1961 Chevy Impala, VB, 3speed.
Metallic Blue & white. New tires and
transmission. Very clean. See Tom at
Lanes American, 13th and Univ.
(G 2t 4 p)
iWWWWyftVWWKWKWXWWWVWWSf
§ LOST & FOUND |
LOST WALLET, old Library. Please,
if found, keep money, return IDS,
etc. No questions asked. 3786042,
Williamsburg Apts., No. 28, Bob
Russo. (L3t4 p)

"Serosa
JUL I STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgale Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
Ww. lita sl
Hp.' 'fyJ,-
Ro ** n SsHH | John Cassavetes I I
RuihGadon Sdneylackmef MaunceEvans and Ralph BeHamy .Jjjjfc.
Produced by mCasae WNunioMhe Screen and Creeled by WomgnftaW**
From The nov by kale** *<*+aS***
T HUiriil>oiM^eAu>*nces
r Penthouse
Mod movie!
1 Daily News
PAKAJAXW PCIURfS presents
l THERCaUNSOrS
The Penthouse*

r^x.x.rx x x*x r*MWW*-*x*x*x x-:*..*.
THE TEDDY BEAR NURSERY will
be open for Florida football games.
Hours of operation will be 7:00 a.m.
until 6oo p.m. Night service for all
home games. Contact Mrs. Townsend
at 3760917 or 3724021 for
reservations. (M2t4p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-lt4 p)
DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
WAKE UP ON TIME!! Call
Phone-Alarm, 378-6994, after Bs30
P.M. Ask for Rick. (M-l-st-p)
DIED: 12:01 p.m., Sept. 23 --
Sammy Seminole hung by the neck
from Century Tower. His remains
may be viewed by the public at the
top of Century Tower until Fri.,
Sept. 2 7. (M-2-3t-c)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Liberty Linda speaking for
Let Freedom Ring. (M-l-st-p)
FIGURES, graphs, illustrations, for
dissertations, articles, slides, etc.
Nancy McClelland, FYofessional
Graphic Artist. 378-4260. (M-4t-3-p)
iWX.W.WivXWW-K-WSVWWWWXn
I PERSONAL
THE SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS
your personal Headquarters for
posters blacklites, flourescent paint,
incense & burners, and something
DIFFERENT in mens and women's
clothing. 10SM 7th St. (Just around
the corner from Santa Fe Junior
college). (J-3-3t-c)

Project Grey Enlists
Aid In Fund-Raising

Project Grey, a student
service organization, has enlisted
the help of the Interfratemity
Council and the State Theater
for the coming quarter to help in
fund-raising projects.
It will provide recreational
and educational assistance to the
Southeast Boys Club of
Gainesville.
The project is headed by
Marc Dunn and Jeff Nye.
The funds provided by a
benefit movie at the theaterand
/ 1
Weimer
Frat Award

Rae O. Weimer, special
assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, has been
named one of the six national
winners of the first annual Aide
Award, sponsored by Alpha
Delta Sigma national
professional advertising
fraternity.
The award is given to the
person who has done the most
to aid university advertising.
Selections are made by the 42
collegiate chapters of the ADS.
Weimer is the past Dean of
the UF School of Journalism
which he founded in 1949 and
administered until his
appointment, in November
1967. as assistant to OConnell.
Many Are Filed
But Few Are Recalled
NEW YORK (UPI)Of 100
pieces of paper filed in the av average
erage average office, only 20 will ever
be called back for reference,
according to the Leahy Busi Business
ness Business Archives.

I'w /JcoM 6 i
j*v V *S) GYM D
a 11/jL BPm 8 P m 0c.31
! ;rko
ZZ Union Box Office ZZ
liMiiiiiiiiHiiFanmmimmmiJ
SAt the [
Main Entrance [
GAINESVILLE MALL 1
lu iai\ v I" \ i
J IxBUtX S || j L Lasagna A- jJI
/continental atmoH>har. i | | , | T Ravioli Pilla |)
Finest in gourmet food A !|ij { / Hours: *3}
§ S Imported Beers end Winee; 01:AM*8:30PM Mon.*Set.j 3(
Service 31 = | R Serving Continuously A |(
|| LJ U |JyLjLjLjy|§
[ Gainesvilles Finest
i and Most Intimate

a fund-rasing effort by the IFC
will be used to better equip the
* club and improve the facilities.
The boys club is
tremendously under-equipped
and could use some external
improvements, Dunn said. We
hope to be a big help to the
Boys Club of Gainesville by
providing the necessary funds.
The main function of the
project is to set up a tutoring
service four nights a week and
help with the organization and

Welcome Class Os 1969
Creative Hair Styling Complete Beauty Care
Wig Sales and Service
HAIR STYLING STUDIO
1516 NW 13th ST.
INTRODUCING
9
GLORIA-LAS VEGAS
PHYLISS-. PENSACOLA
SALLY-GEORGIA
SPECIALIZING IN ALL PHASES OF BEAUTY CARfc.
I HulreT
HAIR STYUING STUDIO
one dollar off |
ON ANY PROFESSIONAL
!*_ BEAUTY CAR
I i I HIM MM. = SB SE Sa ~ mm

staffing of a recreational
program
Last year Project Grey was a
big success and we hope to do
even better this year, Nye said.
The project depends on
student volunteers to staff the
program
An orientation meeting is
planned for Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
in room 361 of the Reitz union.
All interested students are
invited to attend.



Bedtime Happening
At Broward Hall
By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
Happenings, by definition, can take place anywhere and at
anytime. That includes even Broward Hall at one in the
morning.
Recently the Browardites massive pre-bedtime ritual of hair
curling, cold creaming, and deep knee bending was interrupted
by soft guitar strumming wafting through open windows
accompanied by the words of Try and Catch the Wind.
Half curiered girls gathered outside on the dewy grass and
were seranaded by three unidentified campus males who said
they were protesting the fraternity rush system.
They told die pis they were bucking a system that said you
have to be in a fraternity to be cool.
The boys were shirtless, barefooted and wore beads. One had
on a leather Red Baron pilots cap.
After many songs, a group of sleepy girls returned to their
dorm rooms. Not just a little reluctantly.
You dont attend a happening every night
1 mSMm £ v 4 1 MtSl v
i _
ifitit S ml 41
1 -am W
MBBMI <:W ;
m M iiT
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PMkj& X~Â¥t*wWi Wmimt l jp **- 'i
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' '' W-Wk' v
-
BOWLING FOR FUN
Students enjoy an evening of bowling one of the Union's
popular game offerings.
Leagues will be forming the week of October 7. There will be
a 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. team league bowling shift.
- The 16 alleys are open weekdays from 9 a.m. to Midnight
and cost is 40 cents a line. Additional charge for shoe rental. On
Sundays, students can bowl from 1 p.m. till Midnight. Cost is
three games for one-dollar or 35 cents a game. Shoe rental is ten
cents.
EXPECTING??
NO MATTER WHAT SHAPE YOUR
STOMACH'S IN ~ LET US FIT YOU FOR
STYLE AND COMFORT DURING THESE
PRECIOUS TIMES.
use our convenient LAY-AWAY-PLAN
OFF STREET PARKING
COMPLETE LINE OF MATERNITY
WEAR FOR THE MOTHER TO-BE.
; ...v.
K EXPECTINGLY
,\tw y yours
L 706 W. UNIVERSITY
372-3850
9:30-5:30

FOR DUVAL COEDS

Gator Bowl Committee
Slates Queen Contest

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Feature Writer
Since 1948 five UF coeds
have won the title of Gator
Bowl Queen. The latest winner
from campus was Suzanne Teate
in* 1966. And, the search is on
again.
Ted Emery, information
director for the contest
committee said, This year it is
hoped that many more young
women from the University of
Florida will enter our
competition.
Regulations include :-
Contestants must be a full
time student
Must be a resident of Duval
County
May not be married
Must be between the ages 6f
17 and 24
Must have a minimum C
average
Must be available for all
Gator Bowl activities and
promotional engagements. All
former Bowl Queens are
ineligible. Former court
members only eligible for
Queens title.
Applications must be
received no later than 5 p.m.
Nov. 1 and must be
accompanied with a 5 x 7 glossy
Lost Singers
Quest Begins
Randy Williams, Program
Director of Gator Growl, is
searching for any of the
members of the "Revised
Vanguard Singers" that
performed in Gator Growl in
1965. Anyone belonging to this
group should call university
extension 2536.
Courtesy Crusader
BRISTOL. England (Ul)
Builder Terence Bryant thinks
jury summonses lack courtesy.
When he received one, he
wrote a letter protesting that
it didnt say please. He re refused
fused refused .to show up.
A magistrate found Bryant's
letter very offensive and im improper
proper improper and fined him 20
pounds (S4B).

ATTENTION
ALL UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
New accident insurance plan to go into
effect October 1, 1968.
Plan covers you and your family for accidents
occurring everywhere on airplanes, trains,
buses, in autos, on the job in the home,
in sports activities
LOW COST PAYROLL DEDUCTION
TO ENROLL
CALL PERSONNEL OFFICE IN THE HUB (EXT. 3165)
OR
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ENROLLMENT PERIOD ENDS OCTOBER 1, 1968 ACT NOW) I
UNDERWRITTEN BY I.NA.

Thursday, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

photograph attached. Picture
should be a head and shoulders
shot to be used during the
judging. The contest will be on
Friday, Nov. 28.
The coed selected as 1968
Gator Bowl Queen will receive a

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Page 15



. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

Page 16

j
' ~.*
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*' ,{,. ;.,... , \,: ; -,'s', \ f |||f.' .>%/' Ayli <
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PERFORMING FLORIDA PLAYERS
_*_, .last years production of "The Imaginary Invalid." ___
FOR FALL play

Players Announce Tryouts

The overpowering urge to
match some particular
outrageous piece of violence
with an even greater and more
outrageous retaliation, is the
concept behind contemporary
British playwright John Ardens
award-winning play of protest
against war, Sergeant
Musgraves Dance. This piece of
drama has been chosen as the
first production of the year by
UFs student drama group, the
Florida Players.
In contrast with the
black/white, hero/villain
approach so common to anti-war
literature, Arden has instead
presented, in purely dramatic
and refreshingly unpreachy
terms, a work wherein die
pivotal figure (Sergeant
Musgrave) is first freely praised
for his abhorrence of war and
later thoroughly condemned for
his appalling counter-proposi counter-proposition.
tion. counter-proposition.
The" efforts of Musgraves
quartet of deserters from a
colonial war to redirect the
agonies of the conflfct against
the initial perpetrators of it
forms the crux of the plays
action. The parallels which
Arden draws between the plays
setting (a tiny Northern England
mining village in the latter half
of the nineteenth century) and
contemporary society will be

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heightened by the experimental
staging involving
heavy use of projections and
musical effects, as planned by
the productions director, Dr.
L.L. Zimmerman.
Technical efforts will be
under the supervision of the
Theatre Departments new
technical director, Mr. Michael
Gillette.
The peculiar mixture of
prose, verse, and folk song which
characterizes Sergeant
Musgraves Dance, as well as
the numerous technical
challenges which it presents, will
require a wide range of students,
both male and female.
Tryouts for roles in the play
are open to all members of the
UF student body, regardless of
experience, and will be held
Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday evenings, Sept. 30,
Oct. 1 and 2, from 7 until 10
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p.m. in Constans Theatre,
adjacent to the Union.
Students interested in any
aspect of lighting, construction,
constumes. or make-up are
welcome to the production
meeting at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
October 3, in.the Theatre.
All members of the UF
student body are invited to
participate in the Florida
Playerss unusual and exciting
production of- Sergeant
Musgraves Dance, a play which
has been ranked by English
critics beside Brendan Behans
The Hostage as the finest
piece of contemporary literature
that has been recently offered in
the English theatre.

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In The Print Contest
Religious Subjects



Intramural Football To Start

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
All dorm residents will once
again have a chance to show
their athletic prowess and
section pride as football kicks
off the new season as the first
sport.
All dorm residents are
encouraged to participate and
may do so regardless of
fraternity Status. A student may
play for a fraternity and dorm
without jeopardizing his
eligibility.
Each dorm section
competes within its area for its
own championship. Winners of
each area meet for the
championship of the sport but
no extra points are given to the
team for this championship,
only ultimate fame and glory.
This quarter the dorms will
compete in football and then
volleyball.
Last years winners were:
Bless of Graham, Yocum of
Hume, Sledd G of Murphree.
and South IV of Tolbert. This
year East Campus composed of
Jennings, Reid, and Towers, has
also been added. Trophies and
awards will be given out to the
winners in each league. All
dorms should sign up by
Tuesday, Oct. 1, in the
intramural office.
The dormitory league is a
major part of an intramural
program designed to provide the
opportunity for every student to
participate in competitive
activity. There are fourteen
organized leagues now: two
fraternity, two sorority, five
dormitory, three independent, as
well as an Engineenng League
and a Law League.
In league activity alone there
were over 210 teams and 4,600
games or contests sponsored last
year.
Few Tickets
Remain For
Home Games
Tickets for the UF games
have been in such great demand
that even season ticketholders
are being assigned seats in the
end zones.
The FSU and Georgia games
are sold out. and only end zone
seats are available to the general
public for all remaining games..
Mrs. Eileen Hahn,
administrative assistant to the
business manager said the tickets
are going unusually fast this
season.
Even people who ordered
their tickets in March for the
Homecoming game against
Auburn would be sitting in the
end zone, she said.
Season ticket holders have
never had to go into the end
zone before, Mrs. Hahn said.
Approximately 2 2.000 season
tickets were sold this year, she
said.
Tennis Meets
The Womens Tennis Club
sponsored by the Department of
Intramurals will meet at the
Broward Tennis Courts.
Tuesday, October 1, at 4:00
P-M. All women students
interested in tennis participation
are invited. Organization and
activities will be discussed.

FOOTBALL: OCT. 1 SIGNUP

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Thuractay, September 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 17



Page 18

t, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26, 1968

| Albert j
L Predicts 1
By Albert The Alligator'**-*^
Well, fans, your favorite alligator, Albert has been snoozing for a
while now, but with a little priming on Gatorade and gin, happily
supplied by my good buddies on fraternity row, I think 1 can start
talking again.
Big game of the week is Purdue at Notre Dame. Nobodys going to
beat the Irish on home turf, or anywhere else for that matter. Try
Notre Dame by 9.
Upset of the week is our good buddies at Air Force. They have the
stuff it takes to put the womp on Wyoming, and this is their chance to
prove again what theyre worth.
The rest of the games fall into line like this:
Southern Cal over Northwestern by 21 I havent seen a brick
fall off century tower all year. __ /
Miami over Georgia Tech by 14 Would anyone consider
soaking LSD in marshmallows?
Stanford over Oregon by seven Bill Peterson drinks Gatorade
Cola, but wont admit it.
Alabama over Southern Mississippi by 13 Vodka and Gatorade
tastes strangely like rubbing alcohol.
Penn State over Kansas by 21 ln fact, 1 didnt see any bricks
fall off Century Tower last year either.
UCLA over Washington State by seven it takes a real nurd to
swipe the placards off the new sports boards around campus.
Minnesota over Nebraska by three does any6ne ever wonder
vhat I keep under those palm fronds in my cage?
Georgia over Clemson by 6 rumors that Gatorade and various
liquids leave no hangover are true most of the time.
Texas over Texas Tech by 14 1 had a party in my cage last
week, and it was fun.
Ohio State over SMU by ten if the above statement sounds
dumb, I think it got censored.
LSU over Rice by six There will be another party this
Saturday. Bring your own.
Finally, ol Albert says Florida will take the girls by ten points.
Ron Sellers may be out of the came with a bad case of colic.

Gator Ray

(Today inaugurates a new
Alligator Sports feature; the Ask
Gator Ray Column.)
Why did Florida consistently
try to run through the line
instead of taking for the
sidelines? On the few plays where
UF & especially Eckdahl)
attempted this they seemed to
be successful.
Air Forces defensive game
plan was to cut out our outside
passing and running, if possible.
To do so they played, primarily,
a defense which left them with
seven outside defenders, four
inside They, thus, had four
inside defenders against seven
blockers, six of our offensive
lineman and the back leading the
ball carrier through the hole.
As they compensated to the
middle our sweep was able to go,
with Larry Smith being led by a
pulling guard and tackle. As ii
matter of fact Smith carried the
Ball 25 times, 16 to the middle
and nine wide, which is a good
ratio.
Larry Smith's pass to Jim
Yarbrough was impressive. Was
this a bench call and will the
halfback pass be included in the
Gator repoitre?
This pass has been a part of
our attack for three years. Smith
was once a quarterback, throws
weH and is 8 x 8 on this pass
during his varsity career. We
need it to help make the sweep
go by freezing the defensive
back but it is not a play you can
throw over once or twice a
game. The pass Saturday was a
bench call.
Whats your diagnosis now of
why Larry Rentz kept eating the
ball; that is, why Marietta and
several other Air Force defensive

men consistently plowed
through the line.
Rentz did not make a crucial
error in the game. Had he not
eaten the ball most of the time
with no receivers open it could
have cost us the game. Air
Forces rush was not
overpowering but even the
Green Bay Packers figure the
quarter back to get 3.5 seconds
to throw on the average pass
attempt. Rentz had almost 4.0
seconds Saturday, a credit to the
offensive line, but simply couldnt
find people to throw to.

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Hodges OK
After Possible
Heart Attack
ATLANTA (UPI) New
York Mets manager Gil Hodges
was reported in satisfactory
condition and resting
comfortably Wednesday after
being admitted to a hospital in
the middle of the night because
of chest pains.
Doctors said they were
unable to determine whether the
44-year-old former all-star first
baseman had had a heart attack.
However, a spokesman at
Crawford Long Hospital said an
initial electrocardiogram
showed slight changes in the
heart pattern.
The spokesman said Hodges is
in the coronary care unit but
added that this merely means
that he is under intensive care
and observation.
You just dont take chances
with chest pains, she said.
Hodges became ill during the
second inning of Tuesday nights
game between the Mets and the
Atlanta Braves. He retired to the
dressing room where he was
examined by trainer Gus Mauch,
and Braves physician Dr. Harry
Rogers, who persuaded him to
enter the hospital.

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Bacheler Selected For Olympics

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Jack Bacheler is a young man
on the rise-fast.
The UF graduate student
showed his speed at Lake Tahoe
Sept. 13 of this year as he
became the first UF student ever
to win a place on the U.S.
Olympic Team.
Bacheler captured his spot on
the team in a close finish in the
5,000 meter event.
Bob Day of the U.S. Army
appeared to be a few steps ahead
of Bacheler in a photo finish,
although both were clocked at a
speedy 14:37.4.
Lou Scott of Detroit, Mich.,
placed third in the event at
14:53.4.
By finishing as the top three,
Day, Bacheler, and Scott
automatically qualified for the
Olympic Games in October.
Bacheler did his
undergraduate studies and
long-distance running at the
University of Miami (Ohio), and
then came to the UF two years
ago to do graduate work in
entomology.
At that time he began
running with the UF Track Club
and last year began coming

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around, according to UF Track
Coach Jimmy Carnes.
Bacheler gave outstanding
performances in the" Florida
Relays and the Drake Relays,
and later was sponsored by the
Florida chapter of the AAU for
a meet in Sacramento,
California.
From there he went on to the
pre-Olympic trials, taking a
fourth place in the 5,000 meters.
His fourth place was good
enough to take him to the finals
at Lake Tahoe earlier this
month.
Carnes, who coaches both the
UF Track Team and the UF
Track Club, explained that the
higher altitudes present a special
problem to athletes due to the
lower amount of oxygen in the
atmosphere.
Athletes are slowed down in
higher atmosphere, theres no
doubt about it, Carnes said.
Events like the 5,000 meters
can be slowed down by as much
as a minute at that altitude
(7,000). You just cant run as
fast as you would at sea level.
Some athletes cant take it at
all.
As an example of how high
altitudes may affect the finishing

ITS OFFICIAL

time for a track event, the world
record for the 5,000 meters is
13:16.0 at sea level. At 7,000

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feet the best time recorded is
14:19.0, more than one minute
slower.

Thursday. Sen timber 26, MBS, Tha Florida AHiptw,

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Read The
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 26,1968

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