Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Alligator Plans Literary Feature Supplement

The Florida Alligator this year will have a new, as yet
unnamed literary supplement under the direction of the feature
department.
The supplement will be published three times this quarter-in
mid-October, mid-November, and early December with content
limited to fiction, poetry, in-depth interviews, photography,
artwork, opinion, and other literary projects.
According to Alligator Feature Editor Allen Pierleoni, who
has charge of the supplement, the purpose is to serve as an
outlet for material that is too literary for the Alligator.
We are not trying to compete with the Florida Quarterly
(the literary magazine under the Board of Student
Publications), Pierleoni said. Theyre two different things
altogether.
It (the supplement) will be different from the Florida
Quarterly because we wont be spending as much money as the
Quarterly does.
Plans for the supplement call for it to be eight pages long, on

SG Secretary
Os Interior
Is Selected
By KATHY KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Mens Interhall
Council President Ric Katz,
6JM, was named Tuesday to the
position of Student Government
secretary of the interior by
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor.
Katz succeeds Roger Carlton,
4BA, who resigned Monday due
to academic reasons and possible
travel plans.
The fall student body
election will be the first concern
of the secretary of the interior
since the date for the election is
Oct. 17, less than a month away.
I was slate coordinator for
two student body presidents,
Katz said, and this essentially
meant that I had to help get the
slate registered, get the
candidates familiar with the
election laws, and be in constant
communication with the
secretary of the interior.
Clyde (Taylor) knew I was
available and that I was familiar
with the problems of an
election, and he asked me to
pick up where Carlton left off.
Katz, working on a second
bachelors degree in
broadcasting, was a member of
the Student Senate in addition
to being a president of Mens
Interhall Council.
Carlton said he planned to
attend law school after
graduation and in order to
graduate on time he felt it
necessary to resign.

Dorm Life Will Be Cooler

With New Installations

The UF is planning a cooler reception for
students in its residence halls.
Air conditioning work is under way in Hume,
Simpson, Trusler, Graham, Weaver, and East
Halls. North, South, and Tolbert Halls are
scheduled for air conditioning next summer.
When work is completed, approximately half
the student rooms on campus will be air
conditioned, according to Dr. Harold Riker,
director of housing. The Twin Towers and Yon
residence halls were air conditioned at the time
of their construction, as will be any future
buildings.
Work started in mid-June on the $1.28 million
project. The buildings are from seven to 20 years
old. The contract with W.W. Gay Mechanical

Ac
*arHaa Ti
vMw
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 3

h m f i
ft : I
Bk k
II vi ** Ti. 'wWBSL
NICK ARROYO
SUNSET
As the sun sets slowly over the drill field and shadows lengthen
from Tolbert to Tigert, weary students nestle quietly in their beds
grateful for the end of the day, right?

The
Florida Alligator

Contractors Inc., Jacksonville, calls for
completion by the 1969 fall quarter.
Delays in receiving equipment from the
manufacturer make completion later than
anticipated and work is continuing in the
corridors during the fall quarter.
Ceilings and old light fixtures have been
removed from the, corridors, and with the
cooperation of student residents, workmen will
be finishing duct work and installing new ceiling
lights and ceilings. Students will be notified prior
to the time the corridor work will be in progress
in their area.
Riker said room rates will be increased by a
minimum amount in these halls when work is
completed in order to cover the cost of operating
the air conditioning.

the same sized paper as the Alligator.
It will be put out in conjunction with the Alligator,
Pierieoni said, but were going to try to put out something
completely different from the Alligator-dike a newspaper and
newspaper supplement.
Contributions will be accepted from any interested persons
and are to be typed and brought in to the Alligator office on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
We already have an idea about a few of the things that will
be going into the first issue, Pierleoni said. We will have
artistic photography by Nick. Arroyo; art work by Jeff Hill, an
artist living in Sarasota; and an interesting interview with a
personality on campus.
We might have something from Joe Torchia if he
corresponds from Turkey as he said he would.
Torchia, a former features and entertainment editor who
graduated from the UF in June, is now serving in Turkey as a
member of the Peace Corps.

University of Florida, Gainesville

REGISTRAR SAYS
Closed Door
Best Policy

By GAYLE McELROY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Registrars office policy
of closed doors during the noon
hour was defended Tuesday by
UF Registrar Richard H.
Whitehead as a duty to
serve the student.
The University is under the
Federal Wage Hour Law,
Whitehead said. The existing
problem is overtime work of
state employees.
By closing the office from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., he
described his staffs ability to
fall just under the maximum 42
hours established by the law.
The state doesnt permit
time-and-a-half, he said.
The registrar explained tallys
were run by his office a long
time to determine the heavy
periods of student traffic.
Results showed the lightest
number during the noon hour.
Late registration, draft
information, students under the
GI Bill, war orphans, social
security benefits and
drop-and-add are only part of
the students need for
accessibility to the registrars
office.
Over 3,000 drop-and-add
cards were brought in Monday,
Whitehead stated.
Though students may use a
drop box during closed hours,
many want to go over them.
We have tried rotating our
staff to keep the office open,
he said, but this created
problems. The registrar stressed
that he_ wanted his entire staff
there all the time to tsrahle to
help any student who comes in.

ALLEN PIERLEONI
... something different

Wednesday, September 25, 1968

K I
REGISTRAR WHITEHEAD
. .a matter of judgment
By closing at noon, we are
able to stay open later in the
afternoon, he said. I couldnt
agree to shutting the door in
students faces.
Its a matter of judgment,
Whitehead said. We think the
way we are doing it is the best.
Why Be Half Safe?
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirk complained
Tuesday, in jest, that he has not
been invited by either school to
sit on the bench with the players
during Saturdays football clash
between rivals Florida and
Florida State University.
Kirk made the comment as he
said he planned to follow the
practice of last year and sit one
half with Florida and the other
half with FSU.
FSU Tickets Left
There are 100 FSU game
tickets left. Those interested
in purchasing tickets to the
game should call the Athletic
Office extension 2131 this
morning. Tickets will be sold
on a first come first serve
basis.

America's
Number I
Collie
Daily



Page 2

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25,1968

Late Arrivals Cause Headaches

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligatar Staff Writer
The major problem
encountered by the UF
Off-Campus Housing office this
year has been finding
appropriate housing for last
minute people, says Mrs.
Andrea D. Hudson, Off-Campus
housing counselor.

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Only mad dogs and freshmen go out in the noonday sun.
Upperclassmen seek the shady nooks.
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1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville I
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the atfldil student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is pnWlshed five times weekly except during June, July and August when it Is jxMisbed
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reltx
Union Betiding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Sabscrlptlon rate is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice la given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Students with low rent
budgets, no transportation, and
enrolled for only one or two
quarters, usually come in at the
last minute seeking housing, she
said.
By this time almost all the
units they can afford have
already been taken. Most of the
remaining units are either too far
from campus, or require a
nine-twelve month lease.

FOR OFF-CAM pll<; HOUSING

The problem, said Mrs.
Hudson, is getting these people
and housing they can afford
together.
Student taste in apartment
units have changed, however.
There has been a shift from the
larger units that house from 3 to
4 students, to smaller units, she
explained.
We were advising developers
beginning new units that the
demand was for the larger 2 to 3
bedroom units, said Mrs.
Hudson, but the demand this
year has reversed Itself. The
smaller, one bedroom units have
gone first.
Mrs. Hudson gave two
possible reasons for this reversal:
Students have found they have
more problems in larger groups
and students are becoming more
affluent.
A great many students are
willing to pay more, and they
have found that fewer problems
Deans Meet
To Discuss
Proposals
Recommendations from UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
Action Conference will be
discussed by UF academic deans
at a meeting Wednesday
afternoon, conducted by
Fredrick W. Conner, UF vice
president.
Dr. Roy R. Lassiter, assistant
dean for academic affairs, said
the president has asked for the
deans advice and counsel on
proposals for non-mandatory
class attendance, the creation of
an office for coordination
disadvantaged students and the
consolidation of campus service
activities.
Lassiter expects most of the
deans to attend the meeting.
If action is not taken
tomorrow, as I expect it will be,
the agenda will be brought up
again in two weeks, Lassiter
said.

NEIGHBORHOOD
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' ph 378-83?A

arise in a smaller group, she
said.
The uniform leasing
agreement advocated for
student rentals by the
Gainesville Apartment Owners
Association (GAOA) last year
has failed to materialize, Mrs.
Hudson said, but some
apartment complexes are now
using a modified version the
plan.
According to Mrs. Hudson,
students have reacted very
favorably to the new lease
agreement. Where it has been
used, it had been very well
received, she said.
Starlight and University
Apts, are two of the apartment
complexes now using this type
of lease.
Under this plan students pay
a larger portion of their years
rent during the first quarter.
But the amount due during
the second and third quarters is
less. This enables students who

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remain in school for three
quarters to afford the apartment
should one or more of their
roommates drop out of school.
Adverse publicity about the
4 uniform leasing agreement
caused the GAOA to scrub the
idea, according to Joe Canto,
president of the association.
The only reason we
entertained the idea in the first
place was that we thought we
were doing the student a favor,
Canto said. The leasing
agreement would have
eliminated the burden that fell
on students who remained in
school.
Canto said the association has
no plans to initiate the plan
again unless, the students
request it.
We are willing to cooperate
with students as much as
possible he said. But the
adverse reaction indicated this
(the new lease agreement) was
not what the students wanted.



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Wedneiday. B*pfmbw 26.1968, Th> Florida Attigrtoc, I

Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25,1968

Page 4

NEW SERVICE PLANNED
Union May Cash Checks

By BILL KING
Alligator Staff Writer
A plan to organize a student
check cashing service is under
consideration by W.E. Rion,
Reitz Union director.

Symposium To Study
Student Movement

A scholarly examination of
the world-wide student
movement will be made during
the fall quarter at the UF under
a newly formed group of
students and faculty named the
Symposium on the Student
Movement.
The symposium, composed of
representatives of the social
sciences and humanities, plans
four seminars during the fall
SG Program
Aids Student
Survival
Operation Student Survival, a
program sponsored by Student
Government and designed to
help freshmen and transfers
adapt to college life, will
continue tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
Grahams recreation room.
The program ends tomorrow
night in the recreation room of
Jennings and Broward.
Speakers will include,
Gainesville Commissioner Perry
C. McGriff, Jr. Lt. Ed Conerly of
the Gainesville Police
Department, and Mike Resnick,
a member of the Task Force
Counseling Committee.
Speakers from areas of
student activity will be Student
Boby President Clyde Taylor
and SG representatives; Roger
Brown, president of union
board; Blue Key President John
Rich; and Alligator editor
Harold Aldrich.

Welcome Students
Meet your friends at the
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Rion, who last Friday with
Pete Zinober, chancellor of the
Honor Court, and other student
leaders said the plan still needs
study and work. But we hope
something develops in the next

term and hopes to schedule
lectures by nationally known
figures sometime during the
winter quarter. 2
The first session is scheduled
for 8 p.m. Oct. 13 in the Reitz
Union and will deal with the
student rebellions in Europe.
Four panelists each of whom
observed student unrest at
various European universities
will discuss the goals, tactics and
results of the student movement.
The three remaining panels
during the fall will focus on
Latin America, the United States
and on a comparison of all
movements across the globe.
Appearing on the first panel
will be Dr. Rene Lemarchand,
assistant professor of political
science, who was in Paris during
last Mays riots; Dr. Kenneth A.
Megill, assistant professor of
philosophy, who spent a year in
Eastern Europe; Dr. A. H.
Oliveira Marques visiting
professor of history, who was in
Berlin at the time of unrest
there, and Hugo DeClercque, a
Belgian graduate student in
history.
The seminars will be
sponsored by groups whose
officers are participating in the
symposium. The first is under
the auspices of Pi Sigma Alpha,
the political science honorary
fraternity.
Charles Savio, a graduate
student in political science and
local resident, is serving as
coordinator of the symposium.
(Savio is no relation to the
leader of the Free Speech
Movement in California, Mario
JSavio.)
The seminars are open to the
public as well as the university
community.

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few weeks, he added.
Rion said all checks cashed
on Friday, Saturday or Sunday
could not be redeemed by the
Union until Monday.
If each student is limited to
$25, the Union would need to
keep SIO,OOO on hand on
weekends, Rion said.He added
the need to hire a security staff
or additional staff on weekends
could keep the program from
becoming a reality.
Zinober labeled the plan as
very necessary for the
students.
The new service, if installed,
will be independent of any other
campus check cashing service.
People passing bad checks is
not a big problem, Rion said,
but the loss of man hours on a
follow up to trace a bad check
could be.'Rion added that the
Honor Court must assume
some of the responsibility.
A student passes a bad
check, Zinober said, either by
accident or on purpose and they
try to cover it before it
bounces. Most students pay up
and usually one warning is
enough, he added.
Presently, students passing a
bad check off campus is broueht
before the Honor Court instead
of the local police.
If the Honor Court is
unsuccessful in collecting the
money it is then placed in the
hands of local authorities.
Zinober says if a student
passes a bad check in the Union
it will be returned to the Honor
Court.
Zinober encourages students
to take on the responsibility of
their own checking account
instead of having their parents
send them cash.

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Child Development
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An eight-week intensive
training program for teachers of
child development centers began
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varying educational
backgrounds.
Under the direction of Dr.
Jo Ann Strickland, the recently
established Early Childhood
Curriculum Laboratory (ECCL)
has received a $207,520 grant
form the Office of Economic
Opportunity (OED) to conduct
four such programs during the
current fiscal year.
Participants are selected each
a c ade mi c q uai tex fr o m
throughout the Southeast by the
Atlanta headquarters of OED.

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One of the four authorized
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Wednesday, Saptembar 25,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25, 1968

Coeds Protest
Cafeteria's
Termination
By PHYLLIS BRASCH*
Alligator Staff Writer
Rawlings Hall residents
presented UF Food Service
Directors with 300 signatures
petitioning to have their
cafeteria re-opened.
The Rawlings cafeteria was
closed when studies from last
years food services showed
excessive losses in operation.
The 350 Rawlings residents
currently take their meals at
Broward.
Linda Frazier, Rawlings Hall
food committee chairman,
stressed Browards facilities
cannot handle the Rawlings
overflow. Eating at Broward is
like being thrown into Grand
Central Station, she said.
Miss Frazier added if
Rawlings food services couldnt
be resumed there should be
functional and serviceable
facilities to provide a decent
place to eat and relax.
Robert W. Overton, UF food
services director, had no
immediate solution to the
problem.
All campus food units must
be self-supporting, and Rawlings
was closed because residents
could eat at near-by Jennings or
Broward, Overton said.
He explained the key to
self-supporting food units is
volume. He suggested Rawlings
Hall Council and residents meet
to suggest limited and/or
planned menus for Rawlings
food service.
Overton and Otis Jones,
Director of UF service activities
agreed to visit Rawlings next
week to hear the girls
suggestions.
Bomb Scare
Empties
Frat House
The Phi Delta Theta
fraternity house, 121 SW 13th
St., was evacuated and
thoroughly searched Monday
night following a bomb threat,
Gainesville police said Tuesday.
The bomb scare came just
after a girls social ended a
fraternity spokesman said.
A threatening phone call was
made by an unidentified male
about 8:40 pm Monday, police
said.

MJIJIJI | m ...So \ I
Colored Passages \ "£?"£££ ***££. \
Jil Simplify Review \
REfID THRU COLOR HUPS wt£2=||pL
~t£ Major Accmmt* a ndreferences at a \ I*
v "is BOOHS. reports! ( f
L [ HttUiMU AND CLASSROOM NOTES
PF.

DROPOUTS
/ INTERMATIOJAU. ) \
( UP 2 POINTS... / V\
"r J

Accent Will Seek
/More Student Aid

By CARON BALK ANY
Alligator Staff Writer
A Student Government effort
to allow all views to be
expressed and all students to be
heard has sparked the 1968
Accent Symposium into adding
student participation to its list
of activities.
In the past, the annual
SG-sponsored event had been a
forum for invited speakers of
national importance. The 1968
agenda includes documentary
films, debates, discussions, and
photography, essay and art
contests for student
participation, as well as invited
speakers.
For the first time in
Accents three years the full idea
of a symposium has been
developed, chairman Larry
Berrin said. It is more than just
the one way communication
that a speaker would provide. It
involves participation on both
sides-student and speaker.
The week-long symposium is
scheduled to begin Feb. 3.

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We will be discussing just
exactly what freedom is, Berrin
said. Is freedom a moral or a
legal phenomena? How free is an
individual?
In line with these ideas, and
the theme Dimensions of
Freedom, Accent has invited
speakers in the areas of politics,
law, civil rights and civil
disobedience, international
relations, and moral freedom.
Hugh Heffner, William
Fullbright, Abe Fortas, and
Tobias Simon are among those
invited. The left, middle and
right viewpoints will all be
equally -represented, Berrin
said.
An Accent magazine released
the same week will feature
articles by speakers who could
not make the February
engagement.
We hope to show the people
of this state that Florida is
essentially what a university
should be-a place where all
views can be expressed.
Berrin said students can still
apply in the Student Activities
office to help with Accent.

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Bored Nixon Confident,
HHH Encourages Treaty

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (UPI)
A confident Richard M. Nixon
took a side trip to the Dakotas
today and confessed he is
becoming a little bored with the
jet age style of campaigning.
Nixon got a big welcome as
he took his presidential
campaign to the Dakotas today,
while Hubert H. Humphrey said
Nixon might well bring on
defeat of the nuclear
nonproliferation treaty now
pending in the Senate.
A band struck up Hail to the
Chief, traditional greeting
march for US. Presidents as
Nixon stepped off his jetliner at
Sioux Falls, S.D. He was met by
several thousand cheering
supporters.
Nixon said Tuesday the vice
president was the most
uncompromising defender of
Johnson administration policies.
Hubert Humphrey has not
disagreed with one policy, the
Republican presidential
candidate said of his opponent.
He is the most articulate and
most uncompromising defender
of the Johnson administration.
In Minneapolis, meanwhile,
Humphrey said in a speech that
unless we want to risk every
border skirmish becoming a
Pueblo Crew
To Be Freed
For Apology
TOKYO (UPI) North Korea
said Tuesday the 82-man crew of
the U.S. intelligence ship Pueblo
will be freed only when the
United States formally
apologizes for the crime of
spying inside the territorial
waters of the Communist state.
The North Korean demand
came in an article in the
authoritative newspaper Rodong
Shinmoon signed by
Commentator which is usually
a pseudonym for a high-ranking
government official.
It was the first definite
statement by the Pyongyang
regime since rumors of the
imminent release of the
American prisoners circulated
earlier this month. _

PRINT SALE
Sept. 24 Sept. 26
, f
1:00 9:00 pm
UNION BALLROOM
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
l
2nd Floor
TODAYS CLUE
In The Print Contest
"ELSPETH TUCKER

UPI
NEWS
nuclear war.. .the United States
must ratify the nonproliferation
treaty now.
Richard Nixon is stalling on
this treaty, Humphrey said,
and he may well bring it
crashing down to defeat. I urge
Mr. Nixon to come out of the
shadows-to stop stalling-and
tell us whether he is for this
treaty now.
Nixons position on the
treaty has been that although he
supports the concept, he does
not think this is the proper time
for the Senate to ratify the pact
because of the Soviet invasion of
Czechoslovakia.
Apparently pleased with his
campaigns progress, Nixon
added a jet stop in South Dakota
at the last minute to lend a hand
in unseating a prominent Senate
dove, George S. McGovern,
D-S.D.
Meanwhile, Gov. Lester
Maddox said Tuesday he was
shocked to hear Sen. Strom
Thurmond, R-S. C., is
campaigning for Richard Nixon,
and announced he will campaign
across the country for George
Wallace.
!ssssssssssssssssssss&
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The governor said he could
not understand Thrumonds
support for Mixon because of
the senators stands on schools,
integration, and law and order,
charging that the Republican
nominee is a man associated
with Earl Warren and part of
Little Rock.
Enrollment
There were 6,902 students
enrolled in the University
College last fall.

The Typewriter
IsMightier Than...
I
'-_ j
. * 7 : _____ o >
r -*

A Newspaper Means Many Things To Different People.
.
One Little Old Lady From Memphis Won A Contest By
Listing 417 Different Ways To Use Old Newspapers. You
Know .. .Things Like Swatting Flies, Lining Garbage Pails,
Wrapping Fish, Making Paper Dolls, Etc.
But Newspapers Are So Much More... Or Should Be.
They Should Defend, Extol, Criticize And Just Plain Tell
A Story.
Help The Alligator Be Better Than Best. If You Have
Talent In Writing, Paste-up, Or Advertising, The Summer
Alligator Wants Your Help.
, * 1 i / f
r T i> r., I. .v <
fs r
The Florida. Alligator
Room 330, J, Wayne Reitz Union
V

SALES A SERVICE
typewriters, adding machines, calculators, mimeographs, duplicators
___ 'IBM* Arttated
Sfftt S -S2?
RENTALS
HANCOCK OFFICE EQUIPMENT
528 N, MAIN 376-5551
LATIN AMERICAN
CLUB MEETING
FOREIGN STUDENT CENTER
Wed. Sept. 25 6B 7:30P.M.
Block Seating, Homecoming Party,
Lectures, etc

Wednesday. September 25,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25,1968

-The Florida Alligator
"Th* price freedom
* exercise of re^onstbiltty."
-r* Dave Doucette
racalam Managing Editor
AM Raul Ramirez James Cook
AmMM Executive Editor News Editor
>*/ 1
ft - ~
Technology

'Constitution Has Certain Safeguards...

Chicken Dinner (CD): Hello, my name is Chicken
Dinner and...
Administrator (AD): Sorry, no animals allowed
in public buildings. Sec. 113.07.
CD: I'm not an animal. But thats why I'm here...
AD: Hey! Are you sure you're allowed to dress
likethat'Mt should be outlawed.
CD: You see, we've made an extensive survey of
Cook County and found that all housing is
substandard in both black and white ghettos, almost
33 percent of Chicagoians are living at or below the
poverty level, most go to bed hungry every night...
AD: Hey! What are you. some kind of dirty
commie!
CD: ...everyone working for the city owns
personal and financial fealty to Mayor Daley,
education is substandard in a majority of schools,
disease...
Ad: Hey! Are those grubby people with you.'
(Pause) Yes, you cockadoodledoo!
CD: Yes, we represent members of the clerical,
teaching, 1ega1....
AD: Hey! Look chicken I don't care who you
are, get out. I'm busy.
CD: We have several other grievances, all
presented here in this petition to the city council
and we would like a permit to parade in our
park...
AD: YOUR park!
CD: ...during the convention.
AD: (On the phone) Quick, Dick, get the tv tape
on, recorder, odormeter, and send Tom down from
the Red Squad. Weve got a bloody riot brewing right

ALLIGATOR EDITORIAL
Get The Cart Before The Horse

Headlines around the state proclaim that
the UF has solved its traffic problem.
Traffic, maybe. Parking, however, is a
different question.
In a much needed effort to solve the
problem of cars on campus the
administration has one-wayed the street
which passes south of Little Hall, halted
unauthorized traffic through central campus
and begun a strict crack-down on all parking
and traffic violations.
Simultaneously, the City of Gainesville
has instituted reforms on the streets
surrounding campus. These reforms, aimed
at assuring passage of emergency vehicles in
time of need, consist- mainly in the
elimination of parking spaces on at least one
side of all narrow streets.
And so the UFs public relations officials
have felt justified in telling the state that all
is better here.
Unfortunately, all the people who are
talking about the great solution are blind to
the facts. They are blind to the facts because
they have comfortable Area One stickers
affixed to the left rear bumper of their cars.
The people proclaiming the progress are
not the same people searching for parking.
The people proclaiming the progress are not
the same people wondering what public
relations has to do with parking the car
and getting to class.
What has happened here is a classic case
of half-baked thinking and well-meaning
action. In tlie interests of pedestrian safety

ro > o~P cj-a o o y c> o- > <3 q
ir ISNF AS BAD /SWSAYAW i
LOSING YOUR SENSE OF IDENTITY AT ,)
LARGE TIMES. BmWAtei

Changes*

By Richard Thompson

here, it's out ol hand down here. Quick.
CD: As I was saying, we would like to protest
these conditions to the nation and the world during
the convention because we have protested here for
the last 10 years and gotten nowhere...
AD: Hey, chickydoo, stop with that subversion
talk. We re going to give you a one way permit to
jail in about five seconds if you don't scat. SCAT!
CD: (After a brief huddle) We have decided we
will not leave until you consider our petition for a
permit. After all, this is our city hall and the
constitution says Congress shall...
AD: Hey! Alt you birds arc weird types it you ask
me. I don't know who Congress is. but you'll have
to wait 90 days for this parade permit request to be
reviewed.
CD: But the convention is only one month away,
it'll be over then.
AD: Details, details. SOP. can't help it. SOP is
SOP. Orders is orders, you know.
CD: (After a brief huddle) We would like to read
where it requires 90 days to review a parade permit
request. Now!
AD: Hey! Whatayatellingmee? I dont know my
job? Why you hairy, freaky looking thing, Ill wring
your neck.
With that AD jumps the counter, grabs Chicken
Dinner, hits him in the kidney, kicks him in the
groin. Just then Tom. from the Red Squad upstairs,
enters stage left.

and traffic flow campus and city officials
have eliminated one problem and created
another.
The master plan, upon which the current
actions are based, calls for the modification
of several streets surrounding campus and
the construction of new master parking
fields in peripheral campus areas. These
fields will be tied to center campus by bus.
But the master plan has been emasculated
because it is being activated backwards.
Instead of solving problems the architects of
the new rules have increased traffic by
leaving students without places to park.
Instead of solving problems the planners
have created a secret sickness in the hearts of
many determined to get to class on time.
The solution to this problem is an easy
one.
For this the entire university should be
grateful. Certainly, as years of increasing
unrest and growing problems have taught us,
we rarely are blessed with easy solutions.
The current problem, can be solved
quickly if the entire traffic plan for the UF
is carried through to its fulfillment at the
earliest moment.lf the parking lots are built,
if the buses are purchased, if the
modification of streets surrounding campus
is carried through to its conclusion, many
who suffer now will suffer no more.
There can be no excuse for delay.
University leaders know what the plans are.
They must move quickly to get the horse
before the cart.

I student mmj
I 26315650. f!
i l

TOM: Looks like to me he pulled you over the
counter, Sec. 10a, attacked your arms with his
kidney and groin, Secs. 927.118 and 927.119.
CD: (In pain, leans on officer while getting up)
Officer, I would like to have this man arrested for
assault and battery...
TOM: 0, assaulting an officer, hmmmmm, Sec.
140111.
At this point several of Chicken Dinners friends
confront the officer and say they will testify in
behalf of Chicken Dinner, that the charges filed are
erroneous, etc.
TOM: 0, conspiracy to commit a felony,
hmmmmm, Sec. 132. All of you are under arrest.
As 184 policemen enter the scene to take away
the five parade .permit requesters, we hear Tom
saying, Now dont worry, the Constitution has
built into it certain safeguards to protect you and
your basic rights. Bear in mind lam required to tell
you that anything you say may be held against you
but that you dont have to say anything until you
attorney, then...*
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida
under auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Opinions expressed Jn_the Florida Alligator are those of the
_editors 6r of the writer of the article and not those of the U 1

Yt)U CAW ,i
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L -o^o<-o o



PUW OMIWS
loH o\
|... (OHATV<|A
DO?
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OPEN FORUM:

The Spectator

End Political Paranoia

There is a growing trend in
America to assume violence is
inevitable, to expect the worst
possible outcome in each event
which we as a society prepare
for, and to prepare ourselves for
the greatest possible dangers
These types of assumptions
are becoming increasingly more
apparent in the news.
The most recent item, and
one certainly quite close to
home, concerns a statement
made by U.S. Rep. William
Cramer.
Cramer proposed in a recent
UPI story that the Florida
National Guard should be
mobilized during the interim of
the November elections to avert
possible violence threatened by
certain members of the New
Left. This statement came in
response to a warning by Jerry
Rubin, a leader in several of the
clashes with Chicago police
during the Demo Conclave, that
his group may demonstrate in
protest of an undemocratic
election.

The Advice & Dissent
v
Page Is For Comments.
Send Yours To-
The Florida Alligator
Room 330
Reitz Union

Aimici mI Vinut
"There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

This does not suggest that the
warnings of Rubin should go
unheeded or be taken lightly.
The past has shown that these
groups are most serious in their
commitment to protest the
inequities which they claim exist
in our society.
However, a danger far greater
than acutal skirmishes and active
protests faces this nation. It is
the very real danger of
apprehension, anomie and
eventual police-state-type tactics
on a grand scale.
Change is taking place within
our society, with some
discomfort. This is to be
expected, but not to be feared
or met with clenched fist.
We must expect
disagreement, even group
protests and demonstrations.
Our constitution has provided us
with these rights. We must not
destroy these rights by scaring or
threatening the populace with
the threat of armed or political
opposition.
When an individual or group
breaks the law, this is the time
to arrest and proscecute. To
place advanced guards around
the symbols of our democracy,

NO THlAffr?,
Hoto COME VeoRE
SO IMPORTANT?
-S gIOTLE!
r
1

_By Stephen Robitaille.

as proposed by Cramer, can only
succeed in destroying the very
rights which our Constitution
# was designed to offer.
Cramer need only take a look
at the trends of police and
political pressure now imposed
on the people of Czechoslovakia
to realize the dangers which
extreme pressures present to free
peoples. His suggestion to alert
National Guardsmen marks an
alarming comparison to the
presence of Russian troops
outside the Czech borders.
This growing paranoia must
be stopped.

The Rational Observer

Letter Writers Guide

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO WANT TO WRITE
LETTERS TO THE ALLIGATOR AND CANT
THINK OF A SUBJECT, HERE ARE 32
SUGGESTIONS. (MY GRANDMOTHERS
FAVORITE NUMBER):
1. How I spent the summer.
2. I really feel Spiro Agnew was the best choice
Nixon could have made.
3. How the Popes Encyclical on birth control
pills have affected my life.
4. The origin of my last name.
5. Why dont they put a zoo on the Plaza of the
Americas?
6. How George Wallace really is for integration.
7. Twenty five things to do with your morning
Alligator.
8. The abysmal tragedy of salsocratudinal
poradusis.
9. My mothers favorite hobby.
10. Lets put curfews in Sin City (could be
related to no. 3).
11. The proper way to shave.
12. When you blend yellow and blue, it turns
green.
13. I think the Alligator is keen.
14. I think college is a place for brains, and not
brawn.
15. Am 1 doing the right thing with my
girlfriend? _____
16. Lets abolish classes.

Wednesday, September 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

'
TM IN
60VSMMFMT.

iV.v.y.y.y.y.y/.v. Alligator Inquizitor
Test Your Memory
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Hello again! Are you still reading this colum.Wow! 1 have
some questions of proportional degree for you today. Heres
what I mean:
1. Who was the recipient of Dr. Christian Barnards famous
first successful heart transplant?
2. Where does this line appear: Abandon hope all ye who
enter here.
3. Can you tell the horses that have won the Triple Crown
since 1940? And can you recall what three races comprise the
Triple Crown?
4. ,Who was the first woman to have her name placed in
nomination for President by a major political party?
s.,What cities'were featured in the following motion
pictures:
a. Summertime
b. Three Coins in a Fountain
c. Topkapi
6.True or False: Houdini, whose favorite trick was to pull a
rabbit out of his nose, died of trichinosis.
I didnt really say that, did I?Here are the answers to
yesterdays Trivia:
1. Theodore Roosevelt, James Polk, Warren Harding, William
Henry Harrison Franklin D. Roosevelt, William McKinley,
Hoover, Truman. 2. Jerri 3. Victor Fleming 4. Happy
Chandler 5. Robbery is the act of robbing property from a
person in the possession thereof, accomplished by violence or
putting another in fear. Burglary is breaking and entering the
dwelling of another with intent to commit a felony therein,
whether the felonious purpose is accomplished or not.
Remove a blemish today.

wwwwy Lewis Rothlein mmJ
17. How 1 made the sun rise this morning
through zen Buddhism.
18. In keeping with the Republican policy, I
think George Wallace should choose Caeser Friglap,
of lower Throggs Bend, Indiana, holder of three
world records in flakeball, for his vice presidential
candidate.
19. How you all really dont exist. You are
figments of my imagination.
20. Twenty-five places in Gainesville that dont
exist anymore.
21. How we could turn our town into the most
influential city in the world.
22. How I became property of Howard Hughes.
23. Lets have school spirit this year and not just
sit down like do-nothings.
24. lam against voluntary ROTC. Lets work on
making it compulsory.
25. LSD is good for acne.
25a. (alternative) You can get high smoking
grape rinds.
26. Im a groovy swinger and heres where to
find the action.
27. Why Harold Stassen could have won this
year.
28. A swinging guide to the campus cafeterias.
29. Lets take the word carcass out of the
English language.
30. Lets astro-turf the cattle grazing fields
behind Hume Hall.
31. How to create panic in a dormitdryi
32. The ten greatest people Ive ever known.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, Saptambor 25,1968

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MAAS BROTHERS
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Maas Brothers presents your
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Deusk, Linda Bennett,
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TWIG
This is the year for fakes!
Fake it in a skirt and vest
ensemble of lambs fur. Also
matching leather vinyl
boots. Topped with a
simulated alligator skin that
feels just like silk.
Modeled by Carolyn.

STAG 'N DRAG
Easy-care easy wear is
this Penguin "mini" in with
white bib, trimmed in
black. (Also grey)
It's a washable machine-dry
knit, with matching mini
shorts. Modeled by Ronna.

lH jt£



*. .. 8 -r -" ~ 7 -^-:..

\

GOLDEN PEACOCK
Patricia feels smartly
dressed for any occasion in
this go everywhere cape
ensemble by Don
Sophisticates. Black and
white checked cape
accented in black over a
feminine soft wide belted
dress. At the Westgate
shopping center.

kBT jK^^xS-x^g^Tx..
nV l^iiSSMSsSw^t
r imi
'.t|
s y?y" jflHsy 'v \

I m
Bl
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flfw

SUSAN SCOTT
.- s
Get set for fall and start
your wardrobe off with a
Langtry velveteen ensemble,
all cotton in Smokey Grey
Blouse with whipped yoke
and ruffled cuffs, $7,100%
Dacron Polyester. Sizes
5-13 about $20.00. As Seen
in Seventeen. Modeled by
Tricia.

3 S* 1 i AKH .;;
!fl '3|>si : : N &**£<
.Jreg^y
mM*i ; '-
\ -< §?C
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BP

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BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBHBBBBRI. 3r-

Wednesday, September 25,1968, The Florida Alligator,

DONIGAN'S
dways classic, Villager's
latest is a gay plaid pants suit.
Coordinated turtleneck
sweater by Villager and
"Ugly" shoes also by
Vi lager. Initial bag in
Cordovan by Etienne
Aigner. Outfit sold
separately or together for a
fashion co-ordinated
pantsuit. Modeled' by
Penny.

SILVERMAN'S
Personality plus is Susan in
a grey-flared wool-rayon
skirt trimmed in black
accented at the waist with a
large self belt. The cotton
rayon blouse is a wild,
flowered print in grey and
white with black trim, and
puffy sleeves.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

:;x*x a x-x a x a x< a x*x* a
FOR SALE
Topcon, Super-D f 1.4, finest 35mm
camera-selected by F. 8.1. & Navy
fantastic buy .55% off list price Must
sell. Call 376-3578 after 6. (A-l-3t-p)
Lambretta motor scooter, 150 cc,
1964 4 speed. Low mileage, excellent
care & condition, SIOO. includes
helmet, tools. Call 376-3578 after 6.
Like-new $350. 32 6HP rider
mower bought May 1 only $250 am
getting tractor. Call 376-9786 to
arrange to see and try. (A-l-stp)
New K+E Deci-Lon slide rule $20.00;
19 Philco tv, good condition, $25.
RCA tape recorder, runs well $lO.
call 378-7331 after S p.m. (A-l-2t-p)
TV, Motorola, 19 x 15 screen, good
picture, 5 yr. old. Stand included.
S6O. Call 372-2332 after 5;{A-l-3t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

ij{.- -II 1 .1,
* 4 j £r*
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
for sale (consoco.i,.) STUDENT PHONE L_
I"! for rent O 1 day
wanted 2 ays ADDRESS
help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
Q autos Cl 4 days ("30% discount) CTY STATE ZIE
Q personal Q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
D r,ie WORDING
mi m 11 11 riTTTTi ii i m i:
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I LL
3 n ii i 11 ii 11 1 1 1 11 11 1 m i 11 i l"i
I I I lil I I I I I I I I II I I I in'ITTTT

:*x*x*x*x*x*x-x*x*x*N%v.N*.-.*.*.w:*xv:*x*x*:*;y
FOR SALE I
Red Impala Convertible 1965 new
Transmission Radio & Heater Call
3763261 x 2636. After 5:30 376724
SI2OO or Best Offer. (A-3-stp)
For Sale Honda S- 90, 1966. Call
378-8893 any time after 4:30 p.m.
ask for Joe. (A-3-3t-p)
1966 Suzuki -80 cc Excellent
Condition! obly 3,000 miles of under
30 mph. Just S2OO call 376-4962.
(A-3-2t-p)
Honda S 90 1966 3,000 miles
excellent condition helmet & mirror
included only $250 contact Mickey
Ross TEP house 372-9479 if gone
leave message. (A-3-st-p
1966 Honda 50 excellent condition
$154. cal! Frank 378-7864.
(A-5t 3-p)
FOR RENT
'** v
Furn up stair apt 2 BR for 4, air cond
wall to wall carpet. Furn downstairs
apt 2 BR for 4 air cond Call after
5:30 3787845 (B-3-ts-C)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25, 1968

;:'vx*x*x*v*v.*- .v;*xvx*x*x*x*x"x*v.*.xx*x'v
WANTED
S*X a X a X a x*v. a i a ; a X a X a X a X*xM-v.w;vx a x a X a X a rf:
Two roommates wanted to share
house nw 29th rd. must be
determined to book it. Call
372-9284, ask for Wm. Bird.
(C-l-3t-p)
Wanted coed to share luxurious I br,
ac, dishwasher, Landmark Apt. Prefer
senior or grad student. Inquire
at Landmark apt. 156. (C-3t-pj
w
Roommate one female to share 1
bdr. apt. Call Terri 372-7343
University Gardens 718-Apt. 214.
(C-3t-l-p)
Fender Baseman Amp exc. condition
Top and Bottom $l5O. Call
378-7810 Or Come By apt. No. 62
French Quarter After 6:oop.m.
(C-4t-l-p)
Female roommate wanted Two
bedroom upstairs apartment, $38.75
& utilities a month. Three blocks
from campus. 378-3238 620 SW 10
St. (C-l-st-p)
B
HOUSEWIFE DESIRES
HOUSEWORK. Ironing, days work.
Call before 10 p.m. 3 72-5269.
(C-2-lt-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Summit House. S4O mo. Air Cond. 1
block from campus. Call 378-5862.
(C-2-st-p)
FEMALE to share 7s/mo. FURN.
APT. for 1,2, or 3 quarters. Come by
915 SW 2nd Ave., Apt. 7. (C-2-2t-p)
LAW OR GRAD STUDENT wanted
to share nicely furnished 3-bedroom
house near campus. Be quiet, poised.
Call Bill early evening at 378-2261.
(C-2-st-p)
Wanted desperately! two tickets FSU
game, willing to pay cost or better
Call Towers A ask for Judy room
1003(C3-3 t-p)
Fourth Female roommate for two
bedroom Camelot Apts. Poolside,
sauna baths. Call Diane 378-868.
(C-3-4t p)
Desparately need 2 female
roommates you live with us at
Summit House or we will live with
you Call 376-9925. (C-33t-p)
Roommate wanted 2br large apt. S4O
per month at 4308V2 rear top NW 6st.
call Eddie at 3726177 or go by apt.
after 6:00 p.m. (C-3-2t-p)
roommate for 2 br. duplex apt. quiet
clean 2W mi. e campus, prefer liberal
over 21. $37.50 mo. private room
372-4433 for information.
(C-33t-p)
Wanted one female roommate for
two bedroom Village Park apartment.
Inquire at apartment 83 Village Park.
(C-2t-3-p)
:j;*x.:*vx*x-x a X a X a X-xNNSvx a x a X a X a X a X.X a X 4;:
HELP WANTED
|x*x*:*x-x*;*x*NS ;*?x a X a X a :*:*x*x*:*:*x*:*r*:*"*:-Wii
Psychiatric Research needs males
over 21 yrs old 35 mins, time for
$2.00 call Pat 376-3211 Ext. 5706 or
3785971 if after 5 p.m. (E-3-3tp)
2 male & Students preferbly married,
must be over 21 part time work
Apply Woodys Sandwich Shop 3458
W. Univ. ave between 3&5 p.m.
(E-3-3t-p)
Reliable student wanted to babysit
IV2 year old at 9th St. & 7th Ave.
SW. M 3:15-6:30, W 3:15-5:45 for
fall quarter. Must provide own
transportation. $7/week. call
376-0976. (E-l-2t-p)
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for part
time or full time male personnel.
Better than average salary and go.d
chances for advancement. Now
interviewing from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
daily. Apply in person, ARBVS
Restaurant, 1405 S.W. 13th St.
(E-2t-2-c)

1405 SW. 13th ST.

# #
v:*x*x*x*x*x*x*v.v.*.v>x*x*xvx*x*x*x*x
HELP WANTED f
>:.;.;.;.;.;.:.:.X.X.X.X.X.'.V.*.*.*:*; X*X*X*X*X*X*V*V.
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
with the nations top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
(E-l-tf-nc)
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A' full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student
330 J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-l-tf-nc)
PART TIME DRAFTSMAN. 4th or
sth year Architectural student. Call
Norwood Hope, 376-5301. (E-2-st-p)

-w "H' l r i r-
13W ST- I H.W. 23rd Bt. Hi. 371-2434 # J
" SHOWN AT 1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
fISkARWERNER/i him ftRRtS B
I W Jft
i__J!cOLU M B.ACOLOR |itow fa tow MARRIEd MAN 1
-THE PRODUCERS"
j | in COLOR 2:00-4:00-6:00-8:00-10:00
They all had something to sel...
m courage...sex...corruption!
T 1 Guardino J
risMyjr The Hell with Heroes'
vrccmncoioh
S YOU HAVE A CHOICE^I
1:25 2:00 3:52
9:25 5:44 7:36 9:28 H
jgjwO]
I r V^
A sportive I MEQk t
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wrougs) of westers I FcJL A Oi|lPl
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DEBORAH j f r >o*e...
| KERR I especially I
Sir ; **
For* -V >
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t DowafewwGafaeiWfle l**-**-!^*?.*********** I *.
3*l:ll.Tid ACADEMY AWARD JO
1 2 W. IMwrifr 4. I WIMMFR BUT DfItECTOR 43

l DUSTIN HOFFMAN BT \ ]
5-30 ANNE BANCROFT. / \ DD j
7:30 / \ s. H .3
9:30 {L I I Jil I.IIV LJ 19&H


Use our handy
mail in order
form.

HELP WANTED |
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman, part time.
Discount Privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-2-st-c)
WANTED Male or Female curb
attendant. Apply 2310 SW 13th St.
or 1505 NW 13th St. JERRYS.
(E-2-10t-c)
GIRL FRIDAY wanted to clean and
iron for five upperclassmen. Once a
week. Good pay. Call Chris or Ron,
372-6885. Williamsburg, Apt. 84.
(E-2-2t-p)
Students Male Part time. Set youi
own hours. Must be neat with car.
Apply University Inn, ask for Jim
T*owelt7~4TLTri. sharp, Mon., Tues.,
Wed. SSO weekly. (E-2-2t-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
ext. 2049. (El-Bt-c)



CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
i
>;._........-.-. ; ; .;. ; .;...;.x>X'X'X-X'X-x-v-'.
foR SALE 1968 VW 21,000 miles.
Make an offer. Call Mrs. Hinton ext.
2973 Campus Credit Union.
(G-3t-l- ')
CORVAIR MONZA CONV. 1966.
4-speed. Ex. condition. $1200.00.
372-9689. (G-3t-2-p)
fil Rambler American, automatic
T*ansm. Radio. Very Good
Condition $275. Cail 372-3110.
(G-3 st-p)
F PERSONAt
kx-*
the subterranean CIRCUS
vour Dersonal Headquarters for
posters black lites, flourescent paint,
incense & burners, and something
DIFFERENT in mens and women's
clothing. 10SM 7th St. (Just around
the corner from Santa Fe Junior
college). (J-3-3t-c)

USE
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
For Your
Call
Ads Univ Ext
283 X

NEED ZIPPY
RESULTS? |
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS 1
X.^t.^v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.y.yy

WPDQ
IN CONNECTION WITH
ATTRACTIONS UNLIMITED
PRESENT
THEASSOOATION
.r|
JACKSONVILLE COLISEUM
FRIDAY, SEPT. 278:00 P.M.
PRICES IN AD VANCE4:OO-3: 50-3:00
50 CENTS ADDITIONAL AT POOR ON NIGHT OF SHOW
tickets on sale at coliseum and downtown ticket office,
HEMMING PARK, ALSO AT THE AUDITORIUM RESERVATIONS
ACCEPTED-PHONE COLISEUM 354-2041

SERVICES
v............. V
DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
WAKE UP ON TIME!! Call
Phone-Alarm, 378-6994, after 8:30
P.M. Ask for Rick. (M-l-st-p)
BABY CARE, 311 NW 15th Terrace,
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; $15.00. also,
half-day weeks arvd hourly.
Experienced, Mature and Reliable
Christian Home. Phone 376-2072.
DIED: 12:01 p.m., Sept. 23 --
Sammy Seminole -- hung by the neck
from Century Tower. His remains
may be viewed by the public at the
top of Century Tower until Fri.,
Sept. 27. (M-2-3t<)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Liberty Linda speaking for
Let Freedom Ring. (M-l-st-p)
FIGURES, graphs, illustrations, for
dissertations, articles, slides, etc.
Nancy McClelland, Professional
Graphic Artist. 378-4260. (M-4t-3-p)

ALAN BATES...
TECIINISCOPE KjSfe:
SWTKTy
3^s^oo(^olso^^
teens
v te.imer
c-,-
Color
sioviy poinra
| nS7* WITH -OF 1
lALiuI ALiu 8
8 "CASINO ROYALE" at 1
| Peter Sellers 9 56

Hart Charges Filibuster
Employs Hippie Tactics

WASHINGTON (UPT)
Conservative senators
threatening to filibuster against
Abe Fortas appointment as
chief justice were accused
Tuesday of using the same
political tactics of hippies and
Yippies seeking to thwart the
will of the majority.
Sen. Phillip A. Hart, D-Mich..
one of Fortas* staunchest
supporters, made the charge in a
speech for the Senate urging his
colleagues to abandon any plans
to talk the controversial
nomination to death and let the
majority vote its wishes.
But Hart's plea showed no
signs of cracking the wall of

US Officials Unsure
Os Space Race Lead

WASHINGTON (UPI)
American space officials are not
sure who is ahead in the space
race, but they warned today the
United States in a very short
period of time" could lose its
world lead in the air.
Edward C. Welsh, executive
director of Mhe National
Aeronautics and Space Council,
said he is worried about
apparent shortsightedness" in
this country on the need for air
research.
Earlier Paine told newsmen
Russia should be able to land
men on the moon in the next
year or so" and that possibly the
United States also can achieve
this feat by mid-1969.
Officer Pleads
'Not Guilty
FORT LAUDERDALE (UPI)
- Former Hollywood policeman
Robert J. Ejler pleaded innocent
today to charges of slaying a
young Georgia girl, wounding
iier mother and then begging
fellow officers over the phone to
please catch me.
Erler, dressed in a dirty
T-shirt, jeans and boots, stood
silent before Court of Record
Judge Robert OToole as his
attorney entered the innocent
pleas.
Erler is charged with second
degree murder for the Aug. 12
slaying of 12-year-old Merilyn
Clark.

piimiimim^^^yiiiimiiim^
- T)/Jb 8pm ct3 T
2 I
j Union Box Office 2
iiimiiiiiiniif^niiiimmiiiiiiie

Wednesday, September 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

opposition to Fortas. Sen. B.
Everett Jordan, D-N.C.,
announced he would vote
against halting debate and
against confirmation of Fortas if
it came to that.
The Senate's leisurely pace
led some members, including
Sen. Russell B. Long. D-La.. to
conclude that a filibuster already
had begun.
Senate truants, stung by a
scolding from Democratic
Leader Mike Mansfield, got back
on the job Monday but the
House was forced to adjourn
because of lack of a quorum for
the second consecutive day.
Mansfield and Republican

Testing of the Apollo 7
spaceship, to be used in a
manned orbit of the earth,
developed a hydrogen pipe leak
Monday at Cape Kennedy, but
officials said the Oct. 11 launch
date would not be affected.

GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
,Were the student's friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 So. Mail Phone 376-7771
I NOTICE j
I REITZ UNION BOWLING LEAGUES j
I WILL BEGIN OCTOBER 7. f
| All parties interested in league bowling |
I who have not received application forms I
I may stop by the Games Area and fill one out.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST j
BE IN BY OCTOBER 1. j
I GAMES AREA j
GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION |

Leader Everett M. Dirksen
denied a report published by the
Chicago Tribune that they had
agreed to try to head off an
anti-Fortas filibuster by
introducing a resolution stating
that there is no vacancy to fill
on the Supreme Court.
Chief justice Earl Warren has
conditioned his retirement on
confirmation of a successor.
Justice Fortas critics contend
this means Warren would remain
unless Fortas is confirmed.
Summit
Canceled
By Kremlin
PRAGUE (UPI) The
Kremlin abruptly canceled the
scheduled summit meeting in
Mbscow Tuesday because it
apparently disapproves of the
makeup of the Czechoslovak
delegation, Czech Communist
party sources said.
It was the second such
postponement in four days. The
meeting originally was scheduled
for Saturday but was put off
until Tuesday and then
postponed again at virtually the
last minute.

Page 13



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25,1968

Page 14

Arts, Sciences Faculty
To Help Make Policy

Plans to increase the faculty
role in decision making in the
College of Arts and Sciences are
being made by the colleges new
dean, Dr. Harry H. Sisler. Sisler
also plans to broaden the scope
of interdisciplinary activities.
One of the first steps toward
achieving higher faculty
participation has been the
establishment of two faculty
committees-one to investigate

WHATS
HAPPENING
~ By DAVID CHAFIN m
Alligator Staff Writer
IN FRIENDLY REMINDERS: All clubs anil organizations that are
composed of UF students or of vital interest to them are welcome
to submit news items to be published in this column.
Just drop by the Alligator office, third floor, J. Wayne Reitz
Union, and leave the appropriate information (who, what, when,
where, why, and how, jou*lLlically speaking.) All items should be
turned in by 4 p.m. at leasi *A hours in advance of the publication
date: articles to go in Wednesdays paper must be turned in by 4 p.m.
on Monday.
IN TOP BRASS BRAINSTORMING: The Benton Engineering
Council will meet in room 355 of the Union at 7:30 tonight. All the
presidents of the various engineering societies are urged to attend.
IN ACNEWNIZING UF STUDENTS: The Young Republicans
Club will be conducting a membership drive today, Thrusday, and
Friday this week. All Interested Students are welcome to join. The
YRs will have tables set up in front of the College Library from 9
a.m. till 4 p.m.
IN UFS CAVEMEN: No animal-skin wearers, these, but cavemen
still the same. Theyre the Florida Speological Society, meeting in
room 347 of the Union at 7 tonight.
IN TELLING IT LIKE IT EES: The Latin American Colloquium
will sponsor a lecture in the Colloquium Room of the College Library
at 8 tonight.
Quarter System
Needs Improving

By CAROLYN POPE
Alligator Staff Writer
Us students have experienced
one year of the 10-week quarter
term, with a few grumbles of
overload and more expense, and
a hooray or two for the tersity
of the term.
Meanwhile, administrators are
regarding the quarter system as
one in .need of more
improvements despite its
advancement over the previous
semester and trimester systems.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter Jr., dean
of academic affairs, states
trouble occurs mostly with
three-credit courses. This
situation makes it difficult for
students to carry an appropriate
class load per quarter.
Too often, Lassiter said, a
student is forced to take five
courses to attain 15-credit hours,
creating an overload of classes.
I cannot say that it (the
quarter system) is an unqualified
Construction
Worker Hurt
Sam Ralston Jr., a
26-year-old construction worker
from Hawthorne, was severely
injured Tuesday when he fell
nine feet from a cement rafter at
the new Materials Engineering
Building.
Ralston was rushed to
Alachua General Hospital where
he was admitted to the Intensive
Care Unit with a possible broken
back.

the handling of undergraduate
students and another to examine
graduate programs offered by
the college.
To increase participation in
the college, Sisler is considering
a student council where ideas
can be voiced and suggestions
made for changes and
improvements.
Chairman of the Department
of Chemistry until he became

success, UF President Stephen
C. OConnell said. He added that
more improvements are needed
and continuing efforts must be
ipade.
Any system has advantages
and disadvantages and all need
continuing study to make them
operate in the best manner. We
will continue that process here,
OConnell said.
As compared to the semester
system, which was 17-weeks
long, the 10-week quarter
session is designed to allow the
student to take fewer courses
with more intensity, Lassiter
said.

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P" mMi JR 1 BiV SI
LOVE OR WHAT ?
"You're kidding, that water has got to be colder than ice and besides it's broad daylight and ...
who's that behind us?"

dean lasi July l, Sisler. talks
enthusiastically about the role of
his college.
I feel the College of Arts
and Sciences is the real
foundation of the whole
University. If there is a strong
arts and sciences department,
the University will be strong.
Without effective direction, the
college will be weak and
bungling, Sisler said.
To improve the direction of
the college it is important to
involve the faculty in the
decision-making process as much
as possible.
Sisler is aware that many
students feel the University has
little concern over individual
problems. To dispel this feeling,
he is trying to foster an attitude
that will convince students the
college exists for the purpose of
serving their needs.
Increased activities between
the college of Arts and Sciences
and other campus units are high
on the list of objectives for the
new dean. One possible area of
cooperation lies in the training
of persons to teach on junior
college or smaller senior college
levels.
A faculty member in the
College of Arts and Sciences
who is interested in researching
the teaching process might work
with someone from the College
of Education in trying to find
and explain teaching methods on
the higher education level, the
dean explained.
Another goal is to find
additional sources of support for
the development of the
humanities and social sciences in
order to add a broader spectrum
of growth and development
throughout the college.
While concerned about
faculty, students and the
administration maintaining
contact, Sisler also thinks it
important for the dean to retain
contact with the teaching and
researching processes.
Therefore, he plans to spend
about two hours each morning
in the Department of
Chemistry-either teaching or
keep lines open with faculty and
students.
Sisler, who holds a Ph.D. in
chemistry from the University of
Illinois, has conducted vast
amounts of research in the field
of liquid ammonia chemistry.

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Even the excitement of UF Campus life has its lapses. Somewhere
between the class he shouldn't have bothered with and the class he
should have gone to, a student finds time to reflect.
Bus May Serve
r Sin City 1 Area

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A shuttle bus service from
various Sin City areas to
campus by the Gainesville
Transit Authority (GTA) may be
included in the proposed
SIOO,OOO Campus Transit
Program, according to Gary
Goodrich, student body vice
president.
If the GTA agrees, well
operate a shuttle on a trial basis
for two to three months starting
second quarter, Goodrich said.
Originally, a university bus
was scheduled to operate as a
shuttle from 16th Avenue to
campus under the Campus
T ransit Program.

Residents of other off
campus areas complained to
Goodrich that this would be an
unfair use of student body
funds.
Goodrich then thought of
approaching the GTA and having
the student body underwrite any
loss up to SSOO for the first
three months.
It would cost us SSOO, at
least, to rent a bus from the
university or $20,000 to buy
one, Goodrich said. The
shuttle would cost us at most
$1,500, for the first three
months. If it is profitable, and
the GTA continues to operate,
the shuttle wont cost us
anything.
Next week, Goodrich and the
Campus Planning and
Development Committee will
meet with about 40 campus
leaders to discuss the transit
program.
For once in UFs history,
we really have a chance for the
students to have an important
voice in this decision. he said.
Last Day For
Bus Seats
Today is the last day to buy a
ticket for the buses chartered by
the Union Board for Student
Activities to take students to
Saturdays FSU football game in
Tallahassee.
Tickets are $7.25 for the
round trip.
Buses will leave from Florida
Field at 9:30 Saturday morning
and will return to Gainesville
after the game.



HFS ONLY 13
Youngest Freshman
Plans Physics Career

By ANNE FREEDMAN
A lligator Staff Writer
The youngest student ever to
enroll at the UF doesnt know
too much about football or girls.
But 13-year-old freshman
Manoj (man-osh) Kumar Prasad,
a native of India, is crazy about
physics, math, golf (which he
discovered in Gainesville) and his
mothers cooking.
Manoj, lUC, is a physics
major, though his first love was
math. His interest in physics
developed from his natural liking
for mathematics at about age
eight.
It is a type of inheritance,
he explained. Both his parents
hold their PhDs in physics. His
father, Dr. Shed Prasad, is an
associate professor of physics
with the UF, while his mother
has temporarily taken on the
role' of housewife. Manojs
maternal grandfather also holds
a degree in physics.
Up to age four I didnt like
mathematics, Manoj said. But
from that point on there was no
stopping him. The young
scientist thought it was normal
to solve math problems in your
head.

UF '-Campus Collage

By JOHN PARKER
Campus Life Editor
The phrase Campus Life
has a tendency to bring to mind
characters from a 1940 movie
standing around the ol frat
house drinking from beer steins,
wearing pipes and letter
sweaters, singing songs by the
11 replace and generally being
cute and lovable.
Some of the remnants are still
here, especially the beer, but the
script has been radically revised.
Campus Life is no longer an
easily defined, capsulated and
continually humorous concept.
It is conglomerate, diverse,
colorful, fast moving mass of
humanity and happenings.
To some people on campus,
life is an endless stream of
parties, dates, drinking bouts,
bull sessions'and night-before
cramming.
To others. Campus .Life
means four hours of classes.

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M / GATOR ADS
U /P / /j / REALLY
... ,' jf v> .i|
*. .jJ.Ij.. " > '/

(Gainesville Sun Photo)
MANOJ KUMAR PRASAD
... Studies physics
He tackled complicated
problems and found them
easy at age seven according to
his mother.
Manoj prefers theoretical
physics to laboratory work. He
was first introduced to physics
in his senior year of high school
last year At the first step, he
said, I liked it very much. In
math I got the techniques -to
apply to physics.
Manoj is carrying 18 hours

The
Florida
Alligator
eight hours of studying, live
hours of sleep, and nervous
exhaustion.
RAAAE HAIR STYLIST
319 W. UNIV. AVE.
20% discount with
this coupon
ph 372-5549

including chemistry, biology,
Math 30.1, English and
Institutions.
He plans on going through
the summers and getting his
bachelor of science degree in
three years, and continuing on
for his masters and PhD.
Id like to do research, but
not make a career of that. Id
like to do a little teaching, too
he said.
What does he like to do for
sun's-
Hes been playing golf since
he arrived last spring. His parents
dont understand the game, too
well, he said, and he didnt want
to reveal his score. But he did
admit that it was well under 90. i
Just recently Manoj started to
learn tennis. He spent the
summer following his courses
watching tv and sleeping late.
The slightly built young man
with long black hair lives with
his parents at their apartment.
Would he like to live on
campus?
Not really.
I like my mothers cooking.
And its roomier here, he said
with a quick smile.

To some, it is shaking hands,
making speeches, smiling and
waiting for election results.
To a lauded few it is
knocking people over, drinking
Gatorade, signing autographs
and chasing off coeds.
Campus Life, in short, is
20,000 different people engaged
in what is now known as doing
their thing or getting into
their bag.
Within these pages of the
Alligator, the Campjjs Life staff
will attempt to reflect this living
collage as best it can.
And that, as they say, is our
bag.

ATTENTION
ALL UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
New accident insurance plan to go into
effect October 1, 1968.
i£>
Plan covers you and your family for accidents
occurring everywhere on airplanes, trains,
buses, in autos, on the job in the home,
in sports activities t ,-J^
LOW COST PAYROLL DEDISON
TO ENROLL
CALI PERSONNEL OFFICE IN THE HUB (EXT. 3165)
OR
CANNON-TREWEEK AGENC* I
ENROLLMENT RERIOD MR OCTOBER I. tR4B I I

Wednesday, September 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Grant Makes Care
Center A Reality
The J. Hillis Miller Health Center will have a comprehensive
rehabilitation center to treat patients suffering from disorders of
the nervous system, such as strokes or spinal cord injuries. Bone
and joint disorders will also be treated.
Funds to match Federal and state funds to develope the
center were donated by retired financial executive George
Graham Hunter. The amount was not disclosed.
The first phase of construction will be called the George
Graham Hunter Rehabilitation Pavilion and will be used to care
for patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal system.
Target date for completion is 1971.
Hunter became interested in the project several months ago
when he was treated for a broken hip. His physician at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, Orthopedist Dr. Howard P.
Hogshead, told him the project for such a center was stopped
when the University lacked the necessary funds.
KISERS OFFICE EQUIPMENT SALE
6 New Portable Typewriters Reduced from sll9. to $95.
42 Manual Typewriters from S4O to $95
5 Used Wood Desks 30 x 60. . $45
8 Electric Typewriters Used from $l5O. to $225
USED Secretary & Executive Swivel Chairs
An Excellent Buy $15.00
604 N. MAIN ST. * 372-9607
SALES SERVICE RENTALS
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To all students and university personnel
j DISCOUNT j
/JT Off Our Low-Low Prices I 5
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2 11:30 AM 2:00 PM
WOTt 14:30 PM 8:00 PM
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K 1212 North Main Street
(Just Four Minutes From Campus)
miamaiaiaiaiaiaiaiaiainiaiaiaiaiaiaiat

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Sepfmbf 25,1968

Page 16

Tune In And Travel
With UF Glee Club

A trip to Jamaica and Puerto
Rico is being planned by UF
Mens Glee Club and Womens
Glee Club.
Dr. John E.. Grigsby, an
assistant professor of the
department of Music and
director of the Glee Club
Tuesday outlined school year
plans for 1968-69.
We have plans to spend the
weekend in the Jacksonville area
on the date of the UF and
Georgia football game. The
Coliseum in that city will be the
location for a UF Alumni
Association dinner and a concert
by our combined glee clubs,
said Grigsby.

Clothes In Europe
Reflect US Mod

By KATHY SCOTT
Alligator Corrwpondent
American students traveling
in Europe this summer were
faced by a new identity problem
stemming from, of all things,
fashion trend.
Influenced by America,
European styles have changed
drastically in the last few years.
At least where the vacationing
student is concerned.
The problem arises when
after three or four weeks of one
foreign language after another
American students are
occasionally hungry for a little
American Bostonian or
Alabamian.
The formula used to be easy.
Look for a pair of wrinkled levis,
slightly dirty tennis shoes and a
college or university T-shirt.
Invariably, male or female, it
always spoke English. Today the
picture has changed, leaving the
homesick traveler in somewhat
of a haze.
The boy in the blue levis and
tennis shoes when approached
with a confusing subway
schedule, far from giving out
with the friendly Howdy
expected, now demands of the
inquirer an adeptness in sign
language, not to mention/
Yugoslavian and German
dialects.
Among females the change is
really upsetting traditional
American ideas of the chic
European chick. Five years ago a
European girl in any kind of
slacks was a rariety. Bermudas
were found only on little school
boys with scratched-up knees.
Today when a bermuda clad
female is confidently
approached for an American
cigarette the brand will seldom
be a Marlboro or Salem.
Surprisingly enough, or
maybe logically, the fashion
change in Europe is working
both ways.
The intent young male in
dark trousers and jacket, ascot,
and long hair, when approached
with a svous plait, monsieur.
invariably turns out to be a
Yale student trying to avoid
American girls with cameras who
want their pictures taken in
front of sidewalk cases.
The American female, on the

Meals, transportation and
rooms are paid for when we
travel out of the Gainesville area.
Often the organization that asks
us to perform at their function
furnishes us with meals and
rooms. But since we are a
promotional organ of UF, the
administration pays our way
when aid is needed.
A repeat of last years
inter-fraternity sing is planned
for the winter quarter to
promote choral singing between
on campus, Grigsby said.
Singing competition
between campus organizations is
a tradition at many universities.
This year the Womens Glee
Club will sponsor a sorority sing

other hand, is fascinated by the
fact that beautiful Italian shoes
rarely cost more than five or six
dollars. French fashioqs they
were drooling over in magazines
prior to leaving the States are
easily acquired for prices that
seem so
be ignored.
Everyone looks like the
stereotype of the other. But,
where does that leave the
homesick student?
Fortunately, there are a few
tell-tale signs that rarely fail the
quick eye. High school and
college rings are a sure sign.
European universities hayent
devised this labeling method yet.
For the female day-time wear
will almost always include a pair
of flat-heeled shoes. American
girls just cant handle all the
walking in anything less than a
very comfortable pair of old
loafers.
However, the surest sign of
all, absolutely unmistakable
when its revealed, is the all time
great and indispensable
American guide, Europe on Five
Dollars a Day. Its not exactly a
fashion determinant, but for the
American student traveling on
limited funds it is guarded more
carefully than his billfold and
wouldnt be traded for all the
stock in Keds, P.F. Flyers, and
Levis.
P" -
Good Service Starts
at
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SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

H NOTHING EXTRA
Thats the way it is with life insurance. The finest quality you can
buy costs no more. In fact, it will often serve you money. My company ggfcftftg.. <
has, for years, been the leader in quality life insurance at low net
cost. I would like to discuss this quality side of life insurance. There J9HHb ofij|i| ;
WILLIAM D.OLINGER J. STEVE WHITE
The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. Kikyij
1831 N. W, 13th. Street 37^jj£[__ = l =^

in addition to the Mens Glee
Club effort.
The Mens Glee Club is the
oldest musical group on the UF
campus. And along with the
Womens Glee Club is in need of
voluntary student support for
the coming school year, Grigsby
said.
We are looking for people
now. Permission of the
instructor is all that is needed to
join. There is no fee required by
the clubs and uniforms are
famished to members of the
group.
Experience is not stressed as
a requirement for signing up.
Our training group offers a
learning situation in a class that
teaches members how to read
music plus other essentials of
choral work.
Last year a sth year
architectural student with no
previous experience at choral
singing with the exception of
singing in the bathroom while
taking a shower, joined the
Mens Glee Club and became one
of our best performers, Grigsby
said.
Scheduled meeting days for
the Mens Glee Club this fall are
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
during sth period classes. The
Womens Glee Club meets on the
same days as the men during the
7th period.

tv A STILL LOOKIN6
I\\ For Apartment 1
vAVw\ You 11 Find ~
j \ Handball Courts
i /a / oc^ Lake
\ jr Gigantic Swimming Pool
\ W \ \ A a Separate Buildings
Jig For Students
JR Shuttle Bus
_ Expert Maintainence
* Individual Heat/Air
* Bedroom Apartments

English Department Plans
On Air f hyme Tyme',

This quarter the Department
will sponsor a project to get
poetry into the Florida air.
Every other Thursday in a
non-academic, informal, and
relaxed setting, member of the
English faculty will meet with
interested people in the Reitz
Union during the 9th period and
talk about and read poems by a

A A 1232 W. Univ. Ave.
A itV 376-7657
{Mm ask us
ABOUT*
£ r ?r.Y j
erosa
JML STEAK HOtJSB
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

major contemporary British or
American poet. The session will
last for a regular class hour
(4:40-5:30), and townspeople as
well as students are invited. The
meetings will be in lounges
122-123 in the Union for each
of these dates except November
7, when the meeting will be held
browsing library of the Union.



fOR
' Paper-Gator l Returns

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Features Editor
The Alligator is back in
action once again, and its
rice to see all the happy UF
students fighting for copies at
the drop-o points around
campus. Some of the old staff
are back again and theyre
running things so smoothly and
nicely that it seems impossible
for difficulties to occur. There
will, however, be one or two.
Theres all sorts of new
equpiment up at the Alligator
office. Theres some good stuff
qn the darkroom and the editors!
nave brand new pads and pencils
for all of the new reporters. But
there is an excess of pads and
pencils because there arent too
many reporters this year, so if
youre interested come on up.
Most of the typewriters are
broken and they all need new
ribbons, but an Alligator
reporter doesnt worry about
trivialities like that.
Harold Aldrich held the first
meeting the other night and told
everyone to be nice and good
and all, so itll be a year of
accuracy, neatness and AP style
sort of thing with opinions and
columns staying strictly on the
editorial pages.
He has the Pacemaker Award
certificate pasted up on the wall
in his office, reminding everyone
that they must write up to par
of the nations leading college
paper. Everybody goes by and
stares at it a lot and touches it.
There are a bunch of new

jfeiLV'-ji jjjol f*/ /iBRfcYJHH
ir; iwpmp / j jm +
n i mmdnm % / m -m Btei mtM li#
y |P
PORE-BOY
1029 W. UNIV. AVE.
ACROSS FROM UNIVERSITY
CITY BANK
10:30 AM 1:00 AM SUN THUR
OPEN
10:30 AM 2:00 AM FRI & SAT

editors up at the office this year.
Some of them worked on city
newspapers during the summer
and they learned a lot and
theyll use this experience to
bring to you, the reader, better
writing, better coverage; thats
what they say, anyway.
Somebody said something
about another newspaper
competing with the Alligator
here on campus but so far
nobody at the Alligator office
has seen any evidence of this.
Probably just a rumor or
something like that
Things are going to be quiet
as compared to the spring
juarter when Stevie Hull was the
MAIN ONE. No more Pork
Chops or Contorchians now that
Joe Torchia is in Turkey. The
Alligator is going to deal mainly
with reporting the news as it
happens and everyone is going to
be serious this year and
competent.
Page makeup will be more in
line with good style and theres
all sorts of new type faces and
things, and the entire staff is
really sure that you readers will
love the Alligator this year.
There are contests planned this
year and a lot of you readers will
have chances to actually see
your name printed in the
Alligator free of charge and to
win lots of keen prizes and stuff.
The Alligator even hired an
experienced reporter working on
his masters degree to help the
reporters and give them advice
and lend a helping hand. Harold
Kennedy, last summers editor,

is now in charge of promotions,
so the Alligator will be
promoted all over the place this
year, wait and see.
The Alligator wont be giving
out the weather report each day
like it did last year, so now Mary
Gantt, former Gator Girl and
now girl Friday at the Alligator,
will be hurting for things to
write. Shes learning to be a
reporter.
Thats about the wrap-up at
the Alligator office for tills year.
There will be some changes in
editorial policy from last year
and it will be noticed, but all
anyone can do is to sit and wait.

BUS 'T FSU
TIRED OF FIGHTING TRAFFIC?*
TAKE THE FLORIDA UNION BOARD
BUS TO FSU AND WATCH THE
GATORS RUN OVER THE SEAAINOLES
TICKETS AT ROOM 310 lUf
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION W jfkjJ
FOR INFORMATION CALL
j.

SAHOWICM
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CHOICE OF BREAD

FAST FREE DELIVERY

chicken boxes
SHRIMP FROM $1.15 I
SERVED WITH COLE SLAW FRENCH FRIES
AND HUSH PUPPIES
DIAL THE DISCOVERY NUMBER
378-1492
*

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Exclusive dealer for American Shelby Cobra
Southside Ford-Jack9onville
Fla. Shelby Sales Representative Jay Baranich.
Fast ones and slow ones, I've got them all.
Come see me. Over 2 dozen in stock.
c*
5303 BEACH BLVD. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
ph. 398-4513

FRENCH
ONION ROLL

Wednesday, September 25,1968. The Florid* Attigetor.

RYE
WHITE

Page 17



Page 18

;, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 25,1968

I Watch Out FSU

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Watch out FSU!!!!
The Gators have had their pride hurt. An Air
Force team which was supposed to be easy to
handle gave them a tough fight and the wire service
dropped them from sixth to 14th.
A good team doesnt take these things lightly,
expecially a team with guys like Larry Smith, Larry
Rentz, Steve Tannen, Jim Yarborough, Kim Helton,
Tom Abdelnour, Mac Steen, Gene Peek, Tom
Christian, Guy McTheny, Skip Amelung, Wayne
Griffin, Teriy Morris, Mike Healey, Bill Dorsey, Jim
Hadley, Britt Skrivanek, David Ghesquire, Mike
Kelley, Ted Hager, Mark Ely and Skip Albury.
The game in Tampa brought the Gators down
from their cloud. The game in Tallahassee will be
regionally televised and another bad showing will
eliminate any UF chances for national recognition.
UF does have an outstanding team; but Larry
Smith must be in better condition and have the
speed he lacked against the Falcons. The passing
attack must be much sharper and Rentz must mix

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NICK ARROYG
DENNIS PROTECTS ECKDAHL
Program To Begin Oct. 2
Independent Intramurals

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
About the best combination
of misfits, bombers, old-timers,
and has-beens can be found in
intramural independent activity.
These were only a few of the
way-out names of the many
far-gone teams that played in
last years Independent League.
As many as 48 teams
composed of people from
different living organizations,
professional fraternities, ethnic
groups and creeds joined
together in spirited athletic
competition to years
Birape tit ion kjJHpfirins so
actiCp that the leagsi champions
were not declared until the last
sport, bowling, and the winner
was not even known until the

last ball was thrown as the
Rodans outlasted second place
Newman Club in the finals of
bowling to win the
championship by a mere 25
points.
All those wishing to form an
independent team are requested
to sign their team up in Room
229 Florida Gym or call
376-3261 Ext 2912 by October
2. The first sport is basketball.
Theres a 25-man limit on the
teams and almost no limit
except the imagination as to the
name. You never know if there
might be another match up like
the Poultry Science Club and the
Booster Shots.
TJjis years program will once
again include volleyball,
football, basketball, softball,
handball, and bowling. In
addition, tennis has been added
to the schedule.

up his plays better. Rentz and Smith absolved the
line of any guilt. A quarterback doesnt get thrown
for as many losses as Rentz did if the offensive line
is doing its job. Amelung, Steen, Helton, Griffith
and Morris are going to have to handle the
Seminoles defense or its goung to be another long
afternoon.
Both teams will be up for the game, not like in
some years past when the Gators took the girls from
upstate lightly. FSU has been ranked in the top 20
this year and they are out to knock us off for the
second straight year.
FSU has Ron Sellers, their all-American pass
receiver, and we all know how good he is. Our
defensive backfield can handle any receiver. Bill
Gaisford especially wants another crack at Sellers.
Recent sports negotiations between UF and FSU
havent been the best anyway to add fuel to the fire.
Peterson and his bunch of cry babies still think
they won that game two years ago. In fact they
actuallythink they have a better school than we do.
Its about time the Gators put them in their
place. Saturday offers us a perfect opportunity.
The Gators should handle the Seminoles by 10
points.

Gators Lose Dennis,
Morris For FSU Game

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
The Florida Gators Fighting
Black and Blue seemed
reminescent of a year earlier
with the announcement that two
players have been definitely
sidelined for Saturdays game
against FSU.
The injured are starting guard
Guy Dennis, and bright tackle
Terry Morris. In addition, Gary
Bimson has been reinjured, and
freshman squad member Tony
Canadeo has been sidelined
permanently.
The only bright spot in the
ailing Gators offense is the
announcement that Tom
Christian will be available for
full duty Saturday.
Dennis suffered a sprained
knee during the Air Force game
at Tampa. Earlier, his chances
had been termed very slim
that he would be able to play in
this Saturdays game.
However, Head Coach Ray
Graves ended all hope at
yeaterdays practice session
when he said Dennis would be
definitely out.
Dennis injury came on
Floridas first offensive play of
the game, but the Walnut Hill
Senior played oiit the entire
game on the injured leg.
Right tackle Terry Morris
was injured in the opening
minutes of yesterdays practice
session. Morris hit a tackling
Gymnast
An organization meeting 1
of the UF Gymnastics Club
will be held on the gym floor
on Wednesday at 4 p.m.
Contact Coach Joseph
Regna for further
information.

UPI Names SEC ;
Player Os The Week

By DAVID M.MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA (UPI)
Alabamas muscular Mike Hall
won all-conference honors as a
linebacker last season but coach
Bear Bryant was unimpressed,
insisting he didnt feel that Hall
gave a 100 per cent effort.
The 220-pound senior from
Tarrant, Ala., made jarring
tackles throughout the game,
hitting VPI quarterback A1
Kincaid so hard he was forced
out of the contest; intercepted a
pass and recovered a fumble.
For his tremendous play, Hall
Tuesday was named
Southeastern Conference
defense player of the week by
United Press International.
Sophmore quarterback
Archie Manning of Mississippi,
making a sparkling varsity debut
in a 21-7 victory over Memphis
State, was named the SEC

dummy, and either from that
contact, or the whiplash effect
when he hit the ground, suffered
undetermined neck injuries.
The loss of the two starters
will drastically alter the Gator
lineup. Skip Amelung is being
moved from his starting position
at left tackle over to the spot at
right guard Dennis will now
vacate. Junior Wayne Griffith
will fill the starting slot
belonging to Amelung.
Replacing Terry Morris will
be sophomore Jim Kiley from
Brandon. Mike Field will move
up a step on the depth chart to
back up Kiley.
Gary Bimson, a junior college
transfer, has been sidelined since
Fall practice on a knee injury^
\
TERRY MORRIS.
.. .out against FSU

offense player of the week by
UPI.
Manning, a rangy youngster
from Drew, Miss., threw two
touchdown passes and ran for
another touchdown himself in a
second-half performance.
Others mentioned for defense
player of the week were Florida
comerback Steve Tannen who
scored on a 64-yard punt return
in the Gators hard-earned 23-20
victory over the Air Force and
sophomore middif guard Dave
Roller of Kentucky who was the
defensive standout in the
Wildcats 12-6 upset of Missouri.
Other offense stars included
tailback Dicky Lyons who
scored both Kentucky
touchdowns to open defense of
his 1967 SEC scoring title,
Florida fullback Larry Smith
who rushed for 109 yards and
two touchdowns, and sophmore
, end George Ranager of Alabama
who caught two touchdown
passes in a two-minute span.

Yesterday, while running, he
reinjured the same knee, and is
sidelined indefinitely.
On the freshman squad, it
was announced Monday night
that Tony Canadeo will be lost
to the Gators permanently. The
Green Bay, Wise, halfback is the
son of Tony Canadeo Sr., former
player for the Green Bay
Packers. Canadeo is now an
announcer for network
television.
Canadeo had complained of
back strains during practice, and
doctors had his back x-rayed.
Monday night, Canadeos
problem was termed a
congenetial back defect, and
it was recommended that
Canadeo give up football.
H f
A Jvi
NICK ARROYO
LARRY SMITH
.. .Ready for action



UF-FAMU Football
'Not In Near Future

GAINESVILLE, (UPI)
- University of Florida football
coach Ray Graves said Monday
that no plans or overtures
have been made toward a
football clash with
predominately Negro Florida
A&M University.
It is not out of the realm of
possibility, said the Gator
athletic director, but when you
speculate about that kind of
future, youre talking about 8,
10, maybe 12 years or more.
Graves claimed that an article
in the sports sectiot of a south
Florida newspaper, the Miami
News, on Monday had blown an
earlier statement by him out of
proportion. The article was
headlined: Gators May
Schedule Rattlers.
The article by sportswriter A1
Levine said Graves hinted at a
press conference after Saturdays
Air Force game in Tampa that
the two schools would be
clashing in. all sports in the
future.
He wasnt there and thats
second and third hand
reporting, Graves snapped,
although he admitted that he
said in answer to a question that
Florida and A&M would be
meeting in other sports in the
future.
We already run against each
other in track, said Graves,
and we feel that we should
eventually meet in other spring
sports. But Floridas football
Gators Drop
The Gator Football team
suffered ups and downs in the
two major wire agencies ranking
for this week.
Associated Press ranked the
Gators fifth, up one notch from
its pre-season sixth-place
ranking. United Press
International, however, dropped
Florida to 14th in its first
weekly rankings of the young
football season.
UPI top 20 major college
football teams with first-place
votes and won-lost-tied records
in parentheses follows:
Teams Points
1. Notre Dame 17 1-0 321
2. Purdue 13 1-0 293
3. Southern Cal 3 1-0 290
4. Penn State i 14) 15 8
5. UCLA 14) 136
6 KA 14) 86
6. Kansas 14) 35
7. Alabama 14)
8. Nebraska 14) 67
9. Louisiana State 14) 59
10. Miami Fla. 24) 55
Second 10-11, Houston 55;
12, Indiana 50; 13, Texas 42;
14, Florida 36; 15. Ohio State
26; 16; North Carolina State 21;
17, Michigan State 11
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Teams

program is booked solid through
1976 with the exception of two
open dates-and we want to go
into other areas of the nation for
those games.
Graves said that A&M coach
Jake Gaither had built a fine
football program at A&M and it
would in no way hurt Floridas
prestige to play the Rattlers.
They have had some years
when they would have beaten
Florida, Florida State and
Miami, he said. But we have
no plans to play them now with
our schedule so tight. We have to
play six Southeastern
Conference games a year and
then theres Miami and FSU.

y* / ..
mmtmm svo
Volkswagen
leaps
into the
present
jf
With a fully automatic transmission.

If you bet o friend we never would, we almost
didn't.
a fully automatic transmission. The kind you put in
drive and forget.
Our aim was to make things easy, but for us
changes aren't easy to make.
Especially in this case. There were certain
things we just didn't want to lose.
Like horsepower, and our reputation hr being
economical.
What we've ended up with is a 3-speed
automatic transmission that's pure Volkswagen
designed from scratch to. get the most out of the
VW with the least expenditure of effort.
It has the fewest moving parts.

MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC.
* 4222 NW THIRTEENTH STREET SIS*

AILIGATOR CORRECTION
Va rnes New Intramural Head

The Alligator is sorry and
would like to correct an error in
fact made Tuesday when it was
reported that UF graduate Bob
Allen has taken over the
position vacated by the death of
Spurgeon Cherry as head of
Mens Intramurals.
*
Dr. Paul Vames is head of
Mens Intramurals and has been
since July. Vames was appointed
associate professor in the College
of Physical Education and
Health and was recommended to
fill the vacancy following
Cherrys death June 7.

Wednesday, September 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Vames worked under Cherry
for three years as program
director when he worked on his
doctorate degree at UF.
Allen is a member of Vames

BE THE STYLE-SETTER AT THE GAME,
CARRY A... "BOOZIER BAG
THE HAN^BAGWmr'\ SPIRIT
$7.95 INCLUDING TAX, POSTAGE
SEND NAME, ADDRESS, AND CHECK,CASH, OR MONEY ORDER
TO. BOOZTER BAGS, P.O. BOX 1144, SARASOTA, FLA.

It's the lightest per horsepower output. And it's
incredibly sensitive. (A model airplane engine is
powerful enough to turn it.)
So come see how far Volkswagen has come.
The Scjuareback and Fastback. Both have disk
brakes, an electronically controlled fuel injection
system, and new, a fully automatic transmission.
If you're interested, it's available as an option
on our '69 models.
If you're not interested, we sure went to a lot of

staff. This marks the first time
the Intramurals department has
been able to support the
Intramurals director with a staff
member.

Page 19



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Wednesday, September 25,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 20