Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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BEAT FSU!
Sammy Seminole Swings in the breeze after mob action say him 'fit to
hang.'

ROTC Enrollment Drops

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Enrollment in Army ROTC
has made an about-face as a
result of the Board of Regents
directive making the program
voluntary
About 1,093 students are
registered for the program this
year, as compared with 2,080
last year, when ROTC was
mandatory for freshmen and
sophomores. These figures
represent a drop of nearly 50 per
cent.
The Air Force ROTC
enrollment is taking a nose dive,
too, with 360 cadets signed up
as compared to 580 last year

(Record Number
I Enrol I For 6B
>:
A record number of 19, 714 students reported
f. for class yesterday at the UF.
:ji Registrar Richard Whitehead predicts the total
£ will increase to 20,100 during the First two weeks of
j; classes as a result of late registration.
: He said the Office of the Registrar had projected
: the registration for this year as being over 2,000
and this indicates normal growth for the
$ university.
The opening total for fall classes last year was
| 18,338 students, rising to the eventual fall
S enrollment of 19,004 after late sign-ups were
§ included.
Students attending the university include
5 under-graduates, graduate students and students in
§ the colleges of law and medicine.
5. Freshman registration as of opening day at the
£ university has increased from 2,544 last year to
f. 2,858 at this time.

DOWN NEARLY 50%

This is close to a 40 per cent
decrease.
According to Major Charles
D. Trunnelle, assistant professor
of military science of Air Force
ROTC, about 40 students
dropped Monday, and 25 to 30
more drops are expected today.
Army ROTC head Col. Arlo
Mitchell said Monday that since
his program has not lost any
instructors, classes will be
smaller and more personal
attention will be available for
the students, with better
instruction resulting.
The Air Force program,
however, has lost two instructors
so far, and, according to

Vol. 61, No. 2

ARREST NOT 'POLITICAL
OConnell Refutes
Editorial Contention

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has refuted a
Gainesville Sun editorial
charging UF police with selective
law enforcement.
In an open letter to the
university community releases
Friday, O'Connell stated there
was never any effort on the part
of UF police to single out any
person because of political
views.
The statement was a reply to
an Aug. 21 editorial in the Sun
charging Lavon Louis Gentry,
2UC was arrested because his
cause was unpopular, not on
the approved list of University
functions, frowned upon by the
hierarchy.
Gentry was arrested Aug. 9
and charged at the University
Police Department with

Trunnelle, possibly one or two
more will go.
Even so, the classroom ratio
is improving, he said, with one
teacher for every 25-30 students
this year, instead of the 1 to 30
or 35 ratio of last year.
We think the program will
be considerably improved,
Trunnelle said, since we will
have cadets who are
motivated.
ROTC was made voluntary
for the UF and six other state
universities in July, after years
of controversy. Much of the UF
community students,
faculty, and administrators,
had issued vocal opposition to
compulsory ROTC for years

_'* -. L I
RECORD CONFUSION SEEMS TO GREET NEW YEAR'S ENROLLMENT |
$

Florida Alligator

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

willfully and maliciously
defacing a building on the UF
campus.
Gentry was alledgedly placing
leaflets advertising a Bust the
Draft Bazaar.
The leaflet said: Bust the
Draft Bazaar, Lawrence
Ferlinghetti guest speaker,
Saturday Aug. 10, 3 p.m., Plaza
of the Americas, University of
Florida Campus, Gainesville,
Fla., Gainesvilles First Guerilla
Theatre, draft counselling
available, three live bands the
Gingerbread, the Bouquet, the
Relatively Straight String Band.
The police report stated
Gentry was picked up Aug. 8 for
alledgedly placing signs on the
walls of buildings and on a stop
sign. According to the report,
Gentry and his companion,
Bobby Quems, were released
without being charged and
instructed they could place signs
only on bulletin boards and not
on walls.
The police also told the two
they needed the permission of
Vice-President of Student
Affairs Lester Hale.
OConnells statement said
such permission was not
necessary.
Early the morning of Aug. 9,
Gentry was picked up again. He
was arrested and charged with
placing the signs on walls of
buildings.
Lt. Vernon Hollinman of the
University Police Department
said Gentry was arrested only
because he was caught placing

Bloc Seating Decided
Tonight By 'Lottery
Representatives of groups wishing block seating for home football
games will meet tonight at 7:30 in the Reitz Union Auditorium.
A lottery-type drawing to determine initial seating for the groups
will be held at the meeting.

The

Tuesday, September 24, 1968

the signs on buildings after being
informed of the regulations.
In the prepared statement,
OConnell also stated Gentry
would not have been arrested
had he heeded the request of
the police officers.
The Sun editorial asked if
University police ever arrested
anyone for plastering campus
walls with notices of the
anannual Sigma Chi
Derby. Freshman Talent
Night. .concerts. .motion
pictures .or any of the other
publicly approved endeavors.
Miss Nora Munn,
provisional secretary of me
recently established student
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU), said the ACLU has
provided a lawyer for Gentry on
the basis that his arrest was
based on the content of the
posters.
Today I plastered the walls
with signs announcing the initial
meeting of th ACLU, and once I
was within 10 feet of a campus
policeman who didnt even look
my way, she said.
There are posters all over
the walls of buildings and not on
bulletin boards, including
student government signs, she
said.
Gary Goodrich, student body
vice-president, said he agreed the
arrest indicated selective law
enforcement.
Goodrich emphasised he was
speaking for himself and not for
student government.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24, 1968

Three Star General Tours ROTC Facilities

I JBU
l' : JjHP
iHi 1m %
. -. \ -&*?
Lieutenant General John H. THROCKMORTON
.. .greets ROTC personnel on brief three hour visit

Education Dean Appointment
Expected By Board Os Regents

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
UPs Administrative Council
is still without a full house.
Vacancies still remain on the
council an administrative and
advisory body composed of
deans of colleges, directors and
other administrators though
some vacancies already have
been filled.
According to Mel Sharpe,
assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, a new
dean of the College of Education
has been selected. Sharpe
declined, however, to name the
new dean, saying the
appointment must first be
Procter & Gamble
Holds Program
L.R. Wagner, a representative
of the Procter & Gamble
Engineering Division will present
a program on The Mechanical
Engineer in a Process Industry
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in room
211 of the Mechanical
Engineering Building.
The illustrated talk, open to
all interested, is sponsored by
the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers and the
Society of Automotive
Engineers.

The Colony House .
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz Union Building.
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is SJO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate typographical tone of all advertisements and to revise
pf turn awaycopy which it considers objectionable,
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving
typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one
day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion of an advertisement schedule to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before
next insertion.

approved by the Board ot
Regents at its next meeting.
It would be a little
premature to announce his name
before he is approved by the
regents, Sharpe said.
Dr. Bert L. Sharp has served
as acting dean of the College of
Education since last year, after
Dean Kimball Wiles was killed in
an auto accident.
Several positions on the
Administrative Council were
filled during the spring and
summer, including four deans
Robert E. Uhrig, former
chairman of the department of
nuclear engineering sciences, was
appointed to the position of
dean of the College of
Engineering, succeeding John
Nattress, the acting dean.
Dr. K. F. Finger was
appointed as dean of the College
of Pharmacy.
Two other colleges also
received new deans on July 1.
Dr. Harry H. Sisler, formerly the
chairman of the department of
chemistry, replaced Dr. Ralph E.
Page, who retired June 30 as
dean of the college of Arts and
Sciences
John Paul Jones, a professor
of journalism, became dean of
the College of Journalism and
Communications when his

VOLUNTARY POLICY DISCUSSED

predecessor, Rae O. Weimer,
stepped down.
Weimer was then appointed
special assistant to President
OConnell.
In addition, George W.
Croaker of the University of
Alabama became director of
sponsored research, and Dr.
Gustave A. Harrer became
director of the university
libraries. Herrer replaced Dr.
Margaret K. Goggin, who left
during the summer to take
another position.
Among thp positions still
unfilled is executive vice

Country Set clothes are sold at the nicest stores in town.

BvSYPWEV frasca
Alligator Staff Writer
Third Armv Commander, Lt.
Gen. John H. Throckmorton,
conducted an inspection tour of
the UF Army ROTC unit
Monday.
During a three hour stay on
campus, Throckmorton attended
a briefing conducted by ROTC
cadets charge of special units,
and presented the Legion of
Merit Medal to an instructor.
Major Carl J. Davis,
sophomore military science
instructor, received the medal
for exceptionally meritorious
service in Thailand from June
1966 to June 1968. Davis
joined the ROTC staff this fall.
Upon his arrival,
Throckmorton met with UF
President Stephen C. OConnell

president, vacated when Dr.
Frederick W. Conner left the
position to take up duties as the
vice president of academic
affairs.
Also open are the deanship of
the College of Business
Administration, with no one to
replace the departed Donald
Hart, and the directorship of the
Center for Latin American
Studies.
A newer vacancy occurred this
fall when Alan J. Robertson,
dean of university relations and
development, resigned.

and proceeded to the Army
ROTC unit sor T a briefing with
Col. Arlo Mitchell, Professor of
Military Science, and another
with cadets
a*
Throckmorton heard reports
from seven cadets, including
Brigade Commander John
McPhail. At the close of
individual briefings,
Throckmorton questioned the
cadets on their area of concern.
When Throckmorton asked
McPhail about his stay at Ft.
Bragg, N.C, this summer,
McPhail replied he felt he spent
too much time sitting down.
1 personally would have
enjoyed more physical work at
Bragg this summer, he said.
UFs new voluntary ROTC
policy was discussed when
Throckmorton asked Public
Information Officer Rodney
McGalliard if his office was
making a special effort to
interest more sophomore
students in the ROTC program.
Major Russell Ramsey,
assistant Prof, of military
science, pointed out to
T h roc km ort on t hat the
sophomores this year are faced
with a special predicament
because they took compulsory
ROTC last year and are faced
with the decision of returning
for the voluntary advanced
program. f
Ramsey said he handpicke
350 of his freshman students
and sent them letters last
summer inviting them to join the
ROTC unit
Over 20 of those
apparently have signed up, he
said



Nixon Leads. Harris Poll,
Wallace Gains Strength

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Rishard M. Nixon leads Hubert
H. Humphrey, 39 to 31 per cent,
in a Louis Harris survey
published Monday which also
showed George C. Wallace
gaining on both major
candidates.
The public opinion poll,
published by the Washington
Post, said 21 per cent of the
voters now favor Wallace, an
increase from 17 per cent in just
three weeks.
The former Alabama
governor is hurting the
Republican nominee more than
his Democratic opponent, Harris
reported. In a two-way race, he
said, Nixon would lead
Humphrey by 14 points instead
of eight, or 50 to 36 per cent.
The Harris survey was
conducted Sept. 11-13 among a
cross-section of 1,322 voters it
Carlton Quits
SG Position
Roger Carlton, 4BA, resigned
Monday as Student Government
secretary of the interior citing
academic reasons and possible
travel plans as his motives.
Carlton explained he planned
to attend law school after his
graduation and in order to
graduate on time he felt he had
to resign.
Ive been thinking about
getting my masters degree in
England before law school, he
said in regard to travel plans.
The secretary of the interior
is in charge of all student
government elections. Fall
elections are coming up the
fourth Thursday of this quarter.
Goodrich said he and Student
Body President Clyde Taylor
planned to meet Monday to
discuss possible successors for
Carlton. ^---
Corrections
The Alligator incorrectly
reported Monday the men of
Tau Kappa Epsilon did not have
a fraternity house since their old
one had been torn down. The
TKEs are living at 1236 S.W. Ist
St. until their new home is
finished.
A picture of AEPi Bruce Levy
was mistakenly labeled as one of
Roger Davis, another AEPi
brother

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had interviewed previously on
the eve of the Democratic
National Convention Aug. 25. In
that poll, Nixon led Humphrey
40 to 34 per cent.
The latest Gallup poll
conducted Sept. 3-7 gave Nixon
a 12 point lead over Humphrey,
43 to 31 per cent, with Wallace
taking 19 per cent of the vote.
Harris said Wallaces strength
was picking up among
independents, the wealthy, the
young and white Protestants,
arid in small towns and rural
areas.
The discontent of the
available choices in 1968 is
reflected in the phenomenon of
both major party candidates
polling less than 40 per cent of
the total vote only six weeks

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before election day, Harris said.
He noted that 43 per cent of
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefellers
former supporters are not ready
to vote for Nixon, and that 42
per cent of Sen. Eugene J.
McCarthys backers say they are
not inclined to vote for
Humphrey.
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Tuesday, September 24, Tha Florida AiNpator, I

Page 3



Page 4

l, Th# Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Saptambar 24.1368

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Ask A Pro
' o'
Worki on a college newspaper is one of the best wavs for a
student to quickly learn the practical aspects of the newspaper
ousin6ss
~ f i evera i 0f ur top edltors worked on the Alligator, and some
of these have now moved on to larger newspapers such as the
Washington Post. e
JACK NEASE
City Editor
St. Petersburg Times
NEWS-EDITORIAL ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS BUSINESS
* ~
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
" ROOM 330 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

# Mos£ Alligator staff writers
work about 20 hours a week
?
- -<* .. _ -- i
# Tftey an average of 2,000
words a week
*
# Tfcey are responsible for cover coverage
age coverage of all local, state, national,
and international news of in interest
terest interest to UF students
\ _


mm m
* Jjp
n " A-yL
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\



HHH Criticizes Publicity
Given Radical Protesters

TOLEDO, OHIO (UPI)
With tears on his cheeks and
sweat on his back, Hubert H.
Humphrey said Monday it was
nothing short of outrageous
that hippies, Yippies and Black
Panthers get more attention than
the majority of Americans.
Humphrey reserved a large
share of criticism to the news
you get about a handful of
malcontents on college
campuses and at demonstrations
such as draft card burnings
before local draft boards.
They represent a handful in
this country and theyve been
given disproportionate attention
and it is nothing short of
outrageous that this should
happen, he said.
It was Humphreys second
day in Ohio, where on Sunday
he hinted again that as President
he would order an early
reduction of American forces in
Vietnam.
Nixon, meanwhile, made
ready to depart later in the day
from his New York City
apartment, where he has been
relaxing since Saturday night,
for Milwaukee and the start of a
five-day campaign swing through
South Dakota, North Dakota,
Washington State, Idaho,
Colorado, Missouri, Kentucky,
Tennessee and Florida.
The GOP presidential
candidates position on the
politically hot question of gun
control was spelled out Friday
night before a statewide
television audience in
Pennsylvania.
The statement was probably
the most definitive he has made

I H&| # w | m mnii I^MMf > T^il7yr M T slliailK| iii aa i |iaiia i i |iaailia,lia,l8 *<
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f If yjjaj3B& :> .^flff
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B i 1 iiWB Bill in
Bill Alexander Bass Ted Hodgkin Drummer
Randy Morris Organ Bruce Bush Lead guitar
Tommie Morris Lead singer
THE POPULAR STYROPHOAM
SOULE MAKES BIG HIT AT
BACK TO SCHOOL DANCE
The Florida Union Barber Shop really know what they were doing when
they threw their back-to-school dance at the Reitz Union this past Thursday
night. They picked one of the hottest groups in this area to play before one
of the largest dances ever held at the I Inion. An estimated 2,000 students
listened and danced to the music that is sure to make the Styrophoam Soule
well known in this area. They specialize in Hendrix, Cream, and Soul music.
All of the members have over three years of musical experience and are
managed by Roy Morris They can be contacted at 244 N.W. 36th Terrace
or phone 37F-1270 after 6:00 p.m. for bookings on Friday and Saturday
nights. \ /?

UPI
NEWS
on the issue since the
assassination of Robert F.
Kennedy.
Responding to a panelists
general question on how he felt
about gun control, Nixon replied
that he favored the mail order
bills.
Second, I favor strong state
laws for licensing and
registration, he added.
In Atlanta, third party

Soviet Troops Take Over
Prague Hotels For W inter
PRAGUE (UPI) Soviet military authorities have taken over two
Prague hotels and ordered evacuation of the Czechoslovak armys
huge Milovice barracks near the capital as winter quarters for Russian
occupation troops, Czechoslovak military sources said Monday.
At the same time, Czechoslovak Communist Party sources said
Soviet attempts to pack the Prague delegation fn their favor may bring
further delay in top level talks scheduled in Moscow.
The Czechoslovak leaders had expected to go to Moscow last week
for talks with the Kremlin leaders. But the talks were postponed until
Tuesday and the Czechoslovak resistance to Soviet demands might
force a further delay.
Military sources said the evacuation of the Milovice barracks took
place during the past week and apparently was carried out to make
room for a large contingent of the occupation

presidential candidate Geoige C.
Wallace said Monday his choice
for a running mate, a real
surprise for everyone, will be
announced early next week.
Wallace said the man would
be a very prominent,
well-known personality, but he
decline to say whether the
nominee would be a southerner.
Wallace also predicted his
candidacy might put some of the
national pollsters out of
business, even though one now
shows him with support form 21
per cent of voters across the
nation. Weve got way more
than that, said Wallace.
Wallace appeared on a
nationally tevised news program
Sunday and wasjiost with Lester
Maddox at the Georgia
governors mansion open house.

Fortas Debate Scheduled I
For Senate Floor Action I
WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield said today he would call up for Senate debate either
Tuesday or Wednesday President Johnsons controversial nomination
of Abe Fortas to be chief justice.
White House sources conceded there was little more President
Johnson could do publicly to promote the nomination.
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' w ? fVt. rw. '>uc - *tty<* .#

Page 5



Page 6

i. Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24.1968


w t(P J H
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'^s!jf :: - iih)BFmJ|Wi mil *
j* : m*i *&& j^BHl *^mmXJt
GATO^G/R^^^^^
Today's Gator Giri is AOPi Sandy Unger. TNs platinum blond 3JM
digs modeling and white bikinis* Sandy's beauty has received
recognition in the Miss Miami Springs and the Miss Liberty beauty
contests.
Work Study Groups
Offer Student Jobs

Thanks to the UFs
work-study programs, students
who need a little more cash for
college can earn it by working at
any one of a number of
part-time jobs on campus.
There are presently 20
work-study jobs open in such
diverse areas as modeling, lab
work, library, typing, drafting,
graphic arts, accounting, and law
research.
Freshmen can earn up to
$1.50 an hour, sophomores
$1.70, juniors $ 1.80, and seniors
$2.00.
Starting in February, there
will be a $1.30 minimum wage.
Students can work up to 15
hours per week during school.
Full-time jobs are available
during the summer.
There are two types of
work-study programs, the Other
Pcrsonell Services and the
College Work Study Program.

St re its 18 W. Univ. Ave.
HfijlVDA
shapes the world
wheels
Some people have all the fun

The OPS, financed by state
money, employs 1,500 students
not on budget accounts. The
CWSP, 80% of the funds being
federally-allocated, 20% state
money, employs 400-500
students, primarily those of
low-income families.
To qualify, one must be a
full-time student and be making
normal progress toward a degree.
Interested students may
apply in Rm. 23 Tigert Hall.
WANT
ADS

SG Expands Text Sales

By GAYLE MCELROY
* Staff Writer
In direct competition with
campus bookstores, Student
Govegiment plans to expand a
book exchange to give the
students fairer prices.
In doing this, we hope the
bookstores will realize their first
obligation is to the students,
stressed Steve Zack,
administrative assistant to SG
President Clyde Taylor.
Zack added that this was just
one of several new programs to
be initiated or expanded during
the Fall quarter.
We are meeting with the
Board of Regents next Friday to
encourage a revision in their
operating manual, he said. It
needs to be revised to meet the

BE THE STYLE-SETTER AT THE GAME,
carry a... gooZTER BAG
BLUE AND A
BHBi
thehandbagwitfWspir IT
$7.95 INCLUDING TAX, POSTAGE
SEND NAME, ADDRESS, AND CHECK,CASH, OR MONEY ORDER
TOt BOOZTER BAGS, P.O. BOX 1144, SARASOTA. FLA.
PRINT SALE
Sept. 24 Sept. 26
v
1:00 9:00 pm
UNION BALLROOM
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
2nd Floor
TODAYS CLUE
In The Print Contest
Renaissance Artist


The nicest people. Honda
people. Theirs is a world
where things get done
quickly. Destinations are
reached just like that.
Parking problems dont
exist. Gas stations are
seldom visited. Joining
the people who have all
the fun is a low-cost propo proposition.
sition. proposition. And %ven though
Honda offers the largest
Parts and service operation
in the country, youll rarely
need it. Economy, performance,
quality and dependability
-thats Honda. And thats fun.

FAIRER PRICES!

needs of the community today, a
job the Council of Student Body
Presidents comprised of all
state university presidents
has been working on six
months.
Zack listed several new aides
to facilitate distribution of
football tickets. Deadline for
turning in I.D.s has been
expanded to the Monday before
each game. This will give the
student an added weekend to
secure a date, Zack said.
Additional ticket windows are
to be open through Tuesday
night to alleviate lines.
SG has expanded off-campus
housing authority to include
consumer products.
This defends the student
rights as far as housing goes and

problems of local merchants
Zacksaid.
Another expansion, he
added, is that the Public
Function Authority has taken in
Lyceum Productions. Polls will
be conducted to see what
entertainment the students want.
A Selective Service Center
to be opened by mid-quarter
is to make available materials
collected this summer concerning
rights and oblications as citizens
Expanding Camigras, a spring
carnival for Dollars for Scholars,
and purchasing permanent voting
machines are also on the ballot.
EVERY
COLLEGE
STUDENT
needs this
book
to increase
his ability to
learn
An understanding of the truth
contained in Science and
Health with Key to the Scrip Scriptures
tures Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy can
remove the pressure which con concerns
cerns concerns today's college student
upon whom increasing de demands
mands demands are being made for
academic excellence.
Christian Science calms fear
and gives to the student the full
assurance he needs in order to
learn easily and to evaluate
what he has learned. It teaches
that God is mans Mindhis
only Mindfrom which ema emanates
nates emanates all the intelligence he
needs, when and as he needs it.
Science and Health, the text textbook
book textbook of Christian Science, may
be read or examined, together
with, the Bible, in an atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere of quiet and peace, at any
Christian Science Reading
Room. Information about Sci Science
ence Science and Health may also be ob obtained
tained obtained on campus through the
Christian Science
Organization at
University of Florida
P.O. Box 3491 Univ. Sto.
Meeting Time 7:00 Thursday
Meeting Place Union Room 357
Dinner Reception
for all interested students
Sept. 26-5:30
Dining Room 150B Union
-



TO DEFEND GENTRY
New Student ACtU
Chartered On Campus

A student chapter of the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) is being organized on
campus.
The decision to form such a
chapter was made early last May,
according to Miss Norma Munn,
secretary for the new group.
The ACLU helps persons
arrested in incidents where their
civil rights have been breeched,
Miss Munn said
The ACLU does not solicit
help. People have to ask for it,
she continued. J
Gainesville already has one
ACLU chapter. Its help was
enlisted by at least one
demonstrator charged in last

WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer

1 N S T U DENT
GOVERNMENTS PIGSKIN
POKER: SGs main bloc heads,
that is, important figures in the
student government governmentadministered
administered governmentadministered bloc seating
program) will meet tonight in
the Union auditorium at 7:30 to
draw for places for their
respective groups.
IN UFS DARRYL
ZANUCKS: UFs annual
extravaganza takes one more
step toward realization when the
Gator Growl Committee meets
at 7:30 in room 349 of the
Union tonight.

I V
To introduce
the most elegant
pen On hL Expensive new
campus. -V,. Bk* Clic* for
big spenders
Only Bic would dare so torment a beauty like this. Not the girl...
the pen she's holding. It's the new luxury model Bic Clic.... designed
for scholarship athletes, lucky card players and other rich campus
socialites who can afford the expensive 49-cent price.
But don't let those delicate good looks fool you. Despite hor horrible
rible horrible punishment by mad scientists, the elegant Bic Clic still wrote
first time, every time.
Everything you wpnt in a fine pen, you II find in the new Bic
Oic. It's retractable. Refillable. Comes in 8 barrel colors. And like
all Bic pens, writes first time, every time...no matter what devilish
abuse sadistic students devise for it.
Wafermon-Bi
springs Dow Chemical protests
at the Reitz Union, Miss Munn
said.
The organization of the
student chapter did not have
anything to do with the Dow
demonstrations, Miss Munn
added.
There is a growing need for
ACLU activities on campus, she
said. Students tend not to
know what their rights are. She
is a board member of the local,
sponsoring chapter.
Miss Munn said the campus
ACLU already has one case on
the agenda. She said the chapter
has enlisted the aid of Richard
Wilson, local attorney, to defend

IN DISCOUNT CULTURE:
The Fine Arts Print Sale will
commence at one oclock this
afternoon in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union Ballroom. The sale lasts
till 9 tonight.
IN RIGHTEOUS PEOPLE:
The Young Americans for
Freedom Club gathers in room
347 of the Union tonight at 7.
IN FACULTY
GOVERNMENT: The University
Senate, the facultys parallel to
the Student Senate, will meet in
Dan McCarty Auditorium today
at 3 pjn.

Lavone L. Gentry, 2UC, charged
with defacing a campus building.
Lawyers donate their time to
such cases and are paid only for
travel expenses and incidentals,
Miss Munn explained.
She said many members of
the local chapter are students.
She said the campus chapter
signed up about 20 students last
week during registration.
The campus ACLU doesnt
really anticipate any static in
getting organized, she added.
Bill Cross, Reitz Union
assistant director of activities,
said the chapters application for
a university sanctioned charter
was approved May 27.
Any university chartered
organization can receive funds
from Student Bovemment, Cross
said.
Miss Munn said the campus
chapter doesnt expect to ask SG
for funds.
The new group is meeting
Friday at 8 p.m. in Room 349,
Reitz Union, she added.

Sheaffers big deal gets you through
29 term papers, 3 book reports,l7 exams,
52 quizzes and 6 months of homework.
SOrry about that. Sheaffer's big deal means you can
write twice as long. Because you
get the long-writing Sheaffer dollar
ballpoint plus an extra long-writing
49C refill free. All for just a dollar.
How much do you think you can
write? QUCACCCD*
The worlds longest writing dollar ballpoint pen. OnL/iriLn
mo
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ifilift
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BNAI BRUH HILL EL FOUNDATION
HIGH HOLY DAYS
YOM KIPPUR KOL NIDRE
October 1-7:00 p.m. Traditional
9:00 pjn. Liberal
Medical Center Auditorium
Tickets available at Hillel Office
YOM KIPPUR
October 2-9:30 a.m. Medical Center Auditorium
1:00 p.m. Yizkor
5:00 p.m. Neliah
New route to tne
FIAT world of fun
and convenience
FI A T 124
; work-n-play wagon w
Big, spacious Low priced, economical
the family outing car the family budget car
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the family fun car standard equipment. Includes
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the family dress-up" car If today. Baa
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506 E. University Ave. 3724373

Tuesday, September 24, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

1. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24, 1968

The Florida Alligator
'The price erf freedom
[is the exercise of responsibility."
PwMmJuAj Dave Doucette
s' Managing Editor
h Raul Ramirez James Cook
Executive Editor News Editor

to
~ ; r.' ' V'' -

Editors Viewpoint

Chicago Debacle .. What Lies Ahead?

Now that the? debacle in
Chicago loosely called a
national political convention is
ove*. it might be interesting,
though frightening, to look
ahead.
But first, a word about
Chicago.
Mayor Richard Daley and his
Chamber of Commerce tried
valiantly to explain away the
indiscriminate swinging of billy
clubs by uptight cops, but they
failed miserably in the TV
special which was broadcast by
stations all over the country.
For one thing, the film clips
selected did not ever show any
of the more than 40 newsmen
who were assaulted by police.
The crime, apparently, was
trying to let the people know
how it was -- supposedly a
cornerstone of enlightened
democracy.
The TV special did, however,
point ou' fairly completely that
many o the demonstrators
wanted confrontation. It is

unfortunate that a large number
of America's malcontents believe
violence is the only way to draw
national attention to their
grievances.
But what the TV report
along with a lot of Americans
failed to recognize is that despite
the fact that SOME protestors
were harassing police with
curses and bottles, that SOME
were armed with knives and
baseball bats and that SOME
were violating laws, not all the
young people in front of the
Hilton Hotel were there for
violence or law breaking. Most of
them were there for the best of
causes -a burning desire to
restore true democracy to
American politics, to prick the
consciences of 200 million
Americans and to express
peacefully their disdain for the
mistakes of a post-atom-bomb
generation.
For many of them, the price
for their hope in America was a
bloodied forehead.
Those who came for violence
got what they asked for and

what they deserved. But
democracy and America can
never flourish when innocent
blood mingles with guilty blood
indiscriminately.
Unfortunate though it was,
America must continue forward,
hopefully wiser, certainly
sadder.
Speaking of the future. .
What does a nation do when
its choices for leadership in these
days of relevance are Hubert
Humphrey, Richard Nixon and
George Wallace?
Humphrey, mellowing with
age, is no longer the liberal
intellectuals' Cinderella who
engineered the 1948 civil rights
plank and helped cause the
southern Dixiecrat walkout led
by Strom Thurmond.
Contrarily. lie has come
dangerously close to defending
the ..unbridled attack on
demonstrators., both guilty and
innocent.
And his expected softening

EDITORIAL
The alleged letters to U.S. Rep.
Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) calling the
Action Conference
hippie-oriented and
un-American have don e the
conference an injustice.
Rep. Sikes struck a low blow:
-- When he, who happens to be a
brigadier general in the Army
reserves, tipped the Pentagon about
the bigotted charges directed at the
conference;
-- When he initiated a formal
investigation into the actions of
Maj. Russell Ramsey, the Vietnam
veteran who was elected by the
conference as chairman.
- When he lent the prestige of his
office to the ignorance of those
1 who sent him letters.
I
-When he and

rOeadl
Wouldn't It
Be Funny?
By Dave Doucette

Someone just said: Wouldnt it be funny
if George Wallace were elected president?
Think about it. Wouldnt it be funny?
Wouldnt it be funny if the entire
country were run the way Alabama is?
Wouldn t it be funny if the country
were run by the type of radical right
wingism that Wallace preaches?

=By Harold Aldrich

on the war in Vietnam is still
just that: expected.
Nixon, who rode to fame on
the coattails of such imminent
and qualified public servants as
Dwight Eisenhower and Joe
McCarthy, seems to believe that
anyone who favors change is
being manipulated by Moscow
or Tel-Aviv.
Wallace found glory on the
steps of the University of
Alabama when, with flexed
chest and jutted jaw, he told a
federal marshall, Aint no
niggeigoin to to come in heah,
suh.
Faced with these alternatives,
Americans have little choice but
to increase their national
attendance record at church.

The Florida Alligator
Ftori
' /
Er2B32 U! "'' SS Ad,e S,n3 0, CeS oo n 3- R <* >*<*. Phom
.heTi""r d i" (he Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article ahd not those of the University of Florida.

unthinkingly stigmatized one of
the most creative attempts ever at
the UF to deal meaningfully with
agonizing problems.
Only time will tell the damage of
the blow which was struck at the
conference and the university.
But Action Conference members
should abound from the attack
with fists flying. They must now
become more determined than ever
to produce a reality of constructive
change in the university
community.
And they should wear their
stigma proudly, for if seeking
relevance is un-American, they
are in damned good company.
Sikes low blow, though unfair
and unexpected, must not be a
knock-out.

Wouldnt it be funny if freedom of
speech, assembly and the right to dissent
were quashed by the man who preaches
police-state tactics against those who speak
out against Americanism?
Wouldnt it be funny if civil rights
advances were devastated by a man who
openly defied the equality of the races by
refusing to admit a Negro student to the
University of Alabama?

Wouldnt it be funny if
the littic man who
preaches states rights
weakened the federal
government to the extent
that the United States
became 50 independent
states under a common,
but powerless, central
government?
Wouldnt it be funny if
men who criticize the
present policies of the
country are brutally
suppressed by the club of
policemen?
Wouldnt it be funny if
the country returned to
those thrilling days of
yesteryear that Wallace
and many others would
like to see?
Wouldnt it be funny?
Not really.



The Fifth Column

Blow Grass? No!...Suck Air
By Jason Straight

Time it was, the honeys only
had to worry about booze. After
all a girl has to be popular, right?
Because after being president of
Future Homemakers of America
and MYF, and after being voted
most popular along with her
boyfriend (who now has a
football scholarship to E.
Carolina State), this Bartow
Produce Queen is not going to
come up to UF and .. .and just
WILT, right? Nossir.
And sure people drink, but
mom gave her all the skinny on
that scene: horses necks, vodka
collins, sippin real slow, and the
tricks so die could pretend she
was drinking and nobody knew,
nobody thought she was a
prude, nobody laughed and
stopped her from being popular,
from succeeding in the college
social game, from getting
married and moving to
... Yes! ... to Tampa!

But the times are a-changing,
and every daddys daughter now
has to worry about, of course!
... the evuhl weed, the acrid
plant, that oF debbil pot.
And this is just a recent thing,
yunnerstan. Because even
though this hotweed factor has
been on campus for quite a

*
ls he really a candidate?

j .v.nv.%v j .%%w.w.w.v.t |-| 0 All iga to r liiC|ui zit o r
Trivia For Mind-Blowing
§ By LEWIS ROTHLEIN £
$ Alligator Columnist $
s

Good morning, ye unfathomable creatures
of the intellectual outside. (!) College is
x starting, and its now time to put our heads into
thinkable condition. Last year, if you recall, it
>: was brainosities, and this year its trivia.
Trivia questions to either a a) blow your,
mind, b) increase your knowledge, or c)
x increase your ego. With this in mind, unravel
: yourself and give it a try:
: 1. With that Administration, or with what
: campaigns, do you associate the slogans:
: a. The Big Stick
b. Fifty-four Forty or Fight
c. Back to Normalcy
:j d. Tippecanoe and Tyler too
e. The Good Neighbor Policy
: f. A Full Dinner Pail
g. A Chicken in Every Pot
: h. The Fair Deal.

OPEN FORUM:
AAiowlml DiMtot
There is no hope for the complacent man.

while, the Bartow honeys were
still golden. The reason was, the
only cats who lit up were easily
spotted; you know, long hair,
sandals, 8.0., the whole hippy
schtick.
No more. Now even the flies
toke up. A prime example would
day and a mind-messin
grass-blowin head by night. So
whats a girl to do? How can she
fake it, if itcan be faked at all? Is
her act now hopeless, obsolete,
is she forever doomed to
marrying a future grocery store
general manager?
No. Rest assured all you
Bartow home-making
Methodists; even you can do
your thing, be popular, not lose
your minds and succeed in the
good life here at UF. Good ol

X
2. What is the First name of Steve Spurriers
wife? %
3. Some people know the name of every s
actor in Gone With The Wind down to the
smallest part, but can you remember who
directed this all-time great movie?
4. What is the name of the man who George
Wallace was recently supposed to have $
announced as his V.P. candidate but for some
reason turned down? >
5. What is the difference in legal terms
between robbery and burglary? :j:
6. How does one unravel oneself?
The answers will appear in tomorrows %
paper. Try to hold the questions in the back of :£
your heads. ~
Till then, adieu, and have a good day. :
. I

uncle Jasons gonna save your
act.
All one has to do is suck air.
Dig it; when you blow grass the
gig is to keep as much smoke in
your lungs as long as possible.
Your toking skill is measured by
the amount of smoke you
exhale, the less the better.
So the trick, girls, is to
seemingly inhale a lot and exhale
little, i.e. s-u-c-k a-i-r. So when
you date passes the joint over,
suck in about 90 per cent air
from the comers of your mouth
along with the 10 per cent
smoke.
It is accepted practice among
heads to take in air along with
the smoke in order to cool the
smoke down. But what you do is
take almost all air and pretend
to hold your breath. After two
of three sticks you can stop with

College Life Rewarding

MR. EDITOR:
ORIENTATION IS NOW
OVER* AND CLASSES HAVE
BEGUN Those of you who are
new to this campus, over 7,000
of you have been skillfully
maneuvered through such tasks
as taking tests and registering.
You are now familiar with the
UFs apparatus in these area.
The orientation program,
which was headed by John
Dodson, was successful in
getting new students through the
tasks that confronted them last
week. But it was not designed to
familiarize them with some of
the real advantages and
opportunities the university
offers. Older students are aware
of these, and can augment the
information found in this
column.
In my years at the university
I have found that both the
administration and Student
Government, mostly the latter,
in realization of the virtual
cultural vacuum that Gainesville

absolutely no loss of face
because every seasoned head
knows that the more often one
smokes, the quicker the high.
Now, a few other pointers
and your charade will be
complete. To heads, the game is
the thing, the medium is the
message. One doesn't just sit and
smoke, one does the whole
jesuschristing ritual thing, dig?
Thus one joint is always
passed around at a time, with
incense burning, the Doors
playing and much mumbling of
such key words as groovy, man,
outasight, dig, hip, down,
bummer, fascists pigs,
industrial-military complex, and
oh wow. Learn to use these
words.
Never, never say marijuana or
mary jane. People that talk
about smoking marijuana still

represents, endeavor to bring to
campus as many of the finest
speakers and entertainers as
possible.
I have had the pleasure of
seeing Bob Hope; Ray Charles;
Feteif/ Paul and Mary; The
Lettermen; Art Buchwald;
Edward Kennedy; Roy Wilkins;
Harry Golden; Ferante and
Teicher; Henry Manchini; The
Chad Mitchell Trio, and and
several ballet companies,
theatrical companies, and one
and two man performances such
as A Wilde Night with Shaw,
Journey to Eldorado, An
Evening with Mark Twain, and
many more.
In addition to entertainment
from outside the campus, there
are the tremendously skilled

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7Vew A/atfz

Tuesday, September 24, The Florida Alligator,!

Folorida Players performing
major plays once each quarter,
and other theatrical
performances much more often.
My two years in Murphree
Area indicated to me how easy it
is to get wrapped up in such
dorm activities as water fights,
section adviser harrassment,
chess games, card games, and
bull shooting.
It is not my purpose here to
ask you to altogether refrain
from any of these worthwhile
activities. But I do mean to
suggest to you that if you let
your time here go by without
availing yourself of the
opportunities described above,
you will have missed out on
some of the best parts of college
llfe BARRY DIAMOND

JASON STRAIGHT
think that it is habit-forming and
leads to heroin and rape. And if
you hear someone use the term
pot then youre still safe
because that means he reads
Time mapzine and has two
friends who said they lit up once
this summer in New York City.
But if he talks about
blowing grass, then chances
are hes tried it and likes it. And
if he asks you to toke a couple
of sticks with him and then goof
on a new shipment of hash, you
better run, sweetheart, cause
that man is gonna jes mess up
you mind.
So dont run tight girls. When
this years Dudley Do-right asks
you out and waits till he picks
you up to tell you its tab-time,
(an that aint no diet Coke
either) you can still carry the
day, be popular, get married and
move to, Yes! ... to Panama
City!

Page 9



Page 10

L The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24,1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS =~?

fOR SALE
i ¥
S.VX*;*;*; ;<*X X*X X X*X XX<*X*X*X X*V*V.v.-
Topcon, Super-D f 1.4, finest 35mm
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fantastic buy .55% off list price Must
sell. Call 376-3578 after 6. (A-l-3t-p)
Lambretta motor scooter, 150 cc,
1964 4 speed. Low mileage, excellent
care & condition, SIOO. includes
helmet, tools. Call 376-3578 after 6.
Like-new $350. 32 6HP rider
mower bought May 1 only $250 am
getting tractor. Call 376-9786 to
arrange to see and try. (A-l-5t p)
New K+E Dec i- Lo n slide rule $20.00;
19 Philco tv, good condition, $25.
RCA tape recorder, runs well $lO.
call 378-7331 after 5 p.m. (A-l-2t-p)
TV, Motorola, 19 x 15 screen, good
picture, 5 yr. old. Stand included.
S6O. Call 372-2332 after 5.(A-l-3t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)


ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
U W K 5 n
I lI 1| If| £
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WANTED
:Â¥x*x-x-:'- Axx*x*x*X">:*:w.vv;v:*x:*:*:i
Two roommates wanted to share
house nw 29th rd. must be
determined to book it. Call
372-9284, ask for Wm. Bird.
(C-l-3t-p)
Wanted coed to share luxurious I br,
ac, dishwasher, Landmark Apt. Prefer
senior or grad student. Inquire
at Landmark apt. 156. (C-3t-p)
Roommate one female to share 1
bdr. apt. Call Terri 372-7343
University Gardens 718-Apt. 214.
(C-3t-l-p)
Fender Baseman Amp exc. condition
Top and Bottom $l5O. Call
378-7810 Or Come By apt. No. 62
French Quarter After 6:00 p.m.
(C-4t-l-p)
1
T
Female roommate wanted Two
bedroom upstairs apartment, $38.75
& utilities a month. Three blocks
from campus. 378-3238 620 SW 10
St. (C-l-st-p)
HOUSEWIFE DESIRES
HOUSEWORK. Ironing, days work.
Call before 10 p.m. 372-5269.
(C-2-lt-p)

WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Summit House. S4O mo. Air Cond. 1
block from campus. Call 378-5862.
(C-2-st-p)
FEMALE to share 75/mo. FURN.
APT. for 1,2, or 3 quarters. Come by
915 SW 2nd Ave., Apt. 7. (C-2-2t-p)
WANTED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share University Apt. Call at 1513
NW sth Ave. Afternoon or evening,
at Apt. 39.
(C-2-2t-p)
LAW OR GRAD STUDENT wanted
to share nicely furnished 3-bedroom
house near campus. Be quiet, poised.
Call Bill early evening at 378-2261.
(C-2-st-p)
v-XXVXvX-X'XX^X-XXV-vX-XvX'X-X-v.X*.;
HELP WANTED I
V *
Reliable student wanted to babysit
l'/i year old at 9th St. & 7th Ave.
SW. M 3:15-6:30, W 3:15-5:45 for
fall quarter. Must provide own
transportation. $7/week. call
376-0976. (E-l-2t-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
ext. 2049. (E l-Bt-c)
~' t
1,
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and
objectivity. Gain valuable experience
with the nations top college daily
work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
(E-l-tf-nc)
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330 J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-l-tf-nc)
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman, part time.
Discount Privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (E-2-st-c)
WANTED Male or Female curb
attendant. Apply 2310 SW 13th St.
or 1505 NW 13th St. JERRYS.
(E-2-10t-c)
GIRL FRIDAY wanted to clean and
iron for five upperclassmen. Once a
week. Good pay. Call Chris or Ron,
372-6885. Williamsburg, Apt. 84.
(E-2-2t-p)
Students Male Part time. Set your
own hours. Must be neat with car.
Apply University Inn, ask for Jim
Powell. 4 p.m. sharp, Mon., Tues.,
Wed. SSO weekly. (E-2-2t-p)
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for part
time or full time male personnel.
Better than average salary and good
chances for advancement. Now
-interviewing from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
daily. Apply in person, ARBYS
Restaurant, 1405 S.W. 13th St.
(E-2t-2-c)
G*
| NEED ZIPPY 1
| RESULTS? |
I |
ss S
GATOR
| classifieds!
*
vSvl'X^lvlvlvlvXsvlvlvlvV'V.V/.vX 1
<

..XvX.X.X-X-X-VXV.v.-X-X-XXvXvX'X-Xv:
HELP WANTED |
!; ...v.v.v.v.y.y.S'X
r
PART TIME DRAFTSMAN. 4th or
sth year Architectural student. Call
Norwood Hope, 376-5301. (E-2-st-p)
AUTOS
v *
Sx-x-x-x-x-x-xx-x-xx.x-x-x.vxx-xx-x-:
FOR SALE 1968 VW 21,000 miles.
Make an offer. Call Mrs. Hinton ext.
2973 Campus Credit Union.
(G-3t-l-C)
CORVAIR MONZA CONV. 1966.
4-speed. Ex. condition. $1200.00.
372-9689. (G-3t-2-p)

$ Order Gator Classifieds by Mail. §
& Use the Handy Form At Left. >j
v,
* SHOWN AT 1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30 HpSfrJ
iskARVVERNE R/i bdm fERRIS W*
Y **3? sis
I VrmiMiAmi nR t^.. f ..L- MAURiFd MAN I
Mm THE PCCCUCMS"
T 1 1 IN COLOR 2:00-4:00-6:00-8:00-10:00
They all had something to sel...
/fiMiilviVy courage... sex...corruption!
Heroes
I *ud,.L u s e [,, \\ ~ Ttru'yip'mnb
(NOW YOU HAVE A CHOICE^
1:05 2:45 4:25 2:00 3:52 Hf
6:05 7:45 9:25 5:44 7:36 9:28
A sportive t JpMfc I
! f l j he S J SSdiW'
fertility riles (and i J§f r D Q V|
wrongs) of western I IFCiL iOltlCl 9
society. I 1
I DEBORAH ; ;
! KERR especially I
!,0 DAVID NIVEN |
-sa|
'9 a f yW/
Color INCOLOR i Z
I Downfow*Gofntiyifle 1*
ACADEMY AWARD Jrt
| 231 W. Unlytrsity 4 y BEST DIRECTOR Ssf?
' NICHOtS
3:30 J OUSTIN HOFFMAN JT \ W j
5:30 ANNE BANCROFT > \ 09 2
7:30 / \ J| 2
9:30 TT^TT'TTTTTTTnB^

SERVICES
DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
WAKE UP ON TIME!! Call
Phone-Alarm, 378-6994, after 8:30
P.M. Ask for Rick. (M-l-st-p)
BABY CARE, 311 NW 15th Terrace,
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; $15.00, also,
half-day weeks and hourly.
Experienced, Mature and Reliable
Christian Home. Phone 376-2072.
DIED: 12:01 p.m., Sept. 23
Sammy Seminole hung by the neck
from Century Tower. His remains
may be viewed by the public at the
top of Century Tower until Fri.,
Sept. 27. (M-2-3t-c)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Liberty Linda speaking for
Let Freedom Ring. (M-l-st-p)



WANT
XTIC I 3.5.7.9. OUT AT 11:00
6 ACADEMY AWARDS!
P973 i
WTIksA t 3123
iop
I UUKHCE HARVEY HEATHER SEARS SIMONE SIGNORET
ALAN BATES ...
tame them' \SW
Time XT o.r.ct.d by V// I
7-45
in DE BROCA rZg&rht Jf\\'
Color _ COLOR by A£KSf~\ 1
. DELUXE r Tj££?T|(*V A*
ii i rwtiaa techniscope k j|s **
WEDNESDAY^
JUL STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
laHMfcl*!llil WELCOME^
Kll lllZulfi\ BACK
ftlkTOtfiE^L TUPENTS
BOX OFFICE OPEN AT 7:30 p.m.- SHOW STARTS 8:00
tWAIT DISNtfS
. iidSk
EDWARD G. DOROfIRY
VAN DYKE ROBiNSON PROtfiNE
RdMMd by BUENA VISTA DISTRIBUTION CO.. INC 1967 Walt Diny Production* TECHNICOLOR
2nd FEATURE 10:00 P.M. aIB%i%FII
l_ PAUL NEWMAN in "HOMBRE
.* i M
NOTHING SPEAKS SO LOUDLY
ON THIS CAMPUS AS
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. ..
and it can speak for you
Call your advertising representative
today. Let him show you how your
message can reach 27,000 people
' v
*
v lt's the best
# * bargain in town.

BY UNION BOARD
Fun Classes Offered

The Reitz Union Board for
Student Activities will present
several instructional classes this
fall. The cost of the classes
includes from six to eight
meetings and all instructions will
be held in the Reitz Union.
There will be two Painting
For Fun classes offered. The
classes will meetvfcr two hours
starting at 7:30 fuh. and the
cost will be $6 per person.
On Tuesdays, beginning Oct.
8, William Osbom will conduct a
class in Beginning Oil. Mrs.
Marion Sheehan will also
instruct a class in Water Colors
(Fruits and Flowers) on
Thursday nights
On Monday, Sept.3o,
Ballroom Dancing classes will
begin. The instructor will be
Mrs. Frances Kessler. The
meeting time will be from 7
until 9 pjn. and the cost will be
$8 per person
Bridge Lessons will be offered
by Ronald Schoenau for $7.50
per person. The classes will begin
Tuesday, Oct. 1 and wil last

|H||p
i mu c k

IN A CRISIS, it takes courage to
be a leader . courage to speak out
. . to point the way ... to say,
Follow Me! In a crisis, it takes
action to survive . the kind of de decisive
cisive decisive action that comes from a man
of sound instinct, as well as intelli intelligence.
gence. intelligence.
If America is to survive this crisis
... if the youth of America are to
inherit a sane and even promising
world, we must have courageous,
constructive leadership. The kind of
leadership that only George G.
Wallace of all Presidential can candidate
didates candidate has to offer. Thats why
young Americans who really think
support Wallace.

I A
-I gMf till 1629 K St., N.W.
IfnilTh TAK UfOIIAPO Washington, DC. 20006
yUU 111 IUI VfdllabC (202) 296 8192
I am years old and pledge to support George C. Wallace for President.
Please send me my membership card in YOUTH FOR WALLACE and the
Newsletter.
PRINT NAME
MAILING ADDRESS ;
CITY, STATE, ZIP
SIGNATURE PHONE

from 7:30 until 9 p.m.
N. Peter Altmanr. will
conduct a class in Self Defense
for Women. The class wil meet
on Mondays, beginning Oct. 14.
Meeting time will be from 7:30
until 9 p.m. and the cost will be
$7 per person
On Tuesdays, beginning
October 8, Charm Classes will
meet from 8 until 9:30 p.m.
Mrs. Anne Foster and Mrs.
Mildred Thompson will conduct
the classes. The cost will be $6

Union Print Sale
To Begin Today
Tired of your dull and drab living quarters already? The Reitz
Union Board is sponsoring a print sale beginning today and lasting
through Thursday that will offer a little culture and sparkle to bare
wslls*
Featuring prints from all periods of art, the sale will be held from
1-9 p.m. each day in the Union Ballroom.
An added feature of the print sale is the Artist Contest. There is
a clue in todays paper that will help identify a mystery painter. When
a student thinks he knows the artist, he should drop by the print sale
and enter the contest.
The prize, which goes to the first person correctly identifying this
famous person, is a framed print of the winner s choice.

Tuesday, September 24, The Florida Alligator,

THEY KNOW that it takes cour courage
age courage to stand up for America against
the pseudo intellectual professors,
the hippies, the press and the entire
liberal Establishment. And theyve
got that courage.
Thousands and thousands of
tomorrow*s leaders the thinking
young men and women of America
who have courage and who are
willing to act are joining
YOUTH FOR WALLACE. You
should join, too.
There are no dues. Send in the
coupon to receive your membership
card, the YFW Newsletter and a
copy of STAND UP FOR
AMERICA, the story of George
C. Wallace.

per person.
Instruction in Motion Picture
Techniques will be given on
Wednesday nights, beginning
Oct. 23. The classes wil meet
from 7:30 until 9:30 pjn. Earle
Jerrigan will conduct the classes
at a cost of $6 per person.
For further information and
registration Mrs. Nita Hawkins
should be contacted at
university ext. 2741 or room
310 of the Reitz Union.

Page 11



Page 12

!The Florid* Alligator, Tuentey, September 24,1968

Orange a d

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Tuesday, September 24,1968
Fine Arts Print Sale, Union
Ballroom, 1:00 p.m. 9:00
p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gator Growl: Skit Chairman's
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Beginning Fencing Clasr,
Registration, Intramural
Office, Fla. Gym
Union Board: Painting for Fun,
118 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 25,1968
Fine Arts Print Sale, Union
Balroom, 1:00 p.m. 9c 00
p.m.
Beginning Fencing Class:
Registration, Intramural
Office, Fla. Gym
Florida Speleological Society,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Benton Engineering Council,
President's Conference, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium:
Lecture, Colloquium room.
College tibrary, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Student Government
Production, sth DIMENSION,
prices are $1.50 and $2.00 for
everyone.
PUBLICATION OF EVENTS:
Students desiring publication of
an event should contact the
Calendar Secretary, Mrs. Parker,
Room 101, Reitz Union.

I Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance - Tmu^
I a llable for neW car loans FHA tttle 1 11011,6 Improvement
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
I GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Hours ; 800 gjn. 330 p.m. Mondoy through Friday

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
The Plaza of the Americas is a
place of free assembly; however,
to avoid more than one group
holding an event or
demonstration at the same time,
a register has been established in
the Public Functions Office, 101
Reitz Union. Any group wishing
to schedule an event at the Plaza
of the Americas is requested to
inform the Public Functions
Office. This is not an event
approval or a reservation but
merely a control to avoid
conflict on the Plaza and with
regularly scheduled events
occurring in the University
Auditorium. When a negative
decision must be made upon the
grounds of potential conflict,
the sponsoring organization is
free to seek a more suitable date
and arrangements.
DIVISION OF INFORMATION
SERVICES, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE
ORANGE & BLUE BULLETIN
SEPTEMBER 24,1968
ADMINISTRATE NOTICES
INAUGURAL ACTIVITIES:
President Stephen C. O'Connell
has cancelled second, third and
fourth period classes on
Tuesday, Oct. 8, so students,
faculty and staff may attend the
Inaugural Convocation.
Scholarship recipients are
particularly urged to be present
so they may be recognized at the
convocation.
Vice President Lester L. Hale
has announced that caps and
gowns may be picked up at the
bookstore Oct. 2-7, and may be
returned within 48 hours after
the convocation.
Faculty members are asked to
assemble in the Recreation
Room of the Florida
Gymnasium (basement level) at
9:15 a.m. to prepare for the
processional. Members of the
Administrative Council will
march as a separate unit of the
faculty and be seated together
on the main floor.
The following is a schedule of
pre-inaugural and inaugural
activities:

BLUB BULLETIN

PREINAUGURAL PROGRAM
Sunday, October 6
7 p.m. Lecture, "A University
Collects," University Galery
Auditorium 8 p.m. Reception
and opening of exhibit,
"University of Florida
Col I ec tion/Selection,"
University Gallery.
Monday, October 7
10:30 a.m. Dedication of
Space Sciences Research
Building, Arthur I.
Bless Auditorium
2 p.m. Symposium, 'The
Function of the University in
the Modem World,"
Reitz Union Auditorium.
INAUGURAL CONVOCATION
Tuesday, October 8
9:30 a.m. Processional begins,
Florida^ymnasium
4-6 p.m. Reception, the
President's home
8:15 p.m. University Chamber
Orchestra Concert, University
Auditorium
All faculty, staff, students
and spouses are invited to attend
the activities.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS: Exams in
French, German, Russian and
Spanish will be held Oct. 26,
1968. Deadline for paying fee to
University Cashier (Hub) is Sept
30. Receipt of payment must be
presented to the Graduate
School Office, 235 Tigert Hall,
vtfiere ticket of admission to the
examinations will be given.
FULBRIGHT GRANTS: Grants
for U.S. students who wil have
at least a bachelor's degree by
fall, 1969, for one-year's study
or research abroad are available
in reduced numbers on a
competitive basis.
Information and applications are
available from G. A. Farris,
Campus Fulbright Adviser,
International Center, south of
Walker Auditorium.

GENERAL NOTICES
DEBATE SQUAD MEETING:
First meeting of the fall quarter
will be Tuesday, Sept. 24, 7:30
p.m. in Room 347 of the Arts
and Sciences building (old
union). All interested students
are welcome.
ORANGE & BLUE
DEADLINES: The bulletin will
appear twice weekly, on
Tuesdays and Fridays. All
notices must be received by 5
p.m. Friday for the Tuesday
publication, and 5 p.m.
Wednesday for /the Friday
publication. Notices should be
in writing, signed by the person
submitting the notice and sent
to the Division of Information
Services, Building H., Campus.
Items for the Campus Calendar
should be sent to Public
Functions Office, Reitz Union.



FOR FALL QUARTER
Art Series Scheduled

A large part of the
entertainment that will be
available to University of Florida
students this fall is the seven arts
events planned by various
campus organizations. These
programs feature speakers,
entertainers and dramatic
groups.
This season ot entertainment
opens with the Union Board
Forums Committees
presentation of F. Lee Bailey on
Oct. 15. Mr. Bailey is one of
Americas most dynamic and
brilliant criminal lawyers and
defended Dr. Sam Sheppard in
his nationally famous trial. This
event will be held in the Reitz
Union Ballroom.
Florida Gym will be the
scene of the Interfratemity
Councils Fall Fralics on Oct. 25.
The Four Tops will be present
at this program.
Mantovani with his famous
strings will perform as a part of
the Student Government
Concert Series on Nov. 6. This
presentation will also take place
in the Flopda Gym.
<(A wvi ib \mMO\KbWi
I
MANTOVANI
.. .to appear in Student
Government Series

Welcome Students
Meet your friends at the
~ L&W CAFETERIA
a Jfl "THE Place toEat
Gainesville
| o money-saving Specials
I Every Day!
I i oNo Tipping .. Ever!
o Serving the Finest Foods
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fried Chicken roast beef
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ONLY Wl SPECIAL
LARGE SELECTION OF CRISP SALADS
HOME MADE PASTRIES, GARDEN VEGETABLES
H 313 W. University Ave.
Vz Block From Florida Thea.
TOUA I 11:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.l

MANU TUPOU
in Shakespeare's "Othello,"
Florida Players fall
production will be given
November 1 1-16. Sgt.
Musgraves Dance is the name
of this first presentation.
On Nov. 16 the Roger Wagner
Chorale will perform in the
Florida Gym. This is another
presentation of SGs Concert
Series.
Shakespeares Othello will
be presented by the National
Shakespeare Company on Nov.
18. This is the fall presentation
of the Sights and Sounds
Series sponsored by the Union
Board Fine Arts Committee.
This company is widely
acclaimed for its excellent
staging and masterful style.
The last program of the fall
will be another presentation by
Student Government.
Carmen, the most popular
French opera in modem history,
will be performed by the
Goldovsky Grand Opera
Theater. This presentation will
take place Nov. 22 in the' Florida
Gym.
Tickets for these programs
may be purchased from the
" IM V
UFs First
The UFs first All-America
football player was Dale
Vansickle, a spectacular end on
the 1928 UF squad.

Reitz Union Box Office, which
is open from 12 noon to 4:30
p.m. Monday thru Friday. It is
located in the Constans Theatre,
adjacent to the Student Union.
With the exception of the
Florida Players production, no
unpaid reservations will be
accepted. Tickets for students
will be limited to two (2) per
I.D.

PRICES ARE "AROUT.
Suede is the story herecombining with wool in John Meyer
clothes with a proper country air. Their thoroughbred tailoring
makes any rural scene. Pierced suede edges the brushed Shetland
cardigan s2l. And suede binds the pockets of the Port Ellen plaid
skirt with front pleats $ 19. Button-down oxford shirt $6.50.
All in brilliant colors. At discerning stores.
'
DON IGAN'S
1123 West University Avenue

New Cartoon Strip
Adopted By Alligator
The Dropouts, a syndicated cartoon strip by Howard Post, will be
published in the Alligator this fall.
It will feature a Laurel and Hardy type pair called Alf and Sandy
stranded on a desert island-Dropout Island.
Post has been an amatuer cartoonist for as long as he can
remember. He is currently living and working in Leonia, N.J. doing
everything from interior decorating to producing films.
The Alligator is the first college newspaper in the country to carry
this strip of philosophical humor.

Tuesday, September 24, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

t, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24,1968

; ~ v _ ;
Traffic Control Off To Good Start

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Many cars were turned away from four checkpoint areas
around the central campus Monday as campus police began
enforcing restrictions on driving in Area One.
Pictured is an example of what happened from 7:30 a.m.

' mam
s^^Hbbkh^mhhbhmhmmh

C
The newly-created campus traffic control system
got underway Monday in a successful but somewhat
confusing tone.
Many unauthorized people tried to come
through the checkpoints, said University Police
Chief Audie Shuler. There was a backup of traffic
at some points, where the policeman had to explain
the new policy to motorists, he added.
Shuler said that cars, motorcycles, and
pedestrians just dont mix. With the former two
eliminated, pedestrian traffic moved smoothly in
the center of campus, he said.
A system of four strategically-located control
points went into effect Monday to keep
unauthorized vehicles out of the main campus area.
The system is designed to allow pedestrians to
move more freely between classes. The policemen
will check parking stickers on cars going into main
campus reserved areas.
Conditions should get better as more people
understand the system and it will be successful,
Shuler said.

to 4 p.m. A cordial officer informs this driver that she is not
authorized to drive on central campus (top).
Reluctantly, she turns to leave (center) and drives away to
find better way to get where she was going (below).

Two Pools
ForDorms
Possible
By JO ANN LANGWORTHY
Alligator Staff Writer
The possibility of swimming
pools behind Broward and
Tolbert has put a hold on plans
for Camp Wauburg development,
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor said.
Both pools could be
completed in three months and
be in use by dorm residents in
spring quarter,Taylor said.
Because of higher costs than
anticipated, Lake Wauburg
would only be partially finished
by the summer quarter.
Taylor'said the original sum
earmarked for the Wauburg
project was about 3100,000
which was to come from
Student Government reserve
funds.
As we got furtherinto the
Wauburg project, he said, we
found it would take $130,000
for just a skeleton of what was
needed. The ultimate would run
about $250,000.
The ultimate would include a
snack bar, overnight facilities
and a paved road with a paved
parking lot.
The cost of providing one
pool would be less than
one-third the minimum needed
to develop Wauburg, Taylor
said. A second campus pool
could be buildt for less than
onp-half the minimum.
Director of Housing Harold
C. Riker is in favor of pools on
campus, Taylor said, and it is
hoped housing might be able to
help with the maintenance costs
of these pools.
According to Taylor nothing
definite can be decided until
proposed locations for the pools
are approved by the Campus
Planning and Development
Committee.
They are the one who can
determine if the ground is
suitable and available, Taylor
said.
The idea of campus pools was
taken from FSU and South
Florida.
From these examples,
Taylor said, it seems far more
students would be served by
even one pool than by the
further development of Camp
Waugurg, because the pools are
closer and more convenient.
Taylor added that plans to
improve Wauburg had not been
scrapped.
Waugurg will never be
dropped as a project, Taylor
said, but it mav have to be
improved in a piecemeal fashion.
Frats Rush
Over 1000
First quarter students, who
last year hesitated to pledge
fraternities because of the
increased load of the quarter
system, have seemingly
overcome the hesitation this
year, according to Bill
Sparkman, vice president of
Interfraternity Council.
Although no figures are
available of the number who
actually pledged, Sparkman said
at least 1,200 men expressed
interest in rushing.
Rush formalities ended last
Sunday, but there is still rushing
on an informal basis. Many of
the houses will be having open
rush throughout the quarter.



Intramural Head Plans More Coed Sports

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Graduate Bob Allen has
taken over the position vacated
by the death of Spurgeon Cherry
as head of Mens Intramurals.
Allens major goal will be to
create more coed activities
within the existing program, and
to expand whenever possible.
A graduate from UF in 1959
with a Masters in physical
education, Allen is presently
working towards his Doctorate
degree in education while
assuming the post of Intramural
head.
Allen, upon leaving school in
59- taught for four years at
Landon High School in
A&S Largest
The College of Arts and
Sciences was the largest upper
division college on the UF
campus last fall, with 3,009
students enrolled. The College of
Education was second with
2,234. Other upper division
colleges with more than 1,000
students were the College of
Engineering (1,480) and the
College of Business
Administration (1,253)

Gators "Soc It To Them

The sun never sets on- the
game of soccer. The only truly
international team sport, it is
played in 130 countries with the
group at Gainesville composed
of nearly 65 students from 18
different lands, and nine states
including Florida.
At times a team with players
representing 10 countries has
taken the field for a local game.
So big is soccer, it provides
the site for the worlds largest
stadium in Rio de Janeiro which
seats close to 200,000 making
our Rose Bowl with 102,000
capacity small in comparison.
Soccer came to Florida with
the formation of the University
of Florida Club in September,
1953, under the guidance of the
Department of Intramural
Athletics and Recreation of the
College of Physical Education
and Health.*
A major y contribution of
foreign students to the athletic
life of the campus, the group
was organized to give those boys
who have an active interest in
the game a chance to practice
and participate. The club is also
open to newcomers who are
willing to learn the fundamentals
of the game.
Celeo Rosa of Honduras, one
of the Clubs organizers in 1952,
was president and captain of the
group 1953-56, and his untiring
interest was instrumental in the
progress and growth of the

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Jacksonville and then transferred
to St. Petersburg Jr. College for
three years as the tennis coach.
With previous Intramural
activities restricted usually to
the men students and faculty,
Allen has hopes to gradually
reorganize this system.
On this quarters schedule is
co-ed bowling and Allen hopes
other activities will also become
coed.
Reorganization of dorm
leagues will also be on the
agenda for the upcoming seasons

Union Fall Bowling League
To Get Rolling In October

The fall season League
Bowling will get off to a rolling
start Oct. 7.
Five divisions in League
Bowling will be available to
students, faculty, and
fraternity-sorority participants.
The five divisions are: Male
Student; Female Student;
Student-Faculty; Faculty-Staff;
Fraternity-Sorority; and
Afternoon only.

The
Florida
Alligator
organization.
Alan C. Moore, Assistant
Professor in the Department of
Required Physical Education,
has been faculty advisor since
the club was formed. Moore
received All American
recognition while playing soccer
at Springfield College in
Massachusetts and is a former
soccer coach at the University of
North Carolina, and brought his
love of the game to Gainesville,
Recently, he cited soccer as a
growing sport in America, saying
that many small colleges have
picked the game up when the
prohibitive cost of football made
it necessary to drop from
intercollegiate competition, and
at the present time in Florida:
Rollins College, Stetson
University, Miami University,
Jacksonville University,
University of South Florida,
Miami-Dade Junior College,

for various activities.
Water basketball has been
dropped from the fraternity
leagues hut, says Allen, We will
make changes as we go along.
There will be a few changes now
and more later as we see where
changes need to be made.
About the Intramural
program Allen had this to say:
Its vital. But the value is in the
participation itself. It must be
well worth it or students
wouldnt participate like they
do.

The first meeting will bc
Monday, Oct. 7, Room 347.
The initial meeting will be
held in the Reitz Union at 6
p.m. or 9 p.m. depending on
individual preferences.
All leagues are sanctioned by
the Collegiate Division of
ABC/WIBC and or regular
ABC/WIBC.
Contact Patrick Day, games
area, room 6-50, Florida Union
for time schedules or additional
information about the leagues.

Embry-Riddle Aero Institute, St.
Leo College, Florida
Presbyterian, and Florida
Southern play soccer as a varsity
sport.
The highlight of last season
was winning of the West Coast
Championship in the final against
F.S.U. 4-0 in St. Petersburg.
The University of Florida
Soccer Clubs record in 1967
was 14 won, 1 lost, 1 tied.
Games this season will
include matches with Glyrieo
Navy Air Station Eglin Air
Force; University of South
Florida; Georgia Tech; Orlando
Soccer Club; St. Petersburg
Soccer Club; Maxwell Air Force
Base; and the homecoming game
with Florida Presbyterian.
It is interesting to note that
the University of Florida Soccer
Club has been defeated only
fifteen times since 1953, the
present record reading 129 won,
15 lost, and 14 tied.

ATTENTION
ALL UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
New accident insurance plan to go into
effect October 1, 1968.
Plan covers you and your family for accidents
occurring everywhere on airplanes, trains,
buses, in autos, on the job in the home,
in sports activities
LOW COST PAYROLL DEDUCTION
tO ENROLL
CALL PERSONNEL OFFICE IN THE HUB (EXT. 3165)
OR
CANNON -TREWEEK AGENCY
ENROLLMENT PERIOD ENDS OCTOBER 1, 1968 ACT NOW! I
UNDERWRITTEN BY I.NA,

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Tuesday. September 24, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 24, 1968

Heisman Hopefuls Romp,
But OJ Leading Pack

By STEVE SMILANICH
UPI Sports Writer
OJ. Simpson, the king of last
years college football heroes, is
showing no signs of abdicating
his title.
Simpson, out to gain the only
major award which eluded him
last year, the Heisman Trophy,
got a running start toward that
goal Saturday when the
powerful University of Southern
California halfback led the
defending national champion
Trojans to a 29-20 conquest of
Minnesota.
Purdues ( Lerojjr Keyes,
Simpsons chief challenger for
the Heisman Trophy, also had an
outstanding day in leading the
Boilermakers to a 44-6 route of
Virginia.
But Keyes effort couldnt
match that of Simpson, whose
clutch running against the
Golden Gophers was reminiscent
of last year when he pulled the
Trojans to victory over UCLA
and Indiana with swift surges to
the goal. The USC speedster
tallied four touchdowns in the
season-opening win over
Minnesota.
Simpson broke through for
two quick touchdowns in the
final quarter the last with a
minute and a half to go to give
the Trojans the hard-earned win.
Notre Dames Terry

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Harfratty, also a Heisman
hopeful, passed for a pair of
touchdowns as the Irish turned
on tlie power in the second half
to crush Oklahoma, 45-21.
Keyes and Hanratty engage in
a personal duel as Purdue and
Notre Dame tangle in the biggest

Game Greyhounds
Continue Chartering

A limited number of seats
remain for the University of
Floridas Alachua County
Alumni Club charter bus trip to
Tallahassee for the Florida-FSU
football game Sept. 28.
Round trip cost, including
tax and refreshments aboard the
bus, is $6.50 per person. Game
tickets must be purchased
separately.
Individuals may order as
many bus trip tickets as they
wish as long as they have
contributed at least $lO to the
Alumni Assoicaitions 1968
Annual Giving Program.
The bus will depart at 8:30
a.m. from the campus parking
lot west of the Century Tower
and University Auditorium.
Arrival in Tallahassee will enable
passengers to attend FSUs
pre-game barbecue at Tully
Gymnasium. Departure from the
FSU campus is planned
immediately following the grid
contest.

game of the early season next
Saturday at South Bend, Ind.
USC will continue to
campaign in the Midwest with
the Trojans favored to down
Northwestern, a 28-7 losej to
Miami Fla. last Friday night.

Checks payable to Alachua
County Alumni Club may be
sent to Alvin Alsobrook, 1725
N.W. 20th Way, or Bob Lynch,
111 N.W. 26th St., until Sept.
23. Telephone reservations
(376-9677 or 376-0030) will be
accepted until Sept. 26.

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