Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Fo/. 67, No. 7

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SMASHING
Gator halfback Tom Christian is helped off the field after a
nose-crushing play during the Air Force game Saturday.

EXPERIMENT IN SELF-GOVERNMENT

Tolbert Area To Set Own Rules

By STEPHEN J. ROBITAILLE
Alligator Staff Writer
The days of dorm cops and
directives from the head
counselor concerning drinking in
the halls may soon be over if an
experiment underway in the
Tolbert Area is a success.
The experiment involves a
group of some 900 men and
women residents who will be
living and working together. The
plan calls for the students to
make their own rules and to
organize their own floor and
area governing bodies.
The experiment may prove
significant to the university. It

Gators Clip Falcons Wings, 23-20
. N,,. 4

The
-.-; .. \.. . 7 ";',' \. r ~ 7^
Florida Alligator

INTERPRETIVE

< '*

rnay reveal which philosophy of
student administration will
eventually be adopted here: in
loco parentis and restriction or
student participation and
personal responsibility.
The idea for the experiment
began in the summer of 1967,
when a study was made of the
present dorm area governments
and the affects they had on

University of Florida, Gainesville

Investigation Prompts
Ramsey Resignation

By DAVE REDDICK
Assistant Executive Editor
Maj. Russell Ramsey, a UF
ROTC instructor, resigned last
week as chairman of the UF
Action Conference following an
Army investigation called for by
a lI.S. Congressman.
The investigation was
requested by Rep. Bob Sikes
{D-Fla.) after he reported
receiving less than 20 letters
calling the conference
un-American and
hippyoriented.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, who set up the
conference in May has
repudiated the charges and
contends the conference has
acted in the best American
Tradition.
Members of the conference
expressed surprise and
disdain at the charges.

student discipline. The first
study showed a change was
needed, but positive suggestions
were not readilv apparent.
Margaret Beistle, co-counselor
for the Tolbert Area, explained
that students on a national
level have attained a higher
intellect and demand a more
active part in campus affairs.
This compared,she said,

AS f ACTION CHAIRMAN

| 1
7 have always been a strong supporter of
the UF. . I know nothing of this
organization (Action Conference), I have no
interest in the organizationUS. Rep. Bob
Sikes. Editorial page 8

In Washington D.C. Friday,
Sikes said he had received less
than 20 letters, some from UF
students, questioning Ramseys

Effigy Hanging Set
For FSU Seminole

FSITs Sammy Seminole will
be hung in effigy today as part
of a week-long project to boost
student spirit for Saturdays
football game with FSU.
Action begins at 12:05 beside
Century Tower, when Student
Body President Clyde Taylor is

with a UF study which showed
that students are more mature.
. that they needed to be given
more responsibilities for
themselves.
Students were later
questioned about their opinions
regarding self-government, and
the majority
confidence that they could make
more decisions for themselves,
without the danger of a
breakdown in order on the
campus.
Positive growth, explained
Mrs. Beistle, is really the basis
for this change. The idea that
(SEE 'TOLBEftT' PAGE 39)

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Monday, September 23, 1968

chairmanship in an organization
which they felt had leftist
leanings.
(SEE 'RAMSEY' PAGE 2)

expected to be on hand to hang
the Seminole.
Members of the band will
play solemn music for the
hanging, and the football squad
will also be represented at the
affair.
Sammy will be left to hang
from Century Tower unti
Friday night, when he wil be
taken down, placed in a coffin,
and burned at a pep rally and
bonfire.
Before Fridays pep rally the
band and cheerleaders will split
into two groups to lead marches
through the campus to the Reitz
Union Colonnade, where the
rally will take place.
The first group will begin
marching at 6 p.m. between
Graham and Hume Halls,
continue up Fraternity Row,
pass Tolbert Area, and continue
up to the colonnade.
The second group, starting at
the same time, will begin in
front of the Sigma Nu Fraternity
House, march up University
Avenue to 13th Street, continue
on 13th Street to Radio Road,
and march down Radio Road to
the colonnade.
(SEE 'SEMINOLE'PAGE 2)

See Story
Pago 42



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23, 1968

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-
RAINED-IN RALLY
, *4.;
A sudden shower drove the crowd, band and weren't dampened and the cheering continued
cheerleaders inside the stadium for the first fifteen outside witht the first sign of clearing,
minutes of the Air Force pep rally Friday. Spirits
Conferees f Surprised
By Ramsey Resignation

FROM PAGE ONE
In an Aug. 27 letter to
OConnell, Ramsey said he was
resigning because of a certain
amount of controversial
publicity (which) has been
associated with the conference.
Ramsey said the time
necessary to initiate the
changeover to voluntary ROTC
would restrict his effectiveness
as chairman. This also led to his
decision to quit, he said.
I made no recommenda recommendations,
tions, recommendations, I made no charges and I
have brought no pressure to bear
on Majoramsey, Sikes said.
I have always been a strong
supporter of the UF. . I know
nothing about this organization
(the Action Conference), I have
no interest in the organization. I
have said nothing about it in so
far as what it stands for. I simply
turned the letters over to the
Army, he added.
Sikes is a Major General in

Home Game Bloc Seating
Applications Taken Tonight

All groups planning to sit in
blocs at home football games
this season should have a
representative at a meeting 7:30
p.m. in the Reitz Union
Auditorium.
At the meeting a drawing will
be held to determine initial
seating, Miles Wilkin, secretary
of athletics,said. Only fraternities,

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate typographical tone of all advertisements and to revise
or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving
typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one
day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion of an advertisement schedule to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before
next insertion.

Wm iK^Hr
BLc W£ Mr
Wj& W -. M MSTEPHEN
STEPHEN MSTEPHEN O'CONNELL
. .set up conference
the Army Reserve.
The conference is made up of
75 people, with equal numbers
of faculty, administrators and
students.

dorm areas and service
organizations will be considered
for the bloc seating.
The purpose of the drawing is
to define the new ticket policy
and explain how the blocs will
rotate during the year. The
troup seating committee will
meet tonight at 7:30 to approve
seating applications.

During the summer, the
conference made many
recommendations, including
voluntary class attendance, an
end to Negro discrimination on
campus, and freedom of
expression under the law.
Rather than be investigated
by anyone, OConnell said in a
letter to Sikes, I take the
initiative and extend to you, and
any other person interested, an
invitation to attend any of the
conference meetings.
Staff Meets
There will be a staff
meeting tonight at 8 oclock
in the Alligator offices, room
330, Reitz Union.
Anyone interested in
joining the newspaper staff is
invited to attend.
Refreshments will be served.

AT
ANTOINES
SANDWICH AND ICE CREAM SHOP
ACROSS FROM MURPHREE DORMS
TODAY & TUESDAY
FREE
LARGE GRAPEADE OR LEMONADE WITH ALL ORDERS
''* f

frankfurters
STEAMED
IN BEER

Seminole To Hang Today

FROM PAGE OHE
Both groups are to meet at 7
p.m. for the pep rally, when
former UF student Red
Mitch urn will emcee and Head
Coach Ray Graves will speak.
The football squad will also

X
Gator Ads Sell I

ANTOINES
FAMOUS
SUBMARINE SANDWICH

be present.
The Union Board for Student
Activities, which is sponsoring
tire weeks activities, is also
planning to have the bells
normally played between classes
from Century Tower replaced
with the sounding of a growling
gator.

BAR-B-O-BEEF
BASKET
includes cole slaw,
potato chips



.^i^.
MHB^B
ll^^^B
B B. .B B_B
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BBB|
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.- '' .. #-
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' ft < . ' fr.
*
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\, *' ,
By now youve probably heard everything there is to hear about Gatorade.
So you know why athletes drink quarts of it while theyre being athletic.
But what you havent heard is how weve turned this drink
of athletes into the drink of regular people. Just by adding bubbles.
The good taste of cola. And by keeping everything else the same.
~ Available wherever soft drinks are sold.
# B


JtOYAL CROWN MTIUU W OW-ANJXVOAINIfVILL*. j

Monday, September 23.1968, Tha Floridi Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

1. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23, 1968

U. S. lmpressed Bv Russian Space Flight

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Soviet Unions successful lunar
orbit and return of an unmanned
spaceship impressed U.S. space
officials Sunday. One said there
was a very slim chance the
United States might try to go
the Russians one better by years
end.
The Soviet feat with Zond 5,
however, served to underscore
the observation of James E.
Justice Signs
Reservist's
' <
Reprieve
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Justice William 0. Douglas
granted a temporary stay
Sunday for 93 Vietnam-bound
Army reservists from New York
who are protesting their callup
as illegal.
The servicemens lawyers
appealed to Douglas after their
application was denied Saturday
by Chief Justice Earl Warren.
The transfer of the 83
reservists from Schenectady, N.
Y., and 10 from New York City
was suspended until the full
Supreme Court can consider
their appeal after it convenes
for its fall term Oct. 7.
Warren earlier had denied and
Douglas subsequently granted a
similar plea from 113 reservists
from Cleveland, Ohio.
Both groups are challenging
the legality of a reserve callup
last May. The contend that
reservists cannot be mobilized
for extended active duty
without a declaration of war or
national emergency.
W allace VP
Choice Soon
ATLANTA (UPI) Third
party presidential candidate
George Wallace said he would
announce his running mate this
week, but declined to say what
day or where.
Wallace was greeted by about
30 supporters at an open house
at the Georgia governors
mansion. Gov. Lester Maddox
said that there would have been
more had they found out sooner
that Wallace would make a stop.
'Mass Walkout
WASHINGTON (UPI)
About half of the congregation
at St. Matthew's Cathedral
walked out in quiet protest
Sunday when Patrick Cardinal
OBoyle publicly chastised
Roman Catholics who disagree,
with Pop Pauls stand against
artificial contraception.-
Those who remained in their
pews gave the cardinal a- rare
standing ovation after he
finished reading a four-page
letter sent to all 130 pastors in
the Washington < archdiocese
explaining why members of the
church should follow the Pope's
controversial encyclical on birth
control-.

Webb, retiring administrator of
the National Aeronatics and
Space Administration last week
that the United States was
second in the space race and
likely to mrain so far several
years.
Rep. Olin Teague, D-Tex.,
chairman of the House Manned
Spaceflight subcommittee, said
he hoped the Russian
achievement would cause some
stir in Congress which is
increasingly inclined to turn to
the space program as a likely
place to make budget cuts. The
Russians again did someth ing-wc
have not done. said Teague. We
slept until the Sputnik". That
may be what we are doing now.
Attention has focused on the
second planned Apollo mission
in December, to be launched if
the first such shot Oct. 11 is
successful in orbiting three
astronauts around the earth for
10 days.

LBJ, Pope Peace
Policies Are Similar

STONEWALL, TEX. (UPI)
President Johnson attended
church Sunday where he heard a
Roman Catholic archbishop
defend his Vietnam War policy
as being basically the same as the
papal peace program.
Archbishop Robert E. Lucey
of San Antonio told a gathering
of several hundred people that
the Presidents war policy is
what we call the papal peace
program,
The 7 7-year-old religious
leader, who has known a
President since 1941, said the
papal peace program was
basically that when unjust
aggression begins, the peac£
loving nations must do
something about it.
Luceys comments came at
the dedication of the new
rectory at St. Francis Xavier
Roman Catholic Church

a SPECIAL NOTICE [
To all students and university personnel
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Julian Scheer. assistant NASA
administrator, said there is a
slim, very" slim, chance that we
could extend the December shot
to circle the moon.
Teague said there wa..
considerable discussion going
on in the space agency as to
what exactly the December shot
should do. He "The
Russian success should make our
people stop and take'a new look
at our program.
But Scheer said Zond 5
would have no effect on .U.S.
man-on-the-moon plans. "We
have a carefully lined-out
program and we will accomplish
each milestone as our capability
develops without regard to the
Soviet program, he said.
The timetable calls for a least
five Apollo flights next year and,
if all goes well, a manned landing

following regualr mormgn
services.
Lucey also told Johnson, who
was standing directly behind him
the the doorway of the talking,
/those of us who love him
Johnson regret deeply that he
does not choose to run.
The archbishop then listed
the social reforms that Johnson
has brought about during his
presidency and said that in the
field of international relations he
has been particularly helpful.
The list of achievements given
by the archbishop for Johnson's
domestic accomplishments were
basically the same list Johnson
himself has been fond of reciting
in recent months.
But the bilk of Luceys
lengthy talk concerned Vietnam
and the rightness of the war.

on the moon by the end of
1968.
Scheer attributed the Soviets''
latest achievement to a
sophisticated spacecraft which
can be controlled precisely."
What is significant is that it
iias returned to earth. he said.

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Page 5



Page 6

L The Florida Alligator. Monday. September 23.1968

UF Sophomore
Charged With
Defacing Walls
A UF sophomore charged with
defacing a UF building goes on
trial in Gainesville Municipal
Court October 1.
Lavon Louis Gentry, 3101
SW 34th St., was arrested Aug. 9
and charged with placing signs
on the walls of buddings without
permission.
Gentry was first picked up on
the night of Aug. 8 when he and
Bobby Queams, of die same
address, were allegedly placing
leaflets on campus buddings and
on a stop sign.
They told police at that time
they represented die Southern
Student Organizing Committee
but could not give them the
name of a person in charge. The
police informed Gentry and
Queams they needed the
permission of Lester Hale, UF
Vice-President of Student
Affairs, to (dace any signs on
buildings.
According to police reports,
both were released without
being charged.
At 1:25 a.m. the next day,
Gentry was arrested again on the
main part of campus and
charged with wilfully and
maliciously defacing a budding.
He was later released on $25.
bond.
Lt. Vernon HoUmun of die
University Police Department
said Gentry was arrested and
charged because he had already
been told not to place the signs
until he had authorized
permission.
We:ve never arrested anyone
(Mi this charge before because we
never had to catch them twice.
The arrest had nothing to do
with the content of the signs,
Holliman said.
Helmet Rule
Still In Force
State statutes requiring all
motor scooter and motorcycle
drivers and passengers to wear
protective helmets wdl be
enforced both on and off
campus, Police Chief Audie
Shuler announced Friday.

Florida String Quartet
To Present First Concert
Earl C. Groth, oboe, assisted by Geraldine Graham, soprano and
the Florida String Quartet will present the first UF faculty concert of
die year Oct. lat 8:15 in the University Auditorium.
Included in the concert will be the Concerto Grosso No. 8 in B
flat, by Handel; Ten Blake Songs for Soprano and Oboe, by
Vaughan Williams; the Quintet in A Major, Opus 45, No. 4, by
Luigi Boccherini; and the Bach Cantata No. 202, Weichet nur
betrubte Schatten.
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DROPOUTS

Comedianob Hope
Running For Pres.

WICHITA,. Kan.--(UPI)-
Comedian Bob Hope says he will
join the presidential race by
announcing his candidacy on a
nationwide telecast next
Wednesday.
Hope said he will declare
under the name of Gaylord
Goodfellow, a bachelor
surrounded by six beautiful girls.
You have your politics; Ill
have mine, the veteran comic
quipped. He was in town for a
Shrine ceremonial session
Friday.
John Waynes
Green Beret
Is Snatched
LAGRANGE, Ga. (UPI)
Honors,, the green beret has
been stolen. The one that John
Wayne wore yet.
The headpiece was on display
at the LaGrange Theater. You
guessed it, The Green Beret
was the featured screen
attraction.
The beret was given to Bill
Bowen, a LaGrange resident,
who served as a standin for
Wayne during the filming of the
movie, all about the Vietnam
war, at Fort Benning.
Frank Jackson, LaGrange
Theater manager, said a reward
was being offered for the return
of the beret which was snatched
sometime between 9:30 and
10:45 pjn. Wednesday night.
No charges would be filed
either, he said.

Asked to assess the
presidential race, Hope said,
Well, everybodys running
except the fugitive, the Muskie is
a lesser-known Spiro Agnew.
He referred to the
Democratic vice presidential
candidate, Edmund Muskie.
Agnew is the GOP vice
presidential hopeful.
In response to a question
whether he were a two-party
man, Hope said: \
It depends on whos there.
Actually there are lot of
interesting people running for
president. In fact I was at
Chicago entertaining the troops
at the Democratic National
Convention.
And the Republican
convention was the most
exciting thing since Lawrence
Welks bubble machine broke
down.

WELCOME UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
WIN FREE
A PORTABLE STEREO OR AUTO TAPE PLAYER
Drawing will be held Saturday, October 12th. Enter
as many times as you wish; you need not be present
to win! Come in to either of our stores and fill out
the official Drawing Coupon. No purchase necessary
and you need not be present to win.
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'University Report Seeking BSP Funds?

By RICHARD THOMPSON
Alligator Staff Writer
The con t rove rsi al
two-month-old University
Report, the second UF campus
student newspaper, may seek
official blessing and financial
support from the Board of
Student Publications (BSP) this
Fall.
NO MONEY
For the time being, however,
there wont be any money to
match whatever official status
the Report could receive from
the board. Most of the $93,000
budgeted for student
publications this year is headed
for the coffers of the Florida
Alligator, only official student
campus newspaper. The balance
is committed.
UF Vice President for student
affairs, Lester Hale, says he and
Report Editor Richard Martin
have a gentlemans agreement
to let me know in the immediate
future if they plan to go befo
the board.
Hale says the administration
wont insist the Report come
under campus jurisdication so
long as it is a non-university non-universityconnected
connected non-universityconnected paper, free and
doesnt affect the orderliness of
the campus in its distribution.
Many administration officials
question the Report not having
to play by the rules, but
generally agree that the
university shouldt have editorial
control powers so long as the
paper is a) not under the boards
jurisdiction, b) is free, c)is not
represented as an official
university paper, d) does not
affect the orderliness of the
campus in its distribution and
obeys the laws.
TALE UNFOLDED
Several off-campus
newspapers have reared their
heads in the past but have gone
under either because of lack of
continuity in management or
scarcity of funds
The tale of the possibility of
two official, free student
newspapers unfolded slowly this
summer amid mixed campus
reaction.
Last April, former Alligator
Editor Steve Hull wrote an
editorial criticizing university
administration procedures in the
Marshall Jones tenure hearing.
Hulls editorial was censored by

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the BSP and for two days the
Alligators editorial page was
blank.
Martin, a third-year medical
student, says that is one of the
reasons the first edition of the
Report went to press July 17.
INVOLVEMENT
Martin said the Report, which
averages 4-8 pages, also was
printed because a) the Alligator
was lacking in depth and
analysis, b) because the
students and faculty should be
involved together in the
educational process, c) the
need for a viewspaper and d)
for the fun of it.
To puj the Report together
Martin called on the skills of his
journalist wife, Eunice ;
Executive Editor Howell
Ferguson, last year law student
and son of State Board of
Regents Chairman Chester
Ferguson, and Bill Huey,
sociology graduate student.
Martin also tapped St.
Petersburg Times stringer Jamie
Jobb, 4JM, for sports.
For moral support the Report
called on Student Government
Vice President Gary Goodrich,
and they got it when Goodrich
endorsed the Report and then
helped to get money to place a
Student Government ad in the
paper. Money has been the
Reports greatest adversary.
Goodrich says he has no
complaint with the Alligator.
This is really a question of
student rights. Ive worked with
the publications board and
student government and they
feel that anytime anyone writes
anything it is subject to review
and censorship.
SENATE VOTE
Additional moral support
came when the Student Senate
voted affirmative July 2 on the
question of a new newspaper.
For respectability the Report
called on campus professors and
coaches. Head Coach Ray Graves
wrote a column, so did
Gatorades daddy, Dr. Robert
Cade.
Visual respectability, a UF
emblem on the masthead, was
taken off for last weeks issue at
the insistence of Hale.
Every Monday night after the
dishes and pots and pans are

NEW OFF-CAMPUS WEEKLY

pushed aside at the Martin
home, staff members move into
the kitchen to cut out and paste
up all night until the paper is
ready for the press.
The kitchen weekly relies on
articles contributed. All out staff
members work free, Martin
says.
NEW LEFT
Asked about the criticism the
Report was a refuge for the
politics of the New Left, Martin
said, thats true. "But its also
true we print articles for the
YAF (conservative Young
Americans For Freedom).
Quality is our only editorial
consideration.
Many campus officials
partially agree with Martin when
he says the Alligator was falling
down in its job and lacked
depth.
vice President Hale is one of
them! I always felt the
Alligaotr could have better
served the campus with depth
reporting, but it relied too much
on letters to the editor and
occasional guest columns.
Even Alligator Editor Harold
Aldrich, 4JM from Tampa,
thinks the Report would not be
here if it were not filling a
student need in this day of
confrontation. And that is, to
serve as an outlet for their
opinions and ideas.
Aldrich added, we cant
compete with them in views and
they cant compete with us in
news.
Partially agreeing with
Aldrich is last years BSP
Chairman Dr. Ralph Thompson.
I think the campus has a better
paper in terms of news,
Thompson said, an d
added: Views are secondary to
the ~ basic purpose of a
newspaper, communication of
events and the basic need to
know.
Asked if he thought this
years board, composed of four
students and four faculty, would
be receptive to the request for a
second official paper, Thompson
said he doesnt know how the
board would react.
Thompson, a business
administration professor, said he
doesnt think you find
competition between
publically-subsidized papers
necessarily a healthy thing.

Inefficiency could easily result
through split funds.
Other officials said the
competition would help. This is
good for the Alligator in that it
will instill a stronger desire for
quality, Alligator Editorial
Advisor Norman Going said.
The Gator wont become
complacent with com petition.
2ND PAPER
B. G. Myking, General
Manager of student publications,
also felt competition might
improve the Alligator.
Myking, who questions the
student status of the Report
because faculty are involved,
said No money is budgeted for
a second paper, and I just dont
know where it could come
from.
If we can work out some
relationship with the university
that would insure continuation
of the Report as a student
publication run by students with
perhaps some financial control
by the board, Martin said,
then we realize you have to

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Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Attigator,

give up a certain amount of
freedom when you become a
part of the iniversity.
i Americas;
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Change with it. Hustle posters in*
your spare time for fun and profit
GNP is a new, improved concept in*
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Page 7



Page 8

I, Th Floridi AWprtor, Monday, Saptnrobwr 23,1988

EDITORIALS

A Lot Os Nerve

Some people have a lot of nerve.
Take Rep. Bob Sikes (D.- Fla.). Sikes got
under 20 letters this summer, some from
UF students which branded the universitys
Action Conference pink and
hippie-oriented.
So Bob Sikes, acting first and pretending
to think later, did his dirty work. He very
subtly had the chairman of the Action
Conference, UF Army ROTC Professor
Russell W. Ramsey, canned.
The official version of the wjiole incident
is that Sikes merely passed his information
along to the Pentagon. Well* when youre a
general in the Reserves, as Sikes is, and when
you sit in the Congress of the United States,
as Sikes does, people at the Pentagon act
fast.
Its bad policy to let some relatively
unknown officer, some officer with the rank
of major, some man named Russell W.
Ramsey, upset your plans and budget.
Better to sacrifice one Vietnam veteran
honored in battle than to reap the wrath of
one headline-seeking politician.
And so, Ramsey resigned. He claims
the resignation came without pressure. We
suspect otherwise.
Where does that leave UF?
Nowhere.
At Columbia University riots greet the
opening and closing of each term. At
Berkeley, New York University, yes, even
Florida State University, student unrest
based on a firm foundation of
non-communication has resulted in student
protest and administrative castration.

In its issue of Aug. 16, the Alligator
published an editorial headed Welcome To
Hard Times.
That issue, mailed to over 6,000 freshmen
and transfer students, was an introduction to
life at the UF.
The editorial was appropriately titled.
Take for example some of the problems
the university confronted last year.
Tenure, censorship, university authority
over students private lives, marijuana,
campus speakers, demonstrations, civil trials
versus university trials, university
discrimination of Negroes, compulsory
R required class attendance, un required
course requirements under the quarter
system, Saturday classes to name some of
the issues spawned in the past year at
times rocked the campus with controversy.
And the university had to come to grips
with the undercurrent of student and faculty

ED JL&

A Challenge

Here at the UF we were on the road to a
possible solution. A representative group of
students, faculty and administrators were
working togtner, under the banner of
Action Conference, to settle differences
through negotiation and planning.
Remarkably enough, the so-called pinkos
and hippies chose an ROTC instructor to
lead their group. The so-called
commie-leaning students selected an
Army officer who fought in Vietnam to
chair their group.
Now the UF is poorer for having lost an
active leader to a politician, now the Action
Conference is stigmatized. And now the
Army has probably put some little red flag
on a fine officers confidential record.
Why?
Because Bob Sikes didnt have the time to
sit and talk.
Because Bob Sikes was unwilling to
devote hours to the discussion of issues.
Because Bob Sikes didnt have the
character of a Russell Ramsey.
Because Bob Sikes took the easy way out.
Fortunately, some mistakes can be
rectified. Bob Sikes error is of such a
character.
Rep. Sikes can, and in all fairness should,
issue a formal apology, both to the Action
Conference and to the university. He might
also note that the essence of democracy is
free discussion among people sharing
divergent points of view.
If Sikes isnt man enough to admit his
.error, he too ought to be canned by the
voters at the earliest opportunity.

dissatisfaction.
A new approach to problem solving was
bom from*the national wave of unrest which
made its impact felt on the UF campus, too.
It was called Action Conference.
It brought students, faculty and
administrators together to debate the great
issues confronting the university and to
re commend possible solutions to the
administration.
Their groundwork was laid this summer,
and the massive task of constructing a more
relevant community lies ahead.
But the Action Conference alone cannot
solve the problems which are likely to erupt
again this year.
The task ahead the attainment of
relevance will be completed only by
individual commitment for constructive
change by every member of the community.
Lets get on with the job.

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom
is the exercise of raponstbilrty.
sSbj&jE&f) Harold Aldrich
* Editor-In-Chief w
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Ml Raul Ramirez James Cook
AuMM Executive Editor News Editor
.,wf ima j|
YOU'RE SURE THA T THING CAN'T GET OUT?''
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 33), Reitr Union. Phone
Ext. 2832
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
those of the University of F lori da/|_____^^i



OPEN FORUM:
Aioiaml V'tMwt V'tMwt---
--- V'tMwt--- There is no hope for the complacent man.
IAMMAMMAMMMMMMMMM Changes ******************************
Etch With Care
W
Welcome.
Etch deeply if you are a
collector. The door you have
entered you will not leave as you
came. You will not sing the same
songs or ride so easily the tides
of rhythms of your nature. You
may later laugh with gods that
now terrify you or genuflect
more often at their alter.
Etch carefully. The door thru
which you now pass is mainly
black and white. It mirrors the
unknown prejudices in you eyes.
That door is a door you bring
with you. It will more deeply
repeat itself, or rainbow.
Etch with care if you are a
collector, so you will, leaving,
remember who and what and
how you were on entering.
Between now and then the two
of you will do great battle. The
moral mileau with which you
come so well-armed will have
served its purpose or been
rendered anachronistic. Etch
carefully, shadings become
important.
Thru that door lies the gang
and vogues and fashions up with
which you must keep or keep
your measured distance from.
Over there are other doors. All
elusive but easy to get at. Behind
each is joy and sorrow, a catalyst
to learning or a method of rote.
Beware: that door over there is
alienation. Discovery is a
launching door that you might
covet if you find it.
Inside many doors are
experiences so meaningful and
real they will last you all the

(WHERE APE YOU HEADED FOR In\
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1o SEE
TEfc> WR

, MAN, this cad t just
V&OTTA our.,.
Iff

way on your trip from here to
your eternity. Taste fully.
Friendships come in rushes, or
slowly, hanging carelessly on the
edge of a sentence you almost
held within you. Achievement is
here -- duck. So too is
disappointment. It is legion.
Doors change.
Etch with care. Love awaits
you. The changing seasons trip
the senses, masking time in
invisible calendars. The doors of
slow cure that. They are subtle
and harder to find. That is why
suddenly time does not move
unless you push it with the
now-sharp, now-dull edge of your
sanity.
Thru those doors over there
are easy laughs. And over here is
understanding, all-important but
elusive. Good hunting.
Doors change.
Etch with care. Those of you
who have felt the exhiliration
and nausea of alcohol or the
liberation and disorientation of
pot and acid or the violence of
fight or the violence and
tenderness and ecstacy of bed:
you will find no difficulty
adjusting. There are those Mho
have been thru those doors, and,
right now, while you werent
looking, they were looking at
you and saying silently,
hmmmmmmmmm, yes, yes.
And there is a door: things as
they arent what they are. And
there is a door serendipity, and a
door: arrogance. It fools you,
doesnt let you know youve
been thru it.

" I
r^^^EjJmWATEGj

Look at that door.
Education. Its enormous, you
say. Etch cautiously. Those who
know education is a panaces will
leave thru a larger door.
And there is a door,
melancholy. It waits, they say,
with malice in its eyes, and, they
say, in the madness of the lonely
that can creep into your mind it
will sometimes follow and cast
shadows that confuse. Etch
broadly, in grand strokes. Ahead
lies laughter, gaiety. They are
rich and full, they say, and able
to leap tall hurdles in the
lightning and thunder of a single
smile.
And there is a door, the other
guy. You are the other guy.
And there is a door yes and a
door no. How will you see your
world?
Etch carefully or the shadows
of your mind will cover over the
soft and cool and secure places
you now know so well. But,
then, maybe its better that way.
All the doors are here,
potentially. Youve but to find
them and step inside.
May the fates smile upon
you.
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

KbuT.MAN, I THOUGHT Ydll WJHST^
J. i

America Died
In Chicago
MR. EDITOR:
Law! Justice! What are they?
A country blessed with democratic government said to be of and
by and for the human race is yielding in 1968 to violent acts'. When
police with vicious dogs and guns roam the streets in the name of law,
freedom and justice, and when countless Americans are injured for the
preservation of the democratic state, that sacred breath of the
people's bovemment has betrayed itself, government has betrayed
itself, an egg driven from its mothers womb. It is not the end, but it is
the beginning. It is not a time for expectation, but for encouragement.
American political leaders tell us that mistakes are made by all, and
this country has made its share. The best of us only belong to the
human race.
, American democracy will never be the same, but time will go on in
spite of us. Indeed, it is not an unchangeable world.
for my own part, I cannot support the Democratic Party, the
party that has brought injury to Americans in 1968. I feel that party
has turned its back upon my generation, a generation of Americans.
TIM STERLING
* * #

Wallace Not Afraid
Os 'Commie Threat

MR. EDITOR:
I watched both the
Democratic and Republican
conventions. Some parts of this
farce was better than a good
T.V. comedy, other parts were
as tragic as the election of L.B.J.
four years ago, and in my
opinion, that was the most tragic
thing that has ever happened to
this country.
The present administration
has been sending aid in all forms
to communist countries, (of
course they have dribbled out in
little bits to non-communist
countries). In turn, these
communist countries that have
been taking aid from America,
have turned around and given a
great portion of this aid to our
cpmmunist enemies.
Why is it that many of the
people we put in office will not
represent us as they are sworn to
do? Why is it that they are
scared to death to speak out
against communism as the most
undesired, unscrupulous,
unwanted way of life that there
is?

BUT I AM GSIW&TO COt^IFUT
a.

I : '
I
(J\ [the ultimate gum
l
l of IS -B~
W X-i-rSl'Fk *o rrr 7f ill*##
\ \ \ J l*\ \Kr\ * - t>ooj 11 j

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

There is only one MAN in the
running who has the nerve to
speak out against communism,
the very threat to this country,
and that man is ex-Governor
George Wallace.
He makes it plain enough that
he will not put up with
communism in any way, shape
or manner. I dont mean to
indicate that all Mr. Wallaces
views are correct, for even he is
not perfect. I do, however, feel
that he is the only one running
who is for the betterment of the
country. He has the old fashion
American way of speaking out
against the machine and against
communism.
Some people who read this
letter will say I have communism
of the brain, well, you bet your
sweet life I have, simply because
I want us to remain a free
people. Just look at what has
happened to the communist
infested countries of the worlds
today, and you should get a
fairly good idea of what I mean.
HARRY BECKWITH

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23, 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
r t

. *y;*:vK'oflc>>s%v:sssssswKss%s^?HSs
i;*'''X-:-x X'X'X-x-:-v.vx\-x-x-x-x-v.v.-.-.-.-x-£
I FOR SALE J
it x
Topcon, Super-D f 1.4, finest 35mm
camera-selected by F. 8.1. & Navy
fantastic buy .55% off list price Must
sell. Call 376-3578 after 6. (A-l-3t-p)
Lambretta motor scooter, 150 cc,
1964 4 speed. Low mileage, excellent
care & condition, SIOO. includes
helmet, tools. ceil 376-3578 after 6.
Like-new $350. 32 6HP rider
mower bought May 1 only $250 am
getting tractor. Call 3 76-9786 to
arrange to see and try. (A-l-stp)
New K+E Deci-Lon slide rule $20.00;
19 Philco tv, good condition, $25.
RCA tape recorder, runs well $lO.
call 378-7331 after 5 p.m. (A-l-2t-p)
TV, Motorola, 19 x 15 screen, good
picture, 5 yr. old. Stand included.
S6O. Call 372-2332 after 5.(A-l-3t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY.
466-3340. (A-l-ts-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
f
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
ealh additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

' ' -
j; < '\*i. M : ' [>' j j
/ *** <
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
(consecutive) PHONE
I*l for rent D 1 day
wanted 2 days ADDRESS -i j
help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
|~l autos Cl 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE ZIP
personal 0 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
services
WORDING
1 M 111. II I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
2l I I I I I 11l I I I I
sri ii 11 11 1 1 11 ii n ri i ii i 11 11 1 11 1 11 11 i
4i i 1 11 1 11 11 1 11 11 1 11 11 11 11 11 11 1 1 1 mr

AUTOS
J* ... *
FOR SALE 1968 VW 21,000 miles.
Make an offer. Call Mrs. Hinton ext.
2973 Campus Credit Union.
(G-3t-l-C)
;.*.vx*x*x*x*xx*xw.:.:.:.m.v.v.v.*xv.v.v.v.m.
SERVICES
:*x*XeWer.vx*xx*x*x:*v.w.vxvxX'X'X*x*xS
DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
WAKE UP ON TIME!! Call
Phone-Alarm, 378-6994, after 8:30
P.M. Ask for Rick. (M-l-st-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Liberty Linda speaking for
Let Freedom Ring. (M-l-st-p)
~ -if
-TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-15-lp)
BABY CARE, 311 NW 15th Terrace,
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; $15.00, also,
half-day weeks and hourly.
Experienced, Mature and Reliable
Christian Home. Phone 376-2072.

FOR RENT ~" |
v
Lakefront house 20 mi. east of town.
2 BR turn 9 mo. Ige family or mature
student group. $125 mo. 372-0007.
(B-lt-l-p)
-tyl-*
WANTED
Two roommates wanted to share
house nw 29th rd. must be
determined to book it. Call
372-9284, ask for Wm. Bird.
(C-l-3t-p)
Wanted coed to share luxurious I br,
ac, dishwasher, Landmark Apt. Prefer
senior or grad student. Inquire
at Landmark apt. 156. (C-3t-p)
Roommate one female, to share 1
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(C-3t-l-p)
Fender Baseman Amp exc. condition
Top and Bottom $l5O. Call
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French Quarter After 6:00 p.m.
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r/Wain Entrance
GAINESVILLE MALL
Cstmltullft $ Sarclm of
Pizza V 3
K
I Mon.-Sat.j |
limate )]

WANTED
Female roommate wanted Two
bedroom upstairs apartment, $38.75
& utilities a month. Three blocks
from campus. 378-3238 620 SW 10
St. (C-l-st-p)
HELP WANTED 1
** !
Reliable student wanted to babysit
1 1 /2 year old at 9th St. & 7th Ave.
SW. M 3:15-6:30, W 3:15-5:45 for
fall quarter. Must provide own
transportation. $7/week. call
376-0976. (E-l-2t-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50 for
1 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
ext. 2049. (El-Bt-C) ''
WANTED: Student Journalists
dedicated to accuracy and andobjectivity.
objectivity. andobjectivity. Gain valuable experience
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work at the center of campus
activity, pay availiable for
experienced and hard-working
reporters and deskmen. The Florida
Alligator, Room 330, Reitz Union
(E-l-tf-nc)

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

help Wanted"!
M GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for
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Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

PEACE I
The duck pond on the j
south side of the Reitz Union I
forms a peaceful scene for a I
pause from the hectic rush of 1
the first weeks of class. I

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

WAly Student
If/ Government iw
BA
Hpjp Concert Series ESI
'y'-lJ|i-iiiWvi-MTirlrtWr
fl Student Government Productions of the
B University of Florida is pleased to offer you
the opportunity to enjoy the finest concerts
available in the performing arts during the
1968-1969 school year.
Each of the seven programs in this series
has been carefully selected to provide you
B with a wide variety of cultural experience
and enjoyment. Each event is distinguished
by the highest achievements of the fine arts.
I ROGER WAGNER CHORALE
November 16, 1968
B Leopold Stokowski has called the Chorale,
B "Second to none in the world;" and Eugene
B Ormandy described it as, "The finest chorus
B I have ever conducted."
I
mm
I November 22,1968
An outstanding operatic combination; the
B most popular French opera in modern
B history performed by the most successful
B travelling opera company in the United
States, the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater.
I "A rousing success, proving 1 that opera in
I English properly staged, is live and appealing
theater!" Newsweek Magazine

IHTtKFKATtUNITY COUNCIL "fall Frolics OCT. 25
I THE FOUR TOPS "Motown Sound" will be the highlight of this year's Fall
Frolics sponsored by the Interfraternity Council. Dedicated artists, the Four
Tops continue to broaden their repertoire to include popular ballads and
H Broadway show tunes. So, for a swinging evening of entertainment be sure
and see the Four Tops at "Fall Frolics" October 25.

Union Program Council Fine Arts Committee Presentations I

OTHELLO November 18, 1968
fl This classic Shakespearean drama will be
H performed by the renowned National Shakespeare
H Company, widely acclaimed for its excellent
H staging and masterful style.

Is Your Pad Dead? Put Something On The Walls Besides Dirt!
VISIT THE PRINT SALE Sept. 24 2u UNION BALLROOM 12 9 pm
Degas, Renoir, Warhol, Osborne NAME YOUR ARTIST, WE HAVE IT
- f A*- V # £
The Student Government Activities Page. This page is sponsored by Student Government every Mondav to nnhlidh
submitted to Mrs. McLeod. Student Government offices. Third floor. JVTReitz Union. P S,Udent aC,M,,eS Any ma,erial ,or ** uld 66

- 9
Under the gracious patronage of Her Majesty
Queen Juliana of The Netherlands, The Hague
Philharmonic was a brilliant success on its first
American tour. Their return to America is
therefore a cultural event of the highest artistic
order to all lovers of great music.
"The ensemble is superior and so is its
conductor. Altogether handsome sound."
r ._ N.Y. Times
"An extraordinary hit... The seasons most
outstanding musical." Life Magazine
Now in its fourth sellout year, this great
attraction not only won all awards as "The Best
Musical of the Year," but has received almost
unequaled audience and critical acclaim.
Kate,.; a
March 4,1969
As one of America's finest creators of ballet
in America, Ruth Page is this season offering a
new repertory filled with the glamour and
romantic beauty of the classical ballet as well as
the dramatic excitement of contemporary
' works.

PRESER VA T/ON HALL JAZZ BAND
The message is Jazz straightforward, rich,
foot-stamping jazz played by musicians who
learned their trade where it all began. These are
the originals straight. r. f JbA Orleans.
February *: 1969

Student Government Concert Special I
THE INCOMPARABLE MANTOVANI, whom Variety called, "The biggest
Musical P nomenon of the twentieth century," will be the featured artist at I
a special concert on Wednesday, November 6. His popularity is world-wide, fl
and records sell into the millions. An evening with the Mantovani strings is
always a memorable and entertaining one.

W/W/ UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA Y^S
March 1969
' fl
_-, i- x BaHaii
i I
VAN CLIBURN I
Since winning the Tchaikovsky fl
Competition in' Moscow' in 1958, Van 3
Cliburn has been a hero to all America, and B
renowned throughout the world as one of B
music's greatest artists. A recital by Van fl
Cliburn is certainly one of the highlights of fl
any musical season, and one you won't want fl
to miss. & fl
Hk jjil
*^*
IKI B B
Jan Peerce, world-renowned tenor of the fl
Metropolitan Opera, has a reputation for B
being equally at home in classical arias and B
popular songs. The N. Y. Times has said of fl
America's foremost tenor, "We know of no fl
finer tenor voice now accessible to the fl
American public." His memorable fl
performance will be an appropriate end to fl
an outstanding fine arts concert series. fl

BHASKAR AND SHALA April 8, 1969 I
Bhaskar, a virtuoso of Indian dancing, and his B
partner, the beautiful Sliala, present an exciting IB
evening of East Indian Music and dances. Their B
masterful performances transport their audiei-jes fl
by music and dance through the mysterir-'is .1:
M _te|][H>jesj>nd courts of the eastern world.



DEFENSE. GOOD EXERCISE*
Karate Course Scheduled
To Train Flonda Coeds

By KATHIE KEIM
and
BILL KING
Staff Writers
A one-man self-defense
school has come to the UF and
Pete Altman, assistant program
director at the Reitz Union, is
the man behind it all.
Altmann plans to start a
7-week self-defense course for
UF coeds on Monday nights
beginning Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Cost for the sessions
tentatively scheduled for room
349 of the Reitz Union is $7.
Im not trying to make girls
into fighters, Altmann said.
Im attempting to show them
something they couldnt do
before but which they might be
able to use in the future in case
of emergencies.
Altmann plans to include
three martial arts in the
course: karate, which includes
kicking, blocking, and striking
techniques; jujitsu, which
combines some elements of
karate with holding and
grappling techniques of judo;
and aikido, a little-known but
effective form of defense
involving action against joints
and nerve centers.
In addition, Ill demonstrate
how to hit and run, Altmann
said, or maybe I should say
protect and run: how a girl can
stun an attacker long enough to
have time to run from him.
A girl just isnt going to be
able to wrestle a large attacker
to the ground without a large
amount of practice, but when
you get down to it, theres no
need for her to wrestle him to
the ground. All that is really
necessary is that die knows how
to get away from him, he
continued.
Os course, theres always the
chance by taking this course a
girl might become interested in
karate and pursue it further. She
might find that not only is
karate a form of self-defense but
that it is a good form of
exercise.
After four years in Martial
Arts Altmann has two black
belts in karate, but his is

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o Personal Grooming Visit the
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"'Y' 7 Smp''\ snMg&V'*
YOU BEAST!
\
...Alligator staffer defends herself against attacker Altmann

proficient in all the Arts. He has
earned a black belt in the
American Goshin-Do
Association and the US Karate
Association.
People seem to think a
karate expert is a vicious little
introvert, Altmann says, but
this is hardly true. Altmann
himself is a living rebuttal to
that misconception.
Before he became interested
in the Martial Arts, Altmann was
a singer. He performed in coffee
houses on and off the beaten
path. His voice was heard often
in Gainesville at the Bend Card
coffee house or UF fraternities.
He often sang songs he had
written; and still occasionally
writes poetry.
A poised speaker, Altmann
referred to his days as a
bartender and bouncer in New
York years ago, I used to have
to prove myself, but now with
karate I dont feel I need to.

YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM
(LARGEST CONSERVATIVE STUDENT ORG.)
PRESENTS-RALPH SINGBUSH
DELEGATE FROM FLA. TO REPUBLICAN CONVENTION
AT OUR 81-WEEKLY MEETING ON TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 AT BGO P.M.
IN ROOM 347 OF THE REITZ UNION.
TOPIC OF MR. SINGBUSHS DISCUSSION WILL BE:
WHY RICHARD NIXON?^
' : ... I
V 1
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There b a Difference And the Difference Grows
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Phone 378-1391 I

^> n il
. Theyre Everywhere...
Love Bugs Invade Campus

Theyre everywhere, theyre
everywhere. Slower than
molasses and able to smash into
window shields in a single
bound, Lovebugs have invaded
the UF campus.
Lovebugs, according to Dr.
/"Lawrence A. Hetrick, professor
of entomology, are relations of
the house fly, horse fly, and
mosquito.
Scavengers by nature, they
feed upon decayed grass
clippings on the sides of
highways. Here each new
generation developes and in
September the adults plague the
gulf coastal region from Florida
to Texas.
The female is the bigger of
the two flies. The male attaches
_himself to the female in mating

The Colony Home .
Jpt where you con afford to coma back.
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Monday, September 23,1968. The Florida Alligator,

and if the female takes off, the
male just hangs on tight.
MINI-SIZE YOURSELF
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Personalize your letters,
resumes, greetings cards, in invitations,
vitations, invitations, calling cards, gifts,
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Page 13



*, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

Page 14

Action Conference Still Moves Mneaa

By JANIE GOULO
Alligator Staff Writer
Twelve changes urged by the
UF Action Conference, and sent
last month to President Stephen
C. OConnell for approval, are
now being examined by the
Council of Deans.
OConnell is waiting for their
reactions before deciding
whether |o approve them, said
presidential aide Mel Sharpe
Friday.
The Faculty Senate will
probably study the proposals
too, Sharpe said, and some of
the plans will get independent
committee work. Emphasis will
be on how to set up the changes,
aid how to make them work.
RECOMMENDATIONS
The recommendations fron
the Action Conference cover
four broad areas: discrimination
to minorities, freedom of
expression, academic standards,
and orientation and counseling.
The Action Conference is
asking the UF to openly declare
its policy of nondiscrimination;
to create an Office for Minorities
and Disadvantaged Students; to
look into possible discrimination
in UF housing; to tell the
Alligator to refuse ads from
landlords who discriminate; and
to create a developmental
education program.
Also recommended is a
guarantee of. freedom of
expression for UF student
publications.
One of the more controversial
proposals is for voluntary class
attendance wherever possible.
Along the same lines is a
proposal for the creation of an
institute for student
effectiveness.
Many of the
recommendations would change
orientation and counseling.
Among these are a study setting
up a campus-wide policy-making
board for counseling and
advisement, re-evaluation of
orientation, especially of junior
college transfers, and
distribution of a directory of all
UF helping services to students,
advisers, counselors, and
department heads.
No official answer to these
proposals from OConnell is
expected for at least two weeks.
The Action Conference is to
reconvene Oct. 1. Several task
forces have been laying the
groundwork for problems to be
tackled this fall.

| notice n
i REITZ UNION BOWLING LEAGUES g
! WILL BEGIN OCTOBER 7. j
I All parties interested in league bowling f
who have not received application forms i
I may stop by the Games Area and fill ore out. t
j ALL APPLICATIONS MUST j
I BE IN BY OCTOBER 1. j
m m
j GAMES AREA 1
| GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION f

I
For Ramsey |
1 See Pg 1
I * I
Editorial
% 8
| On Page 8
C*. v
V. v
V. V
TASK FORCES
UF housing will be dissected
by Gary Goodrichs University
Community Task Force. Also
planned is a study of
student -faculty-staff
relationships, with emphasis on a
need for more courtesy.
The Minimal Conduct
Expectations Task Force,
chaired by Pete Zinober, will be
working on Code of Student
Conduct and dorm judiciary
revisions. But the first problem
is determining whether the Task
Force should be general or
specific in its proposals, Zinober
said.
Dorm council revisions would
entail unifying the councils
under the auspices of the
Interhall Council. Also planned
are campus-wide surveys of a
possible code of ethics for the
faculty, and surveys about the
honor system and Honor Court.
The Task Force for
Evaluation of Goals, headed by
Dr. Delton Scudder, plans to
consider the goals of the UF as
both an academic center and a
sociological community.
Lecture policies will be under
fire with the Freedom of
Expression Task Force.
According to chairman Harold
Aldrich, plans for changes
include trimming the 25-member
Public Functions Committee to
seven.
Another recommendation
will be for an open lecture
policy, in which any
organization could bring any
speaker to campus, as long as the
speaker would sign a statement
that he would not incite to riot.
The Task Force for Relations
with Community and State,
chaired by Frank Sciadini, will
be concerned with keeping the
community informed about the
UF. Under consideration is
feedback from the community
to find out whether people hear
only spectacular things about
the UF, rather than more
substantial news.

PROPOSALS BEING STUDIED

CRITICAL PROBLEMS
Action Conference is a
by-product of an academic.year
marked by such problems as
demonstrations against Dow
Chemical Co., opposition to
compulsory ROTC, and
controversy caused by the Jones
tenure case.
Created at the end of the
spring quarter by OConnell, the
Action Conference was to seek
meaningful solutions to critical
problems; that is, to produce a
reality of change where change is
needed on campus, according
to OConnell.
Our task here is to examine
what we have to identify our
problems, to determine causes
and to recommend reasonable
solutions, OConnell said at the
first meeting in June.
A cross-section of 25 each ot
students, faculty, and
administrators was picked to
man Action Conference. The 75
members run the gamut of
colleges, concerns, and beliefs.
They were divided by an elected
steering committee into ten
subcommittees to study one of
ten areas of concern chosen by.
Action Conference.
These ten topics are
university government,
evaluation of goals of the
University, the University as a
community, curriculum, quality
of instruciton and research,
freedom of expression, minimal
conduct expectations,
responsibility to minorities and
disadvantaged groups, counseling
and advisement, and relations
.with community and state.
The task forces were
mstructed to study what is
needed and make
recommendations for
improvements. OConnell
pledged to carry out all
recommendations, unless there
are very good reasons not to.
Though there was much
optimism, loud criticism came
from campus activist David
Noble, who termed the
conference a public relations
vehicle for OConnell.

WORLD FAMOUS
' CIRCLE 0
"Tcmith of
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1969 MODEL
NOW BETTER
THAN BEFORE
- i
The MODERNE Z 565
NOW WITH INPUT JACKS FOR A TAPE
PLAYER OR SOLID STATE TUNER
"THE BEST IN STEREO SOUND
FOR YOUR MUSIC DOLLAR
COUCH'S
SERVING U. OF FLA. SINCE 1933.

However, Major Russell
Ramsey, the recently-resigned
chairman, pointed out that the_
Action Conference proved

I WELCOME STUDENTS
SB
I for Complete Service
on all American and
I
Foreign Cars see
I John Kelly or Bill Holladay
AT
UNIVERSITY SHELL
1805 SW 13th Street
Next to the Pizza Hut
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theres the low cost of running it.
It gets about 27 mpg.
Takes pints of oil. Not quarts.
And the engine is air-cooled. No
anti-freeze. No water.
Its the small price you pay for
owning a Volkswagen.
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC.
4222 NW THIRTEENTH STREET SST*
Local Delivered price, plus tag, title & tax.

persons of all categories can
cooperate to propose specific
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WILD FRAT PARTIES?

Campus fiat houses; the old makes way for the
new. The Kappa Alphas and the Tau Kappa Epsilons
are both without houses this quarter.
The Kappa Alphas (top picture), who are
presently renting an apartment house, have made no
decisions as to where their $350,000
modem-colonial style house will be located.
It will accomodate 60 men, in ten 6-men suites..

o O
c Wherever you g 0...
Zales has a \
Stainless
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long as case and crystal are
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I v purchase date to any of the more
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OPEN A STUDENT V JBHv )
ACCOUNT NOW i _y J|^H^Vj2s/j
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Plans include construction for a pool.
Brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon (bottom picture),
are making plans for a $125,000 house located at
1236 SW Ist Ave. They consider their house to be
a new concept in fraternity living.
It will consist of 7 four-man apartment units,
each with 2 bedrooms, living room, hthroom, and

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Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



i, The Florida Alligator. Monday, Sep ter iber 23,1968

Page 16

A TOUCH OF FLORENCE

7 Students Study In Italy

Florida may Find itself with a
touch of Florence, Italy, some
day-a three dimensional
touch at that-in its concepts
on urban living.
These new ideas are being
imported this fall by seven UF
architectural students and one of
their faculty-Dan Branch,
associate professor of
architecture-who spent the
summer studying in Italy.
General
r'
To Tour
UF Campus
Lieutenant General John L.
Throckmorton, 3rd Army
Commander, will tour the Us
campus today.
Throckmorton, a three star
general, will arrive at the
Gainesville Airport at 10 a.m.,
and will come directly to the
campus for a 10:30 conference
with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
At 10:50 he will be briefed
by Col. Arlo W. Mitchell,
professor of military science.
Following a lucheon at the
Ramada Inn, Throckmorton will
attend a 1 p.m. awards
ceremony at the military
building.
The general, whose area of
command includes seven
southeastern states, containing
36 ROTC units, plans to leave
the campus at 2 p.m.

Welcomes All U of Fla Students
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A report on their activities
came back to the university with
Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of the
UF Graduate School, who
recently conducted a tour of
university-related activities in
Europe.
Our students spent the
summer studying urban planning
under Leonardo Ricci, a world
famous teacher of urban and
regional planning at the Urban
Design Institute, said Grinter.
The student group engaged in
planning a residential and
shopping center as a
three-dimensional project in
urban living, Dr. Grinter
reported.
An imaginative project
directed by Professor Ricci, it
considered personal desires,
transitional tendencies and the
need to simplify travel, foot
traffic pattern and specific use
of building floors according to
height level.
The two-month study
program, in connection with the
Florence institute, also included
curriculum on Roman,
Renaissance and modern
architecture.
Dean Grinter expressed the
belief that The influence of an
exchange of students and
teachers between the UF and the
Urban Design Institute in
Florence may stimulate the
development of more
imaginative housing
developments in Florida and
elsewhere in the United States
when students trained through

this exchange become practicing
architects. 1
In Beitostdlen, visited in
August, the UF and the
University of Uppsala were
sponsoring a high-level scientific
conference for faculty members
engaged in the study of quantum
chemistry, physics, and biolocy.
Earlier this month Dr. Grinter
visited the Uppsala campus
where he inspected the activities
of the Quantum Science
Institute, which operates in
parallel with a similar research
group at the UF. Each year
several students and professors
are exchanged hetween the two
related research groups.

BUS 'T FSU
TIRED OF FIGHTING TRAFFIC?
TAKE THE FLORIDA UNION BOARD
BUS TO FSU AND WATCH THE
GATORS RUN OVER THE SEMINOLES
TICKETS AT ROOM 310 MCf
j. WAYNE REITZ UNION W _TFIj3B
FOR INFORMATION CALL IMtHSsSI

UNIVERSITY AVENUE
CHURCH OF CHRIST
639 E. University Avenue
- -p : ; :
SUNDAY Bible Btudy ~ 10.00 e.m. I
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 7:30p.m.
WEDNESDAY Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Listen to Herald of Truth
9:30 a.m. WRUF
Sam G. Hill, Minister
W
Gator Ads Will Blow Your Mind! (



Two Professors
Join UF Faculty

By GAIL McELROY
r ' 1 Staff Writer
International, national, and
state honors have been garnered
by faculty and
administrators, while two
professors with national acclaim
have joined rank with the UF
Dr. Walter D. Mauderli,
professor of radiation physics at
the College of Medicine, has
been appointed to the staff of
the International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA) in Vienna.
Tapped by the Atomic
Energy Commission, Mauderli
was chosen among highly
qualified U.S. scientists to serve
on the international agencys
staff.
Recently appointed to the
National Research Council of
the National Academy of
Sciences was Dr. Richard T.
Smith, professor and chairman
of the Department of Pathology
at the College of Medicine.
Smith will serve on the
Subcommittee on Tumor
Immunology of the Committee
on Tissue Transplant.
Dr. Harold R. Stanley,
clinical director of the National
Institute of Dental Research
(NIDR) and an oral pathologist
with national reputation, has
joined the College of Dentistry
faculty as professor and
chairman of the Department of
Oral Pathology.
Stanley is the fourth member
of the College of Dentistry to be
announced by Dean Edmund R.
Ackell and hold a joint
appointment in the Department
of Pathology in the College of
Medicine.
Professor of finance and
director of graduate studies Dr.
John B. McFerrin has been
appointed acting dean of the
College of Business
Administration.
IFC Story
'Erroneous
Interfraternity Council
President Jim Devaney has
charged a story in the Tampa
Tribune concerning an IFC
discussion on visitation policies
was erroneous.
The article in the Sept. 18
edition of the Tribune, stated
the IFCs final recommendations
had been finalized and sent to
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell for review and
authorization.
It should be explained, said
Devaney, that the
re-examination of existing policy
is still in the discussion stage
and the president of the
university has received no
proposals or recommendations
for changes in the existing
policy.
He went on to say any
recommendations from the IFC
will be presented to the
Committee on Student
Organizations. The Committee,
after reviewing these requests,
will then make recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations for changes in social
regulations to Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale.
Until changes are approved,
regulations of the Student
Handbook will remain in force.

JjH^
HI Hi HHH JH!

DRS. MICHAEL, WHEAT
. .new appointments
According to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell,
McFerring will serve until a
permanentre placemen tis found"
for Dr Donald J. Hart
Dr. Max Michael Jr.,
executive director of the
Jacksonville Hospitals
Educational Program Inc. and
assistant dean of the College of
Medicine, has been appointed to
the Board of Regents of the
National library of Medicine
(NLM) by President Lyndon B.
Johnson.
The Board of Regents is
comprised of ten members from
the fundamental sciences,
medicine, dentistry and other
scientific and library fields. Each
member serves a four year term.
Dr. My Myron W. Wheat Jr.,
professor of surgery and chief of
thoracic and cardiovascular
surgery at UFs J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, has been
designated Director of
Professional Services and Chief
Clinical Physician.
Wheat will work closely with
the director of the Shands
Teaching Hospital and Clinics
and the deans of the various
colleges of the Health Center in
carrying out his new
responsibilities which extend the
conventional chief of staff role
to include all members,of the
health care team.
- Fresh from commanding the
U.S. Air Forces prisoner of war
interrogation program in
Vietnam, Col. Jere H. Hudson
has been appointed the new,
professor of aerospace studies.

I 1/2 PRICE SALE
Buy One Box Os Maryland Fried
Chicken At Regular Price sl.lsGet
The Second Box For Half Price
| 1 TAKEOUT
Pi i 1/2 PRICE COUPON i O,M S
V I Buy one at regular cost and with this DRIVE IN
| coupon buy the second box for 57 cents | WINDOW
Wry/ffn7\ EXPIRATION DATE SEPT. 30 | call in
I FRIED CHICKEN;! | _ ADVANCE ORDERS
GOOD AT BOTH LOCATIONS
516 N.W. 13th STREET-Ph. 378-7412
2205 N.W. 6th STREET-Ph. 378-7411

ins
Hr jH

j FOREIGN POLICY ISSUE
I Debate Tryouts Open
Aspiring orators will get a tournaments scheduled; this Tennessee State Oct. 4-5. For
chance to whow their stuff at years opener sees the Gator information contact John Wittig
the debate team tiyouts Monday debaters to Middle at 372-0387, ext. 2778.
and Tuesday nights at
pjn. in Room 347 of the Arts
and Science Building (the Old JOIN THE
Union .)
No background in debating is
required; the tryouts are open to fZ LJ j I I I D
all UF students. I I V* L D
The topic for this years
tournaments is Resolved :That (HELP HURRY HUBERT HUMPHREY HOME HOMEexecutive
executive HOMEexecutive control of United 1
States foreign policy should be TO MINN.)
significantly curtailed.
The debate season lasts from BOOTHS WILL BE SET UP ON CAMPUS
Octover to April, with over 50 I mm
SMITHS MENS SHOP 919 W. University Ave.
WELCOME STUDENTS
and FELLOW GATORS. Since 1958 it has been our
> privilege to welcome you back to Campus.
May your year be a happy one.
May we enjoy the pleasure of serving you again
and again for your wardrobe needs whether it be
dress or play.
LETS GET
ASVMIAILITCn V Ur Se,eCtk)n 0f
ACQUAINTED POPULAR PRICE from
national advertised sources
mo/ SU,T and SPORT COATS
V /q BARDSTOWN by Merit
DISCOUNT HARDWICK 37.50 to 85.00
ON Traditional and Conventional styles
shirts
PURCHASE ..... __ __
ENRO and AETNA 6.00 to 9.00
Perma Press and Pure F ibre Button Down,
Spread, Tab collars. Stripe Solid Checks
Mon 23-Tues 24
10 AM til BPM PANTS Ar>ITi^KIAI
BAIRDSTOWN TRADITIONAL
GULFSTREAM CONTUR 8.25 to 23.50
KNITWEAR
SHIRTS andSWEATERS by ft
ENRO. BRENTWOOD and Ji|J llWthS
HEATHMOOR 5.00-32.00

Monday, Saptsmbar 23,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

l The Florida Alligator, September 23, 1968

H p'3l i I §:-
| ||l | 4 188 l
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BUBp | y'
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~ -.n:ft' :! H^. ,; M.: v-^^Bs.. -->
fPW*PSF?'i jHv s --* -.-itlfc-* % *'--. JriwoiliSiil

- jp *wl^.:
\a; %*dt: JH
' j|^
|^mf
> fc x J*^H^H'"ftPr jHL
.

Ask A Pro
*
i .. ; "
- : : .
: r Work! student to quickly learn the practical aspects of the newspaper
business,
Several of our top editors worked on the Alligator, and some
of these have now moved on to larger newspapers such as the
Washington Post.
JACK NEASE
City Editor
St. Petersburg Times
' s l. I
NEWS-EDITORIAL ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS BUSINESS
*
- \
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
ROOM 330 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

-
- *
# MosJ Alligator staff writers
work about 20 hours a week
5-
C'
# 77*e;y write an average of 2,000
words a week
# They are responsible for cover coverage
age coverage of all local state, national
and international news of in interest
terest interest to UF students
. ~ *v *"
ts *"'
- ...
_-"- *

I &^3MhH&L^
y&r fwk
i J M-
.; |
k w : .
\ \ tWB b^i£^B^ :^iHl




64 Committee Spots
Open To Student Body

Sixty-four student positions
are now open on Constitutional,
Senate and Presidential
Committees, Student Body
President Clyde Taylor said.
Requirements to serve are
interest in the committee work
and being able to attend all
Committee meetings. Taylor
added previous experience will
be considered.
Only one opening is available
on the Constitutional and Senate
Committees, with the remaining
openings under the heading of
Presidential Committees.
Committees with one
position open are: Fine arts,
Schedule and Calendar,
Cooperative Living and House
Plans and Construction.

Queen Applicants Sought

Applications for the 1968
Gator Bowl Queens Contest to
be held Friday, Nov. 29, are
available in Room 123, Tigert
Hall.
'Outstanding
Law Student
Wins Grant
Stephan Pierre Mickle, 1635
SE 14th Ave., has been awarded
a $1,500 grant to continue his
studies at the UF College of
Law.
The grant by the Samuel
Kipnis Family Foundation,
Miami, is for the 1968-69
academic year. Mickle, an
outstanding law student, won a
similar grant last year.
Mickle, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Andrew R. Mickle,.residents of
Gainesville, received his
bachelors degree in political
science in 1965 and his masters
degree in education in 1966,
both from UF.

WELCOME STUDENTS
THIS IS THE YEAR THE YEAR THE GATORS
PAINT ALL OPPONENTS DOLEFUL BLUE.
THEY WONT USE PAINT, OF COURSE, BUT IF
THEY DID, WED GLADLY FURNISH IT, FOR WE
CAN MAKE DOLEFUL BLUE, OR ANY OTHER
COLOR, FROM OUR TOP OUAUTY TUNGROC
PAINTS. WE ALSO HAVE,
AT REASONABLE PRICES
,9
ART SUPPLIES CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMES
ANTIQUING MATERIALS WALLCOVERINGS
DECOUPAGE MATERIALS FRIENDLY SERVICE
m S.W. 34* STREET PHONE 375-3431

HP
' v
CLYDE TAYLOR
... seeks workers
Academic Regulations,
Campus Planning and

All unmarried full-time
female students who are
residents of Duval County and in
good scholastic standing may
participate in the contest. They
must be between the ages of 17
and 24, and available for all
Gator Bowl activities and
promotional engagements.
All entries, completed in full
with a 5 x 7 glossy photograph
attached, must be received no
later than 5 p.m. Nov. 1. The
picture is to be used during the
judging to determine photogenic
qualities of entry.
A Queen and two Princesses
will be selected to reign over the
Gator Bowl Week festivities. A
dress or suit and heels, with hats
optional, will be worn for the
judging.
Contestants must agree to
pose for publicity pictures in a
swimsuit, but there will be no
judging in this attire.
The 1968 Gator Bowl Queen
will receive a $500.00
scholarship, a wardrobe, a
formal gown and a diamond
wristwatch. Princesses will

s mm"
Development, International
Students and the Advisory
Committee to Student Health
Services Program -- all
Presidential Committees have
two openings.
Three vacancies need filled on
the Faculty Committee on
Intercollegiate Athletics and
Traffic and Safety.
The following committees
have four available positions:
Civil Defense, Public Functions
and Lectures, Student Housing,
Student Board of Publications
and Student Financial Aid.
Five positions are open on
the Student Conduct Committee
and six on the Student Affairs
Committee and Student
Organizations, and Social
Affairs.

receive a formal gown and a
wristwatch.
Previous Gator Bowl Queens
are ineligible, and former court
members may only be selected
for the position of Queen.
dreaming
about
your future?
then stop!
Here's a once in a lifetime
opportunity for adventure and
challenge.
A civilian career with the
Army Recreation or Library
Program in Europe or the Far
East.
If you are single, a U.S. citi citizen
zen citizen and have a degree in
Recreation
Social Science JpjiS
Arts and Crafts JyHk
Music h
Dramatics or
Library Science p
WRITE FOR A BROCHURE
SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION
IRCB
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20315

I JOIN I
r t <** ,' yt *-
THE
DISCOUNT REVOLUTION
AT
Rebel Discount
BACK TO SCHOOL
SPECIALS
RAPID SHAVE
LIME
98* VALUE 59*
CREST
EX. LARGE
83< VALUE 49*
:

BIC
PENS
.09$

ALL COSMETICS DISCOUNTED
24 HOUR FILM SERVICE
UP TO 50%0FF
AT
REBEL DISCOUNT
1227 UNIVERSITY AVE;
ACROSS FROM RAMADA INN
i v
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

- .
l l-300
-300 l-300 COUNT
NOTEBOOK
PAPER 49a
79< VALUE
A

Page 19



Page 20

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

National Crime Rate Up 21% For 1968

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
nations crime rate rose 21 per
cent in the first half of this year
over the same period in 1967,
according to the FBI. The
biggest increase came in larger
cities and in the Northeast.
Director J. Edgar Hoover,
releasing the FBls latest crime
report, said Thursday that the
crime rate was up 24 per cent in
cities with more than 250,000
population and' 17 per cent in
those with fewer than 10,000.
Suburban areas reported a 21
per cent increase while crime in
rural areas rose by 14 per cent,
the report said.
Hoover said the upward trend
was consistent throughout the
nation up 27 per cent in the
Northeast, 20 per cent in the
West, 18 per cent in die South
and 17 per cent in the North
Central states.
A national breakdown
showed a 29 percent increase in
robbery, a 17 per cent increase
+ ...+
Young Tend
To Imitate
TV Violence
WASHINGTON (UPI)-The
National Commission on the
Causes and Prevention of
Violence was told by a
California psychologist Thursday
that children tend to imitate the
aggressive conduct they see on
television or in real life.
Dr. Albert Bandura, professor
of psychology at Stanford
University, said experiments he 4
conducted with young children
showed clearly that televised
violence teaches forms of
violent behavior to the viewer.
< But punishment that befalls a
criminal, for example, may be a
deterring factor in whether
violent acts actually are carried
out, he said.
The most that can be said,
he concluded, is that television
violence increases the
probability that actual violent
behavior will occur.
Hearing academicians on its
second day of closed hearings,
commission members viewed
two films showing how children
responded to violent behavior
with increased aggression.
Dr. Neil Smelser, professor of
sociology at the University of
California at Berkeley, cautioned
that delay or vacillation by
authorities in response to
collective violence-such as a
riottends to attract more
participants and intensify the
disorder.
At die same time, police
overreaction tor violence will
create public sympathy and
weaken die public feeling that
the police are acting
legitimately, Smelser said.
The commission will resume
hearings Sept. 25 with a report
from the now-defunct
' Presidents Commission on
Crime. Former Chairman
Nicholas B. Katzenbach, now
undersecretary of state, will be
the first witness.

in murder, als per cent increase
in forcible rape, and a 14 per
cent increase in aggravated
assault.
Property crimes increased
by 20 per cent as a whole, led by
a 24 per cent increase in

* *
Contagious Violence
Influences Crowds
Os Mice And Men

KNOXVILLE Tenn.-(UPI>
A husband and wife research
team at the University of
Tennessee has gathered evidence
that witnessing violence can
stimulate the witness into
joining the action.
Dr. Bruce Welch and his wife,
Annemarie, working with mice,
have determined that physical
changes occur in the brain of the
witness. Their finding supports
the contention of many
sociologists that violence is
contagious.
The Welches investigated a
chemical substance called
norepinephrine, which is
released by nerve cells in the
brains of men and mice and acts
as one of several transmitters of
electrical impulses between
nerve endings.
The research showed that
mice, separated from the action
in individual cages, show a
significant increase in the rate of
release of norepinephrine when
they witness a fight between
other mice. They appear
stimulated to join the action.
This study appears to
provide the first evidence for a
specific neurochemical change in
the central nervous system
following a mildly stimulating
psychological event, Welch
said.
The researchers found that
the levels of the chemical in the
lower brain stem of the excited
observer mice was 32 per cent

pBEED BARN W
WELCOMES BACK ALL U. OF
FIGHTING GATORS AND
OFFERS this fine assortment of tasty food
to serve you

Big Barney4 5C
Ha mburg §rs2o<
Cheeseburgers2s<
Fish Filet Sandwich3o<
French Fries 15<
Onion Rings2s<
Shakes 25<

STUDENTS IN PREVIOUS YEARS HAVE TRIED OUR FOOD AND LIKED IT ITWE
WE ITWE THINK YOU WILL TO. SOME OF OUR COMPETITION IS CLOSER
BUT- WE THINK YOULL BE MISSING OUT IF YOU DONT TRY US
N.W.l3th St. Across From Gainesville High School

ACCORDING TO FBI REPORT

Automobile theft, a 23 per cent
increase in larceny involving
SSO or more, and a 17 per cent
increase in burglary.
Hoover also said there was a
34 per cent increase in armed
robbery anc! a 28 per cent

below normal, indicating a
release of the substance from the
nerve cells during their
excitation.
The researchers said that
much work still needs to be
done before any firm
conclusions can be drawn as to
the part played by the
chemicals, and whether the*
stimulation of the observer mice
comes through the sight, sound
or the smell of battle.

ATTENTION
ALL UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
' 0
New accident insurance plan to go into
effect October 1, 1968.
Plan covers you and your family for accidents
occurring everywhere on airplanes, trains,
&
buses, in autos, on the job in the home,
in sports activities
LOW COST PAYROLL DEDUCTION
TO ENROLL
CALL PERSONNEL OFFICE IN THE HUB (EXT. 3165)
OR
CANNON-TRE WEEK AGENCY
378-2511
ENROLLMENT PERIOD ENDS OCTOBER 1, 1968 ACT NOW!!
UNDERWRITTEN BY I.N.A.

increase in assaults with
firearms.
Purse-snatching during the
first six months ofthej/ear_rase__

I"aNSWEIMO A PILOTS PRAYER I
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Bucket 15 pieces $3.59
Barrel 21 pieces $4.89
Soft Drinks 1(X-15<

45 per cent, tire report said, and
theft of personal property from
automobiles climbed 20 per cent
during thejxriod.



Three Major Education Projects Underway

ByftONNIE SACHS
Alijptor Staff Writer
Three major projects, aided
by large grants, are underway in
the UF College of Education.
Two of these are research and

Policy Changes
In Publications

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Aligator Staff Writer
UF Student Publications is
putting the finishing touches on
numerous changes designed to
improve operations.
One of the major changes
involves rewriting and revising
the outdated, inefficient
policies governing student
publications.
Complete policy revisions
which require responsibility
but guarantee freedom have
been written and approved by
the Board of Student
Publications and are now before
UF Pres. Stephen OConnell for
approval.
Hardd Kennedy, Promotions
Man ager of Student
Publications, explained that the
policy includes a statement on
journalistic ethics, changes in
advertising policy and sets up
guidelines for the BSP
supervision of student
publications.
Further changes within
student publications include a
complete changeover in
management.
A general manager, former
Business Manager Brent Myking,
will serve in the same capacity
past directors have, retaining
management of business affairs,
but relinquishing journalistic
advisement to die new Editorial
Advisor, Norman Going,
formerly with the Orlando
Sentinel.
Ed Barber, production
manager of Student Publications
last year, has been moved to

dVorth d*enlral L -rtiurch I
404 N.W. 14th Avenue 1
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 3260 V |
CHRIST I Centered I
S.S. 9:45a.m. jBL. T.U. 6:15 p.m. I
Worship 11:00a.m. worship 7:30p.m. I
_ S I .mfe i I
- H
NORTH CBTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH §
BOS SGHEDOIX §
Mallory Hall 9*oo a.a. 1
Broward Hall 9*03
Rawlings Hall 9*05
Jennings Hall 9*lo a.m.
'Hume Hall 9*15 as. |
Prat Drive 9*17 *. 1
Tolbert Hall 9*20 a.m.
Main Cafeteria-Vest side 9*25 a.m. I
Murphree Area 9*26 a.m. §
let Ave N.W. & 17th St. 9*28 a.m. §
, BSU 9*30 a.m. 1
CHURCH 940 j
Return to Campus iztib r.n. B
. H
JhContc (1 Lire It for iltc University of I

training programs concerned
adapting educational
administration to meet the needs
of modem society. They are
supported by grants totaling
$360,000.

training programs concerned
tufith adapting educational
administration to meet the needs
of modem society. They are
supported by grants totaling
$360,000.

Operations Manager and will
supervise non-editorial
operations in advertising,
production, circulation and
promotion.
R. French, formerly with
student publications at the
University of New Mexico, is
now the UF Student
Publications Production
Manager.
Some S9OOO worth of new
equipment has also been added
to the production department.
New IBM typesetting equipment
which provides more versatility
in type sizes and styles, new
headline writers, and camera and
darkroom equipment are being
leased this year by Student
Publications.
Deadline For
Chartered Bus
To FSU Game
Wednesday is the last day to
reserve space on the
specially-chartered buses taking
students to the FSU game in
Tallahassee.
Five buses chartered by the
Special Projects Committee of
the Union Board for Student
Activities will leave from Florida
Field at 9:30 Saturday morning
and will return to Gainesville
after the game.
There is room for 185
students aboard the buses.
Tickets are available in the
Union Board office, room 310
of the Reitz Union for $7.25.

GRANTS TOTAL $ 360,000

The first, a three year project
which began last week, is seeking
to develop a model program for
educating school administrators.
It is working with $260,000
from the U.S. Office of
Education (USOE).
The second project consists
of a two year investigation of big
dty school systems to precede
the construction of a model
urban education administration.
Utilizing a SIOO,OOO USOE
grant, this project is in its
preliminary stage.
Dr. R.L. Johns, an authority
on school finance, and Dr. Ralph
Kimbrough, chairman of file
Department of Administration
and Supervision, are the
principal investigators in both
projects.
One object of the program is
to make the training of
administrators more relevant to
the complex problems in urban
school systems. Emphasis will be
placed on specialized research.
The projects also tocus on
teacher militancy in large school
systems. Model administrations

THREE mums EVERY WEEK AT FRISCHS!
Free Autographed
GATOR
FOOTBALLS
t
\ V I VI I
jfOr yy I* i f j jj / #yy
vBl I \ 1 y f 1 1
I/Imy I I m \
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v\ \ 1 // i y r I
It'B your chance to win a prize football trophy for your home. The real foot footballs
balls footballs are personally autographed by team members and each ball is mounted
on goal posts, custom-designed trophy base. The free football awards will
be baaed on lucky name drawings three winners each week during the
football Beason. Just visit Frischs and register your name for the weekly
drawings. No purchase is necessary and you do not have to be present for
drawings to be a winner. All winners will be notified. Be sure to register
every week. First drawing will be September 21.
Dining Room In-Car Service Carry-Out Orders
2035 N. W. 13th Street Gainesville Phone 378-2304

will be set up for testi gin such
areas as New Orleans, Miami and
Atlanta.
A
The third project, the largest
of the three, is alreadv

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71' 1013 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
Phone 372-1189 I

Moncby, Saptambar 23,1968, Th# Florida Alligator,

underway. Funded by a grant of
nearly $1 million dollars from
USOE, die project win study
school finance from early
childhood through the junior
college levels.

Page 21



Page 22

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

SURVEY INDICATES

Nixon May Landslide

W ASHING TON--(UPI)
Everything appears to be falling
into place for Richard Nixon in
the early weeks of the

AEP Brings Home
Convention Awards

The Ufs chapter of Alpha
Epsilon Pi returned from the
national convention in New
Orleans recently, with awards
for best chapter and best
delegate.
Roger Davis, master, was
voted best delegate in
competition with 118 other
delegates, while Bruce Levy, past
master, received recognition as
the outstanding undergraduate
in the nation.
The competition for the best
chapter award was based on all
facets of fraternity life, from
scholarship to social activities
and from N membership to
community service. The UFs
chapter led in all of these fields.

UF Literary Magazine
Seeking Student Help

The Florida Quarterly, UFs
student magazine, is seeking
voluntary help for its second
year of publication.
Editor Mike Mahoney said
applications may be picked up in
room 336 of the Student
Publications offices in the Reitz
Union. A meeting is planned on
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. for
selecting staff members.
According to Mahoney,

Col" *O4 Cok *r*
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presidential campaign and to be
propelling him toward victory,
possible along landslide lines.
Everything seems to have

iiira
ROGER DAVIS
... best delegate
Last year s membership drive
netted the fraternity more
members than any other chapter
and set a new national record,
Davis said.

persons seeking the editorship
may contact him by phone at
378-5557 and send an
application to room 207
Anderson Hall, or come by room
336 of the Reitz Union.
Poetry and fiction
manuscripts, critical articles,
reviews, and graphic arts must be
submitted to the Florida
Quarterly in room 207
Anderson.

gone wrong for Vice President
Hubert H. Humphrey, who
desperately needs-to turn things
around quickly and to generate
enthusiasm instead of defeatism
among his Democratic troops.
Assessments by UPI state
capital reporters indicate that, if
the election were held now,
Nixon would carry 33 states
with 381 electoral votes.
Humphrey would carry only 4
states and the District of
Columbia with 28 electoral
votes. The winner needs 270.
' ;,: 4 .
The survey indicates that
George C. Wallace as the
candidate of the American
Independent party is ahead in 7
states with 64 electoral votes.
Wallace appears to be hurting
Humphrey to the point that the
vice president is rated third in
six states. He is damaging both
major party candidates in
fact-Nixon especially in the
South and Humphrey among
blue collar workers in northern
industrial areas.

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And as a finishing touch, reflective safety striping highlights the vinyl top.
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- Get Involved, Learn, Be Good Citizens

Become involved, leam all
you can, be good citizens and
work for orderly change.
These were the charges made
to new students gathered for
orientation Wednesday at
Florida Field.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, one of four speakers,
told about 3,200 freshmen and
transfer students, The real issue
begging for solution today is
finding away of reconciling
freedom with order.
He warned that efforts
probably will be made in many
places to disrupt and cause
discord on the campus and
suggested to students that before
they join such actions they
should gather the facts, study
them carefully and weigh
possible consequences for their
actions to themselves and the
university.
Their real role on campus, he
noted, is to join the cause of the
university, which is to transmit
and extend knowledge and
encourage and demonstrate its
effective use. Unless they enlist
themselves in this cause, they
will be out of step.

, jUnEELDS^
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jjnJIEIDS

Dr. Lester L. Hale, vice
president for student affairs,
advised them that in their quest
for personal freedom they must
not fail to overlook the necessity
for personal direction.
Society in all its patterns
.* must have away of regulating
itself wisely and for the benefit
of all members of that society,
Dr. Hale noted.
The university has
procedures for effective change
where change is warranted and
has used and will use these
procedures freely.
V**
Dr. Franklin Doty, dean of
University College, the liberal
arts learning center for freshmen
and sophomores, said: The
purpose of these classrooms is
not teaching, but learning. Woe
to any instructor who stands
between you and learning.
The goal, of University
College is to provide everyone
with a liberal education-a
general knowledge of all
fields...to provide you with an
understanding of human values,
he said.

SPEAKERS TELL FRESHMEN

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liv JF Sg If m' s-
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VICE PRESIDENT HALE ADDRESSES NEW STUDENTS
T7 .effective change where change is warranted

Clyde Taylor of Miami,
student body president, told
students they were coming to
campus at perhaps its greatest
hour-at a time when great
change is taking' place.
Taylor cited revised housing
and updated rules and
regulations, including relaxed

curfew rules for women;
voluntary ROTC and a second
student newspaper as examples
of change in the last three
months.
He noted that these changes
constitute a challenge to students
to become involved in everyday
events of University life,

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

questioning all sides of every
question before reacting so
we can honestly say we acted as
rational adults.
We never can have student
opinions considered seriously by
alumni, parents and the
administration unless they are
rational.

Page 23



Page 24

k Th Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

Control Points Initiate Traffic Program

By DAVID OSIER
Aligator Staff Writer
A system of four strategically-located
control points will go in to effect this week
to keep unauthorized vehicles out of the
main campus area.
The control stations, each manned by a
campus policeman, will be at the Stadium
Drive and North-South Drive intersection,
the NW 17th Street entrance, the main
entrance opposite SW 2nd Avenue, and the
Inner Drive and Newell Drive intersection.
The system is to allow pedestrians to
move more freely between classes. The
policemen will check parking stickers on
cars gomg into main campus reserved areas.
Arnold Butt, architecture department
chairman and former UF consulting
architect, said a recent survey showed thaL
of 7,000 tickets issued during one quarter
last year most were parking violations in
the central campus area.
Butt, along with architecture professor
Harold Kemp and Us Planning Director W.
Ellis Jones, has been working on a parking
and traffic plan for several months.
The control point system is only the
first phase of a two-part short range
plan. The second phase will begin in
January.
According to university police Chief

So What?
In 1960 Corry Villages
capacity was 192 persons.
Shucht Villages capacity was
104 persons.
In 1960 the combined
capacities of all married students
quarters at UF were 903
persons.
The combined capacities of
the three Flavet villages were
609 persons in 1960.

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Audie Shuler, essentially no parking areas
have been changed yet. However, at the
beginning of the winter quarter commuters
may be required to park in perimeter areas
and ride a shuttle bus to class.
Ellis estimated a fee of $lO may be
required from all vehicle owners, apd

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Shuler predicted a winter quarter
re-registration may be initiated. The vehicle
registration fee is needed to finance the
shuttle bus system, Butt said.
A main perimeter-commuter parking lot
is slated to be built south of Hume HaU on
North-South Drive. Butt said buses can be

scheduled to run every five minutes and
carry commuters to main campus.
Ellis said the group, along with a
consulting firm, RAMP Associates of New
York City, has studied problems here and
on other campuses. He pointed out, for
example, University of Illinois allows no
student parking on campus during classes.
Shuler said the $lO registration fee is
extremely low in comparison to other
campuses. UCLAs fee is $72 while Iflinoi
is S6O, Butt said.
In addition to handling commuters,
Butt emphasized, the buses will service the
Health Center, married housing villages,
and dormitory areas. Six buses will handle
three routes he said.
By January, Butt said, 1,500 new
parkingjspaces will be provided on campus.
The Hume Hall lot will have about 930
commuter spaces. Presently, there are
about 6,450 spaces for about 16,000 cars.
Butt said one of the reasons for heavy
main campus traffic congestion in the past
has been the large percentage of transitory
traffice. He said the RAMP consultants
found 43 per cent of all traffic were
vehicles passing through.
The long range plan calls for two or
three level parking lots, Butt said.

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Page 25



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

Page 26

ivWv.wAw.WA'K'KvMwx'K*:*; MANY GOOD RESULTS
{Charles Shepherd Attends!
i Democratic Convention 1

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Assistant Executive Editor
Past student body president
Charles Shepherd, who served as
a Florida delegate to the
Democratic National
Convention, returned from the
Windy City with mixed feelings.
I didnt enjoy it at all-not
any of it, he said. But at the
same time, I wouldnt have
traded it for anything.
Shepherd said he felt many
good results came out of the
confab.
The unit rule was done away
with, to me this was very
important, he said. It was not
done away with to the extent I
would have liked, he
continued.
I voted to make it apply to
all Democratic conventions from
the precincts up, although this
would create some legal
problems for some states who
have had this in their state
statues, he said.
Although he worked for the
Draft Kennedy movement,
Shepherd was not completely
disappointed with the
nomination of Hubert
Humphrey as presidential
candidate.
1 think the Vietnam debate
was a tremendous step forward
as far as open discussion goes,
said the third year law student.
If we were just thinking
politics, we would have wanted
to discourage that type of
debate before the American
people. They would have wanted
to try to bury it under the rug,
he said.
We had a free wheeling
exchange of ideas-one of the
best debates Ive heard on the
Vietnam war, he added.
*
Shepherd said he voted for
the unsuccessful dovish minority
plank of the platform.
Although he said he realized
many students were unhappy
with the Humphrey nomination,
he said he felt it was also one of
the positive outcomes of the
meeting. __ _____
l dont think Hubert

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Humphrey would be a disaster
for the country if he was
elected, he said. Hes the only
answer of the three major
candidates, he added.
I feel the American people
need some kind of psychological
release from the Johnson
Administration-heavy handed
politics, ego-centric politics of
the administration. Hubert
Humphrey is not in the position
to be that answer, he said.
The Democratic party
probably came closer, through
all of this disruption and voicing
these frustrations, to mirroring
the present day society,
Shepherd said.
There were people there
from all age groups. We had
students, delegates with
beards-all the way to the very
conservative, he added.
Shepherd expressed shock
at the action of the Chicago
police in connection with the
rioting in Grant Park during the
convention.
When I saw the police in
action in the park, I was
outraged, Ive never been so
angry and just disgusted, he
said.
I thought I was dismayed by
what was going on inside. .. but
I was disgusted by what was
going on outside, he added.
Yet, when I left the
convention hall to go back to
the hotel, I was glad the police

were there. .they were some ot
the nicest people Ive ever met,
he said.
The American people have
j ust about had enough of
student demonstrations-there
must be a more effective way
found of presenting opinions,
he said.
The American public, under
this business of law and order,
places rioters and looters in the
same group as student
demonstrators, he said.
I think the police, in many
respects, acted out of personal
provocation, mirroring this
feeling-hit em again,
Shepherd added.
The convention and the
primary campaigns were a good
experience for many of the
young people who worked in
them, Shepherd said.
He disagreed with those who
have said many college-age
people who worked in the.
McCarthy and McGovern
campaigns would become
dissatisfied with politics.
If they are really interested
in politics, Shepherd said, this
experience will only whet their
appetites.

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Over 1,300 Girls Rush

TJie largest number of coeds
in UF history have gone out for
sorority rush this year-1300,
according to Miss Jackie Jedel,
Panhellenic Rush Chairman.
Computers handled the
invitations to informal parties.

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held Sunday, and to the Theme
Parties which are Sept. 29.
Rushees will pick up their
invitations for theme parties
Thursday, Sept. 26, 7-10 p.m. in
the Panhellenic Office, 3rd floor
of the Reitz Union.



Monday, September 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Wall Street 'Attraction Draws 5000 Crowd

NF.W YORK (UPI) A
stockbroker in a proper blue suit
shinnied up a buttonwood tree
to see what the fuss was all
about.
The steps of the New York
Stock Exchange were jammed.
Spectators ran to rooftops and
clung to light poles. The
windows of the staid old Morgan
Guaranty Trust Co. were
mobbed.
At 1:34 p.m., Thursday,
police estimated the crowd on
Wall Street near the Stock
Exchange where the nations
financial business is centered at
5,000.
At precisely that moment
Francine Gottfriend, a
21-year-old computer operator
from Brooklyn, stepped from
the BMT subway station and
walked down Broad Street.
She wore a tight yellow
sweater and a red skirt and
almost caused a riot. For days
the word had spread through
stock exchanges, banks and
brokerage houses about
Francines walk. Daily the
crowds grew.
Thursday Wall Street erupted.
Clerks in beige jackets mobbed
the sidewalks an hour early to
get good positions. The roofs of
Gov. Maddox
Says 'Raise
Bible Belt'
STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga.
(UPI) Gov. Lester Maddox said
Friday he would meet in the
middle of a hundred acres of
corn stubble at dead midnight,
* in a cold January to advance
religion in America.
The Georgia governor, in a
second Holy Ghost revival
speech in as many days, said the
teachings of Christianity are
alive far north in the arctic
snows, where the Ten
Commandments and the Sermon
on the Mount are heard tonight
by fur-clad peoples.
He made the remarks in his
prepared speech to the Georgia
State Youth Fellowship at Stone
Mountain Event, in this town
just east of Atlanta.
1 would meet in the middle
of a hundred acres of corn
stubble at dead midnight, in a
cold January if by doing so we
could advance the word of God
and the teachings of Christ,
Maddox said.
Even inside our own land,
the Fifth Column of Godless
communism is pressing a steady
and stealthy attack, and that
attack falls most fiercely on our
young, Maddox told the group.
We need, as we had never
needed it before, a great revival
of the Holy Ghost, and it is up
to us to bring it about.
There are no finer boys and
girls than those in Georgia, and
we read sometimes that Georgia
is in what is known as the Bible
Belt. Well, thats a million times
better than being in the Tribal
Belt,- whre looting and burning
and killing appear the order of
the day.
It might solve a lot of this
nations problems if we could
move the Bible Belt up to about
where Canada starts, Maddox
said. > -v. : J ~

Page 27

two cars were stamped in.
Women screamed, photographers
shoved.
Two plainclothes policemen
(the word had spread to City
Hall) managed to pull Francine
from the mob to safety in a
hotel lobby.
The cause of the near-riot was
the yellow sweater and
Francines figure, which
measures 43-25-37.

r Open Lot Policy
For Union Parking
Persons with business in the Reitz Union will be allowed to park in
the recently paved lot beside the building, even though they dont
have parking decals, W.E. Rion, Union director said last week.
The open lot proposal has been given full support by the
university Traffic and Parking Committee following meetings between
student leaders, campus officials, and the Chief of Campus Police.
The idea of the lot is to have a constant turnover of parking spaces,
rather than serve as a storage lot, although there will be no
maximum time limit for parking or policing of the lot._
Everyone using the lot must have a cooperative spirit, or the idea
will fall flat on its face, Ricn said.
No parking tickets will be issued for any violations of the intent of
the specific policies. If the new parking concept doesnt work,
however, a charging concept has been considered. The charge would
serve to keep a turnover, not to create money.

NSA speaks your language

And furthermore, if you are especially
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the National Security Agency is ready
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Demonstrated ability in language
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of special reports are important parts of
these assignments. And scientific
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opportunities for practical applications
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At NSA you will be joining an Agency
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43- 25- 37

Its the biggest thing to hit
Wall Street since the Cash, said
one Stock Exchange clerk.
Like the man up the
buttonwood tree, Francine
didnt know, or wouldnt let on,
what all the fuss was about.
Some people ask me for my
autograph, she said. Why
should they? Im just an
ordinary girl.

developing "secure communications
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NSA offers you this opportunity to
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Do you fit the picture?
Where to go ... what to do
Language applicants must take the
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Francine may be just an
ordinary girl, but one Wall Street
veteran said the crowd she drew
Thursday at least matched that

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turned out on May 17,19.67, for
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ceremonies of the New York
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Page 28

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 23,1968


l>:f* W H
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ENTERING MED STUDENT
Donald Henderson of Jacksonville (seated) receives advice from
Miss Hazel Donegan, administrative assistant for student affairs, and
Charles Dellinger, second-year medical student from Jacksonville
Beach, on how to succeed in the College of Medicine by utilizing the
study "cubes."

3 Computer
Courses Are
Scheduled
Three non-credit computer
programming courses will be
offered during the fall quarter
by the UF Computing Center.
The eight-week courses in
COBOL, FORTRAN IV, and
PL/I will introduce those not
familiar with computers to the
basic concepts and techniques of
data processings here is no
pre-registration; to enroll,
interested persons should simply
attend the classes.
Cobol (Common
Business-Oriented Language), a
new offermg this Fall, begins
Sept. 30 and will meet on
Monday nights from 7 to 9 p.m.
in Room 224 in the Engineering
Building.
The class series of FORTRAN
IV, probably the most widely
used programming language in
the data processing profession,
will begin on Oct. 2, in Bless
Auditorium, 133 Williamson
Hall, on Wednesday nights from
7to 9 pjn... PL/I, a new
programming language designed
to exploit the special capabilities
of third generation computers,
will meet on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 4:30 to 5:30
p.m. beginning Oct. 1 in Bless
Auditorium.
For further* information,
interested persons should
contact Frank Towers at
extension 3346, or Room 233,
Space Sciences Research
Building, opposite the Hub.
In additon to the three
courses already scheduled, the
Computing Center is planning a
course in Autocoder, the
language of the IBM 1401
Interested persons should sign
up at the reception desk in the
lobby of the Space Sciences
Research Building by Friday
Sept. 27.

Hi, gang WE RE SUMPTUOUSLY I
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something special, just ask, and we'll try our best. For today's looks, see our
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put a leather or velvet vest over a tweed skirt. The Nehru look is ever present in
minis, shifts, pant tops, blouses, and pantsuits. In dresses, let us show you the 1
many looks of Arpeja, Jeune Leigue, Jonathan Logan, and Country Miss, to (
mention a few. We're known for our accessories, and of course John Romain leads
the way. Come in today, let us open a Twig charge account for you, and show I
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SG INSENSITIVE

Debaters Seek Autonomy

The UFs debate team, rated
first in the South, is seeking
financial autonomy from
Student Government.
Coach John Wittig feels the
Debate Society has not been
able to have the best possible
program under the financial
direction of SG and hopes
autonomy can make this
possible.
Unlike most teams Florida
faces, the Debate Society
receives no scholarships and
must often operate on a budget
which is only half of its
opponents. Wittig feels SG has
failed to recognize the
educational aspects of the
Debate Society and has been
insensitive to the particular
problems of the team.
He contends SG has cut the
debate teams budget without
his knowledge or consultation as
to which tournaments are most
important. Further, SG is unable
to meet the needs of an
organization wlich must do
extensive traveling in order to be
effective, he said.
Student Body Vice-President
Garry Goodrich said the Debate
Society has actually received an
increased budget of almost 50
-per cent during the past four
years and SG has been
cooperative in working out the

problems the debate team faces.
The Debate Society now has
a budget of over $7,000 for
approximately 30 participants
attending debates around the

Welcome Class Os 1969
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INTRODUCING
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country. In addition to this
money, the Debate Society re received
ceived received an additional S9OO to
attend the National Tournament
in Chicago.



Barren Plot Os Eternal
t %
Triangle Found In 'lnterlude

By SUSIE HAL BACK
Alligator Reviewer
Its that same old eternal triangle again -a man,
his wife, and his mistriss. And although this is die
traditional formula for lovesick tragedy, in
Interlude (now playing at the Plaza), the
enchanted crystals do little more than gel.
Oskar Werner as Stephan Zelter is the intense,
yet sensitive, conductor of the London Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra. When confronted by
femme fatale newspaper gal Sally, (Barbara Ferns)
Stephan has no recourse;the desirous duo become
immediately involved.
Nothing comes of the affair, hence the title. And,
unfortunately, nothing comes of the movie either.
For all the action (Sally and Stephens meeting)
takes place within the first ten minutes of the show.
What remains are two hours of Salty and Stephan
wandering through flowers or amorously
intertwined in bed, occasionally interspersed with
Stephan conducting his orchestra. Lovely as the
photography is, it is no substitute for a barren plot.
Even flower children do* wilt
The shows ending is as awkward as its beginning.
Stephans wife of course discovers the affair and
graciously hands her husband over to Sally.
Suddenly Sally, rather unconvincingly, realizes that
Stephans music is the true love of his life.
Obviously there is a vast difference to her in
playing second fiddle to Stephans wife and in

STAFF NOTICE
The Board of Directors of the Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit I
Union now has a plan whereby University Employees may request payroll
deductions for Credit Union share or loan payments.
Credit Union members have already been notified of this but employees
of the U of F who are not already members of the Credit Union may visit
our offices and make the necessary arrangements. y
U of F ers like the Credit Union because it is so easy to save and borrow I
there Dividends are credited semi-annually with current rate 5%% per
year. The Credit Union is owned entirely by U of F employees and their
families and is operated for them exclusively You can count on quick
sympathetic help when you have money problems.
Loan protection insurance is provided on eligible loans. accounts I
carry life savings insurance, insuring each eligible member up to $2,000 of
his savings based on his age at the time the deposit was made. I
Remember, if you are a full time employee of the Uof F you and your I
family may be a member of this $4,000,000.00 Credit Umon.
Write or call for information on payroll deductions, and I
SAVE FROM THE TOP OF THE PILE!! I
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA
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REVIEWS

playing second fiddle to Stephans music. This
difference is never explained; Salty simply rejects
him. Stephan walks out her door and we never learn
what he does.
Then, a year later, the two meet again, in die
conclusion of a very clumsily handled flashback
which began this insipid interlude. Sally, now
married, is naturally still in love with Stephan, and
he is still in love with her. But, just as she did
previously, Sally crumbles into tears while Stephan
again walks out the door to??? again we never
learn and it serves to cap this whole febrile facade of
tragic love.
The one moment which could have saved the
movie was the brief reference to die conflict
existing between the love of an artist for his work
and his love for a woman.
Stephan as an artist was treated as
inconsequential; instead one witnessed, at
ten-minute intervals, Sallys crying spasma over
Stephens affections for his wife. Only when
Stephan is dumped in her lap, does Salty even
consider the possibility that he also loves his work.
She cannot accept the idea, but by dien even the
conception of Stephan as an artist is rather
unbelievable.
The involvement of an artist with his art can
attain a level of sacredness far above any tangible
comprehension. In Interlude, the artistic level
attained is a descending one, unfortunately
disintegrating into mere plodding platitudes.

Gainesvilles Movies

The following flicks are now
playing in Gainesville.
PLAZA I: Interlude, (see
review, this page). PLAZA II:
the Producers. CENTERI:
Prudence and the Pill.
CENTER II: For Love of Ivy.

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Monday, Saptombar 23,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

FLORIDA: The Graduate.
STATE: Room At the Top.
SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN:
Hombre md Never A Dull
Moment. GAINESVILLE
DRIVE-IN: To Sir, With Love
& Casino Roy ale.

Page 29



i, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 23,1968

Page 30

Homecoming is Fall Entertainment Highlight

ByTEDREMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Last year was the year that
was (entertainment-wise
anyway). Dont forget that THIS
is the year of the Gator.
Saturday nights are already
taken' before classes start.
Dormitory and Union dances
along with local night spots for
the over 21 set are available
for independents while
fraternity parties keep the
Greeks on campus occupied,
parties keep the Greeks on
campus occupied.
Big names are brought to the
UF throughout the quarter.
Anna Moffo, noted opera star,
was a guest of the Union Board
Fine Arts Committee, Lyceum
Council sponsored a visit from
die American Ballet Theatre,
and Popular singing star Jack
Jones appeared at the
Interfraternity Councils
quarterly Frolics.
There are also many BNOC
(big names on campus)

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TAKING IT EASY
. . at UF's Lake Wauberg.
BNAI BVITH HIUEL FOUNDATION
HIGH HOLY DAYS
Rosh Hashanah September 22 24 .._
September 22 7:00 p.m. Traditional
9:00 p.m. Liberal
Septembef 22 9:30 a.m. Medical Center Auditorium
September 23 7:30 p.m. Hillel Foundation
September 24- 9:30 a.m. Hillel Foundation
Yom Kippur Kol Nidre
October 1 7:00 p.m. Traditional
9:00 p.m. Liberal
Medical Center Auditorium
Tickets available Hillel Office
Yom Kippur
October 2 9:30 a.m. Medical Center Auditorium
1:00 p.m. Yizkor
5:00 pjn. Neibh Hilw F-***"
Rabbi SIMEON KOBRINETZ, Director
1 6 N. W. 1a T N TR EE T 3 7 2-2 90 0

JACK JONES
. appeared at IFC Frolics.
associated with the Florida
Players, UFs dramatic, group.
They usually present one or two
plays a quarter. Last years
production of Marat-Sade was
very successful.
Lake Wauburg is usually a
favorite spot at least during the
first part of the fall quarter.
While weather permits, the lake

is available to university students
for water skiing, canoeing,
swimming, sunbathing and
various other outside activities.
As everyone (even freshmen)
knows, Homecoming is THE big
weekend during the fall quarter.
With the theme set during the
summer term by Florida Blue
Key the spon soring
organization, work is well under
way in preparation for the
gigantic weekend bu the time
classes start.
Themes the past four years
have ranged from Floridas
discovery and the new
Disneyland to be built in this
state, to the Peanuts craze and
now the national elections.
The parade Friday afternoon
kicks off activities and sets the
stage for Gator Growl, the
largest student-produced
program in the world. After a
night of bands marching, skits
performed by various campus
groups and an introduction of
the Gator football team by
Coach Graves capped with a
fantastic fireworks display, the
next morning brings political fun
Student
Composers
Sought
Sounds of Young America,
is a new national competition
for collegiate composers and
writers and will provide an
opportunity for students to
compete for national recognition
and scholarships, plus a chance
to see their works performed by
the top stars of records and
show business.
Entries will be judged by a
panel of music and literary
experts and three Finalists in
each category will fly to Salt
Lake City, Utah on May 8-10,
1969 to see their works
performed by the top recording
artists in a big salute to the
Sounds of Young America.
Entrance applications may be
secured from Sounds of Young
America, Room 458, Union
Pacific Building Annex, Salt
Lake City, Utah 84111. There is
no charge for entering the
contest. >

NOTICE
KIDDIE KORT CHILD CARE CENTER
5240 NW Bth AVE.
IS NOW OPEN JSKoKSff
WE WILL PICK UP AND DELIVER CHILDREN AT:
LITTLEWOOD ELEMENTARY
P. K. YONGE ELEMENTARY
MYRA TERWILLIGER ELEMENTARY
WE CARE FOR CHILDREN AGES 2-8 BY THE HOUR, DAY, WEB<, OR MONTH
WILL BE OPEN FOR ALL GATOR HOME GAMES FROM 10 am-6 pm
ALSO:
FLORIDAGEORGIA GAME 9am9pm
FLORIDAFLORIDA STATE 9am9pm
Jimmy Pogue-Mgr.
OPEN MONDAY 7:00 ams:3o pm
372-6667 Call for Reservations 376-4155
(after 600 pm)

with the annual law school skits
reviewing state and national
government. £
But as always, the football
game is what everyone came for
and Saturday afternoon sees
thousands of Gator fans
streaming into the stands at
Florida Field to spend a hot
afternoon cheering for their
team.
The celebration after the
game lasts until the wee hours of
Sunday morning and the
students spend the whole day
coming down to Gainesville soil

Looks great greatwrites
writes greatwrites great...
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EBERHARD FABERS
NOBLOT DESK SET
with your college emblem
Two famous NOBLOT Ball-Point
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in modern chrome holders on
deep-lustre black base.
., (with emblem)
Handsome, handy, perfect for- a college bookstore only
your desk.
Pick up an Eberhard Faber TR 35 porous point pen, too. With Perma-Moist
Point. Writes with a thin, strong line every time! Eight colors. 69.
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Monday, September 23.1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 31



Page 32

:, The Fieri*** AiUntar. Monday, September 23,1968

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NOT REGISTaIiP* 1 .FILLED. .MEETING CONFLICT. .NOT REGISTERED
. .this IBM Caqlpjjar tells the sometimes sad, always hectic, story of registration
. -^;
-Ifew

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UNION TERRACE RESEMBLES FRATERNITY ROW
.
. .as campus greeks greet potential pledges

II
-'WSPPISii*;: *
JUNIOR COLLEGE WAS NEVER LIKE THIS
. .transfer student Drake Osgood was rejected 12 times

Registration...
A Maze Os Action,
A Week Os Activity

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.joh
THE FIRST OF MANY TRIPS
. .as Jancie Kurst moves into Broward Hall



Heart Study
Program Gets
Fund Grant
Financial support for a
graduate training program to
train greatly needed heart and
lung surgeons has been granted
to UFs College of Medicine.
The National Heart Institute
of the U.S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
awarded the college $43,200 for
the first year of a Five-year
graduate training program.
Ultimately, the award will
exceed $200,000.
Cardiovascular disease is the
greatest single cause of death in
the nation and there is great
demand currently for
cardiovascular" surgeons
throughout the country.
The need for competently
trained heart and lung surgeons
is even more pertinent to
Florida, one of the most rapidly
growing and developing states,
with a steadily enlarging segment
of older people.
The UF program, which will
be directed by Dr. Myron W.
Wheat Jr., professor and chief of
the Division of Thoracic and
Cardiovascular Surgery, is
designed to train young surgeons
in clinical application, teaching
and research into heart diseases
in local communities, regional
complexes and academic
environments.
The young surgeons will be
well grounded in basic
cardiovascular physiology,
pathology and embryology; the
methods and application of
cardiovascular techniques of
diagnosis and treatment and the
philosophy and basic surgical
skills involved in management of
the broad spectrum of
congential and acquired
cardiovascular diseases.
Physicians must meet the
requirements of a one-year
medical internship and four
years of general surgery training
in addition to being certified by
the American Board of Surgery
before they can be considered
for the two-year Florida training
program in thoracic and
cardiovascular surgery.
Paintings
On Display
4
In Gallery
Contemporary American
paintings are being displayed this
week at the UF.
The 1967 Corcoran Biennial,
on display through Wednesday
at the University Gallery,
features 21 works depicting the
most recent directions and styles
in contemporary American
painting.
The Cororan exhibition,
seasons first for the University
Gallery, is being circulated
throughout the United States by
the American Federation of Arts
in New York.
Part of a larger version, the
traveling display stresses the
younger, Hess well-known artists
whose merit have been
recognized in their own
localities. Their works, mostly
abstracts, were chosen for the
Corcoran based on open
competition.
The exhibition is free.

l
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fl c
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The magic of a name! I
Thomas Campbell (1777-1844)
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Our good name is our most prized possession, I
but much of its magic we owe to many manufacturers I
and craftsmen who permit us the substantial right to I
represent them and their superlative merchandise in our I
city. -
For many years, these business associations I
have added luster to our name. For proof you need I
only glance at the following: i
- Nottingham Norman Hilton and Hickey-Freeman suits I
* Sero and Troy Guild shirts I
Pendleton woolens
London Fog outerwear I
Pringle of Scotland I
Allen Solly, Ltd., Izod, Ltd. I

Corbin and Oaks Trousers I
We cordially invite you to look them over. I
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Number Six Main Street South i

Monday, September 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 33



>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

Page 34

WHATS
HAPPENING
! 1 ; . r . i_ _i a
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN GREETING OLD FRIENDS (?): Whats Happening is back in
the Alligator again this year. Full of snappy phrasemongering and (nit)
witticisms, this (hopefully) daily column gives campus-oriented
organizations a chance for some free publicity on upcoming events.
If your club or organization would like to have an item published
in this column, please .bring the appropriate information by the
Alligator office, third floor, J. Wayne Reitz Union, by 4 p.m. at least
24 hours before the item is to published. For example, if yOu wish an
item published in Wednesdays paper, the information should be in
the Alligator office no later than 4 p.m. Monday.
IN ONE OF LYNDONS BETTER IDEAS: Headstart, the tutoring
program for underpriviledged pre-school youngsters, has a meeting in
room 361 of the union at 10 a.m. this morning.
IN PIECING TOGETHER SUPPORT FOR
DUMPHREY: The Young Democrats Club starts a membership drive
at 8 a.m. today in the UF Service Booth.
IN COLLEGE ALTERNATIVES: The U.S. will be
recruiting today in the Games Area lobby of the union from 8 a.m. till
5 p.m.
IN LEARNING HOW TO STEP-TWO-THREE INTO THE SOCIAL
WHIRL: The Union offers dancing lessons in rooms 245 and
246 of the union tonight at 7 p.m.
IN MAKING WAVES: The Gator American Radio Club meets
tonight in. room 525 of E and I Building at 8 oclock. Everyone
interested in amateur radio is invited.
Nov. 9 Rings In
Centrex System

v UF -dormitory students can
expect telephones in their rooms
to start ringing by Nov. 9, when
the campus # Centrex system
begins, Cole A. Wagener,
communications consultant to
Southern Bell said.
All University housing areas,
with the exception of the
married students and Murphree
areas, will be connected on
Centrex. Those areas not
included are to continue their
use of the Gainesville telephone
system.
Using Centrex, students may
save money dialing their long
distance calls direct, rather than
using an operator. Wagener

* jkjtc #
j W I
f PEOPLE'S i
l CAPITALISM
*
Without revolution, the ownership of U.S. industry has quietly! +
+ passed into the hands of the people, not the Government.
* The electric utility industry, for example, is partly owned by
4,000,(XX) individuals directly .. partly owned by 135,000,000
with life insurance (whose insurance companies hold shares
* worth $23 billions) .. and partly owned by the millions with
* savings accounts. More people have more savingssso billions
invested in electric utilities than in any other U.S. industry.
* Thus, your parents (or you) may own part of Floridas four
investor-owned electric companies.
Thats peoples capitalism. J
* In communist countries, the
* names the same, but not the game.
Florida's Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor- owned
gL* ''* r
* FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY GULF POWER COMPANY
* FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY

added operators will no longer
break into direct dial calls to ask
for the number where the call is
originating. Automatic toll
systems have been established to
identify the numbers.
The Centrex phones are to
have seven digits, replacing the
extension lines now in use.
Campus calls will go through by
dialing the last five digits. For an
off campus call, students must
dial 9, and then the local
number they want.
Quarterly housing rates have
included the charge for the local
conversations. Long distance
calls will be handled separately
and billed directly to the
student.

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simply showing your current I.D. Card. Its true.. .at SILVERMANS
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING AT THE REAR OF STORE ~



# CONNECTS UF. ORLANDO
Libraries Install Telephoto Hook-Up

Two major Florida libraries
have launched a joint effort to
hold the lid on the information
and population explosions.
In the process UF and
Orlando libraries become the
first in the state-and among the
first in the nation-to use
telephoto transmission of library
materials, according to Dr.
Gustave A. Harrer, UF libraries
director.
It all adds up to instant
information for Central Florida
residents with pressing needs for
business, science, medical,
technical or academic answers,
he says.
Harrer and J. R. Jones Jr.,
social sciences research librarian,
represented the university
libraries at inauguration
ceremonies for the high-speed
communications system last
Tuesday at the Orlando Public
Library.
The new cooperative system
places the more than 1,300,000
volumes of the university
libraries on immediate call for
the rapidly expanding
population of the greater
Orlando area.
In turn, more than 200,000
volumes at Orlando, including a
highly specialized technical
collection and indexes, are open
to academic staff and graduate

a
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STUDENTS
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I 1 be
JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS

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UF ORLANDO TELEPHOTO LIBRARY HOOK-UP
... among the first in the nation to use high-speed transmission

students at the university. The
Orlando collection is expected
to be of great assistance to
university research in urban
planning Harrer says.
Inter-library loan services,
which formerly required up to a
week to obtain, are now
available within hours, Harrer
points out. He says speed in
reception of actual materials can
be essential in solving medical
and industrial crises.
He explains that the new
service, resembling a photo
copier with teletype accuracy
and speed, permits rapid and
accurate reproduction of

citations requested and materials
needed. This, he says, avoids
mistakes in locating or
interpreting materials.
As examples of the new
systems usefulness, he cites
mathematical euqations, charts,
and graphs or foreign languages.
Instead of trying to explain
what the source says or shows,
we now can send a copy of the
needed portion of material,
Harrer says.
The experimental project
originally was designed to test
the feasibility of facsimile
reproduction and high-speed
transmission in linking the

resources of the Business,
Science and Technology Division
of the Orlando library with
those of the Technical
Information Division of the UF
libraries, according to Jones,
who wrote the original program
proposal.
Harrer suggests that the
facility also may provide a
feasibility test for opening a
broader scope of the massive
university library resources to a
wide segment of Florida
, residents, So long as this does
not interfere with the primary
needs of university faculty and
students, he cautions.

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Mrs. Casellas and Jones
jointly prepared the proposal for
the cooperative venture, funded
for one year from Tuesday, with
a $25,009 grant through the
Library Service and
Construction Act of 1966, using
funds assigned to Florida
through the U. S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
The Florida Library and
Historical Commission approved
the grant in June.
The service, providing the
library user with an actual photo
copy of requested material, will
be free of charge during the
one-year grant project. Cost and
effectiveness of service will
determine the projects future,
according to Harrer.
Apparatus for the new service
includes: Photo copying
transmitters and receivers at
both libraries, utilizing a special
direct telephone wire between
the two to carry both the
microwave relay for facsimile
services and for voice
communications; a
teletypewriter at Orlando to link
into the TWX system already in
service for Floridas academic
libraries and making accurate
and immediate communication
possible with any other national
or international institution using
TWX.

Page 35



Page 36

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

Student Absentee Voters
m r *
Must Apply For Ballots

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writr
UF students who are not
registered voters in Alachua
County and will be voting
absentee in the Nov. 5 General
election must apply for absentee
ballots.
The ballots must be requested
from the county of residence,
notarized and returned to the
home county by 5 p.m. Nov. 4.
Mrs. Alma Bethea, Alachua
County Supervisor of Elections,

Seven New Editors
Named To Alligator
; >
Editor Harold Aldrich has announced seven appointments to
editorial positions in the 1968-69 Florida Alligator.
Raul Ramirez, from West Palm Beach, has been named Executive
editor. A summer interm with the Miami Herald this summer, Ramirez
will be in charge of assigning stories and supervising news coverage.
Assisting Ramirez will be Dave Reddick, 4 JM from Gainesville,
who interned with the Orlando Sentinel this summer.
Sports editor is to be Neal Sanders, 2UC, from Miami Springs, who
was assistant sports editor last year, while former Editorial Assistant
James Cook, 3AS from St. Augustine has been appointed news editor.
Marc Dunn, 4JM from Hollywood and sports writer last year, is to
assist Sanders along with Miss Kathie Keim. A 4JM from Orlando,
Miss Keim was press secretary to the Board of International Activities
and a reporter last year.
Continuing as entertainment editor from this summer will be Ted
Remley, 4AS, from Tavares. His duties will include movie and play
reviews and coverage of general entertainment.

Why should you read
The St. Petersburg Times 9jH
Gainesville |j
Because its the newspaper
for the compleat thinker.
Wherever you are. ***
It s tuned in to our times
the best state and national news coverage
the most comprehensive sports coverage
the liveliest features and best-known columnists
the most penetrating background and analysis
Keep up with The Times, the best-read newspaper on Florida's west coast.
To start your subscription in Gainesville, call 372-4532. Just 65c a week,
delivered to your dorm.
imps'')
S BEST NEWSPAPER ? -y

FOR NOV. 5 GENERAL ELECTION

said the ballots can be requested
by mail but must be attested to
by someone authorized to
administer an oath before they
can be counted.
Mrs Bethea offered the
services of her office to the
out-of-county voters at the UF.
She said voter registration
offices throughout Florida will
be open Saturdays until 5 p.m.
for students wishing to pick up
absentee ballots or register to
vote.

The deadline for registration
is Oct. 5, and a person must
register in person in his county
of residence.
Mrs. Bethea said residency is
determined by the individual
facts in each case.
If a UF student is in
Gainesville for the sole purpose
of attending classes but plans to
return to his home county after
he graduates, he.. is not
considered a resident of Alachua
county, she said.
But if he has a family here,
is working here and in all
probability will accept a job here
upon graduation, he is
considered a resident of Alachua
county.
Mrs. Bethea pointed out that
persons who will fulfill their
residency or age requirement
after the deadline of Oct. 5 but
prior to the Nov. 5 election can
still vote in that election.
They must register before
the registration deadline,
however, she said, not on the
day they fulfill the
requirement.
860 Masters
During the school year
1966-67 2,730 Bachelor degrees
were awarded by the UF. Also
awarded during the year were
860 masters degrees and 155
Ph.D degrees.

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Researchers
Investigate
New Living
j n a long dormant corner of
UF campus, rumblings of
research are erupting that may
change concepts in man-made
environments.
Searching for new light in
modem living are architects,
artists and specialists in building
construction, lighting and even
music instruction.
Catalyst for the research is
William G. Wagner, an associate
professor of Architecture, who
directs the Bureau of Research
in the College of Architure and
Fine Arts.
Wagner explained that
although the bureau was
established 20 years ago, it
remained inactive until two
months ago when it becanie a
budgeted unit.
The bureau acts as a clearing
house for College of
Architecture and Fine Arts
personnel who wish to engage in
research.
One such research project
by faculty members in
architecture and building
construction is exploring the
feasibility of an underfloor air
distribution system for
conditioning Florida homes. At
present, the system utilizes
wood framing, eliminating duct
work.
The project, which renewed
interest in research in the areas
of architecture and fine arts,
began under a series of grants,
totaling $92,000, from the U.S.
Forest Service. The objective of
the project, begun more than a
year ago, is to determine the
performance of an underfloor air
distribution system using wood
floor framing.
About 150 temperature and
moisture probes are distributed
throughout the 1,900 sq. ft.
building to determine building
materials performance as well as
humidity, temperature and air
movement inside* the rooms as
related to human comfort.
Research in interior design to
determine effective lighting in
both atmospheric and critical
situations is being conducted by
lames McFarlane, assistant
professor of architecture, using a
composite model to study and
analyze light in space with color.
A project that may make
teaching music more meaningful
to children in the lower grades is
being conducted by James Hale,
associate professor of music.
Hale explains that modem
methods of teaching elementary
age students music leave out the
bass part of compositions. But
he believes it is important to
include the bass so the child will
receive a full awareness of the
musical scale while he is young.
To help teach bass early, Hale
I s developing a prototype
instrument which includes the
fiv.e basic tones usually
associated with childrens music.
The instrument and music will
be color coded for ease in
teaching early
handicapped and brain-damaged
children to play simple tunes.
Byron Prugh, associate
Professor of building
construction, is working to make
construction slopes safer. His
Project involves development of
a method of soil analysis to
etermine how the ground can
e excavated to avoid cave-ins
and landslides when foundations
af e being dug.

11 .J ~ :
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TELEPHONE AND YOUR ORDER WILL BE READY WHEN YOU ARRIVE
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I FRIED SEAFOOD CHESTS
shrimp regular 1.70
half 1.30
select oysters regular 1.70
half 1.30
deep sea scallops (when in season) ....... regular 1.70
r half 1.30
red snapper regular 1.80
I I double 3.00
cedar key mullet regular 1.05
double 1.60
fillet of flounder 1 regular 1.35
double 2.10
B Pirates Platter
shrimp, oysters, scallops, fillet of flounder 1.80
shrimp, oysters, scallops, fillet of snapper 2-03
shrimp, oysters, scallops, fillet of
snapper & deviled crabs ...11. 2,40
| deviled crabs two to a chest 1.40
extra crab each JO
all the above chests served with french fries, hush puppies,
< cole slaw, ketchup and our own delicious tartar sauce.
"YOU CAN BUY ANY OF THE ITEMS
WITHOUT FRENCH FRIES, HUSH PUPPIES, AND
COLE SLAW IF SO DESIRED.. JUST ASK US !!!
SPECIALTIES AND SALADS
fish-nrchips (fish, french fries. 1 hush puppy) ... .79
frog legs !- 75
veal cutlets (3 pieces) 1-35
macaroni salad ... cup .15 y 2 pint .25 pint 45
potato salad cup .15 y> pint .25 pint 45
cole slaw cup .10 y 2 pint .20 pint 40
hush puppies .... 3 for .10 dozen 4 0
french fries tttt. order .25
. I
onion rings 00
I
P ;1 ;
I" I \

FRIED CHICKEN CHESTS
chicken chest "special (3 pieces no choice) .... 1.13
half chicken (4 pieces) 1.40
uhite meat (3 pieces) 1.25
white meat (4 pieces) .. 1.50
dark meat (4 pieces) 1.40
whole chicken (9 pieces) 2.55
chicken livers regular 1.00 double 1.50
chicken gizzards regular .85 double 1.35
all the above chests served with french fries,
cole slaw, hush puppies, and honey.
PARTY AND PICNIC SUGGESTIONS
9 pieces of chicken only 2.15
with order of french fries, 4 hush puppies
cup of cole slaw 2.55
15 pieces of chicken only 3.45
with pint of cole slaw and 6 hush puppies. ...... 385
21 pieces of chicken only 4.70
with pint of cole slaw and dozen hush puppies 5.30
BEVERAGES
selection of assortment of milk
so ft drinks chocolate milk
DESSERT
ASSORTED PIES CHEESE CAKE
GAINESVILLE
809 B.w. 18th itmt TALLAHASSEE
phone 878-6811 020 w. tennesaee street
881 n.w. 10th avenne phone 884*1181
phono 878-8646 hours 11 am -9:00 pm.
hours 11 am 8:30 pm
S\ eloood weekdays 8-4 pm
discount* given on quantity orders
delivery can be arranged

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 37



Page 38

I, The Flaridi Alligator, Monday, September 23.1968

r W ffli wiS:' a
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A NEW HOME

Campus dormitory rooms become the home
away from Home for these two freshman coeds as
they unpack their clotfies and countless boxes and

Financial Aid To Students
Totals Over $1 Million

Banks throughout Florida,
with federal support, have
assured over 1,000 UF students
of another year in college to
the tune of over $1 million.
I. Douglas Turner, UF
director of student financial aid,
said since the Federal Insured
Loan Program was implemented
last February, more than 1,000
students have been granted
loans.
Loans of SI,OOO for
undergraduates and $1,500 for
graduate and professional
students per academic year still
are available for the 1968-69
school year, Turner said.
Students may apply through
their local banks.
FBK Seeks
Sweetheart
Applicants
* T
Applications for the
Homecoming Sweetheart
Contest are now being accepted
in the Florida Blue Key offices,
312 Reitz Union.
The deadline for application
and payment of the S2O
entrance fee is Wednesday, Oct.
2. Contestants must be at least
of sophomore standing,
sponsored by a recognized
campus organization, and a
full-time student with a
overall average.
Three finalists will be selected
after preliminary judging on
personality, in bathing suits and
in evening gowns.
Judges for this years
competition will be Basketball
Coach Tommy Bartlett, Dr.
Robert Cade, who developed
Gator-Ade, Mrs. Terry Kazaros,
Maas Bros. Fashion Coordinator,
and Mrs. Clyde Taylor, wife of
the student body president and
Mrs. UF for 1967.
The student body will vote
on the three finalists selected by
the judges, and the winner will
be announced at Gator Growl,
Nov. 1.

In addition to guaranteeing
the loan, the federal government
pays all interest while the
student is in college and 3 per
cent after graduation, provided
the parents annual income is
under $.15,000.
Over 200 banks and
employees credit unions in
Florida have provided loans to
students, Turner said. Alachua
County banks have given the
best support to students while
the leat amount of participation
has been from banks in South
Florida, Turner reported.
Turner said a 6 per cent
ceiling on interest had
discouraged many banks from
participating. But recently when
President* Johnson signed an
emergency law extending the
program until Oct. 31, he also
raised the ceiling to 7 per cent.
I believe this will encourage
more banks to make loans to
students, Turner said.

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baskets of personal belongings that simply couldn't
be left behind. It just wouldn't be home" without
'em.

It is expected that Congress
will pass similiar legislation in
October as part of a Higher
Education Act Amendments of
1968, eliminating the October
cut-off date.

'CS> oe More time for Yourself When You
SiMl liiM
Mjms.
, X&4*' / ACCENT with READ-THRU COLOR
* Kt *%. and find references at a gi ance v#plMll
C % O %V IN BOOKS, REPORTS and //
, CLASSROOM NOTES l \X_'Y
, oOX '* / >/\ Major Accent* Accent
O'.*/- 1 / ff /*! 1 lit fi-acaa. r *.
/ feMi
AT YOUR OFFICIAL COLLEGE BOOKSTORE

OP
Spieitb
Jfond&y SckuuHH Salei (rS&wice,
818 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE
GAINESVILLE,FLA 32601
*> r J :-- -v ~
PHONE 376 2637

Rent A Picture Program
Brightens Drab Rooms
The University Library will rent reproductions of some of the
finest are works available beginning today for students and September
3t) for staff members.
Color prints, ranging in rental price from SI.OO to $1.75, are
framed and ready to hang
Prints of the art works on display in the College Library may be
checked out during the regular library hours by showing an I.D. card
and making the necessary payment.
The reproductions may be used to decorate dormitory rooms,
apartments, fraternity and sorority houses.
The library has a wide selection of styles and techniques ranging
from classical to modem.
/gX Whats NEW at the
rf/P BOOKSTORE*?
THE CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE IS PLEASED
TO ANNOUNCE THAT WE RECEIVE ALL
TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS FROM ALL MAJOR
PUBLISHERS AS THEY ARE PUBLISHED.
WE ARE ALSO PLEASED TO OFFER A COMPLETE
SELECTION OF ALL BESTSELLERS, IN BOTH
FICTION AND NON-FICTION.
YOUR INSPECTION WILL BE MOST WELCOMED.
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M.
Campus Shop l Bookstore

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CYCLES j



Tolbert Self-Governing Project
May Spread To Other Dorms

r~ 0M PA6tONE*I
students dont mature unless
they decide for themselves.
Hence, a need for more
self-government.
Some university leaders
confided that they spend too
much time handling problems
that really should be solved by
students.
Robert Mcride, Tolbert
Area counselor, stated that
co-education was just a
beginning. . why not open the
doors for other beginnings
When you have a very strict,
tradition bound, inflexible,
non-student centered
administration, problems arise
when the students want to go
out and participate. They want
to have a say This is ril they
want, he noted.
I dont believe in radical
groups becoming violent, Mrs.
Beisde asserted. I -dont believe

I
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' i |r!!% N^iaS.^TW^F ll *jWt: JtoMZF
BACK-TO-SCHOOL JAM

Thousands of vehicles invaded the UF campus last week as over
20,000 students put away their summer paraphernalia and strolled
back to campus for registration and orientation. Campus traffic woes

Students Housed In Lounges

The popularity of study lounges has already reached an all-time
height this quarter with four dorm study areas hosting full-time
occupants.
Dr. Harold C. Riker, director of housing, said approximately 85
students are being temporarily housed in the study lounges of
Rawlings, Jennings, Graham and Simpson Halls until dorm space is
available.
Students change plans about attending the university, the
director Explained, some may not get the courses they want, while
others move into sorority or fraternity houses.
As rapidly as these vacancies occur, the number housed in the
floor lounges will hopefully diminish, he added.
Admitting to overshooting the approximate 6,200 on-campus living
vacancies, Riker said the number of students accepted above that to
be somewhat over capacity based on previous experience.
This isnt the first time such a situation has arisen and it Varies
form year to year, he said.
Most of die students in the temporary living quarters were last
applicants, he said.
Several underclassmen awaiting dorm space in Rawlings Ha sai

Tnlhprt aJ nment at cou ld spread to be campus wide, co-ed residents in
stur/pn t? tr, a ar t wo .^ an d living together under a plan calling for these
governing WH TUIeS md organize ttieir own floor and area

in taking over the Presidents
office. If this happens, mass
hysteria results.
She explained, however, that
often these problems result
because the administration
should have listened, and they
didnt. We are trying to open
some of these channels of
communication here.
The basis of the Tolbert Area
structure will be the individual
floors and their judiciaries. It is
intended to be a group system
designed to informally and
personally solve any problems
which may arise among the
residents.
Only in severe circumstances
would an issue be taken to any
higher authority,such as the

Area Judiciary composed of
members from each floor.
The floor judiciary,
explained Mcride, has the
power to bring any person
before the floor to be warned,
counseled, and in serious
instances, removed. These
decisions will be honored by the
administration.
The se guidelines were
established by a student group
which met last spring. Most of
these students have returned to
the Tolbert Area as student
advisors and resident assistants.
The student advisor will no
longer act as a policeman on the
floor, enforcing regulations
established by administrative

should be somewhat alleviated this week as parents return home and
new parking regulations go into effect.

their applications were made in May and June-before the contract
deadline.
We were sent form letters from Dr. Riker about three weeks ago
one girl said. He explained the situation and said there were still
opportunities to make other housing arrangements. Two days later
the coed arrived in Gainesville and was unable to find an apartment.
Discontent was shown at the part of the letter that advised them
not to plan to bring all of your personal belongings when you first
arrive, but rather wait until you are transferred to a regular student
room.
When asked about the duration of stay in the floor lounges,
Rawlings Residence Assistant Barbara Nunn stated, a week would be
short, a month long.
We realize its an unfortunate situation, she added.
The women interviewed have heard nothing about a reduction in
the $123 they paid for a dorm room. Though he wouldnt venture the
length of time necessary, Riker stated there would be a reduction for
those staying in the lounges a long time.
Riker expressed great expectations for supplying the necessary
housing. We always have in the past, he said.

Monday, September 23, 1968. The Florida Allioator.

bodies. Their only authority will
be in the form of counseling
members of the community.
There will, in fact, be no
disciplinarians in the Tolbert
Area. The only rules ot set by
the floor governments are those
set by the hoiising staff
regarding fire and safety,
open-house guidelines and city,
state and national ordinances.
The Tolbert Area Staff will
participate in training programs
to better prepare them to solve
individual problems. They will
also attend year-round staff
meetings to discuss the
experiment and to iron out
difficulties that may arise during
the transition period.

W-'''WsSwg?
Jj %OZ'-
CLYDE TAYLOR
.. .to speak
'Survival*
Program
Starts
Operation Student Survival, a
program sponsored by Student
Government and designed to
help freshmen and transfers
adapt to college life, will kickoff
Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. in
Humes recreation room.
The program will*also beheld
Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m. in
Grahams recreation room, and
Thursday, in the recreation
room of Jennings and Broward.
Students are given a chance
to meet informally with student
leaders during these programs
and find ways to get involved in
Jhe University community,
Bruce Harlan, secretary of mens
affairs, said.
Speakers will include,
Gainesville Commissioner Perry
McGriff, Lt. Ed Coneriy of the
Gainesville Police Department,
and Mike Resnick, a member of
the Task Force Counseling
Committee. Speakers from
various areas of student activity
will be Student Body President
Clyde Taylor and other Student
Government representatives;
Roger Brown, president of
Union Board; Blue Key
President John Rich; and
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich.
OF Student
Arrested At
Pot Parly
A UF student was one of ten
young men arrested Thrusday
when state and local narcotics
agents raided a pot party in
Jacksonville and confiscated
$2,500 worth o£ LSD and
marijuana.
William James Mcride, 4As,
and Patrick H. Quinn, 22, of
Gainesville were among those
arrested at a party being held
in two unfurnished rooms of a
home occupied by Charles
Butler, 20,j0f Jacksonville.
Agents of the Florida Law
Enforcement Bureau said several
of those arrested were under
heavy narcotics influence.
Agents also said they found a
small amount of opium and a
25-gallon jug, equipped with a
burner and two rubber pipes for
smoking either marijuana or
opium.
Among those arrested were
two students from Jacksonville
University and a marine
stationed at the Jacksonville
Naval Air Station. The ages
ranged from 16 to 24.

Page 39



CAMPUS SHOP
AND BOOKSTORE
" r
THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE
* ?
Located In Student Service Center

GET YOUR
' <* *
BOOKS

AND SUPPLIES
ON CAMPUS
AND SAVE

I TEXTBOOK PRICE POLICY I
- USED BOOKS SOLD AT 257. DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE.
VVE PAY 50% OF NEW BOOK PRICE FOR USED BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITION IF
AUTHORIZED TO BE USED AGAIN AT THE END OF TERM.
__ WE OFFER TOP MARKET PRICE FOR ANY TEXTBOOK THAT HAS BEEN DISCONTINUED.
__ ~ %.

<\
w
HA : <*s
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BRANCH STORES
MEDICAL CENTER.
BROWARD,GRAHAM
AREA, JENNINGS,
FLORIDA UNION
& THE NEW
TOWER SHOP

SELF SERVICE
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY TEXTBOOKS
& SUPPLIES NEW & USED
TEXTBOOKS & THOUSANDS OF
PAPERBACKS THE BEST OF
EVERYTHING AT THE
LOW EST PRICE
.1 ;
FOR OVER 1700 DIFFERENT TITLES OF PAPERBACK
BOOKS & OVER 500 TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
BOOKS IN MANY HELDS
*



Alumni Magazine Takes
Two Top Annual Awards

The Florida Alumnus,
quarterly magazine published by
the UF Alumni Association,
captured first and second place
awards in two categories of the
12th annual Florida Magazine
Association competition this
year.
The alumni magazine earned
a first place General Excellence
Award among association
publications and second position

Science Foundation
Supports Symposium
OnQuantum Theory
The National Science Foundation has awarded the UF $40,435 to
support the universitys internationally known institute and
symposium on quantum theory.
* Quantum theory is a theoretical approach to the study of the
innermost structure of matter the interior structure of atoms,
molecules, and crystals.
The institute, a six-week course on quantum chemistry, solid-state
physics and quantum biology, will be held at the university from Dec.
2 to Jan. 11.
Sanibel Island, west of Fort Myers, will be the site of the one-week
international symposium Jan. 13-18 on the quantum theory of atoms,
molecules, liquids and solid state with some emphasis on quantum
biology.
The 1969 symposium will honor Dr. Henry Eyring, graduate school
dean of the University of Utah from 1946-67, for his outstanding
contributions in the quantum field.
Dr. Per-Olov Lowdin, UF graduate research professor of chemistry
and physics and professor of quantum theory at the University of
Uppsala, is director of the institute and symposium, which attracts
outstanding scientists from throughout the world each year.

'Florida Coed Combines
Three Womans Handbooks

The Florida Coed UFs
handbook for women students,
combined three former
publications in this years
edition.
The 60-page booklet includes
information previously found in
Coedikette, begun 20 years
ago as the Association of Women
Students (AWS) welcome book
for new students. Also included
is information from the Coeds
Compass, guide to campus
activities, AWS rules and
regulations and other*
information for coeds.
This issue of The Florida
Coed commemorates 20 \ears
of coeducation on the UF
campus. Distribution of the
6,000 copies began last week in
residence halls and sorority
houses.
Off-campus women students
may pick up their copies at the
Dean of Womens office, 123
Night Cl ass
For EGR 180
The Benton Engineering
Council will handle a special
evening class session for all
engineering students enrolled in
EGR 180, Engineering Concepts
and Studies, on Wednesday, Oct.
2.
All regular EGR classes will
be cancelled for the week, and
class members will meet in the
Reitz Union Ballroom at 7:15
P-m. that Wednesday.
The program will include a
guest speaker in Dr. R. B.
Gaither, chairman of the
department of mechanical
engineering.

behind Florida Trend Magazine
in the Best Investigative
Reporting section.
Eleven other associations
entered the contest in a bid to
dominate awards.
Commenting on reasons
leading to the first place choice,
judges noted: The writing varies
between good and excellent; this
was a main reason for putting
them first. The photography

Tigert Hall, or at the Activities
Desk, third floor Reitz Union.
Selections of next years staff
will be made within a few weeks,
according to Lanie Fuller, 1968
editor. Applications will be
distributed in residence halls and
sorority houses.
They may also be picked up
in the Dean of Womens Office
or at the Activities Desk in the
Union.
re.,
Work in Europe
American Student Information
Service has arranged jobs,
tours & studying in Europe for
over a decade. Choose from
thousands of good paying jobs
in 15 countries, study at a fa famous
mous famous university, take a Grand
Tour, transatlantic transporta transportation,
tion, transportation, travel independently. All
permits, etc. arranged thru this
low cost & recommended pro program.
gram. program. On the spot help from
ASIS offices while in Europe.
For educational fun-filled &
profitable experience of a life lifetime
time lifetime send $ 2 for handbook
(overseas handling, airmail re reply
ply reply & applications included)
listing jobs, tours, study &
crammed with other valuable
info, to: Dept. M, ASIS, 22
de la Liberte, Luxembourg
City, Grand Duchy of Lux^

shows a feel for personality,
which is, after all, the subject of
the readers interest.
Alumni of the university
undoubtedly are proud of this
publication, and rightly so," the
critique continued. They also
learn a lot, which is an even
more admirable objective.
The investigative reporting
second prize was based on
Floridalumnus articles
entitled Yesterday, Today and
Tomorrow that appeared in the
spring edition last April.
, More than 40,000 alumni
were on the distribution list for
that issue.
The series of three features
looked 10 years back and a
decade ahead in evaluating
campus construction, academic
program changes and student
life.
Judges wrote, The article
does a fine job of placing present
and future development of the
university in perspective by
tracing past developments.
Admittedly the article largely
ignores the rough spots and
some of the controversies in
which all state institutions
become involved. However, it
holds together well and sustains
a high interest level.
Research Rooms
There were 2,509 rooms
devoted to research on the UF
campus in the fall of 1967. This
was 21.9 percent of the UF area.

' <*>
ANNOUNCING
the fall opening of
The Arredondo Room
. ...
fourth floor J. Wayne Reitz Union __i_
- i 4 %
Open 5 days weekly
Moderate prices
ip
Attentive service
Lunch 11:30- 2:00
Dinner 5:30- 8:00
Gala Buffet 11:30-2:00
before every home game
p
r
/ R
n

Pntoersttg j^ljop
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 *n Men's or Ladies' Wear I
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
will win Saturday, Sept. 28. Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will be the tie breaker
Entries must be deposited in "U" Shop by Fri., Sept 27
in case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners.
SEPTEMBER 28
Fla. State vs q Florida
Ohio State vs n S. u
Alabama vs Q S. Mississippi
g Ga. Tech vs g Miami, Fla.
O Notre Dame vs Q Purdue
Pittsburgh vs Q W. Virginia
O T.C.U._ vs Q lowa
E Duke vs Michigan
O Mississippi vs Kentucky
Illinois vs O Missouri
__ by FLORIDA I I
Winners Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
Inuftraitg
1620 West University Avenue university plaza
SIGNATURE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED. TWO PER PERSON
Freak Out With Gator Ads if

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 41



\, Th# Florida Alligator, Sap toolbar 23, 1968

Page 42

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BILL GAISFOR D INTERCEPTS
.. .as Brad Powell runs up to aid in blocking
Gator Victory Unfelt

By MARC DUNN
Assistant Sports Editor
The UF dressing room
remained closed an additional 15
minutes after the game
Saturday. The explanation was
that the players wanted to talk
among themselves, privately.
Young boys were waiting
outside for chin straps, parents
watched for their football
playing sons, girlfriends looked
for their Saturday heroes and
fans hoped for a glimpse of an
All-American. The outside of the
winners locker room was
crowded but no one was happy.
The scene inside the Gator
dressing room looked more like
the losers than the winners.
The entire team walked
around with their heads down.
No one patted anyone on the
back or offered any
congratulations. The players
showered and changed
methodically, glad the afternoon
was overs.
t
Defensive comerback Steve
Tannen stood in a comer by
himself. Tannen by most
standards had a good afternoon.
He recovered a fumble and ran a
punt back 64 yards for a
touchdown. Tannen stood there
with tears in his eyes.
We didnt play well at all.
Our d use is great but we
didnt show it, Tannen said.
Tannen said he picked up a
good Mock from safety man
Mark Ely and then outran two
Air Force defenders on his punt
return touchdown.
A few plays earlier Tannen
and Ely had mixed up their
signals and allowed the Falcons
to complete a long pass.

I think we were a little to
hopped up today,Tannen said.
A little too anxious, not
looking ahead, just anxious.
Larry Rentz came out of the
shower and sat in front of his
(CONTINUED P. 43)

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LARRY SMITH SCORES HIS FIRST '6B T.D.

UF Squeaks By Falcons
23-20 On Breaks, Skill

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
The Gators went to Tampa
Saturday, untried, but played up
by every pollster in the country
as being among the nations best.
They came back a lot wiser,
victors in a game which they
won by a mere three points,
after being down four points
with seven minutes in the game.
It was Florida over Air Force,
23-20, and it was a dent in UFs
hopes for the prominent ranking
everyone felt was coming this
year. Florida, said the ratmg
services, should walk all over
Air Force.
The game abounded with
heroes. For Florida they were
Larry Smithy Tom Christian,
Steve Tannen, and Bill Gaisford.
For Air Force, there was Curtis
Martin and Tony Marietta.
It was a game of breaks,
mistakes, and deflating egos.
Fans were still filing in when
Martin took the opening Florida
kickoff and ran it down the
sideline for a 98-yard score.
Gator Coach Ray Graves
remarked later that Martin ran
so close to him that he could
reach out and tackle him.
All the time,said Graves, I
was just thinking, if only that
uniform was blue...
Florida, jolted at being down
6-0 ten seconds into the game,
roared back by moving the ball
to the Air Force 37. It was here
that Larry Rentz discovered that
Flofidas highly touted passing
attack was going to be useless
that afternoon. On his first
attempt, Rentz rolled back for
the pass, found his receivers
double-teamed, and three Falcon
linemen on his heels.
Rentz lost three yards on the

'EL dH m^B :
1 ^HB*
LARRY RENTZ
. .engineers touchdown
play, and never got a chance to
pass again that quarter. Later, he
would be dropped for losses of
up to 14 yards.
Unable to move the ball,
Florida traded it to the Falcons,
Questions?
N
Got a question about
Saturdays game? Beginning this
week, and continuing each week
through the football season,
Gator Coach Ray Graves will
answer your question about UF
strategy and performance on the
flfeld in the Alligators new
feature, Ask Gator Ray.
The Alligator will take all
questions about the game this
afternoon, from three to six.
Those questions most asked, or
which are most pertinent to the
game will be relayed to Graves,
and his answers, along with
comments on the game will
appear in Wednesdays paper.
Questions should be directed
to Neal Sanders, Sports Editor,
at 376-3261, ext. 2832.

who in turn had their own drive
killed before it started with a
holding penalty. Air Force
punted from their own 18 to set
up UF*s first scoring drive.
Grinding out yardage from
the Air Force 37, Smith and
Christian alternately pounded
the Falcon defense to little avail.
Florida got on the scoreboard
with a 42-yard field goal by Jack
Youngblood.
Florida and Air Force traded
the ball once each following the
score, Rentz continued to be
unable to pass, largely at the
hands of Air Forces Marietta.
The guard dumped Rentz for
consistent losses.
In the final minute of the
quarter, Air Force took over at
midfield. There, quarterback
Gary Baxter lobbed the bomb to
end Gary Longnecker. (hie play
later, Baxter went over to make
the score 13-3.
Into the second quarter, Air
Forces first scoring attempt
began at their 20, and ended at
the 23. Kicking specialist Scott
Hamm put the ball into
Tannens hands at the 36, and
Tannen ran 64 yards to make
the score 13-9.
Floridas final score of the
quarter was .set up by defensive
comerback Bill Gaisford, who
snatched a wild Baxter Pass and
ran it 31 yards to the Air Force
26. Six plays later, Larry Smith
went over die center three yards
for the score, and Guy Dennis,
kick made the score 16-13.
Florida led for the first time.
Rain dampened much of the
third quarter. Florida lost their
slim lead early in the period
when a scoring drive, set up by a
decisive third down pass, netted
die Falcons 21 yards. Halfback
Martin scored three plays later,
and the kick made the score
20-16.
With Jackie Eckdahl calling
signals, Florida ground out
yardage from their own 24 to
the Falcon two, before Eckdahl
flipped a sideline pass to
sophomore Gary Walker. Walker
was shoved out of bounds inches
short of the goal, and Air Force
regained possession of the ball.
Tannen, who had earlier
scored UFs first touchdown, fell
on a Martin fumble at the Air
Force 29. Five plays later, Rentz
gave the ball to Smith, who
smashed his way to the goal line.
Neariy a minute elapsed between
the time Smith landed and the
referees decided he had scored a
TD. Dennis kicked the extra
point, and Florida led when it
counted, 23-20.
With less than a minute to
play, Florida ended Air Forces
hope for a last minute victory
when Skip Albury intercepted a
Falcon pass at midfield.
The game cost UF two
players, at least temporarily.
David Mann is the most serious
injured, with a twisted ankle
which will keep the back
sidelined at least four weeks.
Tom Christian suffered a broken
nose, but may see action next
week against Florida State.
Larry Smith was pulled to the
sidelines several times during the
third quarter for leg massages
after he suffered a possible
pulled muscle.



Graves: 'A Lot Os Work To Do

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Coach Ray Graves has a few
more grey hairs than when he
went to Tampa Friday, and
theres going to be a lot of work
done this week on UFs passing
attack.
Both insights came from
Graves as he bundled up his
team after the game in
preparation for the trip home.
There was no jubilation in the
Florida dressing room, and even
Graves was talking softly.
Dave Manns loss is going to
be a lot easier to take now that
Ive seen Tom Abdelnour
working the back position,said
Graves. He did an excellent job
replacing Mann for three
quarters.
Asked about Manns chances
for a quick return to the game,
Graves gave his cigar a close
examination before answering.
That will be hard to say, he
explained,until we get a chance
to really go over the ankle. I
would say that he could be back
in four weeks.
The Gator passing attack,
which along with the running
ability of Larry Smith make up
UFs most potent attack, will
certainly be worked on this
week.
Why it didnt work wont be
known until we go over the
game films. I was able to make
some adjustments in patterns
that allowed Rentz and Eckdahl
to flip off passes for crucial
yardage. That aspect of our
game, will get the greatest
amount of work this week.
Graves suggested that there
may be some changes in the
Gator lineup* but would not say
if these changes would be seen in
next weeks game. Asked if Gary
Walker may now find himself in
the middle linebacker spot,
Graves acknowledged that he
had given the idea consideration.
For his first varsity game, I
think that Walker did an
excellent job, said Graves, But
well see how our workouts
come this week before making
any announcements.
On the Gators total offense,
Graves said that he intends to
Florida
Victory
Unearned
(FROM P. 42)
locker just staring blankly at the
pool of water on the floor.
I had real good protection,
but I just wasnt staying in the
pocket long enough, the senior
quarterback said.
Rentz thought he had more
confidence when he came out in
the fourth quarter to lead the
team to the winning touchdown.
All-America fullback Larry
Smith wasnt happy with his 109
yards rushing, either.
I wasnt moving well, I just
didnt have much speed, Smith
said.
They were hitting real hard
and were much better than we
thought, he continued. Our
hne was doing a good jub, you
cant blame them.
Tannen summed it up
Perfectly when he said, Well be
better next week.

work both quarterbacks more
frequently.
I had no set pattern with
Saturdays game as to who
would quarterback when, other
than that Rentz would start,
said Graves. This week, I will
have both boys working with
both the first and second team.

I B /L If

off- .a
v #Pi
ii, i* M (Hi
; > I
MOOD OF DEPRESSION WAS ON PLAYERS FACES TOO
.. .Buster Brooke bows head near end of game

MWMT WQDWM MMMWffi MM *
Whether it be Old Guard Right or New Left, the politics of appearance
begin within these walls. Before stumping or table-thumping, the cam campaigners
paigners campaigners wardrobe must be faultless, the good looks of his position
(any position) must be obvious. Vote yourself a new suit or several now.
FROM $75.00
> . + ri..
StaijnDrajj
At 2 Locations 1
L__ Univ. Ave. and tilt Gainesville Mall
~ I

Finally, as to why the Gators
didnt run over the Falcons, as
they were expected to, Graves
stated what he had been saying
all week.
I said they could sc we two
touchdowns on anybody,
commented Graves, And 1 said
they were underrated. Both of

those statements turned oitf to
be true. I think we played a fine
ball team, and Im sure that we
learned a lot.
Ill just be glad when we get
back to Gainesville.
And the press conference
ended.

This is W here Good
Service Starts
CRANE IMPORTS
9- \ **
,5
Specialist in repairs of
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in North
Central Florida
Crane
Imports
G
506 East University 372-^373

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

jr INVI
s Your GMtroter \
| OVERHAULED Social 1
Uas )
INCUIOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
see MW Mi AVt. OAMCSVIUf
MON.-MN. t AM-tWe SAT. m S PM
sr s-4011

Page 43



, The Florida Alliptor, Monday, September 23,1968

Page 44

Falcon Coach: 'We Beat Ourselves

By DON AVERY
Alligator Sports Writer*
We didnt get beat by a
better team. We got beat by our
own mistakes. We only made a
couple, but they were enough.
Air Force quarterback, Gary
Baxter, stood mopping water
from his face and talked about
the Falcons 23-20 loss to the
Gators.
We looked like winners out
there today, but die errors cost
us and we didnt win. And most
of the errors were my fault,
Baxter said.
This is the first time Ive
called all the plays. Last year I
was a sophomore and Coach
Martin called most of the plays,
the 190 pounder said.
Baxter said that two serious
Flash Bulletin
There were 52 wood-frame
on-campus student residential
buildings at UF in the fall of
1967.
' **
The normal capacity of the
81 on-campus student residential
brick buildings at UF was 6,789
persons in the fall of 1967.

Alachua County contributed
2,958 students to the UF
enrollment last fall.
*
There were 4,011 rooms
devoted to instruction at UF in
the fall of 1967. This was 29.9
per-cent of the total UF area.

I (SORRY-JUST RAN OUT)
1029 W. UNIV. AVE.
ACROSS FROM
UNIVERSITY CITY BANK
OPEN 10:30 A.M. TIL 1:00 A.M. 7 DAYS

I .... ' P i I
THE DEPARTMENT STORE OF TAKE OUT FOODS

errois he made cost the Falcons
victory. S'
I knew I wasnt supposed to,
but 1 threw into the crowd
twice. And I lost the ball both
times, the quarterback stated,
pointing out that the second
interception came as he was
trying to get the ball into field
goal range with only a
half-minute left to play.
And another thing, I varied
from the game plan. Ill never do
that again, Baxter said and
continued:
On third-and-short yardage,
we were going to run the option
at their comerbacks. A couple of
times I came up with another
play and both times we didnt
make it. When I ran the option it
worked every time.
Air Force Head Coach Ben
Martin (no relation to Curtis
Martin) would not criticize
Baxter or any of his Falcon
team.
Im proud of Baxter and Im
proud of the whole team,
Martin said.
Its heartbreaking to come
so close and then get beat on a
couple of errors. But 1 even with
the errors, this game showed me
that were going to surprise some
people this year.
Martin said that his nine
sophomores did a great job.
They played a little
conservatively, but thats
something theyll grow out of
with some experience.
The Falcon Coach praised the
Gator defense calling it the one
thing that cost us the game.

Florida wouldnt let us
throw. On third down situations,
theyd drop both linebackers
into the secondary and just dare
us to run. If we did, we found
their tackles shooting the gap.
We got thrown for some big
losses.
The Falcon coach called
Baxters pitchout which Curtis
Martin fumbled in the fourth
quarter the turning point in the
game.
It was about the only thing
we could do. It was raining and
we couldnt pass and we had to
get the first down. It was just a
bad break, Martin said.

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The most pleasing thing
about the game was the tactical
knowledge his sophomores on
defense showed, according to
the Falcon Chief.
Martins parting comment

: A A 1232 W. Univ. Ave.
JIAJ fW 376-7657
4 vmm ask us
ABOUTJ
mreff 8 SSilg

was not one of pleasure as he
took a jab at the Tampa Stadium
officials over the scoreboard
clock which was not working.
Maybe they ought to get a
sundial.



'
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SPORTS POSTERS ERECTED

Permanent additions to campus have been made
by the Student Contractors and Builders Assn., who
as their organization's most recent project, have
posted sports information boards as student
reminders.
Pictured left to right, are faculty advisor Tom
Martin, and members Tom Shaughnessy, Ray
Cooper, and Ted Steinwinder.
Cost of the project was approximately $l5O, and

Umps Spell Darker Days?

By DICK WEST
United Press International
WASHINGTON (UPI) One
of the> more interesting
developments in the labor
movement recently is the talk of
organizing an umpires union.
That possibility is causing
concern among league officials.
They fear that every time the
plate umpire called a strike, the
base umpires would walk off the
job.
The players, however, like
the idea. Should a baserunner be
called out when he thinks he is
safe, he could submit the case to
the National Labor Relations
Board.
The NLRB may eventually
have to determine whether the
infield fly rule is an unfair labor
practice.
Baseball fans like the idea,
too. It would provide them with
a whole new repertoire of names
to call the umpire.
When an umpires decision
goes against the home team, fans
who once screamed blind

It's in Tampa-It' sin St. Pete-It's in Lakeland
MOW ITS HERE!
"THE WHITE RABBIT
809 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
u LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
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FEATURING J K AND THE JUG JUGSET
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THE LIGHTER SIDE

robber would shout lousy
scab instead.
There are, of course, any
number of demands that the
umpires could make when they
begin collective bargaining.
Overtime pay for extra-inning
games would surely be high on
the list along with double time
for doubleheaders.
I imagine, however, that the
main thrust of the umpires
union would be toward
improving working conditions,
which are downright deplorable.
At present, for instance,
there is no provision for giving
umpires a coffee break, although
that is now recognized as one of
the fundamental rights of the
working class.
A 20 or 30-minute pause
along about the fifth inning
would be a step toward equality.
Another severe hardship $
the inordinate amount of time
that an umpire working at home
base must spend dusting off the
plate with his whisk broom.

the signs, which will change for every intercollegiate
athletic event, will be permanently maintained by
the club.
Signs are posted at Little Hall, the Hub, Matherly
Hall, Reitz Union, Dairy Science Building, Norman
Hall, and at the intersections of Radio Rd. and
North-South Dr., Stadium Rd. and North-South Dr.,
and Radio Rd. and S.W. 13th St.

Some of the more progressive
ballparks have air tubes that
blow away the dirt. The union
should work for total
elimination of this form of stoop
labor, which is ? throwback /to
the Middle Ages.
As things now stand, each
umpires area of responsibility is
prgtty well defined. But when
they become unionized, there
are bound to be jurisdictional
disputes.
The solution to that problem
is the employment of more
umpires. One umpire at each
base, one behind the pitchers
mound and three in the outfield
would seem a reasonable
expansion plan.
Once the umpires have
achieved these modest goals
maybe something can be done
for the football referees*

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PGA Dispute Unsolved

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The bright hopes kindled last
week that a peace proposal by
the American Professional
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Professional Golfers Association

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Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator,

was finally patching up
differences between the two,
seemed dim today.
Gates said the j>Fan had been
forwarded to the PGA for
acceptance or rejection.

Page 45



Page 46

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23, 1968

'6B Intramurals Adds Tennis, Swimming

STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Orange and Blue League
fraternities will start off the
1968-69 intramural season with
\

Gators Top Polls-
Could Finish Sixth
By Marc Dunn
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
A weaker schedule and an abundance of returning lettermen has
put UF football team on every major pre-season pollsters top 20list.
The Watts survey, an analysis of all the pre-season prognostications,
rated Playboys Anson Mount as the best. This comes in spite of
Playboys Kiss of Death to their No. 1. ranking team. Mount picked
the Gators to finish third in the nation. Larry Smith, everybodys All
America, is expected to lead an offense which will pass much less than
UF students have seen in the last four years. Quarterback Larry Rentz
must be very effective if Smith is going to be a potent punch.
i
Street and Smiths official yearbook predicts UF will finish as the
Fourth best team in the country for reasons similar to Mount. Writing
in the yearbook, Tom Siler thinks the UF Orange and Blue will bring
home its first Southeastern Conference title after a drought of 34
years. Siler points out the Gators strong experienced defense will keep
the opposition from scoring more than UF. Siler also mentions the
biggest offensive problem, two effective receivers to replace Richard
Trapp and Mike McMann.
Alabama is seen as a threat to the UF SEC championship by Sports
Illustrated. The Gators, for the same reasons as mentioned before, are
picked tenth by SI.
Look Magazine rates the Gators 13th, winning 9 and losing 2.
Georgia is suppose to beat UP in regular season play and Penn State is
expected to win when they meet the Gators in the Orange Bowl.
The last major poll to rate UF was the Associated Press. The AP
placed UF sixth in its first season rankings which was one notch
higher than their pre-season ranking.
The only break in the UF schedule this season is playing Florida
State University early in the season. The prognosticators seem to have
overlooked the fact that FSU, Auburn, Georgia and Miami are arch
rivals of the Gators and pose a tremendous threat. By playing the
Seminoles this Saturday UF has eliminated the usual back breaking
final half of the season.
The problem of inexperienced receivers should be solved by the
end of the Air Force game. Gene Peek is a fine split end with speed
and good hands. The split end position could also be filled by Ted
Hager. The flanker duties have been assigned to Guy McTheny, a
junior. McThenys spot appearances last year were very good, he
caught three passes for 54 yards and a TD against Miami.

Steve Tannen, at comerback, and Dave Mann, at linebacker, will
lead a tough defense. Mike Kelly, a sophomore linebacker, lacks
experience but he is on the SI list of sophomores to watch. The
defensive line returns with the experience and playing knowledge that
will make them hard to fool.
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a splash on October 7-10. This
years splash will come in the
form of a swim meet, however,
as opposed to last years
waterbasketball.
Swimming was voted into the

program by the fraternity
managers at the end of last year
in an effort to allow a fairer
distribution of points. Likely
events in this years meet will
include a medley and free-style
The
Florida
Alligator
.elay, 50 yard freestyles,
breaststrokes, and backstrokes, a
100 yard freestyle and 150 yard
freestyle.
Also entering the program
once again after a long absense
will be tennis which will be
played in a future quarter.
This years fraternity
intramural activity is slated to be
similar to the highly competitive
action of last year which found
close league races until the end.

WELCOME- STUDENTS & FACULTY I
TO OUR 35th YEAR- INVITING UNIV. OF FLA. I
STUDENTS- STAFF & FACULTY TO MAKE I
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Last years champs, Sigma Nu
and Pi Kappa Phi, are expected
to have rough goings in attempts
to retain their champion ships.
Drawing for fraternity
swimming and volleyball will be
monday September 30.
Dorm leagues this year have
been expanded from four to
five. This years addition to the
league will be East Campus
composed of Reid, Jennings, and
Towers halls. Old dorm buffs
may have a hard time
rationalizing a game with
Jenn ings or Reid. All
dormitories must sign up for
football before Tuesday,
October L
A large part of the intramural
program is the independent
league. Any student who is not
participating with a fraternity or
dorm in I specific sport, may join
or form an independent team in
that sport. Independents must
sign up for basketball by
Wednesday, October 2.
The intramural department is
now looking for people who
would like to officiate
intramural action. Anybody is

eligible and all he woulcfnave to
do is sign up with the intramural
department. Officials are
currently needed for football,
basketball, and volleyball.
All persons wishing to sign up
a team or sign up for officiating
must either go to room 229 Fla.
Gym, or call 376-3261 EXT.
2912 and ask for Ray or Bob.
GATOR ADS MAKE
SENSE
T* r "~ : - -- -'
4
- 4
C 4 C
4



Crisis That Almost Was: But
Injuries Healed Just In Time

By Kathy Keim
Asst. Sports Editor
According to UF Head Coach
Ray Graves, the team he sent
against the Air Force Falcons
Saturday was one of the most
physically fit teams he has had
at this point in the season.
But weekend appearances can
be deceptive-dining the two
weeks before the game coaches
faced a near crisis that might
have marred Gator football
hopes.
The near-crisis? Several key
players, including pre-season All
American Larry Smith, were lost
for parts of practice, leaving
vacancies to be filled by players
who were often young and
inexperienced.
Fortunately, however,
injuries healed and players began
returning to drills and
participating in hard contact the
week before the game with the
Fakons.
Smith, the powerhouse of the
Gators running attack, pulled a
leg muscle early in practice and
sat out of the mainstream for 10
days. He returned to actual
contact the Tuesday before the
game, after beginning to run at
full speed for about four days
before that.
Graves reported then that
Smith was holding up well
and would start the season at his
No. 1 fullback position, where
he would be given a heavy
workout.
Smith said during the week
that he felt all right and that
he felt he would be in top form
for Saturdays opener.
The temporary loss of Smith
did give coaches reason for some
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LARRY SMITH
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Both of Smiths two
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The Gators have only two
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BRIAN HIPP
.stand in?
drills along with Sm^..
Defensive tackle Mike Healy,but
for a few days after he suffeied a
concussion in a scrimmage, and
linebacker Mike Kelley, out with
a back injury, began hitting the
same day as the talented
fullback.
Other players missed some
practice due to injury and
illness. Middle Guard Bill Dorsey
and flanker Paul Maliska missed
some action because of a virus,
while defensive tackle Jim
Hadley missed three days with
bruised biceps.

4SBBsF Text's Ho PLACE I*l 'Rfm
V THIS WORLD WHERE I'LL SELOH6, W
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PHIL OCHS flfl

Monday, September 23,1968, The Florida Alligator. I

Page 47



Page 48

The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 23,1968

STUDENT PAPERS
' by
willie the lump
As I motored the car through its paces it suddenly
seemed animate. A car, a sportscar... animate? Yes!
It was animate! I could not love something like a
stone or metal. This I loved. It must be animate.
Then I shifted to third etc, etc, etc.

PROFESSORS
CORRECTIONS
J
In college, we are expected to
be objective, reasonable and
aloof of the petty emotions.
You say the Datsun sportscar
or whatever it was seemed
animate.
Please remember, the things
man makes are not animate.
And another thing, I think
feels is a better word. You felt
the Datsun's power, its life,
and you thought, for a
moment, it was animate.
By the way, how much are
those dammed things?
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PLAYER of the WEEK
ajjjjj
S< SftWfij jSS || ' ||
LARRY SMITH STEVE TANNEN
c.
Steve Tannen and Larry Smith share our first Player of The Week award
this year for their sparkling play in an otherwise off-day for the Gators against
Air Force.
Tannen played heads-up ball Saturday, as he sprinted 63 yards with a punt puntfor
for puntfor one touchdown, Floridas first of the game, and recovered an Air Force
fumble on the Cadets 22-yajrd line, which proved to be THE crucial play, as
fullback Larry Smith scored five plays later to give the Gators the victory
23-20.
Smith edged out running-mate Tom Christian by the narrowest of margins
for his share of this weeks honors.
P ..
During the first half, there was little, if any, difference between the two
bruising runners, as both put on a devastating display of sheer power.
However, Christian was injured early in the second half, and carried the ball
sparingly, while Smith continued on his rampage, ending the game with 109
yards in 25 carries for a 4.3 average, while throwing one pass good for nine
yards, receiving another for 14, and scoring two touchdowns -- all in one day!
Christian ended the game with 68 yards in 14 carries for a 4.8 average.
Also in the running for Player of the Week were defensive end Britt
Skrivanek and line backer Tom Abdelnour, both of whom proved to be as
bothersome to the Cadets as Mr. Marietta was to the Gators.



\ arts first lettfrs Florida's ideas arts rrst LETTERS I
1 -"

HOME OF THE OfUGHUL
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