Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 60, No. 1 70

1968 Fall
Preview
Edition
' *?
Front Section
O News Analysis
O Commentary
O Editorials
Section A
O A Year Os Discontent
O News Wrap-up
O Entertainment
Section B
O Campus Life
O Student Activities
O Academics
Section C
O Sports
O Sports Personalities
O Student Organizations

.

Florida Alligator

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

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Friday, August 16, 1968



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Todays Paper
Just A Teaser
The Florida Alligator, named the best college daily in the country
three months ago by the American Newspaper Publishers' Assn.,
today attempts to capsulize that award winning school year for
inbound students.
The 1968 Annual Fall Preview edition contains 100 pages in four
sections and will be mailed to 6,000 incoming UF students.
The editors' goal is to present to the newcomer a brief
cross-sectional picture of what life at UF is like. This special.edition
contains samples of UF happenings during the 1967-68 school year.
The first section touches on current news, news analysis,
commentary and editorials. Section A, dubbed "A Year Os
Discontent," tells how the national wave of student unrest affected
UF.
In Sections B and C, The Alligator describes campus life -- both
social and academic -- and sports and student organizations.
Obviously The Alligator cannot do justice to a 30,000
faculty-staff-student community in 100 pages. It is hoped, however,
that this Will serve as an appetizer.

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WEDNESDAY NIGHT ONLY
SHRIMP
BASKET
15 delicious Shrimp
Large
Rolls and Butter
Coffee or Tea W
wondeb| W
vr/?
HOUSE y
RESTAURANT IP
14 SW First St.
Parking For 200 Cars Within 150 Feet Jj

THE FLORIDA AX,LOCATOR Is tha official ltudcnt nawipiper of th* Unlwraltyof Florid*
and to published fly# time# MUy except during June, July and Aiust when it to published
MM-waakly, and durln* etudent bolide ye and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Florida
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator to entered
as_ second class matter at the United States Pont Office at Gainesville, Florida, 3*601.
Subscription rate to 'OO per year or *4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator * serves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertise
meats and to revise or turn away copy which It conslderes objectionable.
The Florida Alligator win not consider adjustments of payment ftr any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice to given to the AdverttoUm
Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be
responsible ter more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times, notices tor correction must be ern

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It offers a constructive way to relieve some
of the tensions and pressures that are a part
of campus life at the University of Florida.
Actual participation in musical events on
campus brings one much closer to the cultural
side of campus side of life.
It provides a welcome relaxation in the
middle of a hard day of classes. Although
hard work is necessary, the enjoyment of
singing with others is more than worthwhile.
Students find glee club a welcome endeavor
away from the usual academic schedule of
study and preparing for tests. Tours harbor
experiences all their own; hard work, long
hours, but also travel, fun and more fun. The
balance is ideal, the experience unforgettable.

JOIN THE
GLEE CLUB

CONGRATULATIONS
on selecting the University of
Florida, the best university in the
south-east. Now select the oldest
musical club on campus sing
with the MEN'S GLEE CLUB.
CONTACT:
John Grigsby, director
Building R,Room 122
no audition necessary

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'End Discriminatory Housing 7 UF Says

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Editor
The UF served notice last week to 1,200 Gainesville
landlords that their renting practices must be
non-discriminatory in order to meet conditions required
for recommended housing for UF students, faculty, and
staff.
UFs Off-Campus Housing Office is requiring those
landlords listed as renting to members of the UF
community to select University student, faculty, or
staff tenants without discrimination based on race,
color, creed, or source of national origin, Director Carl
Opp said Thursday.
Under the new requirement, landlords must also:
Meet established structural, safety, sanitation,
and service standards and allow University inspection at
times convenient to the owners and his tenants;
# Provide tenants (or tenant groups) a clear and
equitable written rental agreement and provide the

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Lavon Gentry (right), 2UC, leaves Gainesville
police headquarters after posting $25 bond for
defacing public property. He was arrested by
Campus Police after he taped upon Little Hall a
leaflet advertising last Saturday's Bust the Draft

USF Axes Final Exams

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
Student objection to the
unwarranted stress put on final
exams at the University of South
Florida has prompted the
abolishment of mandatory final
exams, according to Harris W.
Dean, dean of academic affairs
at the Tampa university.
South Florida has also done
away with the traditional final
exams week, so that there can be
an extra week of classes under
the shorter quarter system plan.
There has been a lot of
Rules|
| Still In Effect |
: Traffic and parking
:j: regulations permitting only |
: property decaled cars to park
: on campus will be in effect i*
: during final exams next week, :
: Chief Traffic Court Justice :J
: Philip Lazzara noted £
Wednesday. :
Lazzara pointed out that :j
ij many students mistakenly :
believe restrictions on parking ij
are lifted after classes end for
5 the term. §

The
Florida Alligator

SPEAKING OF BUSTED

ACADEMIC PRESSURE CITED

student objection as to the
importance many instructors put
on final exams, Dean said
yesterday. Were trying to
improve university relations with
the students; we want to give the
students the best break
posable.
The new system, which will
be given a two-year tryout, also
came about because of the loss
of class time under the quarter
system, as compared to the
trimester system. The extra
week of classes will help
compensate, and if the
instructor chooses to give his
class a final exam, the test will
be administered during a
regularly scheduled class period.
Dean said that the press,
including South Floridas own
newspaper, The Oracle,
misconstrued the edict to mean
that final exams were being done
away with.
' This is not true; were not
doing away with final exams,
Dean noted. Were just going to
leave the whole matter up to the
individual instructor.
i
At UF, all upper division
courses give the instructor the
\ right to decide whether or not to

Off-Campus Housing Office with a current, blank copy
of such a rental agreement for its records.
Cooperate with the University in the reasonable,
informal review of any dispute which may arise with any
University student, faculty, or staff tenant in any of
the units.
Landlords received word of the new requirements in a
form mailed to them last week.
Any landlord not willing to meet the requirements
will no longer be listed by the Off-Campus Housing
Office as UF approved, Opp said. No UF student,
faculty, or staff member will be referred to unlisted
housing, Opp said.
The Florida Alligator, in line with an Action
Conference proposal, has agreed not to accept
advertising for unlisted rentals.
Opp said the new procedure will largely affect rentals
of single rooms in private homes and a few houses.
Owners of large apartment complexes have long rented

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Bazaar. His case is on appeal by the Gainesville
Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. With
Gentry is Bobby Querns (left), 2UC, who posted his
bond.

give a final exam. But University
College does not; all freshmen
and sophomores must take final
exams. At South Florida, lower
division courses have also had
mandatory finals removed.
Im concerned about the
role of a final exam as a prod to
get the student to do his work,
said Franklin A. Doty, dean of
the University College here.
But basically, I think it is a
healthy thing to have a final
exam at the end of the run.
Some freshmen dont need
final exams, I know, he added.
But most freshmen do; I dont
expect freshmen to be highly
motivated.
Doty said that he would
anxiously await the results of
the South Florida experiment.
If they (South Florida) find'
their experiment to have had
successful academic results, I
would certainly consider trying a
change here, he said.
Last Go Round
With this issue The Florida
Alligator ceases publication for
the summer quarter. The
Alligator will resume operations
for the fall quarter on Sept. 23.

without discrimination, Opp said.
Off-Campus Housing has encountered no organized
resistance to the new requirements but the Office
expects a large percentage of small landlords will
remove themselves from the UFs listings, rather than
submit to the non-discriminatory requirement, Opp said.
Opp said his office's action helps bring UFs housing
requirements in line with Title VI of the 1964 U.S. Civil
Rights Act and administrative regulations of the U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW).
HEW requires institutions receiving grants from it to
adhere to Federal housing regulations. UF has been
under pressure from HEW recently to upgrade its
standards, Opp said.
Opp said be was pleased, in general, with the new
regulations.
Im happy that weve finally gotten our cards on the
table, Opp said. Now we can deal fairly and honestly
with the Negro and other minorities.

ON COUNSELING
'Action Passes
8 Proposals
By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
The final Action Conference meeting of the summer approved
eight proposals from the Task Force on Advice, Counseling, and
Communicatiofts Wednesday before recessing until Oct. 1.
In the most strongly worded proposal of the eight, the task force
stated that increased effectiveness of counseling and advisement will
not be felt on this campus until some changes have occurred.
It urged that a study be made of administrative and financial
autonomy and functional co-ordination of the helping services, such
as the counseling center, mental health clinic, reading clinic, speech
and hearing clinic and student health service.
The task force also recommended the establishment of a
policy-making board composed of personnel from these services and
urged that a university-wide counseling co-ordinator be selected.
Another proposal called for the university to secure funds for
construction of a facility to house all campus helping services. It
recommended the establishment of an Institute for Student
Effectiveness or Institute for Human Potentiality.
Another recommendation urged recognition that faculty involved
in academic advising and counseling are performing an extremely
important function in the university community ... which should be
acknowledged... when decisions are made regarding salary,
promotion and tenure.
Recommending that all University College students consult with an
upper division advisor upon declaring a major, the proposal also asked
that facilities be provided for University College students who have
not declared a major to retain the same advisor throughout their stay
in University College.
Another proposal called for in-service training for improving
counseling techniques. The training would be supervised by the
helping services and academic counseling coordinator*. It also urged
that a co-ordinator of advisors be named within each college.
Orientation of freshmen by upper division colleges was also
recommended. The task force further suggested that such a program
be made available to all student levels. A re-evaluation of orientation
programs, especially those involving junior college transfers, was also
proposed.
Another proposal recommended that a directory of helping services
be made available to all students, advisors, counselors, and department
heads during the first week of classes.

Rocky Man Switches

Clark Holmes, local chairman
of the New Majority for
Rockefeller, announced recently
that he planned to switch his
support to Hubert H. Humphrey
for the 1968 Presidential
elections, and added that the
majority of his organization
would probably follow him in
his move.
I have decided that the way
Nixon got the Republican

Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

nomination has alienated me to
the party, Holmes said. Not
only will I vote for Humphrey,
but I will soon re-register as a
Democrat.
Holmes said that he had
become alienated to Nixon
because he based his support
on men like Strom Thurmond,
and also because Nixon is
basing his campaign on
converting the Wallace people.

Page 3



Page 4

1. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

Action Conference: A Child Os Unrest

Vehicle For Change,
Or Public Relations?

Spring, 1968, was an uncomfortable time at UF.
Several students were arrested during a demonstration
against recruiting on campus by Dow Chemical Co.
Controversial psychiatry professor Marshall Jones was
stirring controversy with his public hearings on why he was
denied tenure by the university.
An editorial in the Alligator condemning the
administrations handling of the Jones case was censored by
the Board of Student Publications. When Editor Steve Hull
insisted that the editorial be run, five subordinate editors
resigned, charging journalistic irresponsibility.
Dislike of compulsory ROTC for freshmen and

I \
O'CONNELL
.. .initiated conference

'!
Ip AT A GLANCE -- JI
Changes Urged
Ul s Action Conference has investigated all aspects of
student, faculty and staff interaction on campus. Among its
com ietc proposals to the President are that tire UF
f I\JI) DISC RIM IN A I ION AGAINST MINORITIES
Ojienly declare its intentions of non-discrimination;
(irate an Office of Minorities and Disadvantaged
St hi lenls,
Investigate possible discrimination against minorities in
If housing procedures;
Ask the Florida Alligator to refuse advertisements from
landlords not complying with UF regulations against
disr i limitation;
Create a university wide developmental education
progi am.
si HI N( i I Hfc N FREE DOM Os EXPRESSION
Guarantee freedom of expression for student
publications
Rf VI I At l/E ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Make class attendance voluntary wherever possible;
( irate an institute for student effectiveness;
Rf ORGANIZE AND STRf NGTHEN STUDENT ORIENTA
MON AND COUNSELING
Study establishment of a university wide policy-making
board, counseling and advisement with financial and
administrative autonomy from all colleges;
Re evaluation of the orientation programs, especially
those < oncerned with junior college transfers;
/Appoint within each i ollege a coordinator of advisors to
londuct m service training to improve counseling techniques;
Distribute during the fust week of classes a directory of
i Ll. lU UmiuMli I J

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor

sophomores was rising at a rapid
rate, particularly with frequent
protests focusing attention on
the issue.
Through these and scores of
Other equally significant issues,
many in the university
community were restless,
disillusioned by the massive
which was the
University of Florida.
Out of this climate of
fermentation was born a new
idea: the Action Conference.
Comprised of 25 students, 25
faculty and 25 administrators,
the Action Conference was
created by UF President Stephen
C. OConnell to produce a
reality of change where change is
needed on campus.
Charging the conference with
the responsibility of seeking
meaningful solutions to critical
problems, OConnell said:
Our task here is to examine
what we have, to identify our
problems, to determine causes
and to recommend reasonable
solutions.
He pledged to carry out
conference recommendations
unless there are very good

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reasons not to.
The conference decided to
study ten general areas of
university concern. An elected
steering committee placed
members in each of the ten
subcommittees, called task
forces.
The ten areas of study are
university governance,
evaluation of goals of the
tl ANALYSIS
university, the university as a
community, curriculum, quality
of instruction and research,
freedom of expression, minimal
conduct expectations,
responsibility to minorities and
disadvantaged groups, counseling
and advice, and relations with
community and state.
The early optimism shared by
OConnell and many conference
participants that the conference
could deal meaningfully with
UFs problems met with
skepticism from a number of
leaders, particularly campus
activists.
David Noble, a graduate
student who heads a group
which calls itself the Student
Board of Investigation, has been
highly critical of the conference
and of OConnells motives in
creating it.
He has frequently charged
that the conference is a public
relations move by OConnell.
Conference Chairman Russell
Ramsey disagrees, though. He
points out that the conference
has already done much for
improving communications
between the three major
segments of the community and
that 16 major proposals have
already been sent to OConnell
for action.
OConnell, who at the time of
this writing is on vacation in
Mexico, pledged before he left
that each proposal will be
carefully studied and that action
will be forthcoming soon.
Ramsey has noted six specific
points which conference work
this summer has proved:
1. Students can submit ideas
to a receptive body capable of
outlining specific changes.
2. Persons of all categories
can create dialogue which
focuses on specific issues,
providing immediate fallout

ACTION CONFERENCE IN SESSION
... chairman leads discussion

benefits for themselves and the
persons whom they influence.
3. Neither the
dynamite-it-all-now nor the
never-change-anything-it-might never-change-anything-it-mightwork
work never-change-anything-it-mightwork philosophies will suffice
to create worthy changes in a
university.
4. The president is
extremely receptive to
improving the university and will
give serious thought to any
proposals which have quality
education at their heart.
5. Students, faculty and
administrators will give
generously of their time to

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CONFEREES STUDY NEWSPAPER
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participate in building a greater
University of Florida.
6. Many of the far out
sounding ideas, such as a
pass-fail grading system, have
been tried at other schools with
varying success.
So the conference and the
striving for change goes on.
The conference will
reconvene in the fall, with much
work still ahead of it.
.A mandate for a better
university community or a
public relations stunt? Perhaps
only time will give the verdict.

I
U!f!'(

RAMSEY
cites 'Action's' worth



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Sockeye Salmon *l£* 49* Lima Beans 4n I Mk /M 6 j|| w ,,
Evap. Milk 6JS 98* Bavarian Kraut *, 19* IHbml Shopping Center Shopping Center
t: pS ; ...? I t '.
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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Welcome To
For incoming students, this edition of the
Alligator represents one of your earliest
tangible contacts with the University of
Florida and its community.
We bid you welcome. You have chosen a
good university, for, while there is much
wrong with the UF, there is much very right
with it, too.
The UF is an institution with high
educational standards. Its College of
Engineering is one of the nations best. Its
t EDITORIAL
Center for Latin American Studies is the
recognized authority in the United States on
South American matters.
Its College of Journalism and
Communications is the second largest in the
country. Its Institute of Food and Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural Sciences conducts statewide research
and distributes information to farmers all
over the world.
The UF is a good university. But it could
be one of the best. It is being held back by a
number of problems, which will confront
you, new students.
The UF struggles under bad financing --
with the resultant low salaries for faculty
and staff, an unrepresentative, anachronistic
and conservative governmental system and a
restless and distrustful band of student and
faculty activists, which demands a thus far

< \F w# / i
Speaking Out

Vet Club Charter Denial Is Intimidation

Imagine: The political activities of Jim
Hoilis, President of the Veterans Club,
have brought about the discontinuation
of Student Government financial support
of his organization.
Statements attributed to Student
Body Vice-President Gary Goodrich such
as, The Senate thought the club didnt
need an SG subsidy and wasnt promoting
the UFs image or Hollis was not
helping the clubs image by charging
around (citing Hollis actions in the Dow
protests and his actions in Action
Conference meetings), unfortunately
add to the sad irony of the situation.
Imagine the headline: President
OConnell labelled a Communist for
selling out to the Universitys special
interest groups despite strong criticism
by the legislators in Tallahassee.
Beyond belief? It could happen
tomorrow. These reversals occur all the
time since epithets like radical,
communist, activist, handy political
(fevices f r isolating and attacking
bothersome or dangerous elements of

Hard Times
denied voice in campus affairs.
There is no end in sight to these struggles.
The UFs top administrators battle dutifully
each year to increase UFs share of the state
budget. But politicians see little to be gained
in supporting the UF over more lucrative
interests.
And UFs government, which was
designed in Tallahassee for a university a
tenth the size of present-day UF, is out outdated,
dated, outdated, unrepresentative, and inefficient. All
governmental power, which resides with the
politically appointed Board of Regents, is
delegated to the. University President to use
as he sees fit.
The University Senate, delegated
legislative powers by the University
Constitution, has become merely a debating
society for senior faculty members and
administrators. All students and most faculty
members are not represented on it.
The Presidents Action Conference is a
brilliant attempt to seek solutions to these
governmental problems and to placate critics
of the UF administration. Through concrete
proposals of this conference, answers to
these problems may be found providing
they are not lost in the sea of bureaucratic
red tape on this campus.
So welcome to the UF, a campus of high
promise, serious problems and a committed
community.

opposition, can be used by both sides in
any conflict with equal effectiveness
regardless of contextual application or
idelogical orientation.
The strategic hurling of these names is
one of the most widely enjoyed and
individually destructive facets of any
political game. It can be carried on by
any individual or group bent on the
destruction of any other individual or
group and the labels rarely if ever require
alteration despite variation in source and
object.
We all cast aspersions, publicly or
privately, at some time or another and
often we do so carelessly, ignoring the
damage that we are doing in the process.
It is all too easy to throw out a
destructive label for general consumption
without fully entertaining the thought of
how easily it sticks to whomever it
touches and how impossible it is to rub
out without spreading.
Jim Hollis should not have to prove
that he is acting in the UFs best interests
any more than Marshall Jones should


have had to. Jim Hollis should not have
to publicly cleanse his soul any more than
should the peace creeps of whom he is
so fond.
And, more to the point, Jim Hollis can
not erase the stigma of activist that has
now been stamped upon him any more
than the Communists of the 1950s
could erase their stigma or the
homosexuals of the Sen. Johns days
could theirs. Any attempt on his part to
dispel the suspicion that his actions have
aroused would merely serve to intensify
the suspicion and confirm the already
widespread doubts.
It is indeed a difficult position that
Jim Hollis is in. Ask Jack Dawkins or
Carole Thomas. Ask Alan Levin or
Thomas Sharpless. Its always difficult
when youre under unreasonable attack
and are impotent to effectively respond.
This is why some people fight to allow
for freedom of discussion regardless of
ideology presented or how the majority
sentiment reacts. This is why some people
dedicate years if not their entire lives to
i <

j|§ii|| Florida Alligator
yy jo Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
iq6S Editor
PttO/tohlAi Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
M Paul Kaplan Neal Sanders
A\MJMM Executive Editor Sports Editor
J
"From The Toadstool
Letters To Mama
George Cunninghams
University College Dean Franklin Doty has vowed to fight to the
end any voluntary attendance policy that does not exclude freshmen.
Pointing to the tender years of these academic neophytes, he has
stressed the Universitys responsibility to their parents to keep them
informed and assured that Johnny or Suzie is attending class and
is maintaining a respectable position in the University Colleges
scramble for grades.
Assuming that the UF freshman is no more immature or
irresponsible than his high school contemporary who didnt go to
college, it is interesting to contemplate the letters home if other
institutions followed the UFs policy:
For instance, how about your friend Hank who joined the army?
Dear Parent:
This is to inform you that your son, Pvt. Jones, Henry S., is doing
satisfactory work in first aid, hand to hand combat, chemical warfare
and compass reading. He is however falling below our expectations in
care and cleaning of the M-60 machine gun, where he is 15 seconds
slow in dismantling, and in close-order drill, where he begins to show
visible signs of boredom after trooping the parade field for an hour or
two.
Realizing the responsibility of the Army to the parents of our
younger recruits, we will be keeping you informed of your sons
progress.
Respectfully yours,
Silas B. Hardnose
Captain, USA
And what about Mario, who wanted to be a barber?
Dear Parent: .t
This is to inform you that your son Mario is in danger of being
dropped from Crew-Cut 101 for excessive absences. I realize that the
crew cut has only limited appeal to a few military and law
enforcement types, but it is a required part of our curriculum here at
Barnabys Barber College. Mario says there is nothing to a crew cut
all you have to do is shear off all the hair and he can master this
without attending class. This is beside the point. We have certain
attendance policies here at Bamabys and cannot condone such
unexcused absences.
Yours truly,
Bradford B. Bamaby
The possibilities of it boggles the mind. Letters could be sent home
to young people in all walks of life, from go-go dancers to sanitation
workers.
It would be a great leap forward in the never ending struggle to
keep the American parent informed.

By David Noble

prevent the harassment and intimidation
of individuals by groups intent on serving
them to a paranoid society for political
profits.
This is why Student Government,
representing an enlightened student body,
must immediately rectify this perhaps
unintentional abuse of individual rights.
Unless the Student Senate can provide
sufficient non-political and non-personal
reasons for refusing to do so, Jim Hollis
and the Veterans Club which he
legitimately represents, MUST BE offered
funds for the coming year. This must be
done if for no other reason than to
alleviate the concern that their denial of
funds has aroused.
A clear statement of intention must be
forthcoming if the rabid intolerance that
so infects university administrations and
all levels of government of our troubled
society is not to be seen as already having
contaminated the youthful idealism
which at long last seemed to be
manifesting itself in and around the
offices of Student Government on this
campus.



OPEN FORUM:
J\(b)ia ml DiAtoMt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

Which One Is 'Small Interest 1 ?

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to offer a few
thoughts to last Tuesdays article
in the Alligator concerning
myself tnd the Veterans Clubs
budget.
The legislative ploy that a
certain member of SG used was,
first of all, not to inform me
that the Veterans Club was
controversial and that we had
been taken off the budget. By
neglect of a certain SG
official, I was never officially
informed of this information.
After checking out a rumor
and finding out that we had
been taken off the budget, it was
too late for us to do anything
about it. When I tried to find
out if our Constitution, they
call it Charter, was being studied
and who objected to it and why,

Tk I
GMjI
W J
\- I
ALPHA
CHI
OMEGA
Welcome all new
students to the
University of Florida

VET PRESIDENT ASKS

I was sent from one committee
to another in SG.
This should not be construed
to mean that all SG members
gave me a run around. Jeff Weil,
Jake Schickel, Ed Tolle and Phil
Burnett did offer to try to help
me find the information I
needed.
The charge that we are a
small interest group is as
absurd as some SG members.
The small interest Veterans
Club, besides serving their
country for two (2) to six (6)
years, have won a Freedom
Foundation Award for
expressing their belief in this
country.
This was not a pro-war type
thing since veterans had and still
have the most to lose in war
THEIR LIVES.

I guess that because we do
not have a man in the Student
Senate and we do not try to
run SG, we are classified as
small interest. Well, if serving
ones country by having been in
one of the military services, and
serving students and other
people as we have, makes us
small interest, then I can only
say that Im proud of being that
type of small interest.
On the other hand, if some
SG members are trying to get
back at me for my protesting the
anti-everything people by
cutting off funds to the Veterans
Club, then I ask you, the
students of the UF, just who is
small interest?
JAMES L. HOLLIS, PRESIDENT
VETERANS CLUB

THE BROTHERS OF
TAU EPSILON PHI
WELCOME ALL NEW
STUDENTS TO THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
/ **'*'*/
/ /
/ CL,*. /
L 8: o P /
9 FRATERNITY ROW

'A Juvenile Cry

MR. EDITOR:
In light of the historic
importance of the coming
election. 1 felt compelled to
reflect on the editorial entitled
Machine Politics.
First one might ask what is
the nature of a political party? Is
it made up of the people who
vote for it or register under it or
work for it? The people who
appear at a convention earn that
right by their participation in
their party and are therefore
reflective to some extent of
party opinion.
At any rate polls have
consistently showed that
Richard Nixon is the choice of
60-70 per cent of the people
who are registered Republican;
and who entered and won most
of the available primaries
anyway? Cart the convention
then be damned for picking the
man the party wants?
The editors seem to think
that parties have no democratic
function because presumably
their man was not chosen. It
seems their basic assumption is
that the only fair democratic
method would be to have 200
million people sitting under

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

some tree all deliberating
intelligently to choose its
philosopher king.
The editors do not make a
distinction between
participatory democracy and
popular control. Political
scientists have told us for years
that the party functions as an
invaluable agent in providing for
the popular control of
government, thus avoiding the
anarchy of a million (or even
1,333) differing opinions.
The superficiality and naivete
of that editorial raises some
serious questions concerning the
ability of quasi-intellectual
journalists to pontificate on
matters that such thinkers as
Montesquieu, Locke, Burke,
etc., never fully mastered. One
could tolerate the reflective
wisdom of a professional scholar
or student of American politics
but not a juvenile cry from the
_ fever swamps of campus
journalists.
Incidentally, I have a political
science reading list for the
enlightenment of the editors if
they choose to be so
enlightened.
i THOMAS R. JONES, 4AS

Page 7



wwr.W.V#WAWWWV.V.V.V.V.V.%V.VtV.%V.V.V.V.'.WO>
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
1959 50 hp Evinrude, 16 Scottcraft.
Excellent condition. Many extras.
Call 376-3261 Ext. 2069 after 8:00
p. m., See at 1111 S. W. 16th'
Ave. No. 47, Price $450.00.
(Al6B3t-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY. 466-3340. (A-154-ts-p)
House for Sale: 3-bedrooms, 2 full
baths, living room, kitchen, utility
room, car port, Completely
furnished, SIB,OOO. 1018 Palm St.,
Starke Fla. (Al692tp)
FOR SALE: Little Gem. 8 x 25
travel trailer in excellent condition.
Tandem wheels. May be seen at
Shady Nook Lot 41-A $1495.00. Call
3766372. (A-170Itp)
Need cheap, dependable wheels?
Ride a Vespa for only $60.00. Call
Tom Quarles, Ext. 2118 or 372-0163
after 6:00 p.m. (Al7olt p)
Roll-a-way compact clothes-dryer,
one year old, excellent condition,
ideal for limitted space, 110 volts
$39. or best offer, call 3 72-0143.
(Al7olt-p)
For Sale Federal enlarger, timer,
trays, developer, tanks, etc. Good
condition, Baker 475-2276 evenings.
(A 167 3t p)
Ml LLIONS of rugs have been cleaned
with Blue Lustre. Its America's
finest. Rent electric shampooer --
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(Al7oltc)
FOR RENT
3 blocks from campus. Double room
for male students. Air Conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
N.W. 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-166-st-p)
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(815715 t-p)
Large, 2-bedroom apartment, AC and
Central heat. Lease required. Ideal
for 3 students. $120.00 month
includes all utilities. Phone
3768314, after 5 p.m. or weekends.
(Bl692tp)
For Rent Small ranch and house,
barn and good pasture, between
Melrose and Keystone Heights. Close
to lake. Phone 475-4381.
(Bl692tp)
ROOMS Men Walk to campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles, Live
with friends, Phone 3788122 or
3766652. (Bl63Btp)
Wanted -- Hip, but mature, coed for
fall. Landmark 1 BR, poolside. Many
extras. Theatre arts or ADV major
preferred. Write 1049 N. Chevrolet
Ave., Flint, Mich. 48504.
(Bl 70lt-p)
.^xwnsv.vxyx*x*x*xxx*x*v;vx*x*x*x*.: ;
| WANTED
A Senior Coed wants 2 female
roommates to share a 3-bedroom
house, two blocks behind State
Theater. Total rent $90.00. Call
Nancy. 378-4578; No. 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. (Cl67-2tp)
Wanted: freshman or sophomore
coed for skiing companion on all
warm weekends left in year. Benefits
include; meals, dances, movies etc.
Call Jim M-Th after 6:00, 376-1352
or write 1601 N.W. 61th Terr.
(Cl7o-lt-p)
mi TECHNICOLOR a w
I GARPHBAG6ERS I
georgepeppard ml

v.v.v. :v:X*X"X > x < x*x*-v.
WANTED |
: .:.:.r.%vxx*xw*X*X*X Wanted-1 coed to share 2 bedroom
French Quarter Apt; with 3 seniors.
Call 376-1631, room 202, or write
Karen Gralow 12-202-B, Towers B, U
of F. (C 169 2t p)
Roommate wanted Male; Fall, win winter
ter winter and spring quarters; Write: Robert
Bell; 2001 Crystal Lake Dr., Orlando,
Florida. (C-169-2t-p)
Male medical student needs place to
live in 68-69. Write: Winston Cope,
9100 131st Street N., Largo,
Florida 33520, or Call 313-301-5643.
(Cl692t p)
Third wanted for 2 BR luxurious
Williamsburg Apt. Senior or graduate
student preferred. Call Arlene
376-1876 before August 22. After
Aug. 22 write A. Cap lan, 1111 N.W.
184th Dr. Miami. (Cltl7o-p)
Quiet refined Jr. girl student would
like same type young woman to share
efficiency apt. at 321 S.W. 13th St.
(Cl7olt-p)
WE NEED one easy-going girl as a
fourth at Village Park for Sept. Call
Chris, 372-6442 or Merri, 376-7434.
(C-167-4t-p)
1 or 2 Female roommates wanted
Butler Apts. To share with 1 girl and
baby. Call 376-2755. Ask for Karen.
(C 168 3t p)
mviT*
HELP WANTED f
Medical Investigator needs someone
with experience to wire electronic
equipment. Will pay by hour, or per
job. Call Dr. H. L. Stewart. 376-3211
Ext. 5255. (El692tc)
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330, J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
Immediate openings for part time or
full time male personnel. Better than
average salary and good chances for
advancement. Also, how interviewing
for full employment Apply in
Person, Arbys Restaurant 1405 S.W.
13th St. (E 169 2t p)
vxx*x*xw*x*x*:*x*x-x*x-:-x*x-x-x.:*
AUTOS
v
>:.vx*x*x*xx*x.:.v.vx*x*x*x*X-xw?:*x*x*&
LEAVING country, *63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater,.
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)
1965 GTO, Convertible, 4-speed.
Tri-power. Excellent Condition.
$1700.00 or best offer. Call
378-4657. (G-167-4t-p)
1961 VW, radio, fair condition, will
pass inspection. Must sell now.
Moving, Need cash, $350.00. Firm.
Call 372-1649 or 378-3522.
(G 169-2 t-p)
1953 Ford. Blue. Runs good for
around town use for student.
SIOO.OO or best offer. At 1405 N.W.
sth Ave. 378-2802 After 6.
(G 168 4t p)
SBWTE
pLttth we.bvwJU
lift. ]
'LORD of
PLitV
WH.J. Il. \
nw.ua.,l- 1 J
SEDUCED
Land ABANDONED

GUNS

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

AUTOS
1966 Triumph TR-4A IRS. Blue with
white top and tonneau. Very good
condition. No Reasonable offer
refused. Call 372-1039. (G-168-3t-p)
Triumph Spitfire, 1963, Red with
black soft-top and tonneau, Excellent
condition, Inspection sticker.
$ 800.00. Call 378-8894.
(Gl7o-lt p)
For sale 55 Chev. 4 Dr., Stick six,
good body, 54,000 miles, S2OO, PH
372-8302. (G 170-lt-p)
PERSONAL
Go with Hairy Tea to see The Jimi
Hendrix Experience in Tampa on the
13th. $5.00 round trip call 372-2728.
Leave noon from Ramada Inn.
(J-1692tp)

) Main Entrance //
GAINESVILLE MALL ))
j tSMftlwllaS (Sfardon of 9
/ r r" r"* nJ
D&& ) hi pDpsiSl
| "/continental atmosphere itc jj Ec "1 Ravioli Pizza 3l
7 Finest in gourmet food \ Hjjj [ S / Hows: *3)
p jTlmported Been end Wmesr ra g -H: AM-B:3OPM Mon.-Set. j 3
pnrrf Ml OP J
( Gainesvilles Finest 1
1 and Most Intimate j

LOST & FOUND j|
Lost: Painting in brown and gold of
Mans head with hands below face.
Reward. No questions asked.
376-1631, Room 301.
(Ll 69
Found in local Movie theatre,
weekend of Aug. 3, Wrist watch. Call
372-4509 and identify.
(L-169-2t-nc)
LOST: Ladies watch. Black band,
between- Infirmary and towers. Call
Karen 1001 Tower B.
(L-170-lt-p)
SERVICES
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS.
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-i 5 3-ts-c)

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

SERVICES
TEDDY BEAR NURSERY. Infants
12 years old. 6 complete
departments. Pick-up and delivery at
five schools. Separate Dept, for
school age children. We are open all
day Saturday. (M-167-4t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-153-16t-p)
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 378-8301. 1726
NE Waldo Road. Electrical Systems
checked free. (M-153-ts-c)
Use our handy
mail-in form



Orange and
BLUE
BULLETIN
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, August 22, at 1:30
p.m. in Room 235 Tigert Hall.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduating, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
RECREATIONAL AREa
The following University
recreational*facilities are being
reserved to host Operation
Concern participants Saturday,
August 10, from 2-4 p.m.:
Murphree Area Tennis Courts;
Murphree Area Handball Courts;
Fleming Field Soccer Fields;
Fleming Field Volleyball Courts;
Women's Gymnasium; Florida
Gymnasium, and the Main Drill
Field. Persons wishing to
participate in recreational
activities during that time should
plan to use other areas.
/
ROTC CEREMONY: The
Joint Army-Air Force ROTC
Commissioning Ceremony will
be held August 27 at 2:30 p.m.
in the J. Wayne Reitz Union
Auditorium. v

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest onOedlt Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement r-' I
Call ext 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
sth Aww erf Hi* comer of 12th Street Hours : 800^jn^3j0^ni 1

FINAL EXAMINATION
SCHEDULE: Students are
expected to report for the
following examinations and each
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil.
Students will be required to
use their Social Security
Numbers. For additional
information and for any courses
not listed, students should
consult the Schedule of Courses
Summer Quarter 1968 or their
instructors.
CSS 11 and CSS 112:
Monday, August 19, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
CPS 121, CPS 122 and CPS
123: Saturday, Aug. 17, 1 p.m.
in Walker Auditorium.
CEH 131: Thursday, Aug. 22,
7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 and CLC 143:
Tuesday, Aug. 20, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171 and MS 102:
Friday, Aug. 23, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251: Wednesday, Aug.
21, 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CBS 261: Saturday, Aug. 17,
7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
GENERAL NOTICES
FALL RUSH: The
Panhellenic Council has set
August 15 as the deadline for
continuing students, incoming
freshmen and transfers to sign
up for fall rush. All incoming
students will receive the
necessary forms by mail and
continuing students may obtain
them by writing the Panhellenic
Office, 315 Reitz Union.
Payment of a $2 fee makes the
students eligible for the fall
rushing program beginning Sept.
18. Students who have been
through rush and paid the fee
will remain eligible.

INDIA CLUB: During the
summer quarter the India Club
will hold regular monthly
meetings on the second Saturday
of each month. Documentary
films on Indian life will be
shown at each meeting. A
Feature Film Show will be held
on the last Sunday of each
month. Meetings will be held in
Room 349, Reitz Union. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets for the Music
Department presentation
H.M.S. PINAFORE will be on
sale at the Union Box Office
on Friday, August 9. The Box
Office will close Monday,
August 12, for the summer.
Campus
Calendar
Friday, August 16
Union Movie: "Agent for
H.A.R.M.," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing,
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
Saturday, August 17
Union Movie: "Agent for
H.A.R.M.," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Sunday, August 18
Program Office: Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.

'Freedom Topic
For Accent '69
Accent 1969 has chosen The Dimensions of Freedom as the
theme for the week long series of lectures and discussions designed to
bring to the UF the people and ideas behind todays issues.
Accent 1969, the largest symposium in the South, will be
presented February 3-8, 1969. It is an attempt to involve UF students
in all sides of vital issues and ideas.
The heart of the symposium will consist of the group of speeches
delivered February 6,7, 8. But the speeches only begin the discussion
and exchange of ideas between speakers and students. Question
periods and informal receptions with the speakers will follow each
program.
The questions that freedoms dimensions raise, said Accent
Chairman Larry Berrin, 4JM, provide an apt theme for any
universitys endeavor. The Accent Symposium will supplement the
ordinary classroom experience with the ideas of, and contact with, the
news-makers in America, not merely the news-interpreters.
The two-year old Accent program has brought such celebrities to
the UF as Richard Nixon, Ralph Nader, James Farmer, William
Rusher, Max Lemer, and F. Clifton White.
The furor that normally surrounds political programs also caused
headaches for last years Accent Executive Committee. Political moves
in the nation caused the last minute cancellation of Selective Service
Director Lewis Hershey and NBC News Chief William McAndrew,
both already
scheduled for I
the symposium.
State and '/ff'
local politicos T, 1 jSsHfoT; <
created a storm
of protest over
Accent's g
to i M Ji
Representative- Mjff
Adam M ms-
Powell. 1 M /
weighing JP a
the possibility
ir;
and
the speaking
record of GOP NOMINEE RICHARD NIXON
Powell, the . .at 1967 Accent program
executive
committee voted 6-3 to rescind the invitation. Although cries of
backroom pressure were immediately raised in. protest, the invitation
and the rejection were both made entirely by students.
Students working as committee chairmen this year are Jeff Weil,
4JM, speakers; Barry Matter, 4AS, personnel; Tom DeMarco, 2UC,
technical; Bill Levens, 4AS, public relations; Ed Tolle, 3JM, program;
Jeff Fenster, 4AS, publicity, Tom Blackmon, 4AS, finance; and Steve
Hull, 4BA, magazine editor.
Speakers including Ambassador Arthur Goldberg, Supreme Court
Justice Abe Fortas, Under-Secretary of State Nicolas Katzenbach, and
dovish Senator J. William Fulbright have expressed their willingness to
speak at Accent 69. But none have yet been able to sign contracts this
far in advance with Accent, according to Weil.

Frosh Orientation
May Be Simplified

Orientation may be simplified
quite a bit for students entering
UF this Fall.
Under plans being proposed
by Assistant Dean of Men
Donald Mott and an orientation
committee, the familiar group
leader with a sign wont be seen
herding his bunch of freshmen
around campus.
Instead, section advisors in
the mens dorms and big sisters

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

in the womens dorms will be in
charge of introducing new
students to .campus life and
directing them to the various
orientation activities.
A natural group is formed
immediately between new
students and their big sisters or
S.A.s, Mott said. Since they
are actually living with the
students, the orientation leader
would be in a more favorable
position to help them.

Page 9



I, Tht Florida Alligator, Frida>, Auaustl6^96B

Page 10

Blood Givers
Called For;
Supply Low
A critical blood shortage at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Blood Bank has launched an
appeal by hospital authorities
for blood donors.
Dr. Joe W. Wiggins, a member
of the blood banks professional
staff, said UFs summer
enrollment drop and the
approaching quarter break has
reduced the donor pool to the
point that the banks blood
reserves are dangerously low.
At the same time a large
number of open heart suigery
cases have been scheduled in
August and September.
According to Shands Teaching
Hospital officials, many
operations, such as heart
surgery, require seven to eight
pints of blood.
Wiggins explained that UFs
blood bank has had to buy
blood through the American
Association of Blood Bank
clearing house system to
maintain adequate supplies for
the teaching hospital.
Wiggins said the blood bank
draws heavily on students,
faculty and staff donors, who
are usually paid sls per pint of
blood.
He urged new donors to call
the blood bank or come to the
first floor office in the health
center to have their blood typed
and be placed on the donor list.
Past donors who may not have
been called recently by the
blood bank were also urged to
contact the bank.
Normal donation is about one
pint of blood. The entire
donation process requires less
than an hour and is conducted
by medical technologists.
The blood bank is open daily
until 9 p.m.
Dorm Phones
Go All Hours
UF dorm residents will not
have to contend with early
closing hours for their
telephones for the first time this
fall.
The UF switchboard will no
longer close early in the evening;
as matter of fact, it wont close
at all.
The phones will work as if
UF were a city in itself. There
will be an automatic
switchboard on campus similiar
to the one in Gainesville. Calls
may be made without contacting
an operator unless information
is needed.
JM Honorary
Elects Officers
Kappa Tau Alpha, the
national honor society for
journalism students, initiated 21
new members at a recent
meeting. Founded in 1910 at the
University of Missouri, Kappa
Tau Alpha selects its members
from the academic top 10 per
cent of the nations colleges,
schools and departments of
journalism.
Officers for 1968-69 include:
Jeffrey T. Weil, president; Neil
P. Linden, vice president; Ann
Ketchum, secretary; and John F.
Sugg, public relations officer.

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By Line

Pvt. Little Fouaht For First Time

Private Little came from a
white-anglo-saxon-protestant white-anglo-saxon-protestantaverage-middle-class-American
average-middle-class-American white-anglo-saxon-protestantaverage-middle-class-American
family-
And Mother cried when he
left; and Father smiled proudly
at his son; and Sally-next-door
told him how
Ill be waiting, Charlie
Ill miss you, Charlie
1 love you, Charlie.
Kiss me, Charlie.

Fifth Column 5

Rednecks. Used to be, as long as they stayed in their place and did
their thing, no sweat. But theyre here. Here. On our campus. No one
knows just how many, but reliable estimates given after last weeks
election place their number up to at least 7,000. Seven thousand.
And this isnt any simple old race bag, either. Theyre living next
door to us, dating our little sisters, eating at the C.L, Joining our
Fraternities.
Now I know your initial reaction is disbelief. No way. Just no way
it can happen, right? I mean every one knows what a redneck is, hes a
good olboy. Back in high school he was 18 and we were only 16. He
lived outside of town and drove a raked 55 Chevy and had a 49 Merc
up on blocks in the front yard. He wore white socks, blue-jeans, and a
t-shirt with a Lucky pack in the sleeve.
When you went home for Christmas break he always embarrassed
you in front of your new collegiate friends by coming over and asking
How yall doing. But outside of minor hang-ups like that, you
generally didnt mix. I mean you dug Sterling Moss, he dug Junior
Johnson. You read Catcher in the Rye, he didnt read. Things like
that. But he never went to college. No more. Now theyre everywhere.
Infiltrating, subverting, Mongrelizing.
But its not too late. The nouveau red can still be identified. Your
R.N.O.C. (Red Neck on Campus) will usually;
- read Valley of the Dolls and say it wasnt as the movie.
- suggest to his new steady date that they go to church together.
" i

I V I
W
\ y J

PAST NATIONS OLDEST SOCIAL FRATERNITY
<
PRESENT CHI PHI IS A TRUE BROTHERHOOD
' ; .. v '\ ; 4 '/ '_
cy
FUTURE TODAYS CHI PHI IS TOMORROWS LEADER

And all his high-school-
buddies had an excuse to have a 1
goingaway for him and the
community even had a band as
he got on the bus and waved
Goodbye Mom goodbye Dad
goodbye Sally goodbye ]
everyone. j
Private-first-class Little didn't ]
want to go there. (
But, Mom, I have to.
I'll be back Sally. ]

GATOR COMMENTARY
Best Os 6B

Social Sunburn

Sure Dad. Dear Charlie:
Dear Charlie: Dont forget to wear
I miss you Charlie. Your long underwear
Im still waiting Charlie If you go out in them
I love you Charlie. swamps.
Love, Sally. Love, Mom.
Dear Sally:
I love you too. Dear Mom:
But I love my country more 1 fought for the first time
(1 think) (with my long underwear).
And I must fight this war. Love. Charlie.
Love, Charlie.

- make conversational ploys like Be good, and if you can't be
good, be careful.
- look forward to spring practice.
-get upset when his campus candidate doesn't win.
- talk jive when he meets Negroes.
- decorate his off-campus apartments with empty liquor bottles.
- ask his parents to send him to grad school to beat the draft and
then call draft card burners cowards.
- ask the band to play Shout.
- think that Sidney Poitier speaks for your average Negro.
- refuse to go to the Schooner Room because of the old Pub
influx.
- so he goes to the Red Lion.
- read the Alligator to stay informed about current world affairs.
- think that George Plimpton is an independent.
- snicker when he sees a supermarket item on sale for 69 cents.
- think Mantovani records are romantic.
- pronounce Truman Capote to rhyme with connote and think
that hes a lUC English Teacher.
- and finally, take himself too seriously and get upset at articles
like this.
So, watch out. They sneak up on you, and before you know it
youre buying Mustangs, going to see To Sir With Love, agreeing
with their ponderous statements and even saying It depends on the
individual involved.

THE BROTHERS OF
CHI PHI
WELCOME ALL NEW
STUDENTS TO THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Jason Straiqht

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Dear Charlie:
Keep your chin up
Love, Dad,
Dear Dad:
l kept my chin up.
I got wounded I got syphilis I
got a promotion.
Love, Charlie.
Dear Charlie:
We're all very proud of you.
Love Dad.
Dear Mom:
l killed for the first time.
Love. Charlie.
ueai Charlie:
l love for the first time. Not
you.
Yours truly, Sally.
Sergeant Little was very brave
as he led his platoon to get
mortared.
And as he saw it coming, and
as just before he died, and as
with his last spoken breath he
muttered:
I hate.
And Sergeant Littles brittle
mother was presented with a
medal for performance (his)
above and beyond the call of
anything.
And then a lurch
And then Sergeant Littles
remains went to the worms as
Sally cried
I love you now, Charlie.
And as everyone said:
I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the and to the for which it
stands one under god with
liberty and justice for
all except Charlie.

Joe Torchia

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,19*8

1 j^j

By JOE TORCHIA
Alligator Feature Editor
Little Joey was engaged to Theresa-next-door
when he was only four and that was when they used
to play games and things together in their secret
hiding place.
Little Joey hated his kindergarten teacher when
he was only five because she made him color
pictures of Santa Claus whom he hated.
Little Joey fell in love with god when he was
only six because he went to a Catholic nunfilled
incense-smelly school and you know about them.
Little Joey got to play The Baby Jesus in the
Christmas play when he was only seven because he
was sure of going to heaven and besides he was the
smallest, person in the class.
Little Joey learned how to fish when he was only
eight and ever since then hes hated worms.
Little Joey hated Sister Mary Julia when he was
only nine because she was a bitch and hit him for
not being able to diagram complex sentences and he
hated her even more than worms.
Little Joey loved Superman-on-television when
he was only ten and thought that Superman was
even better than God.
Little Joey jumped off the wall when he was
only eleven because he thought he was Superman
only he wasnt and he broke his leg.
Little Joey ate meat on Friday when he was only
twelve and ever since then hes been condemned to
suffer everlasting punishment in hell.
Little Joey hated God and began to love girls
when he was only thirteen.
Little Joey got his first real hard-on for life when
he was only fourteen Sharon was her name and

THE BROTHERS OF
PI KAPPA ALPHA
1
f-
WELCOME YOU AND INVITE
ALL NEW STUDENTS TO DROP BY
1904 WEST UNIV. AVE.

she had to get married two years later but not to
Little Joey.
Little Joey had his cousin come to live with him
when he was fifteen because her mother and father
died and he felt sorry for her but she didnt feel
sorry for anyone so Little Joey didnt either.
Little Joey got in his first big fight when he was
only sixteen and he pounded the crap outta
somebody only that somebody also pounded the
crap outta Little Joey and ever since then Little
Joey has hated lots of things.
Little Joey graduated when he was only
seventeen and he was happy because he hated all his
high* school buddies and even Mary Kay who he was
going steady with because everyone else was.
Little Joey was free when he was only eighteen
because he went away to college and his mother
cried and his father sighed but Little Joey laughed
and was for-the-first-time happy.
Little Joey met Donna when he was only
nineteen and for the first time in Little Joeys big
life he was sure he was in love but Donna wasnt so
Joey wasnt either and besides Donna had to get
married too. Little Joey realized when he was only
twenty that he hated Donna, that he hated
Theresa-next-door, that he hated Mary Kay, that he
hated Sharon, that he hated Sister Mary Julia, that
he hated God, that he hated home, that he hated
worms, that he hated Superman, that he hated
mother, that he hated Little Joey.
Little Joey got a letter when he was only
twenty-one saying You are now being considered
for induction and then Little Joey hated his
country too.
And then Little Joey realized that he was just
Little Joey and he didnt really hate anything
because there wasnt anything.

Journalists Given
Cash Awards

Ninety dollars in cash awards were made last week by the Copeland
Sausage Company of Alachua to students in the Advertising Seminar
class of the College of Journalism and Communications.
The awards were made in recognition of a three-month advertising
campaign created and produced by the class. Students organized into
a typical 26-man advertising agency complete with six departments.
After an official critique, the awards were presented to:
Market Research Department, SSO Paul Siegel, Chairman, William
Barnes, Catherine Bond, Jeanne Lowman, Michael Sternberg.
Media Department, $25 Robert Goodman, Chairman, Bobbie
Albritton, James Jones, Michael Kartt, Harvey Starin.
Print Creative sls Don Gilbert, Chairman, Jeanette Haas,
Lawrence Nixon, Pamela Parnell.

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Friday. August 16,1968, Th Florida AWHrtorJ

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Photos By
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Page 13



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 14

Today Minus One

A little over four years ago, a world
was critically wounded. One instant He
was sitting there; in the next, blood was
spattered on the car, her dress and the
conscience of a world.
I was sitting in a classroom when
someone said Hed been shot. I laughed.
Legends dont die while theyre still in
the making.
Sometimes I sweat ice in the night and
wake up screaming I laughed.
The rest of the day is a fog. My dad
staring at the television set. He never
spoke. Me, standing and trembling as my
eyes fixed on visions of impossibilities
unravelling. Nineteen years old and I
cried.
1 think back further to the Bay of Pigs.
1 can picture Him stooped in defeat. His
words still haunt the corridors of my
mind, I made a mistake. Before the

Fifth Column^

Alice Long

What did you love?
What I knew.
3. What did you know?
\. Very little ...
I knew a truthful smile and
long clean fingers. (Restless
nights and a' perfume that
lingers.)
I knew strange places, once
visited and never forgotten.
This eyelid, and that chin.
Her sensuous laugh,... and
oh, of course,... that nose.
(I would draw her and I never
could get that nose.)
Long serious talks studded
with giddy tenderness. Its so
much fun getting to know
you. (Ed. Note: Ill give it a
week.) 1 knew shaky hands
and muscles rippling; catching
breaths and hearts pounding.
This Id known
before ... but not like this.
(Breaking the silence.
.. What are you thinking?)
Youve been in love before?
... Thats nice.
You like to go out and meet
people? We wi11... cmere.
While I knew her, I knew no one
else:
While I knew all this, I knew
nothing else. I didnt know
before -for I wasnt there.
Give me ten minutes of your
family, thats all I want to
hear.
I dont care what people
say is easy to say as long as
people arent saying. (Love
cant live without others
praise.)
Mothers and fathers are fond
memories that send
checks ... and stop sending
them. (Your Mother and I
have agreed ... )
Roommates are for lying to.
(Where are you going? Out
to study.)
Soon, too soon, my emotions
betray me; Previous
protectiveness dwindles to
irrational possessiveness.
Conversations become
bittersweet and are spoken in
the past tense. Lasting looks
change to suspicious glances.

JFK Remembered: A Leader Who Cared

world, I made a mistake. He was a
man.
He talked from power and was
respected. The world knew where He
stood. Across the country we knew what
was happening.
Missiles 90 miles from home? Never.
Across the land his voice rang,. I need
your support. A country rallied to stand
with Him. Those missiles sailed away.
A victory, yes. But He did not gloat
and the world came from the brink of
disaster to a closeness it has not known
since. Not since those shots blasted apart
the man who offered global sanity to an
insane world.
He made possible trade between
enemies. He echoed the glory of Lincoln.
He unfroze a cold war. He was a leader,
but, at the same time, He was of the
people.
He, more than any man who sat

s Jason Straight
Casual questions are now
entrapping accusations. We hate
what we are doing to each other,
but it cant be helped. .
Can it?
It never had a chance ...
Did it?
We3l never know, but oh lordie,
I think so.
I thought so. (Oh hell, who
am I kidding?)
I woke up this morning and you,
(it) were, (was) gone. Same face,
same hands, same clothes, same
voice ... different feeling.
Study, eat and wonder.
Look out the window and
ache.
Once in a while ...
remember.
REMEMBER WHAT?
We never ever had a song.

1969
THE YEAROM^RATOR
M Phi 1

florida Quarterly
V A LITTLE MAGAZINE OF ARTS AND LETTERS
V WILL BE OUT
T OCTOBER 1
Single copy $1.25
m year subscription (3 books) $3.00
Florida Quarterly
207 Anderson Hall
University of Florida
U

behind that lonely desk, knew it was
more than a country He guided, it was a
world that looked to Him and depended
on Him.
If there is a God, for a 1,000 days He
had reason to smile. And God looked
around Him and saw that it was good.
People say to me, Bob, how can you
say He was great? He wasnt around that
long.
Around me I see boys who comb their
hair just the way He did. No loud drums
or speeches are needed. Just a silent
homage that has become a part of them.
Sometimes I catch a glimpse of His
picture in a strangers billfold: Or I see a
half-dollar, brown from non-circulation,
in the bottom of a purse.
When I stood at His grave in the
summer of 66,1 felt a cold chill of power
and greatness. As I looked around, I
could tell others felt it too.

No, Hes not great so much for what
He did. But for what He stood for. And
for the memory and legend He left us.
This generation is a little better for the
love He felt for it.
Adults are a little closer to this
generation because He was there to bridge
the gap.
And somehow people are a little better
because they had the fortune to live in
His time. A time of truth, understanding,
sanity and a leader who cared.
He began with the words, With a
good conscience our only reward, with
history the final judge of our deeds, let us
go forth to lead the land we love asking
His blessing and His help, but knowing
that here on earth Gods work must truly
be our 0wn...
And the world was a little better
because He meant it.

Bob Moran



Wrights Cartoons: Political Barbery

Cartoonist Don Wright, whose masterpieces of political
Ibarbery are a daily feature in the Alligator, is the editorial sjk
[cartoonist for the M iami News. jX
i
I WELCOME
I ...To the University of Florida. While waiting for
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I chemically clean your portable typewriter for half price.
I Simply bring this coupon with you, along with your Student
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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

WELCOME
MALL GATORS
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37 STORES UNDER ONE ROOF
The Regional Shopping Center of Northcentral Florida
THE MALL JOINS GATORLAND
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Shop in Airconditioned comfort in all 37 stores and'the Mall
2,500 FREE parking spaces
Come spend the day
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Section A

1968: A Year Os Discontent

EflK|^ a I iMKIi B
V' 1 ] H *.3. ,' :3^UfmskZ'*
.... all
fepUpi
- -Bh*, fl|H||teM

The
Florida Alligator

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

7965 was a eAr of discontent at UF.
Disillusioned by a social system they cannot embrace,
students roared for change, for greater personal freedom.
They demanded an end to compulsory ROTC, they
denounced a controversial professor's denial of tenure by
the administration, they defended a black militant who was
jailed for contempt of court.
They deplored apparent pressure to block an invitation
to Adam Clayton Powell to speak on campus, they endorsed
the state-wide teacher walkout, they walked hand-in-hand
with local Negroes to mourn the assassination of Martin
Luther King.
Unrest percolated when several students were arrested
while protesting recruitment on campus by Dow Chemical
Co., producer of napalm used in Vietnam.
These, and scores of others, markes a restless year for a
university painfully seeking change.
Photos By Nick Arroyo

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Friday, August 16,1968



Page 2-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

A Year Os Protest, Painful Change

Students Seek Ways
To Reshape University

May 31, 1968
This has been a year for change. This year
the UF had come face to face with realities.
With these new realities the UF must
reshape some old, obsolete ideas. This year
the UF has begun to do that, and next year it
will go through more of these growing pains.
September
Thousands of new faces arrived at the UF
with the Fall quarter. Among them was new
UF president, former Florida Supreme Court
Chief Justice Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnells arrival brought the first of
many controversies plaguing UF during the
year.

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Florida Governor Claude Kirk charged
Czarist moves by Board of Regents
Chairman Chester Ferguson in the boards
selection of OConnell.
But, he added, OConnell is going to be
the finest president the UF ever had.
Kirk called for Fergusons resignation.
Ferguson refused to resign, declaring he
was a man of guts and integrity. He added,
I will resist to the last drop of my blood the
effort of the governor to dastardly run me
out of my position. And he did.
Amidst state-wide reaction favoring
OConnell and Ferguson and walkout threats
by UF students and professors, the issue
fizzled out after a few days.

October
In the wake of this political
hodge-podge, student politicos
campaigned for Legislative
Council seats. United Party
swept the Leg Council elections,
winning 22 out of 30 seats in an
election that saw 4500 students
go to the polls.
In the same election, students
chose voluntary over
compulsory ROTC by a 3-1
margin. It was the beginning of a
new wave of anti-compulsory
ROTC feeling that still sweeps
the campus.
Also shaping up in October
was the Marshall Jones tenure
appeal to the administration.
Jones, a psychology
professor, was denied tenure by
then UF President J. Wayne
Reitz despite Jones colleges
recommendations that he be
granted tenure or continuing
contract.
Traditional Homecoming
closed the month with its
theme: Happiness is being a
Gator, -a tired Gator after a
long weekend of activities.
November
Early in November, the Jones
tenure case gained momentum
when the administration denied
to hear his appeal. Students and
faculty were split over the issue.
OConnell said Jones should
either ask the Board of Regents
or the Faculty Senate
Committee on Academic
Freedom and Tenure to review
the situation.
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Meanwhile, a battle was
developing between student
publications and Student
Government.
The controversy arose when
then student body treasurer Don
Braddock said he would not sign
student payroll checks for
publications employees. He
charged the payroll request had
exceeded for the third
consecutive pay period the
amount budgeted to
publications for salaries by Leg
Council.
A bill for temporary student
publication autonomy was
passed by the council. It was to
encounter endless obstacles until
it was finally vetoed by
Braddock.
December
The Fall quarter closed as
Pamme Brewer, the UF coed
who gained nationwide fame
after she posed in the nude for
an off-campus publication, was

arrested for selling alleged
obscene literature at her
Gainesville shop. Charges against
here were to be dismissed later.
January
In January Jones and seven
others began a hunger strike in
sympathy with several civil
rights workers in the Alachua
County jail. The workers, Irvin
Jack Dawkins and Mrs. Carol
Thomas, were found guilty of
contempt of court when they
passed out an issue of Black
Voices, a black power sheet
urging Gainesville Negroes to
boycott white merchants in the
Negro district.
That month, UF Vice
President Robert B. Mautz was
whispered to be the leading
candidate for the post of
chancellor of the state university
system. The rumor was verified
three months later when the
(SEE 'RESHAPED' PAGE 4-A)



Hf Government 1 wMIMa rque&NNm / 1968/1969 SEASON
P Subscription Concert Series IjUjUtf January 12, 1969 March 16, 1969
I Student Government Productions of the HAGUE PH ILH Aft MON 1C |t IB |||^^^B
University of Florida is pleased to offer you Under the gracious patronage of Her Majesty
the opportunity to enjoy the finest concerts Queen Juliana of The Netherlands, The Hague
available in the performing arts during the Philharmonic was a brilliant success on its first
1968-1969 school year. American tour. Their return to America is
therefore a cultural event of the highest artistic
Each of the seven programs in this series order to all lovers of great music.
has been carefully selected to provide you "The ensemble is superior and so is its
with a wide variety of cultural experience conductor. Altogether handsome sound."
and enjoyment. Each event is distinguished N.Y. Times
by the highest achievements of the fine arts.
I ROGER WAGNER CHORALE CBfX Ef*"* I
I November 16, 1968 $ I
Leopold Stokowski has called the Chorale, |m l-vs&i&d {B^bUBBI
"Second to none in the world;" and Eugene
Ormandy described it as, "The finest chorus February 6, 1969
I Since winning the Tchaikovsky l
J&Mjgsr _ > \ .v- Competition in Moscow in 1958, Van
1c Cliburn has been a hero to all America, and
W' 7 '^ r f j\ \ music's greatest artists. A recital by Van
"An extraordinary hit. . The seasons most Cliburn is certainly one of the highlights of p t
outstanding musical." Life Magazine an Y musical season, and one you won't want
Now in its fourth sellout year, this great to miss.
attraction not only won all awards as "The Best
Musical of the Year," but has received almost /
audicnc* H
I November I
Jan Peerce, world-renowned tenor of the
An outstanding operatic combination; the March 4, 1969 Metropolitan Opera, has a reputation for fi
1 most popular French opera in modern being equally at home in classical arias and B
history performed by the most successful As one of America's finest creators of ballet popular songs. The N. Y. Times has said of B
ii travelling opera company in the United in America, Ruth Page is this season offering a America's foremost tenor, "We know of no
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fl "A rousing success proving that opera in romantic beauty of the classical ballet as well as American public." His memorable B
Â¥ English property staged, is live and appealing the dramatic excitement of contemporary performance will be an appropriate end to B
| theater!" Newsweek Magazine- works. an outstanding fine arts concert series. H
I SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT SERIES TICKET INFORMATION I

[Student Government is offering, to students
only, a limited number of preferred seats
through this advanced subscription series ticket
offer.
The primary value of a subscription ticket is
that it reserves you a much better seat for each
performance than you can buy for the same
price at the box office.
Seats for the special 600 student box office
tickets will be in the side stands.

IHTtMHATIRHITY COURCII "fall Frolics OCT. 25
THE FOUR TOPS "Motown Sound" will be the highlight of this year's Fall
Frolics sponsored by the Interfratemity Council. Dedicated artists, the Four
Tops continue to broaden their repertoire to include popular ballads and
Broadway show tunes. So, for a swinging evening of entertainment be sure
and see the Four Tops at "Fall Frolics' October 25.

OTHELLO November 18,1968
This classic Shakespearean drama will be
performed by the renowned National Shakespeare
Company, widely acclaimed for its excellent
staging and masterful style.

Union Program Council Fine Arts Committee Presentations

U of F Students Only
$6.00 EARLY BIRD BARGAIN
For U. of F. students only there is a special
subscription price of $6.00 for all seven events.
These seats are located in the side bleachers.
U. of F. students may also purchase front
main floor seats at $14.50 and rear main floor
and rear bleacher seats at $9.00, a saving of
20% over regular box office prioes.
Subscription and individual prices for the
general public will be announced later.

PRESER VAT/ON HALL JAZZ BAND
The message is Jazz -- straightforward, rich,
foot-stamping jazz played by musicians who
learned their trade where it all began. These are
the originals straight fron New Orleans.
February 1, 1969

Student Government Concert Special
THE INCOMPARABLE MANTOVANI, whom Variety called, "The biggest
Musical Phenomenon of the twentieth century," will be the featured artist at
a special concert on Wednesday, November 6. His popularity is world-wide,
and records sell into the millions. An evening with the Mantovani strings is
always a memorable and entertaining one.

Friday, August 16,1968. The Florida Alligator,

ALL RESERVED SEATS ARE ASSIGNED ON I
A FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS.
The subscription series sale will close October H
15. All ticket orders will be acknowledged upon H
receipt, and the tickets will be sent out in
October. H
Send to: REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

BHASKAR AND SHALA April 8,1969
Bhaskar, a virtuoso of Indian dancing, and his
partner, the beautiful Shala, present an exciting
evening of East Indian Music and dances. Their
masterful performances transport their audiences
by music and dance through the mysterious
temples and courts of the eastern world.

Page 3-A



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 4-A

Reshaped UF Sought

(FROM PAGE 2-A)
Board of Regents named him to
the post.
In early January campus
politics began making news with
Clyde Taylor and Bill Mcride
announcing for the Student
Government presidency. Later in
the month the campaign heated
up as Mcride attacked the
Alligator for endorsing his
opponent.
January also saw several UF
coeds attacked on campus. No
assailant was ever apprehended.
In the middle of that month
it was announced that Adam
Clayton Powell would speak on
campus. The invitation was later
revoked and then offered, only
to be revoked once again. The
Afro-American Student
Association again extended an
invitation only to have Powell
back out at the last moment.
January was the month of
Saturday classes.
After the balloting, Mcride
was named student body
president by an 8 vote margin,
the closest ever. The controversy
was not to die, for on Thursday,
Feb. 1, Honor Court Chancellor
Bob Hughes called for new
elections for what he called
irregularities.
In the second election Taylor
won by a landslide.
That same day a dozen
people were arrested in Reitz
Union when they staged a
sit-in protesting Dow
Chemical Companys recruiting
on campus.
They were later found guilty
of trespassing and were fined
and sentenced to several days in
jail.
February
The middle of February also
saw a new student publications

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autonomy bill fail to pass the
Student Senate. Funds for
student publications are still
under the control of student
government,
February 19 was the day set
for the state wide teacher
walkout in Florida.
Members of the AAUP
considered walking out of their
classrooms in sympathy of the
teacher walkout, but the plans
for a walkout were changed to
an Action Day off campus
when students and instructors
joined in a march to a local
theatre to show support for the
teachers.
February 28 the Alligator ran
a paid advertisement accusing
Vice President Lester L. Hale
with overstepping his legal
bounds in administering student
affairs. The advertisement was
paid for by a group of graduate
students who later formed the
Student Board of Investigation
(SBI).
March
Early in March, Florida Blue
Key (FBK) President Bill
McCollum accused several
student leaders of backing the
We Accuse ad. Student leaders
Charles Shepherd, Fred Breeze
and Cliff McClelland all denied
the charges but McCollum stood
by his charges.
The break between quarters
lasted three weeks. When
students returned they were
informed that Director of
Selective Service Gen. Lewis B.
Hershey had cancelled a planned
visit to campus.
The next day the Student
Conduct Committee (SCC)
overruled the Honor Court so;
the first time in history. A
student, found guilty of
cheating, was not to graduate.
However, SCC overruled the

decision and allowed him to
graduate.
April
On April 5, the murder of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. in
Memphis, Tenn. set off a series
of nationwide riots which almost
came to Gainesville.
Gov. Claude Kirk on Sunday,
April 7, ordered 300 National
Guard troops into Gainesville to
preserve order. On the same day
the Gainesville city commission
instituted an 11 p.m. curfew
which was in effect two days.
On Monday, April 8 the news
broke that over the weekend
visiting Negro law professor,
Spencer Boyer, had fled back to
Howard University in
Washington, D. C. His life had
been threatened the day after
Dr. Kings murder.
Boyers departure ignited a
furor in the law school. Students
and faculty wanted to know
why the law school and
university administrations
remained mum on Boyers
leaving.
On April 16, the long sought
open hearing of Dr. Jones
tenure case began before the
Senate Committee on Academic
Freedom and Tenure.
Jones defense claimed he had
been denied tenure for political
reasons. The Administration
claimed Jones had incited
rebellion for rebellions sake
and influenced students into
courses which they otherwise
would not have taken.
The Administration proposed
to present testimony from 40
witnesses and evidence which
included the names of persons
and organizations not directly
involved in the Jones case.
Fuel was added to the fire
when an Alligator editorial on
the Jones hearing written by the
Editor Steve Hull and Executive
Editor Mike Abrams was
censored by the Board of
Student Publications on the
grounds that it might be
construed as contempt of court.
The editorial was withheld for
two issues.
On April 18, at the peak of
editors on the Alligator walked
the controversy, five subordinate
off their jobs protesting
irresponsible journalism.
One week later Jones
dropped a bombshell revealing
he had accepted a job at a
northeastern college. He asked
that his hearing be continued to
show that he was wrongfully
denied tenure.

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The Administration presented
a profert of evidence for the
Senate Committee to consider.
It has been considering it and
deliberating ever since and says
now it will reach no decision on
Jones until the fall.
Another controversy erupted
when ex-Student Body President
Charles Shepherd called for an
end to the dean of womens
domination of the Association
of Women Students (AWS).
A proposed new Constitution
provides for faculty
representation in the AWS other
than someone out of the dean of
womens office.
On April 24, the SBI held a
teach-in in the Plaza of the
Americas. It urged sophomores
not to sign their housing
contracts for next year.
During the rally a reporter
uncovered a state police officer
who had come on campus to
observe the SBI meeting. The
SBI also charged, and the
Administration confirmed, that
files were kept on all students.
On April 26, the Student
Conduct Committee began an
open hearing for five students
who had already been convicted
at municipal court for their
actions in protesting Dow
Chemical Co.
The SCC rejected a directive
from President OConnell by ah
8-3 vote and subsequently
dismissed the Administrations
charges by a 9-2 vote because it
said the Administration had
made no effort to show the
students had threatened the
health, safety or academic
reputation of the university.

May
On May 6, Chairman Chester
Ferguson talked about
censorship and compulsory
ROTC. He said both were
needed. Censorship was needed
because young people can
engage in reckless assassination
of people, and ROTC builds
bodies and mind, Ferguson
proclaimed.
An immediate reaction was
manifested two days later when
two students walked off the drill
field and just Wednesday 60
students took part in another
demonstration against the
ROTC.
More unrest was fanned here
by nationwide student revolt
elsewhere. At Columbia it was
violent and at FSU it was
peaceful and orderly.
This has been a quarter
marked by confrontation and
reaction. There was been
confrontation because a lot of
people began to question the
efficacy of the university
structure here.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor reported the UF
campus was tense, and the UF
administration reacted to
student demands. President
OConnell called for an Action
Conference to try and solve
some of the acute problems.
The university has gone
through a profitable, yet trying
year. There is soul-searching
going on here, and that, after all,
is the purpose of a university.
The UF can look to 1968-69 as a
time of challenge and a time to
heal its wounds and realize
change.



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Friday, August 16.1968. Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 5-A



Page 6-A

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Soph, Jr, Curfew Axed

July 16,1968
By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
Sophomore and junior girls
living in campus housing at UF

'Students Can
Replace SG
Feb. 24,1968
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator News Editor
Student Body President Clyde Taylor has vowed to offer a
referendum which will enable students to abolish Student
Government under its present constitutional setup at the end of his
term of office.
If Student Government cannot truly serve the students, then it
should not exist. If the students do not believe that SG is really doing
anything for them, then lets get rid of it and give students what they
want, Taylor said.
In other words, he continued, I am asking my party and all the
students on this campus to put up or shut up.
Taylor pointed out that the election of Charles Shepherd last year
signaled student disillusionment with machine politics and broken
promises. Shepherds election, he said, indicated that students
wanted a change.
The people of my party have had a year to experiment with the
ideas that -students really want. And we made many advances,
highlighted by the revised student conduct code, he noted.
He also indicated that there is much SG can do for the betterment
of recreational, social and cultural programs and atmosphere, but
only if students can be involved in SG through dynamic leadership.
We know the problems and needs of the students, Taylor said.
And I am convinced that I can do the type of job as student body
president that students want. If I cant, then I am willing to place the
entire concept of Student Government on the line a year from the day
I am inaugurated.
Taylor said the main reason students are dissatisfied with SG is the
unwillingness or the inability of student leaders to take government
to the students, where it belongs.

&atf)skeUer (rats / kel / er) German
the celler of city hall. Often a restaurant
and a place for friends to meet.
We went the Germans one better, we moved
our rathskeller
Bmpi r'~*\
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IlMMoy will be new to the
ca mpus . as will
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DEAN RECOMMENDS CHANGE

will not be required to meet any
curfew regulation beginning in
September.
Recommendations for the
change originated in the office
of Dean of Women Betty Cosby.

Miss Cosbys recommendation
was reviewed and approved by
Vice-President of Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale, who then
sent iOo. the UF Executive
Council ancbftesident Stephen
C. OConnell for final approval.
Miss Cosby announced the
curfew abolishments in a
memorandum from her office
Sunday. She is on vacation and
unavailable for comment.
The official statement reads
as follows:
UF sophomore and junior
women will join senior women
in the privileged housing
program next September. All
women with a two, three or four
classification will be allowed to
determine their own curfew via a
system security precaution
which includes 24-hour desk
coverage in the dormitories and
a special key system in the
sorority houses.
The 24-hour desk coverage
will include the security of a
police officer at the main
entrance of every girls
dormitory around the clock.
Sophomore and junior
curfews this year held that the
girls were required to be in the
dormitory area by 11 pjn. on
weeknights, 1 a.m. cm Friday
night and 1:30 a.m. on Saturday
night.

fl IS V
UF CADETS GO ABOUT BUSINESS AS USUAL
... While students with placards protest in background
Regents Abolish
Required ROTC
July 2, 1968
By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
The ROTC program at UF and the states other six universities will
become voluntary next September. The decision was made
unanimously at yesterdays Board of Regents meeting in Pensacola.
In another ruling, the Regents gave the presidents of the states
universities the discretionary power in any case ... to summarily
suspend a student from the university pending a hearing contemplated
by this (Board of Regents Operating Manual) section.
In the past, a state university president could suspend a student
only after a hearing by the Board of Regents.
Voluntary ROTC will be in the best interest of national defense
and of the universities, said Dr. Burke Kibler 111, Chairman of the
Compulsory ROTC Training Committee appointed by the Board of
Regents.
The ROTC program at UF has been a compulsory curriculum for
freshman and sophomore males ever since the schools inception in
1853.
A uniform voluntary program for the states seven universities was
set up. UF and Florida A&M were under compulsory programs before
the ruling. Florida State University has always had a voluntary
program.
It was pointed out to the board that the new ruling might mean
that Florida A&M will not have enough participants in the ROTC
program to continue, and this prompted the board to ask FSU to
consider a consolidation of their program with that of Florida A&Ms
in order to keep both programs alive.



Mcride Wins, Then

Feb. 9,1968
By FRED McNEESE
Alligator Staff Writer
Clyde Taylor, United First
Party, defeated Forward Partys
Bill Mcride for student body
president by what may be the
largest margin in UF history.
Unofficial totals gave Taylor
a 1,100 vote victory over
KT
jfl
BILL McBRIDE
... defeated
Mcride in the second
presidential election in as many
weeks. Previous high was in
1963 when Paul Hendrick swept
into office by 1139 votes.
time Thursday,
Taylor had 4710 votes compared
to 3615 votes for Mcride.
Election officials said over
8,000 students voted in
Thursdays election. What

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IN DISPUTED PRESIDENT RACE

started off as a cold and windy
day, warmed by noon, and
allowed students to go to the
polls.
Mcride took only four out
of 18 precincts. He won in
Murphree area by 3 votes, Hume
area by 14 votes, the law school
by 17 votes and in the College of
Agriculture by 43 votes.
In the last election, Bill
Mcride was declared an
unofficial victor by 8 votes.
United First Party immediately
charged election irregularities.
Robert Hughes said last week
that the charges included such
violations as electioneering
within the prescribed 100 feet of
the poll and improper
performance of duties by
election officials.
After three days of closed
hearings, the Honor Court called
for a new election.
Taylor has pledged to
continue the work of Charles
Shepherds administration and
to give the voters a chance to
abolish Student Government if
they are not satisfied within a
year.
He has also promised to
establish a housing authority for
the benefit of off-campus
students, and accumulate data
on the armed forces and
selective service. He has also
promised to work for a grade
appeals board.
With 14 fraternities and
sororities backing him, Mcride

was favored in the campaign.
Clyde Taylor campaigned on
the image of First party that
of a clean sweep for change.
Taylor counted heavily on
independent support because,
though he had 13 of Floridas 27
fraternities behind him, he was
about 400 block votes behind
Mcride.
The winning candidate and
incumbent President Charles
Shepherd walked into the Sigma
Nu fraternity house,
United-First partys unofficial
headquarters, at the same time
as losing presidential hopeful Bill
Mcride conceded the election
to Taylor.
For a few seconds, a satisfied
hush enveloped the crowd of
over 100 Taylor 1 supporters.
Then pandemonium erupted.
The cheering crowd
surrounded Taylor and his
running mate Gary Goodrich,
and handshakes, hugs, and
congratulations went to the
elated pair.
'The student body made a
very wise decision, a smiling
Shepherd told the Alligator,
and they will see what they got
today during the next year.
He added it is very
significant that Taylor is the
first majority party candidate
elected to the UF SG presidency
in four years.
We hope qualified people
from both parties will work with
us, he said, and we will

CLIP AND SAVE I

Taylor

welcome anyone interested in
working for the students.
Asked specifically how he
plans to provide the leadership
which will make SG responsive
to student needs, Taylor said:
r**s*l will take government to
/ the students. I will offer them
CLYDE TAYLOR
... victorious
our ideas. I will involve them,
interest them prove to them
that SG can and is doing what
they want done.
If at the end of my term,
they are still dissatisfied with
SG, then Ill give them the
opportunity to replace it with
whatever they want, such as a
faculty-student board to act as a
central service agency.

Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Court Voids
Ist Election
Feb. 5,1968
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Managing Editor
Honor Court Chancellor
Robert Hughes said Sunday
his reason for calling a new
election for student body
president is that there were
irresponsible actions by
individuals in the Jan. 25
general election.
Hughes stressed there were
no organized irresponsible
actions.
The decision marked the
first time in UF history that
the court has overturned an
election.
I want to make certain
that as far as Im concerned
the ordering of the new
election is not the fault of
either party or both parties
taken together or the fault of
either candidate, the
politically unaffiliated
chancellor said.
The election was thrown
out in part, but not in
whole, because of the
election officials, he
continued.
Hughes said three general
considerations entered into
his decision to void the
previous election:
ill performance of duties
by some officials connected
with the election;
electioneering in the
areas prohibited by statute;
- and irregularities on the
part of individual voters.

Page 7-A



L, The Flortba AlHptor, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 8-A

jj^Hj
: jjm
,211^

RAY GRAVES
... Accused of discrimination

Student Records
Now Confidential

Oct. 3,1967
All student records are now confidential and will not be released
without the written approval of the student, Lester L. Hale, vice
president for student affairs, announced.
All student records shall be regarded as privileged information,
kept under close scrutiny, and used only by authorized administrative
and clerical personnel in the performance of official duties,
according to Hale.
The previous policy allowed for release of a students confidential
information with only a valid court order, but now all such
information will not be released to anyone other than the professional
staff of student affairs agencies except with the written permission of
the student.
James T. Hennessey, assistant dean of student affairs said that the
main basis of the new ruling is to safeguard the student.
However, the revision does state that in response to a legitimate
request, information concerning place of residence, a students
academic classification, name of roommate, location and periods of
employment may be given.

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Local NAACP Criticizes Graves

Feb. 6 r 1968
By STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
WASHINGTON Statistics
released here Saturday reinforce
recent charges that the UF is not
hewing to the spirit of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964 in granting
athletic scholarships.
The figures, compiled by the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW),
stated that the UF gave 300
athletic scholarships but that
none were to Negroes.
UF Athletic Director Ray

UF COACH COUNTERS CHARGES

Graves was accused recently by
the Rev. T. A. Wright, local
NAACP president, of
discriminating against Negroes in
recruiting athletes.
Coach Ray Graves is the big
reason why Negro athletes never
compete at the UF, Wright
said.
Graves countered the charges
last week at a Dialogue meeting
when he said Negroes arent
recruited because most of them
cannot meet UF admission
requirements.
Os the 15,221 full-time
students at the UF 87 are Negro.
Os the 300 scholarships granted
at the UF each year, all go to
white athletes.
According to the HEW
figures, Southeastern Conference
schools offered only 11 athletic
grants-in-aid to Negroes.
A HEW spokesman who
wishes not to be identified said
Saturday the results of their
survey is a sad commentary
on the status of Negro recruiting
in the SEC.

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Gut down on the high cost of getting is) only gets 14.
a Volkswagen. It's only *1768.* Ke m re d,iVS ' He m re V U
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DEALER

I

The UF athletic department
may have to forfeit federal funds
if charges of discriminatory
recruitment policies are proven,
the HEW spokesman said.
The HEW statistic stemmed
from a survey by the
departments Civil Rights office,
which stated that 3,900 univer universities
sities universities and colleges in the U.S.
comply with the Civil Rights
Act of 1964.
validate claims
Apparently there were a
number of skeptical HEW
officials who did not believe the
schools assertions.
Therefore, according to the
spokesman, an in-dept survey
was taken by the department to
validate claims by the
universities surveyed.
Figures in the most recent
GO
GREEK

survey do not support the
universities claims.
The UF, for example, stated
that it gave 300 athletic
scholarships but none to
Negroes. Georgia gave 202
scholarships to athletes but none
to Negroes. Auburn, Alabama,
Mississippi, Mississippi State and
LSU followed suit.
I'lxn
1405 SW 13th ST.



UF, Union
Prepare
For Powell
Mar. 7, 1968
After two months of
negotiations, if looks like Adam
Clayton Powell is finally going
to speak at the UF.
The Alligator learned from
Reitz Union Director Bill Rion
that University Auditorium has
been reserved for Powell March
30.
His visit is to be sponsored by
the Afro-American Student
Association (AASA) headed by
Wayne Fulton. Fulton could not
be reached for comment at press
time.
The Alligator learned from
another source that Powell has
accepted an invitation for the
AASA to speak.
Powell was originally invited
to the UF in January for
ACCENT, which is a speakers
forum scheduled for April..

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However, the ACCENT
committee, composed of
students, subsequently voted 5-3
to recall their invitation.
Finally, the Student Peace
Union (SPU), represented by
David Noble, and the AASA
invited Powell to speak. Their
request was approved by the
faculty lectures committee, Mrs.
Eleanor Roberts, public
functions manager, said at the
time.

Leary Lecture Rejected

Feb. 12,1968
By STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
A proposal to bring LSD advocate Timothy
Leary to campus in April has been rejected by the
Executive Council of the Florida Union Board, the
Alligator learned Sunday.
Citing Chester Fergusons recent blast against
campus drug users, Ed Koren, president of the
Union Board and a member of the Executive
Council explained that Leary had been rejected
because the board felt bringing Leary to campus
may cause people to think the UF is advocating the
use of drugs.
We feel that in light of the regents statement
concerning drug use, we of the Union Board believe
it would be best not to allow Leary to speak on
campus.
Koren also cited that money spent on bringing
Leary to campus could be better utilized for
someone else.
The Union Board has already screened a movie
in which Leary appeared, Koren said, We want a
variety of ideas and if Leary speaks it would just be
a repeat of what he said in his movie.

BY UNION BOARD COUNCIL

Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

According to Koren it would cost SI2OO to bring
Leary to campus.
Linda Tarler, a member of the Forums
committee which recommended the appearance of
Leary, said Sunday the Executive Council of the
Board telephoned UF President Stephen C.
OConnell before making their decision.
According to Miss Tarler, OConnell, although
being very receptive to the idea, thought it would be
unconfortable for him as well as the UF for Leary
to come to campus in April.
Miss Tarler said OConnell did speculate Leary
might be able to appear in the Fall.
Miss Tarler defended the rejection of Leary on
the grounds that by allowing Leary to speak, the
Board would be defying the university and President
OConnell.
Anyway, she continued, if Leary was to
speak it might give the UF some bad publicity.
A spokesman for the Union Board who wished to
not be identified said the Board had enough money
to bring Leary to campus.
The rejection of Leary comes on the heels of the
Accent executive committees decision to retract
their invitation to Black Power advocate Adam
Clayton Powell.

Page 9-A



Page 10-A, The Florida ANigrtor, Friday. August 16,1968 I I f ||
Five Editors Quit Alligator Staff

The Florida AHigrtor, Friday. August 16,1968

Page 10-A

*
April 19,1968
By MICHAEL ABRAMS
Alligator Executive Editor
Five editors resigned their
positions from the Alligator
Thursday night in disagreement
with an editorial which they feel
is irresponsible.
Managing Editor Harvey
Alper, Executive Editor Harold
Kennedy, News Editor Harold
Aldrich, Sports Editor Bob
Padecky, and Assistant News
Editor Dave Doucette quit after
they learned that a controversial
editorial blasting the Marshall
Jones hearing Tuesday night

Editorial Censored,
Revision Printed

April 19, 1968
(EDITORS NOTE: A revised
version of the editorial was
approved by the Board of
Student Publications for
publication on Monday, April
21.)
By DAVID REDDICK
and
808 MORAN
Alligator Staff Writers
For the first and second times
in the Alligators 62-year history
an Alligator editorial was
withdrawn from publication
following action by the Board of
Student Publications.
Thursday night in a telephone
survey the board voted 4-3 to
withhold an editorial similar to
the one withheld from

The Men of
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'The U of Fs Newest and Fastest Growing Fraternity
i -t $
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Welcome all new students to the University
of Florida, and invite all interested men to
visit our house during open rush.
Winner of overall humor division, 1967 Homecoming f
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1
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might be run today.
Signed by Editor Steve Hull
and Michael Abrams, the
editorial demanded the apology
of Tigert hall for allowing the
names of students to be read
into the testimony against Dr.
Jones in his tenure hearing.
Tuesday night Alper termed
the editorial irresponsible
journalism.
Im quitting because of what
1 consider irresponsible
journalism being exercised on the
part of Editor Steve Hull who
has refused to consider the fact
that he just might be wrong,
Alper said.

Thursdays paper following a
BSP meeting Wednesday night.
The editorial, critical of the
actions of the Faculty Senate
Committee on Academic
Freedom and Tenure, was pulled
Wednesday afternoon by
Student Publications Director
Jack Detweiler.
The BSP upheld Detweilers
action and Editor Steve Hull was
told by the board to revise the
editorial and run it in Fridays
paper.
Speaking for the board,
Detweiler said the members
voted 4 to 3 that the revisions
were not sufficient to meet the
intent of the action taken
Wednesday night by the board.

Padecky termed his departure
a professional, decision. He
said that he believed the
editorial to be too strongly
worded.
The editorial devotes so
much space to name-calling and
so little space for the reasons for
such beliefs we feel it prostitutes
the integrity of the Alligator.
Kennedy said.
The editorial termed the
administrations case a
wich-hunt and accused the
prosecuting attorney with trying
to prove guilt by association
and resorting to outright smear
tactics. It pledged the resources
of the Alligator to see that the
freedom and good name of every
teacher and student of UF was
not infringed upon by the
administration of this school.
The editorial was
irresponsible, immature, and
inflammatory, said Aldrich. I
cannot in good conscience be a
party to it.
Hull said he was very sorry to
see the editors leave.
They are close friends and it
is a disappointment to me
personally that they chose to
leave the Alligator, Hull said.
As editor I will take the full
responsibility for the editorial.
GO
FRATERNITY

V ** 4 .^wg^gjiy
\
.t ; .\f-y. ^ 1 I/

LOOKING
FOR SOMETHING
TO DO?
BOWL-PLAY POOL or
PING PONG AT THE THEGAMES
GAMES THEGAMES AREA
GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION
ASK US ABOUT FALL BOWLING LEAGUES!

EDITOR STEVE HULL WORKS ALONE
... after mass walkout of five editors



IFC Accuses 'Gator
Os Irresponsibility

Feb. 10, 1968
By RAUL RAMIREZ
1 Alligator Staff Writer
Inter-Fraternity Council
(IFC) officials and Tau Epsilon
Phi fraternity President Alan M.
Brunswick charged Alligator
Sports Editor Bob Padecky with
journalistic irresponsibility at

Editor Testifies
On Illegal Files

Dec. 6, 1967
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Alligator Managing Editor
Harvey Alper was subpenaed
Thursday to appear before the
Board of Masters of the Honor
Court Dec. 14 to testify about
alleged illegal fraternity files.
Alper said in a statement
Thursday that he is being
required to testify because of an
editorial, Fraternity Cheating,
which he wrote and which
appeared in Tuesdays Alligator.
The editorial was published
with the approval and
concurrence of the Alligator
editorial board, he said.
Members of the board are Alper,
Editor Steve Hull, Executive
Editor Harold Kennedy, and
News Editor Harold Aldrich.
At this time I consider it my
pleasure to appear before the
Board of Masters and answer any
questions they put to me to the
best of my ability, Alper said.

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ft disposal, dish washer and quick recovery water heater all served by dependable, flameless electric
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a special hearing of the Board of
Student Publications (BSP)
Friday.
The hearing blossomed into
general criticism of Alligator
coverage of fraternity, religious,
and political news as charges of
alleged political and
anti-fraternity bias were made.
The hearing was originally

In my opinion, the
allegation in the editorial in
that body
an end to ALPER
fraternity files which contain
privileged test information and
other forms of cheating which
now exist on this campus,
Alper added.
Honor Court Chancellor Dave
Welch said Thursday, The
Honor Court has intitiated this
action because Attorney General
Fred Cone and I think the
allegations made by Mr. Alper
are very serious ones and if they
are founded in fact it is our
intention to take immediate
action to prosecute the persons
involved to the full extent of the
law.

requested by Brunswick to
complain derogatory
statements about his fraternity
and the Jewish religion
appearing in one of Padecky's
sports columns.
Brunswicks charges were
echoed by IFC member Steve
Uhlfelder, who is also a member
ofTEP.
Alligator Editor Steve Hull
apologized for the content of
the columns and said no
malice was intended by the
sports editors comments.
He added that religious
matters would be omitted on
future sports columns.
GO
GREEK
I'ljJll
1405 SW. 13th ST.

Alligator Best In Nation |
May 23,1968
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Managing Editor
The Florida Alligator has been rated the best college daily
newspaper in America by the people who should know.
The American Newspaper Publishers Association (ANPA) and the
Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) announced in a telegram Friday the
Alligator has been awarded the 1968 ANPA-ACP Pacejnaker award as
the best college daily in the country.
The citation the highest honor a college newspaper can win for
overall excellence was won jointly by the Alligator and the Michigan
State University State News.

a little philosophy
with every label
There's a well-known beer company that invites you to read its
philosophy printed on the back of every can.
Unlike the beer company, we at the University Shops can't print
our philosophy on the merchandise we sell, mainly because you d
look kind of ridiculous walking around with our philosophy
printed on the back of your can.
But we would like to have you think about something every time
you see the University Shop label with those wild little lions and
that impressive-looking crest.
It all started with the idea of providing you with quality
merchandise at reasonable prices all year long. So we decided to
cater exclusively to college students.
Then we started opening up our market. We extended our charge
account service so you could use it even after leaving the security
of the ivy-covered institution. And we started advertising in
national magazines.
The idea was catching on. We tried it out at a few more schools.
No matter where we went, students liked the idea of shopping at
a store where they could find their kind of clothes.
So we've opened more stores to give more students the chance to
take advantage of this little philosophy of ours. No, we don't
have a University Shop at every campus, but -- like the beer
company -- we're working on it.
We're The Nation's Largest Group Os Apparel Shops Catering
Exclusively To College Students.
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Friday, August 16.1968. The Florida Alligator,

Page 11-A



, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16.1968

Page 12-A

p
i
'- .; vs- **~ f. ygy
* si &£> -' > 5 ,%

UF Professors Overcome
Opposition, Form Union

May 1,1968
By ANN FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Despite last minute opposition, a labor union for
university professors has been officially established
at the UF.
Chartered by the AFL-CIO, the newly-formed
local of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT)
will meet in the Reitz Union Auditorium.
The AFT was denied use of the auditorium last
week by Union Director W.E. Rion because it had
not obtained written sponsorship from an
academic department or a student group, Dr. Paul
L. Adams, local AFT president reported.
The AFT was not recognized as a bonafide
campus organization, Dr. Adams explained.
Fortunately, the Student Committee on Academic

1
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TWO NEGRO DISTRICT RESIDENTS
... Reflect the despair felt by many

Freedom is now sponsoring us and providing the
protective cover.
Moderated by Professor Thomas Hanna,
chairman of the department of philosophy, the
panel will review the recent resignation of noted
faculty members from the UF and discuss the
problems underlying the exodus.
Panel members include Stanley Laughlin (law),
Herman Levy (humanities), Robert Curran
(education), Sidney Jourard (psychology), and
Richard Hixon, director of the College Department
of the AFT from Washington D.C.
A spokesman for the union said that union
members are free to join other academic
associations such as AAUP and NEA without
jeopardizing their standing in the labor union.

IN GAINESVILLES NEGRO DISTRICT

Ghetto Homes Unique

Feb. 2,1968
By 808 MORAN
Alligator Staff Writer
There is no such thing as a
typical home in a ghetto.
Every home is unique.
But for the purposes of
description, two such homes in
Gainesvilles Negro district might
be called representative.
One is a faded brown. The
once white outside trim has
turned yellow and is embedded
with powdered sand. The
cement steps leading to the
porch are cracked and have
separated from the porch.

UFS NEIGHBOR:
X
THE BLACK GHETTO
A couple of chairs and a
couch swing are there. Women
and old men sit in the sun and
pass the time. The air is cold and
a mist-like rain makes one shiver
and breathe deep, so the porch is
deserted.
Inside its warm and dry.
Portable electric heaters glow
sunset red. In the living room a
young boy about 12 is stretched
out beside a heater with a small
portable record player beside his
head. Hes listening to loud soul
music and tapping his foot in the
air.
The floor is carpeted, though
the rugs are thin and worn
smooth. The furniture is old and
of blue paisley design.
A girl named Betty lives
here. She is 20. She finished high
school and has a little college.
Its a Friday evening, and
Betty tails excitedly about her
weekend plans.
We turn the conversation to
the militants and the fire bombs
of recent. She says she doesnt

know much about Negro
militancy in Gainesville. She
feels it is no real concern of hers.
Her mother listens quietly to
the talk about riots. She says her
fear is that innocent people will
be hurt.
Its the young men, she says,
who are dissatisfied and want
something better. She
sympathizes with them but does
not agree with their methods.
In the second home lives a
young militant. He isnt home,
but his parents talk about him
extensively.
The boy, in his early 20s, is a
high school graduate. He does
manual labor for $1.25 an hour.
His mother said he is bitter
about his position and his place.
Tonight he has the family car.
His parents have no idea where
he is or what he is doing.
You know how kids are,
his mother explains, they get
the car and its Saturday night.
Hes just looking for a good
time. We pray he keeps out of
trouble.
We pray..., say many
people in Gainesvilles Negro
district. Every home has a
picture of Christ, a cross or some
other religious artifact.
The family community life
centers around the church. The
ministers are recognized as
leaders among the women and
the white community.



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Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13-A



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

Page 14-A

Pot Purge To Affect 4,000 Students?

Feb. 12,1968
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
If the Board of Regents new
get tough policy with campus
drug users ensnares every
student who smokes marijuana,
UFs population may drop by
about 4,000.
This projection, based on an
Alligator poll of one per cent of
the student body selected at
random, comes close to a figure

'

recently termed grossly
exaggerated by a university
official.
The anonymous
questionnaire survey grew out of
Regents Chairman Chester
Fergusons pledge last week to
get tough with campus drug
users, following a report in the
Tampa Tribune on the
availability of marijuana on the
campus of the University of
South Florida.
The Tribune quoted one coed

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as saying that pot was so
abundant that the price was
dropping.
Ferguson declared at a
regents meeting last week that
no student, professor or official
linked to illicit drug action will
be given a second chance. They
will be dismissed or removed
immediately.
The Alligator questionnaire,
distributed in six classes chosen
at random, asked ten questions
relating to drug use.

Os the 173 students polled,
34 claimed to have smoked pot
at some time. Twenty-one, or 12
per cent, said they still smoke
pot.
The survey, taken last week
in six classroom buildings,
indicated that 20 per cent of the
respondents had smoked
marijuana at some time during
their college careers.
Based on an enrollment of
about 18,000 students, a
projection of the survey would

conclude that about 3,600 UF
students havd smoked pot.
And even more students 23
per cent -- said they would
smoke marijuana if it were not
illegal.
The results of the question
About what per cent of your
UF acquaintances smoke
marijuana, were:
One per cent or less 93; two
to ten per cent 30; 11 to 25
per cent -6; over 25 per cent
24.
Two of the admitted users
said they smoke it daily. Six
claimed to be weekly users, and
13 said they smoke it monthly.
The poll also indicated that
UF students have very little to
do with stronger drugs, such as
heroin, opium or LSD. Only
four students claimed to have
taken stronger drugs.
Nearly half the students
surveyed declared that marijuana
is easily available on campus.
And 41 per cent said they know
whom to contact if they wish to
purchase marijuana.
Over a third of the students
indicated that they favor
legalization of marijuana sale
and use. Twenty-three per cent
Tooth Decay
Many Florida cities have
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supply because the State Board
of Health says this reduces
dental decay

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said they would smoke pot if it
were legal.
It is probable that the survey
does not have a high degree of
reliability. But it does indicate
that a large number of UF
students smoke marijuana at

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least occasionally.
The most pertinent question
the survey raises, regardless of its
accuracy, is why a large
number of UF students be it
400 or 4,000 are willing to
violate a law in order to smoke
marijuana.



ar J
a |^VV|
S
IBBBBIPBp n

I UF Protest Backs
Striking Teachers

Feb. 27,1968
' By STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
Nearly 1,000 UF students and
faculty members Monday staged
a 30-minute protest march in
sympathy with teachers of the
Florida Education Association
(FEA).
The crowd marched four
abreast down University Avenue.
One UF faculty member said the
march was the largest such in
Gainesvilles history.
The march began on campus
at the Plaza of the Americas at
10:30 a.m. with a scant
following. However, as the
procession continued, interested
students and faculty, many of
whom skipped classes, joined the
entourage until over 1.000 were
marching when the group
reached their destination the
State Theater.
At the theater, striking
Alachua county teachers joined
the march and moved to a

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parking lot where prominent UF
professors and students
addressed the throng.
UF Student Body President
Clyde Taylor told the crowd
that the march shows there are
many individual thinking
persons who realize there is a
crisis in the states education
system.
Resigning UF political science
professor Harry Kantor blasted
Gov. Claude Kirk as an
incompetent flunkie who
should be impeached by the
people of Florida.
Continuing his attack on Kirk
and the state legislature, Kantor
told the audience that what
this state needs is a legislature
not interested in vested
interests.
GO
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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15-A



Page 16-A

l, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Avgust 16* 1968

No Mercy
For Killer
Os Coed

Jan. 15,1968
By JEFF ALFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Mercy has no place in this
case, said State Attorney T.E.
Duncan in demanding the death
penalty for Willie Samuel Rivers.
Apparently the jury agreed,
but not the murder victims
husband.
At 3:35 pm. Friday the jury
convicted Rivers of the July 23
murder of Mrs. Carol Persons, a
25-year-old UF coed, and they
did not recommend mercy for
him.
Sunday the victims husband,
Roy Persons, took issue with the
death penalty which is
mandatory in such a conviction.
Despite my feelings of
anger, disgust, pity, and nausea
toward Rivers, I do not think
that his life should be taken,
Persons said in a letter to the
Gainesville Sun.
He added that the jury was
not wrong in convicting Rivers,
but the law is.
Nobody has the right to
take a human life, and this
included that State of Florida,
Persons said.
In his summation, Duncan
demanded to know what rights
had been given to Mrs. Carol
Persons when she was shot.
She (Mrs. Persons) is why
we are here we cant forget
her, Duncan shouted.
He declared if ever a case was
tried that demanded capital
punishment this was it.
When the State Attorneys
recounted the last moments of
Carol Persons life, Roy Persons
silently wept.
And as the'jury deliberated,
Rivers friends sat quietly with
their fingers crossed.
Few people doubted
Sammy* Rivers guilt or
innocence. The gun that killed
the UF coed was found at his
house along with the victims

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WILLIE RIVERS

... No doubt of guilt
keys and watch.
The county police had a
confession.
The defense didnt attempt to
prove his innocence. Rather it
pleaded in vain for mercy.
Gainesville jurors who agree
with Persons did not hear the
defenses plea. All those who
oppose capital punishment were
dismissed from the jury box
during the first day of the trial.

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sesame bun. Simple as that.
Nothing is added but care.
Arby's* are what Roast Beef
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Try one today.
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Regents Removal Os Film
Called Act Os Censorship

Mark Damen, program
director of WUFT, called the
Board of Regents action
denying the screening of Felix
Greens Vietnam war film a
flagrant act of censorship in a
sixth period freshman lecture in
Walker Hall. Damen said that he
had been simply, strickly, and
frankly rather rudely ordered
not to repeat the program
containing the film on the UFs
educational TV station.
During the lecture, Damen
was questioned by three
students about his part in the
films banning.
Two of the students that
questioned him and one other
walked out about mid-way in his
speech in protest of Damens
failure to take a stand against
the Board of Regents film
decision.
All the students were
unidentified.
Damen cleared Regents
Chairman Chester Ferguson of
any responsibility in the film

banning order, saying that I do
know that Mr. Ferguson had
nothing to do with the film
decision.
Damen said that the
Chairman of the Higher
Education Committee of the
Florida Senate had seen the
program containing Greens film,
become very mad, and then
ordered a special screening of
the program to his committee.
Every member of the Higher
Education committee became
indignant at the film, stated
Damen, and he was subsequently
directed by a staff member of
the Board of Regents not to
repeat the film on his station.
Damen called the suppression
of the film a regrettable thing,
and said he was working to see
that an event such as this is not
repeated.

He also stated that one reason
why the film was banned was
because there were mistakes
made by people on certain

levels, and that this is an
example of what can happen
when you get people over you
who dont know what theyre
doing.
The broadcasting licenses for
the state educational TV stations
are in the Board of Regents
name.
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V
. . Soon to have a NEW Home

\
One of the oldest landmarks on campus will be rapidly disappearing as the fall quarter begins this year The
old Kappa Alpha Mansion which has towered over University Avenue since 1904 is making way for the new.
A building campaign, which began about 6 months ago, started showing material progress 2 weeks ago
when a local contractor began demolition. In the meantime, KA brothers will move into a temporary house
behind the Gold Coast Restaurant.
The building project is headed up by Kappa Alpha actives and alumni from start to finish. Brother Jimmy
Kynes, former state attorney general and UF football star, is spearheading the fund raising drive. Kynes plans
for construction to begin in Jan. of 1969.
Brother Hal Reid of Ocala will unveil drawings of a new $300,000 house on the 20th of this month. Reid
claims that his work is the Southern tradition but with slightly modern technique. His drawings will be on
display at the temporary chapter house when the brothers return for fall classes.
THE BROTHERS OF KAPPA ALPHA
"

WELCOME ALL NEW STUDENTS
Come by our temporary house at
18 NW 17th St. and see the drawing
of our new house on display.

Friday. August 16. 1968. The Florida AlHoator.

Page 17-A



Page 18-A

f Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Entertainment At UF: Only The Best


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Entertainment at UF
in the past year included
some of the most popular
names in show business:
Peter, Paul and Mary;
Ray Charles and the
Raelets; Rufus Walkin'
The Dog Thomas; Flip
Wilson; Jack Jones; lan
and Sylvia; the Hollies;
Buddy Rich; the Staple
Singers; the Beach Boys;
the Strawberry Alarm
Clock; the Buffalo
Springfield, and many,
many more.
Besides the popular
groups, UFs entertain entertainment
ment entertainment slate includes
symphony orchestras,
ballets, dramatic
readings, plays and
variety shows.
Photos By Nick Arroyo

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The Beach Boys Discuss Music, Meditation

April 17.1968
By ROY MAYS
Alligator STaff Writer
Hie Beach Boys, Strawberry
Alarm Clock and Buffalo
Springfield came to Gainesville
full of ideas and opinions on
drugs, music, meditation and
audiences which, although
sometimes not in agreement
with each other, they were

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willing to talk about.
Four hours, five Beach Boys,
four Buffalo Springfield and one
Buffalo s mother plus assorted
Strawberry Alarm Clock, extra
musicians and technicians
explored the different world of
three groups on tour.
Beach Boy Bruce Johnston,
who substitutes for non-traveller
Brian Wilson, talked of the new

MIKE LOVE

IN ALLIGATOR INTERVIEW

Buffalo Springfield release
Tulsa.
This song will be number
one, Bruce said. Im
producing the record for them
but what Im doing only
amounts to writing Happy
Birthday on a beautifully
decorated cake.
The Beach Boys talked of
their meeting with Maharishi
Yogi during their UNICEF show
in Paris. Later they travelled to
India to participate in
transcendental meditation along
with the Beatles, Mia Farrow
and Donovan, with plans to
return this September.
Transcendental meditation
is not a fad, remarked A1
Jardine of the Beach Boys. It
gives a new perspective on life. It
calms your nerves and eases all
the tensions.
From transcendental
meditation the conversation
turned to drugs.
They (drugs) are bad, said
Bob Comden, trumpet player for
the Beach Boys, They mess up
your mind. None of the groups
take any type of drug.
Were strictly vitamins,
minerals and vegetables boys,
chimed in Dewey, drummer for
the Buffalo Springfield.
Rock and roll groups are
treated with greater respect in
Europe than in the U. 5.,
according to Johnston. Groups
arent paid as mich over there
but we dont mind trading
money for artistic value.
In England we were met at

k HP

the airport by 5,000 people who
followed us everywhere we
went.
What do the groups think of
the audience reaction?
Let them do whatever they
want, said Beach Boy drummer
Denny Wilson. We enjoy a
crowd, the bigger the better, I
just cant describe the feeling of
being before an audience, it
cant be described in words its
more of a spiritual feeling. It

Friday, August 16,1968, THa Florida Alligator,

BRUCE JOHNSTON

makes the work worth it if we
can make people happy.
By this time the Buffalo
Springfield had finished and
right behind them, bounding up
the stairs toward us was the
mother of Neil Young, guitar
player for the Buffalo.
How did they sound? she
beamed, seemingly oblivious to
the fact that we were on the
opposite side from where the
sound was.

Page 19-A



Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 20-A

ii ROLLICKED AT FROLICSs=^=a
1 Peter, Paul And Mary |
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Gilbergs Manager Vincent Luca shows a dress to a customer in Gilbergs Gainesville Mall
store.

Gilbergs Carries Fabrics
For Mod And College Sets

I feel the new shop will provide a most pleasant
shopping experience, Luca said, referring to its relaxed
atmosphere.
The new location will also aim at all fashion groups, he
said.
For the college set, Gilbergs will have daisy prints,
kettlecloths in prints and solids, homespuns, canvas
stripes, crinkle crepes in geometric patterns.
Chino for the dress with the border, and Moygashei

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

sets with pre-cut dress panels are also big and will be
available.
For the strictly mod, Gilbergs has bold-colored
fun-prints, complete with mini-care finish.
More moderately reflecting the new trends are its
delicate country canvas prints and embroidered serrano.
Along with many more fabrics, Gilbergs will have
buttons, zippers and notions to finish any project.

Page 21-A



The Florida Alligator, Friday, Augwjt 16,1968

Page 22-A

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Former Student
Has Much Talent

April 9,1968
By O.J.MOSELY
Alligator Faatura Editor

How did Faye Dunaway
get to the top of the heap?
Well determination to get
there has had a tremendous
amount to do with it, said
L. L. Zimmerman, who
directed Miss Dunaway while
she attended UF. rs
She was hell-bent on §
being an actress and I suspect 5
that no one could have ever s
talked her out of being one, §
said Zimmerman.
I have never known
anyone and Ive been in the $
business about 25 years to §
have such intense desire to ¥
succeed as an actress as Faye |
Dunaway had, declared £j
Zimmerman. |
Zimmerman described J
Faye as a very young college :
girl, wljo was still a kid, a |i|
very attractive kid, but still a jij
plump young girl. If j:|
Hollywood had wanted to §
cast her then, theyd have had ¥
to have her take off the $
pounds she still had the J:
plumpness of raw youth. j|:
While studying at the UF ::
Faye Dunaway starred in the J:
Florida Players production of J
Medea which Zimmerman if:
directed. jj;
Commenting on her£
performance, Zimmerman }
said: Faye gave a very jj;
competent performance and*:;
was able to extract for the j
most part the unique :
emotional intensity thats in |
that role. She gave a fair |i:
definition of the character, :
but the unique thing about J
the performance was he sheer |
physical stamina. :
Its a tremendously £
taxing thing physically, and jS
she was able to play it |
through rehearsals and §
nightly without exhausting |
herself, said Zimmerman.
She was one of the best S
students we had at the time. 8
Her technical skills were
better than average. At
tryouts, for example, she
funded better than 90 per?
cent of the other women, 8

FAYE DUNAWAY
... former UF student

praised Zimmerman.

You can know all there is.
to know, continued
Zimmerman, in terms of
theories and techniques that
should be used, but unless
you have a play in which you
can experiment and perfect
your ability, you are lost.

RSRDWtf
The Florida Union Board Presents
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what are you waiting for? A B T\T TW TW JL TTTTT 1
Enter the Pizza Hut Smorgasbord jtjg mII £.M.i\ JlxU X
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nil v iiii
THE MEN OF
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WELCOME YOU TO THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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I AEn = LEADERSHIP
I AEn = SCHOLARSHIP
1.1 - I
I I
* AEn = SOCIAL
I AEn = SERVICE
I AEn = ATHLETICS
I i
I THE OPPORTUNITY TO BECOME A BETTER MAN

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator^

Page 23-A



Page 24-A

k. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

UF Drama: Year-Round Entertainment

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ALAN'S CUBAN A
"MISTER SANDWICH OF GAINESVILLE
Welcomes All New Gators And Old Ones Too,
To The Only Complete Sandwich Specialty House
In The Area. .
FEATURING;
Submarines (all varities) DINE IN AT THE
DELIVERY Regulars "CUBANA
TO YOUR APARTMENT
rizzas
OR DORMITORY
DAY OR NIGHT Desserts
e t
LOCATED IN THE CAROLYN PLAZA
NEXT TO THE BOOK STORE W. UNIV. AVE.
376-1252 378-1230

PRESENTED BY FLORIDA PLAYERS

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ALPHA EPSILON PI
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
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CHI PHI
DELTA CHI
DELTA SIGMA PHI

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
, ..- : -.- ~ > v . I,
REPRESENTING THE UNIVERSITY'S FRATERNITY SYSTEM
JIM DEVANNY, President
_ 0
JACK BODZIAK, Executive Vice-President STEVE UEFELDER, Treasurer
BILL SPARKMAN, Administrative Vice-President BQB HUDSON, Secretary
WELCOMES WITH OPEN DOORS
THE
INCOMING MALE STUDENTS
GO
GREEK
* ' --
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FRATERNITIES OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

DELTA TAU DELTA
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KAPPA SIGMA
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PHI EPSILON PI

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Friday, August 16.1968, The Florida Alligator,

SIGMA CHI
SIGMA NU
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Page 25-A



Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Aitput 16,19j>

Page 26-A

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Sou/ Drives
Gators Wild
April 22,1968
By MIKE ABRAMS
Alligator Executive Editor
Ray Charles the blind soul man who drives his
piano like a sports car delivered his message to a
jammed UF audience in the gym Friday night.
And they loved him.
Look at all the lonely people, Charles sang
with a voice modulated to grind like flint to
screech like a wounded ghoul to whine like a cat
with its tail in the door.
And all the lonely people looked at Ray Charles
and they were lonely no longer.
Ah dont mind tellin ya as for me Im feelin
perty good, shouted Ray.
G-a-i-n-e-sville, huh?
Ray writhes in the agony of a martyr at the stake
when he plays his piano. The keys are molten lead.
He claps hisjhands mud-pie fashion. He is big, black,
and treacherous. He owns his piano. He owns the
world. He owns you.
His head jerks up. Up. Up.
I was busted, sings the blind ipan. I went to
my mother to ask for a loan for I was busted!
The sun died, he sings in a voice which whips
cream and scours the ears.
Ray Charles and his band of brass and drums and
a guitar and his women the Raelettes stopped at
Gainesville to cut through the hot days of April
on their annual world tour.
The Raelettes joined Charles in several numbers
and the brass came through with sparkling solos.
Ray Charles was blinded at childhood. He was an
orphan at fifteen. And he climbed to fame from
Florida.
Georgia on my mind, he sings.
I cant stop lovin you, said the blind man.
And they cant stop lovin Ray.
Photos By Nick Arroyo

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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 27-A



Page 28-A

k. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

TREASTERS UNIVERSITY ENCO WELCOMES YOU
RECORD BAR OF GAINESVILLE TO GAINESVILLE
ANTHONYS
w/
COME BY AND SEE
Jj COMPLETE SERVICE FOR I
IJI your car I atfimii SUPER
rn 926 W UNIV AVE. % TIGER
TAPES-4 and 8 TRACK
H If LATEST 45S
If COMPLETE SERVICE FOR |
IJI YOUR EARS 1 LATEST LPS
///i m SOUND EQUIPMENT
m Kccond x>ctn \\\
m(l of Gainesville Vim Sony Norelco
| FREE PARKING IN REAR OF STORE \| Harmon Kordon
\ 923 W. Sco Mfroeord
*P.A. System Rental
* lECHAN PEQUENO
SPfJagMf SPANISH AND BLACK
SANDWICHES AND BEER
BAGELS LOX AND CHEESE
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CAMPUS LIFE

Life at the UF is both
exciting and relaxing,
hurried and leisurely, joyful
and sad, passionate and
indifferent, enthusiastic and
subdued.
There's a time for
laughing and a time for
crying; a time for working,
a time for playing; a time
for listening, a time for
speaking; a time for
enlightenment, a time for
disillusionment; a time for
harmony, a time for
dissension.
This section offers only a
small sampling of life on
UFs campus. But may this
taste whet your appetite,
your curiosity and your
involvement in your
university.
Photos By
Nick Arroyo

Florida Alligator

THE NATION S LEADING COLEGE DAILY

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, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 2-B

A Campus Pulsating
With Growth, Change

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is
reprinted from the Florida Alumnus
magazine, Spring, 1968, edition. Its author
is a UF alumnus and has worked as a writer
for the Orlando Sentinel and the Tampa
Tribune.)
By AL WEST
' ')
Twenty years ago, two or three
thousand students ; took part in what
probably was the biggest high spirits
episode that has ever occurred at the UF.
Tragedy was narrowly averted in that
incident, remembered as the 1948 Beer
Riot.
Two-thirds of that student body of
approximately 9,800 were ex-servicemen,
men who not long before dropped bombs,
Fired machine guns or performed other
deadly tasks in the bloodiest war in
history. The war was over at last.
Uncle Sam was footing the bill, and for
many college was a place where one could
conceivably get an education as a fringe
benefit while enjoying the Joe College
life on government money.
Todays student is a cooler breed of
cat, using the more contemporary
jargon. The UF campus habitue of 1967-68
is more serious minded about education.
Whats more, he has to be to survive.
There were slightly more than 19,000
students registered last fall and about
1,000 less than that when the winter term
began this year. Some no doubt were sons
or daughters of members of that 1948
student body. By 1988, a few of their own
off-spring may be students here.
While the intellectual level and academic
sophistication of todays student makes the
old timer of twenty years ago look pale
by comparison, the student of the future
will be perhaps three or four times more
advanced.
Tomorrow is anyones guess in many
respects. But the constant improvement in
quality and quantity of pre-college
education trends of today, the increasing
momentum in technology and educational
attitudes forecast an awe inspiring future
for the student still to come.
Those were the good old days ... I
think, one alumnus said. The late 40s
and early 50s was quite a metamorphic
period for a good many students and the

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UF STUDENTS:

The 01d...

University served as their cocoon.
Another recalled that the life of a
student in those years was a pretty good
thing if you were interested in a good time.
This is not to say there wasnt education
aplenty for those who would avail
themselves of it. But you see, the war made
it pretty hard for many of us to settle
down to the academic life after the, places
we had been and the things we
experienced.
A broader view of the impact of the
period may be symbolized by a faculty
members comment that In spite of the
seeming frivolity of the immediate postwar
years, it was in this transitional period that
students and the University truly broke
through the surface of the educational
pond toward what may yet result in the
ranking of the UF with the great
institutions of the world.
In 1905, the year the university was
permanently established in Gainesville,
there was a grand total of 186 in the
student body. The student population
never rose much over 3,000 until 194647
when the massive postwar influx began.
University facilities we re* hard pressed to
accommodate the more than 7,000
enrolled in that first postwar year.,The
future was just as difficult to predict then
as now and officials theorized that once
the veterans were gone, enrollment would
shrink.
Suffice it to say, matters didnt work
out quite as predicted. The postwar baby
boom was to crowd the public schools
and soon after, the University. When the
1950s began, 11,000 students were
enrolled and that level held steady until
1955.
A gradual increase from then on
culminated in a student explosion in
1963 that saw enrollment soar to 14,000
and continue skyward to the present
number.
Student Dean Emeritus Robert C. Beaty
probably knows more first hand
information about students at the UF than
any person in history,. Arriving at the
university in 1925, Dean Beaty has spent
his professional career dealing with
students and even now serves as a
development consultant. He particularly
recalls the GI years.

Students of that day were nothing like
those of the present, Dean Beaty declared.
Over half of the student body was
composed of veterans. With their wives and
children here also, the campus literally
overflowed with humanity.
There were two kinds of Gls of that
time, Dean Beaty recalls. There were the
ones who wanted to get through as quick
as they could and the ones who wanted to
stay as long as they could with the
government paying for it.
When the World War II Gls left and
the new freshmen came in, it was again a
new kind of student body. Admission
requirements became necessary and
standards increased to the point where
only the top 40 percent of high school
graduates could enter.
A student used to be able to stay as
long as he paid the fees, the dean
reminisced. Standards are higher now and
most of the old students couldnt get in
today.
Korean War veterans who flocked to the
University in the 50s were not quite the
same as their predecessors and not as large
a portion of the enrollment, although
certainly numerous. Students would never
be the same as before nor would the
University.
Among the new ideas and techniques in
higher education that have flowered are the
junior colleges... designed to teach the
first two years of college work. Progress
and change are not always easy on the
student of today. The transition from
junior college to the university is a good
example.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter, assistant dean for
academic affairs, explained there is a
definite problem of meshing the university
system with that of the junior colleges.
We have gone the second mile in
attempting to alleviate the problem, he
said.
Lack of understanding about what the
two concepts entail is the cause of a great
deal of the predicament. Junior college
students are being prepared to enter the
upper division as if it were a single unit
when in fact it is a group of units with
different curricula and requirements.
We are aware that we are
misunderstood, Dr. Lassiter said. Most
junior colleges feel we dont want their
students but such is not the case.
A long range study is now underway to
solve this particular pang of progress but
elimination of the bugs will take time as
with all new processes. Progress has
resulted in many changes academically for
the student of today.
Also, knowledge is changing so rapidly
students are pressed to keep up no matter
what their prior education background.

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...The New

Students necessarily dont have as much
time for the pranks and good times
enjoyed in the past.
* Competition is greater between student
and course and student and instructor. The
knowledge explosion is occuring so swiftly
that textbooks cant even keep up.
The speedy pace of progress causes that
which was learned five years ago in science
and technology to be obsolete today.
The state legislature officially made the
UF co-educational by statute in 1947. But
even before women students were not
strangers to the campus.
The College of Education practically ran
the summer campus in the all male days
and the majority of students were women
teachers. However, bootleg students
from Florida State College for Women in
Tallahassee also attended. Female
enrollment ran as high as 1500, a situation
that saw the ladies take over the
dormitories and be restricted to campus.
When the University finally became
fully coeducational, many alumni and
others thought a great calamity had
occurred. Women students in great number
during the regular terms were so unusual in
fact that several years elapsed before the
wolf Whistles subsided whenever the girls
dared leave their residence areas.
Times have changed in more ways than
acceptance of women as year round
students. Affluence and economics are
larger parts of student life than they used
to be even 10 years ago.
There is no' doubt that todays student
is less playful than his earlier counterpart,
Dean Beaty declares. There are not many
pranks pulled anymore and students go in
for a different line of activity sit-ins,
wade-ins, love-ins.
Trouble itself seems to be an activity
and that brings up the hippie or beatnik
side of todays student life. In the last year
or two, vociferous student minority groups
have crusaded for one thing or another, it
sometimes seems almost constantly.
The furor of a year ago may be recalled
r when a coed posed in the nude for an
off-campus humor magazine and protests
ensued that called for student
emancipation. Many other causes have
been espoused since that time including a
minority group campaign this year to have
the dean of students dismissed for reasons
that remain as yet obscure.
The voice of active dissent has grown
louder in the last few years because of an
increasing awareness and concern by
students about the world in which we live.
Dr. Ben Barger of the UFs Mental
Health Unit said todays student is the
clear, sharp, true reflection of the changing
(SEE 'STUDENTS' PAGE 16-B)



'Are You Here For The Party?

By DAN HOGAN
Alligator Correspondent
This girl answers the door,
grabs me, kisses me, and says
Are you here for the party?
I hold up this bag and say,
No, but I brought the food for
it.
This was the situation late
Saturday (Homecoming) night
when a delivery boy from the
Pore-Boy Sandwich Shop arrived
at an apartment with a food
orders,
From the doorway, I can see
into the room. There are a lot of
couples on the floor and several
on the couch.

YOUNG MAN... YOUNG WOMAN...
TO MAKE THE GRADE ON CAMPUS
TAKE YOUR BASIC COURSE IN
CLOTHESMANSHIP AT
/ SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTBTS jlEi
f flor,da F R 34 years
m. .. i.t.ii.
1.. T.I T.I. .. C..^n^
[I KALEIDOSCOPIC
We extend a cordial welcome to the freshmen, Km CLOSET IF FAYE
upperclassmen, old friends, faculty and new residents cii v/cd MAM uac
of Gainesville. We would like to mention a few of our 3IL v ekiviA
extra services that will make your stay here a little HER WAY THIS FALL
more comfortable... Alteration service for men and Free customer parking on the huge lot at rear of
women. Monogram service both in our store for fast store. Store hours 9:30 AM to 6 PM daily except
and efficient service. Student checks cashed (no Friday -- 10:AM to 9:PM.
charge). A student charge plan to make your y
shopping a little more convenient. (No forms to fill SILVERMANS 225 W. University Ave.
out just show your current I.D. Card) Phone 378-1611-12

A girl sitting on the couch
with her boyfriend looks at me
and says, Who the hell are
you?
lm from Larrys and I
hold up the bag again to indicate
that before she gets violent.
About that time in the
corner of the room at a little
round table with a light hanging
over it a gentleman yells to me,
Come back here and Ill pay
you.
Well, this in itself is difficult
because I have to climb over
about 15 couples. I edge my way
through, though, and the guy
says, Do you mind if I pay for
these things individually?

DELIVERY BOYS DILEMMA

I have no choice in the
matter, because he doesnt have
$7.17 himself.
So, he starts calling these
drunks up one by one and
acquiring money from them,
while I stand there wondering if
all this is really worth the $1 an
hour salary Im getting.
Another guy comes up
behind me. He talks like his
throat is burning up from
drinking something hard.
Breathing all over me, he says,
Will you take a check?
Well, I figure I will never be
able to read what he would write
on it. So, I say, No, Im sorry, I
cant.

He says, You gotta take a
check, I dont have any money!
I tell him Im not allowed to
take checks.
So, then he looks at me with
sort of an enlightened expression
and through that liquor haze of
his he is able to exhibit a little
bit of intelligence and says,
Hey, I just thought of
something ... I cant pay you
by check, anyway ... I dont
have any checks ... as a matter
of fact, I dont even think I have
a checking account, and then he
walks away.
In the meantime, the
original fellow that I had talked

Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

to has managed to collect about
$5 and he and I start the long
process of going over the register
tape and marking off each
individual sandwich. We
eventually collect the entire
$7.17.
1 then begin to make my
way back through the crowd and
just as I get to the door, a guy
looks up at me from the couch
and says, Hey, buddy, you gotta
extra sandwich?
No, this is my last delivery
and were closing up for the
night.
You sure you dont have
an extra one out there?
No, Im sorry.

Page 3-B



Page 4-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Life In Flavets:
Close To Campus
And Economical
dy STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Nows Editor
It saves us money, its close to the campus, and
other people here are in the same situation we are.
That is how John and Barbara Winesett
summarize the advantages of living in Flavet 111, a
UF married student housing complex at the west
end of the campus.
John, his attractive wife Barbara, and their
18-month-old son Cory, are typical of the 428
families living in the Flavet.
John pays $29.75 per month rent, and his
furniture is supplied by UF. John and Barbara
painted the apartment themselves when they moved
in.
They both feel the people living in the Flavet are
friendlier than people in most close communities.
You walk down the street, said Barbara, a
21-year-old native of Ontario, Canada, and people
say hello to you. It is easy to make friends.
John, also 21, is from Punta Gorda, Fla. He has a
2.8 grade point average. He is' a member of Sigma
Lambda Chi, professional construction fraternity;
Gargoyle Society, honorary society for Architecture
and Fine Arts; and Student Contractors and
Builders Association.
Cory played on the floor with toy trucks. He
wore a plastic hard hat, a replica of one John
wears at his part-time job in the afternoons.
John, a Building Construction major, feels the
Flavet is a safer place for Cory than living on a city
street.
There is a 10 m.pJi. speed limit here, he said.
Os course, not everyone obeys it, but it is still safer
than many other places.

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Barbara spends most of her day playing with
Cory while John is in school or at work.
I sew and watch a little TV, she said. I do my
housework, but it is disoouraging. I get the place
cleaned up and it looks like it needs it again.
John said he doesnt watch television very much.
He said a typical day for him is to get up at 7 a.m.,
go to school and to work, come home, eat, and
study until 12.
I might take a coffee break from studying and
watch a 30-minute program, he said.
Thats about the only time we/have together,
lamented Barbara, except when were eating.
I try to spend at least an hour each day outside
with Cory, John said. Then I dont get much
studying done until he goes to bed at 8.
Barbara added, John cant sit down to read or
study without Cory climbing on him or on his
desk.
Cory, obviously pleased at hearing his name
mentioned many times, grinned broadly.
What do they do on weekends?
What weekends? exclaimed Barbara. John has
attended classes the first three Saturdays of this
quarter, and I spent last weekend in the hospital.
I worked as a waitress six, and sometimes seven,
days a week until this term started, she said, so
we didnt have any time together on weekends.
We dont go out much, added John. A big
night to us is going to a drive-in movie or going out
to get a pizza. It is easier, said Barbara, to get a
baby sitter here if we do go somewhere.
John and Barbara have lived in the Flavet village
for two years. The village has a small store, a
part-time policeman, and a laundromat for its
residents.
Using the laundromat is amusing, said Barbara.
When the washers are full, people stand around
waiting for someone to take her clothes out. When a
washer is emptied, eveiyone races to use it.
John and Barbara will leave the Flavet when
John graduates in June. They are unsure about
where they will go to live.
John is interviewing now, said Barbara, but
nothing is definite so far.
Photos By
Nick Arroyo

Barbara And Cory Stroll Down Fla vet Boulevard

Cory Interrupts John's Studying

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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Free Parking
On First Federal Lot

Page 5-B



Page 6-B

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16. 1968

w -W. f-Miijpikvi, liuaj, riuyuai U, I9UO
'67 Campus Mood:
War Opposition, Social
Welfare Main Topics
Os Campus Protests

MADISON, WIS., The
American college scene has
swung from hope to frustration
in five short years for those who
believe in causes.
'the prevailing mood in
student political and social
action movement in the fall of
1967 is powerlessness. It is also
bewilderment, dissension and
anger.
Five years ago, in the spring
of 1962, an observer visited 10
campuses across the U.S. and
interviewed hundreds of students
and professors.
That year there were three
movements with strong activists.
They were civil rights; the new
student right, led by the noisy
militant Young Americans for
Freedom; and the peace
movement, focused then on
banning the atomic bomb.
Five of the same 10 campuses
were revisited this month:
Harvard University at
Cambridge, the University of
California at Berkeley, the
University of Texas at Austin,
Grinnell College in lowa and the
University of Wisconsin at
Madison.
Both the spirit and the
movements have changed
dramatically. What has
happened?
1. The civil rights groups have
vanished. The white liberal
students have gone into the New
Left movement, or the peace
movement, or both, and almost
all their activity revolves around
Vietnam. The Negro students are
flocking into all-black identity
groups that encourage race pride
and selfpride.
2. The peace movement is
now entirely focused on the
Vietnam war and the draft.
Opposition to the war ranges
across the entire spectrum of
student ideological opinion
active, passive, white or black,
Republican or Democratic. It is
impossible to tell how many
students oppose the war.

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3. The rambunctious
superpatriotic Young Americans
for Freedom conservatives of
1962 have shriveled to virtually
nothing.
4. The left of 1967 is far
more radical than the left of
1962. The New Left of 1967
also exhibits striking similiarities
to the New Right of 1962.
Politically, the most extreme
students in the New Left
advocate revolution and tend
towards anarchism. The
moderate members are really
liberal Democrats with a radical
vocabulary.
5. The growing social
concern of the 1960s has drawn
thousands of previously
uninvolved students into welfare
movements, particularly on
campuses in big cities. They

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make no noise and no headlines,
but they represent the most
important single social
commitment, numerically, in
1967. Five years ago they might
have chosen to enter the civil
rights movement or do
nothing.
Meantime the vast majority
gets on with the business of
going to school: growing,
' learning, reaching some kind of
truce with the status quo. These
students are seemingly
uninvolved with anything but
their books and dating.

UF Students Hold Teachln As Liberalism Sweeps Florida

Reprinted from Gainesville Sun
(New York Times News Service)

The members of militant
activists of every stripe have not
increased significantly over
1962. They still range from 1 to
10 per cent of the student
population at most. But their
tactics, ideology and rhetoric are
more extreme.
What are todays issues?
Overwhelmingly, Vietnam and
the sicknesses of society.
Vietnam and violence have
poisoned some campuses,
particularly Berkeley and
Wisconsin.
The bright promise of 1962,
that a peaceful sit-in, boycott
or picketing could change
indeed had already affected
deeply rooted institutions and
prejudices, has turned into ugly
disruptions. Martin Luther
Kings non-violence and

Christian love has given way to
tear gas, clubs and hatred at
some colleges and
dra ft induction centers.
Student action was exhilarating
in the spring of 1962. It is
depressing in 1967.
The 1967 students have no
heroes. Last time around, John
F. Kennedy and Barry
Goldwater could arouse
enormous fevor. This fall, Gov.
Nelson Rockefeller, Robert F.
Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, John
Lindsay, Charles Percy and Mark
Hatfield are popular, but the

Anger, Dissent


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passion is missing.
Clubs of Young Democrats
and Young Republicans have
become largely speakers bureaus
or paper organizations. The
Y.D.s at Harvard, with 800
duespaying but largely inactive
members, believe Lyndon B.
Johnson has betrayed his 1964
campaign promises about
Vietnam and oppose his 1968
candidacy by 4 to 1.
The president of the Young
Dems at the University of Texas
is equally disaffected.
Vocal students express
irrational hatred of President
Johnson and Secretary of State
Dean Rusk. They call .the
President a murderer for his
escalation of the war. The most
charitable terms applied to
Secretary Rusk were that he was
intractable and a blithering
idiot.
New Leftists are both an
expression of and a reaction
against a society they despise
and call grossly materialistic,
hypocritical and inhumane. They
see the divisions white against
black, haves against have-nots,
rich against poor, the world
against the U.S. in its most un unpopular
popular unpopular war. They see no hope
in America.
Prof. Stanley Hoffmann of
Harvard says that in 1962,
Some students here were
disaffected with their
government -- but it was still
their government, they had the
basic trust of people brought up
to believe it was really tneirs.
They now believe even their

Bill Ryan Quiets Dow Demonstrators

government may be a bunch of
liars and cheats.
Like the extreme right
students of 1962, the extreme
left of 1967 is suspicious of the
establishment, press, liberal
teachers and liberal textbooks,
the Communist party, the U.S.
and the Soviet Union, which
student Michael Lemer of
Berkeley called the second
most important imperialistic
power in the world next to the
U.S.
New Leftists can also be
dogmatic, noisy, skilled at
disruptive tactics,
philosophically confused,
unwilling to compromise and
fascinated with rhetoric.
Their campus gurus include
Michael Ansara of Harvard and
Robert Cohen of Wisconsin,
each brilliant, likeable and
dedicated, with a carefully
thought-out and articulated
radical philosophy. Neither has
any blueprint for revolution
and major change. Cohen
believes Cuba has best met its
historical possibilities toward
the goals of a free, national and
happy society.
In many ways, these two
young men resemble Thomas
Hayden, one of the founders of
the Students for a Democratic
Society six years ago. Hayden,
interviewed at length during the
1962 survey, was then
committed wholly to the civil
rights movement and S.DJS. had
only a few hundred members in
the U.S.
Rational, discourse about
issues, even the war, is still the
order of the day in meeting at
Harvard and Grinnell. Texas has
been calm this fall, brfl
resentment still rankles on both
sides following a student
rebellion last spring against strict
rally controls. This campus
could blow up any minute over
some silly little university rule,
said Mary Morphis, the student
(SEE 'CAMPUS MOOD'
7 PAGE 21)



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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7-B



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

Page 8-B

Motorcycle Gangs 'Move* To Florida
v i -1 al. 1 tKa miinn Vaii OAt a hniNM f

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Feature Correspondent
Licentious barbarians on
wheels ... brazen libertine
mojigrels ... monsters that
mean business These are
some of the printable
descriptions of some of the most
notorious gangs in America, the
motorcycle gangs.
These bands of rebels who
ride the roads on their chopped
hogs (stripped down cycles) have
left an impact on American
communities that is almost as
greasy as its members.
Last week in Palm Beach
County, an attractive
18-year-old girl was beaten on
the head with a beer bottle and
nailed to a tree by two
hoodlums of the Outlaws, a
gang that has reportedly made
Journalism
Expansion
Fastest At UF
By ROGER HEMLEPP
Alligator Correspondent
With 644 students enrolled in
the University of Floridas
College of Journalism it ranks
second in the nation only behind
the University of Missouri.
Thats an increase of 24.6
percent over the 1966 Fall
enrollment which makes the
College of Journalism the fastest
growing college at the U of F.
This is the fifth straight year
that this distinction has been
designated to the journalism
college.
As to the academic
distinction of Floridas
journalistic quality, Rae 0.
Weimer, dean of the College of
Journalism, stated, The only
way we can compare the quality
of our students with other
universities is the direct
competition of the (William
Randolph) Hearst Contest, thats
on a national scale.
Students from the UF have
never placed below sixth in the
six years of entering the contest.
No other university has done
that well, stated Weimer.
A check with the Information
Services shows that the College
of Journalism is in the middle
as to its relationship with other
colleges on campus.
Larger enrollments in order
are: Arts and Sciences, 3,009;
Education, 2,234; Business
Administration, 1,253;
Engineering, 1,180:
Architecture, 770; Law, 723;
and Agriculture, 683.

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li OCCASIONS
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INCORPORATED
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EX-HELL'S ANGEL GIVES INSIDE VIEW

Florida a major base of
operation.
Gov. Claude Kirk declared
war on the gangs last week and
said sternly that he would use
every law at his command to get
rid of them.
What type of man joins The
Hells Angels, The Outlaws, The
Coffin Cheaters or The Stray
Satins?
Dr. Lewis Yablonski, a
sociologist who has studied gang
conduct in our society, claims,
Theres a little touch of this in
all of us.
With a curiosity to satisfy and
a weekend to spare, this reporter
headed for St. Petersburg to find
the answers.
On the outskirts of town, off
on a shell-top lane was a sinple,
tidy white cottage. A plump
bearded fellow came to the
door. I introduced myself and
spoke of a mutual friend whod
sent me.
Rex first made it clear that he
was no longer associated with
any gang although he had at one
time ridden with The Hells
Angels and The Outlaws.
I inquired first about the
philosophy of the gangs.
Man, we didnt have no
written philosophy, but we just
did what we did with nobody to
bug us. Everything got under
your skin, and thats what we
were against everything.
Anything we werent against, we
were for. And they were all
Angels or Outlaws?
He explained that the Angels
got started in Fontana,
California.
I think there were a few
boys in that little town who
at the steel plant there.
They started the club around
1950,1 think it was.
Rex said that the gangs were
not against any particular group,
race or religion.
We were against all groups,
races and religions. No one in
particular. 1 take that back. The
cops and us never cut it too
smooth together.
The dark complexioned
ex-Angel offered me a beer. He
said that the gangs actually got
started as motorcycle clubs.
Thats what theyd call it,
but it was more. The whole
world started pinching me.
School lost out. I had to join
and ride just for my kicks. It got
in the blood and that was it.
Membership in the gangs is
extremely exclusive.
I should say so. It was
tough, but they wanted the best.
There were always a lot of stunts
youd have to pull before you
could join ... little thefts and

stunts on the other gangs in the

area.
Rex said it was necessary for
a prospective Angel to have the
right attitude.
You had to be repulsive.
You had to ride like a pro and
tear down your hog (cycle) and
slap it together like that.
The gangs dont like any
ties. They have no homes that
they would hesitate to leave.
Girlfriends and wives had to lead
the same carefree and careless
lives.
Rex went to the closet and
brought out a ragged denim
jacket. He handed it to me.
This here swastika dont
mean that I was a Nazi or
nothin like that. We just liked
for them all to look at us real
hard and be a little afraid.
And this l means I rode
with that 1 per cent of the gangs
that wasnt run by the cycle
association. The l3 represents

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the thirteenth letter of the
alphabet and marijuana.
Rex said he was willing to
talk about the charges against
the motorcycle gangs.
"It was the kicks and the
power. 1 guess the gangs got
nothing else to get their kicks
from. They just got to raise hell.
But sometimes the big gangs get
blamed for everything, even
what the hog-dogger (smaller
gangs pranksters) pull otl.
Rex told how his gang would
steal a cycle from a kid and rev
the engine till it blew, scattering
metal all over the ground. He
told of bizarre woods parties in inwhich
which inwhich clouds of marijuana
smoke, alcohol and cycle
exhaust filled the forests.
He talked about the gangs
use of drugs and their habits of
sexual abandon.
Thats a funny thing. I
wanted better things for my old
lady (his wife). I guess it was too

much. You got to havin some
wild times. There was a lot of
times like 1 was just there
wa telling some of the crap. Not
doing it. just watching.
**'Youd get yourself to go
along with the rest. But youd
start to hate yourself bad along
with everything else you hated.
Thats a lot to hate at one time.
So Rex pulled out of the
gangs and now he talks about
them. He talks about how
Florida is becoming another
California with the presence of
cycle gangs. Rex came to the
state to get away from his
former life.
The gang, formerly of
Dayton, Ohio, and
Crawfordville, Indiana, is known
to be active in Miami, Tampa,
Hialeah and Juno.
We are going to make living
in Florida so unpleasant, they
will go back home, said Kirk.

O f Florida



Mr. Mitchell says..
Every loyal U.of F."GATOR
needs a pair of Jarman
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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida AHigator.

Page 9-B



[, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 10-B

Few Coed Attacks Reported On campus

By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator News Editor
A student wife in Fla vet II
receives an obscene phone call.
A UF coed, walking through
the wooded area between Mal Mallory
lory Mallory and Broward Halls at night,
is confronted by a male who
exposes himself and makes ob obscene
scene obscene remarks to her.
Three boys stop in front of
the girls and make out-of-the out-of-theway
way out-of-theway remarks to them. The stu student
dent student who is with his wife tries to
tell the boys, That is no way to
talk to a lady, and is beaten up
for his valor.
The University Police have
many reports such as these in
their files. There is no estab established
lished established pattern to the incidents,
and no one person seems to be
doing them all.
Descriptions given by the
victims and witnesses of such
incidents vary. Usually there is

Pranks r Out Os Style* Today f
But Dorms Don*t Miss Them

By MICHAEL ABRAMS
Alligator Correspondent
Take the hinges from the
door of the guy across the hall,
and pour ketchup into his
pillowcase. Wire a door shut
tonight, and make sure the slats
are missing from someones
bunk.
You are now a dorm
prankster of the First water, but
one of a class of Merry Neds
which is fast disappearing from
UF.
The heyday of the college
prank at UF is the day of
yesteryear, according to
oldtime rs.
Shaving cream fights and
water battles still go on, says
Residence Advisor Bob Young
of Tolbert Hall.
But we really havent had
anything unique in quite a
while.
The second and last pig left
the residence halls years ago.
He was pink with black
spots, recalled Young, 3LW.

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no description, because the girls
are too frightened to get a good
look at the offender.
Gene Watson, chief
investigator for the University
Police, said his department is
hindered in apprehending such
offenders because the victims do
not report the incident
immediately.
They usually talk it over
with their roommates, friends,
and resident assistant before
reporting it to us. Sometimes we
dont find out about it until the
next morning, said Watson.
Watson said this school term
has not been unusual in having
incidents of this type reported.
It goes on all the time, he
said. If anything, there may be
a possible decrease this term.
Watson said there have been
no physical assaults on girls as
yet.
On the night of August 10, a
coed was grabbed by the arm

Mustve weighed 300 lbs.
standing there in the shower
room that morning.
The pig wasnt too happy
about the whole thing cornered
there like he was. I called in the
Swine Unit of the UF Animal
Science Dept, and they came out
and looked him over and said it
wasnt one of their pigs. They
wouldnt touch the pig. Thought
he would contaminate their
herd. They told me he was a
Poland China, though.
Then the janitors found a
rope and hauled the grunting
animal downstairs. But we still
had the pig.
Finally I called the
Gainesville Sheriffs Department
and the sheriff sent out some
trustees from the county jail.
They came in a truck and took
the pig. I understand the
prisoners had pork for supper
the next day.
Although pranks persist in
dorms, they are not as frequent
or as dangerous as years before.

while walking in the area
between Mallory and Broward
Halls.
The girl broke away and ran
toward the tennis courts. The
man followed her to Radio
Road.
Watson said no remarks were
made to the girl. He said she
broke away from the man and
ran before he had a chance to
say anything to her. The girl
called police but they found no
one in the area.
Watson said anyone convicted
of this type of crime is subject
to a fine of up to SSOO and/or
six months in jail.
He said he would advise coeds
to stay away from dark areas at
night, and to travel in pairs if
possible. He said that coeds
should not be apprehensive
about this situation, but that
they should be aware that it
exists.

Young recalls the less harmful
pranks of shaving cream in
shoes, firecrakers in the halls,
smoke bombs, and soaped
floors.
Take the floor, pour Tide all
over it, mused Jad Batteh, SA
of North three. Slide from one
end of the hall to the other.
While the shaving cream wars
continue, the philosophy in
dealing with pranks is left open
to the section adviser on each
floor.
Although there are penalties
for pranks which ultimately
become public nuisances or get
out of hand, few students have
been evicted because of pranks.
What may have started out
as a prank could develop into
something grossly negligent,
said Young.
The point is not to keep
fifty or sixty guys from studying
or sleeping. Its hard to find a
prank that doesnt bother
someone.

UF TEMPORARIES"
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with Olivetti Underwoods
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Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11-B



The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 12-B

Quarter System
Stiffens Studies
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The first leg of the quarter system has nearly run its course at the
UF.
A typical reaction to the new system was voiced by a male student:
I think it reeks. The courses have been crammed from one semester
to one quarter; and theres no time for any one quarter courses.
Some faculty members and administrators see shortcomings in the
system, also, while others are supporting it cautiously.
The most common student gripe is that the trend from semesters
to trimesters to quarters is like a pressure cooker, with the term
being shortened from 17 to 14 to 10 weeks. Many students think
curriculum requirements havent been sufficiently modified to meet
the shorter quarter term.
The UF operated on the semester system until about five years ago.
At that time, the old Board of Control (later replaced by the Board of
Regents) called for the state universities to make year-round use of
their facilities. The result was trimesters, or trimonsters, as it
sometimes was called.
As it worked, the calendar year was split into three terms of 14
weeks each. The spring trimester, from April to August, was divided
into two seven week terms. Most students, however, stayed in school
only two trimesters.
The Alligator at the end of the 1967 B-Term, called the trimester a
bitterly competitive grind of long hours, aching eyes, and sleepless
nights, but noted that the long summer vacations gave more job
opportunities. The paper added that students could graduate in three
years by attending school year round.
It had been announced in October, 1966, that the quarter system
replace trimesters. It was explained that each quarter would consist of
10 weeks of classes and one week of exams; a quarter hour would be
worth two-thirds of a trimester hour, so that junior college transfers
with 60 semester hours would now have 90 quarter hours.
Minimum and maximum hour requirements were unchanged (12 to
20). A normal academic year would be three quarters. The scheduling
is arranged so that students may enter at any quarter and take a
normal sequence of courses.
A scholastic squeeze is noticed by many students under the quarter
system. Many are required to take five three hour courses each
quarter. Again this summer, the Alligator said, ... having to prepare
for five three hour classes each week is harder than having to prepare
for three five hour classes.
Most schools on the quarter system shy away from three-hour
classes for that very reason.
But not UF.
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale said hesnever seen
pressure like there was this fall, though he wouldnt positively
attribute it to the quarter system. It could just be the modern age,
he said. Part of the problem lies in adjustment. We never really
adjusted to trimesters, either. Hale added he wishes exams came after
Christmas, since they shorten the holiday season.
Many students think course credit is not increased sufficiently, but
a random survey of courses indicates otherwise:
Course Sem. Tri. Quar.
EDF3OO 3 3 5
JM 301 3 3 4
ES 201 3 3 5
ESM 301 3 3 4
FY 220 2 2 3
HY 245 3 3 3
NSG2OI 3 3 4
PS 120 3 3 6
PCL2OI 3 3 4
In all cases but HY 245, credit is increased under the quarter
system. In all probability, HY 245 is not increased because, under the
semester and trimester, it covered American History through 1865,
while now it goes through 1815.
Dr. Ralph E. Page, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, said
his colleges policy is to credit courses according to the amount of
work required. He said hes satisfied in general with the quarter
system, though he prefers semesters.
No machinery can make a program work, he said. It wont be
good or bad except for the way the faculty plans it.
Dr. Eugene Todd, associate professor of education, said the
problem in the short quarter term is determining priority of topics.
There are several alternatives, he said. You can eliminate topics,
spend less time on topics, or create additional courses.
But, according to students, teachers are requiring too much,
especially outside reading in history courses.
A campus politico summed up student sentiment with these words:
The quarter system in theory is good, but its not applied correctly
here. In most cases, you cover the same amount of material in four to
eight weeks less.

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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13-B



Page 14-B

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

* si tiMM fIWMHBfeJI W"-v M:.
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c.lr AasKiLfti.ui3Hfe>. ..a. ja^wg

O'CONNELL DISLIKES PROPOSAL
UFDrinking Condemned

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The controversial drinking
amendment to the Code of
Student Conduct which
prohibited only public drunken
behavior will not be approved
by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
In a letter distributed to 22
campus organizations the
president said he would not
approve the amendment. The
letter requested that UF
organizations study the many
segments of our university
population that will be affected
by such a regulation, and
submit to me, by Dec. 4, views
and recommendations on the use
and consumption of alcoholic
beverages on campus and other
places and events subject to
university regulations.
Students, faculty and staff
from all areas of campus have
been asked to make independent
reports to OConnell. Deans,
campus police, Student
Government, married students
and the University Religious
Association are some of the
groups that are presently
studying effects and possible
changes of the ruling.
The basic question,
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decision whether students, who
are permitted by law to drink
elsewhere, will be allowed to
drink or possess alcoholic
beverages on campus, or at other
places and events subject to
university regulation.
OConnell also asked the
groups to consider whether
drinking should be permitted in
the stadium, the Reitz Union,
dormitories, fraternity houses,
and the faculty club. He also
asked that the committee
consider whether only wine and
beer be permitted or hard
liquor also.
OConnell said that common
sense dictates that any
regulation must (1) be based on
reason, (2) not encourage the
disruption of academic effort,
and (3) be capable of efficient
enforcement.
The letter also noted that any
adopted regulation must be
consistent with state statutes
and Gainesville city ordinances.
Representatives from groups
receiving the letter met with
OConnell last week to discuss
the issue. They were asked to
give the matter careful
consideration and submit their

recommendations to the
president.
L. Sharpe, the
presidents assistant, said
Wednesday that so far none of
the committees have submitted
reports.
Mosquito Planes
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Brevard, Brpward, Collier, Dade,
Hillsborough, Indian River, Lee,
Monroe, and Volusia use air
planes in mosquito control, says
the State Board of Health.

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Dorm Counselors
Assist Students
With Problems

You name it, we handle it,
says Robert Mcride, head
counselor of Tolbert Area.
Counselors are available to
students in all housing areas on
the UF campus.
All of the full time counselors
have completed work on their
masters degree and some are
working on a Ph.D. Others have
already gained a Ph.D.
We try to help them find
who they are, said Mcride,
with relationship to their
families, their peers, and the rest
of the world.
Some of the problems t
handled by area counselors
include academic, vocational,
and personal problems.
I counsel mostly freshmen,
said William Bosbybell, area
counselor in Murphree Area,
and most of their problems are
dealing with adjusting to campus
life.
Quite a few of them have
trouble studying, said
Bosbybell, who is also an
ordained Episcopal minister,
while some need to be advised
about vocational matters.
I may lead a student in the
right direction, he explained,
but I leave the ultimate
solution of the problem to him.
I am sure, however,
Bosbybell added, that all

counselors have a different
method of problem solving.
Some of the personal
problems suffered by students
who have been counseled
include loneliness, dating
problems, problems of isolation,
and conflicts with roommates.
I find many students who
are troubled about their own
identity, said Bosbybell.
Students with emotional
problems more serious than the
area counselors feel they can
handle are sent to either the
mental health center or the
counseling center.
In Graham Area, a program
of routine counseling is being
instituted. All area residents will
be interviewed and informed of
the counseling services available
to them
Besides counseling, area
counselors are active in other
areas of housing.
In Tolbert Area, research is
being done of segregation of
freshman students.
The area counselors also
sponsor showings of vocational
films and invite speakers to the
various areas to talk on subjects
of vocational, academic or
general interest to the students.
The area counselors work in
close cooperation with
the reading clinic, mental health
center and the counseling center.



HIPPIES DESCRIBED
Friendly People
By HARRISON HOPPER
Alligator Correspondent
Become a hippie and earn four hours credit?
Thats what UF student Steve N. Kreinberg did.
I had never heard about the hippies until January of this year,
said Kreinberg. I read about them and my curiosity was aroused.
The thought came to him that he might do a sociology paper on
the hippies. He inquired into the Sociology department and received
special permission to take Sy 530, Individual Work. The trij) to San
Francisco was approved. He was to finance the affair himself.
Kreinberg arrived in the Haight-Ashbury area on May 6. He was
somewhat frightened and unsure as to what to do.
I was surprised to find the hippies really friendly, he said. I was
offered food, clothes, a place to stay anything I needed.
He was immediately accepted even after explaining the reason he
was there to write a sociology paper.
Food and lodging werent the only free things offered to Kreinberg
by the hippies.
My first day in the hippie colony I was offered all types of drugs,
from marijuana to LSD, said Kreinberg.
Drugs were so prevalent they were amost ignored by the police,
he added. I saw a probation officer smoke marijuana; a narcotics
agent admitted he had taken LSD. I didnt have to pay for marijuana
there was so much of it.
The police werent concerned with marijuana and LSD nearly as
much as heroin, cocaine and other strong habit-forming drugs.
The hippies seldom took heroin or cocaine. However drug addicts
living in the hippie colony did. They werent the only non-hippies
living in the area.
There were also alcoholics, mental cases, Hells Angels, runaways,
thieves and many others of the type society frowns upon, said
Kreinberg. Society classifies all these people as hippies thus giving
the hippies a poor reputation.
Kreinberg thinks this is wrong.
The real hippies were such beautiful people, he said. I would
sum them up in three words: peace, love and happiness.
Being a hippie is a state of mind; a state of being at peace with
everything.
The San Francisco hippies were generally broke. Any money they
made was quickly spent on enjoying themselves.
Kreinberg outlined four ways the hippies made money:
1. They dealt in LSD, marijuana and amphetamines (various
stimulant type drugs including methadrine and benzadrine referred
to by the hippies as speed).
2. They sold underground newspapers which they mostly didnt
read and tourists bought. I sold $ 10 worth in one hour.
3. They panhandled begged money from other hippies but
didnt get much from the tourists.
4. The U.S. Government employed them as mail carriers. They
could dress any way they wanted when they delivered the mail.
The majority of hippies didnt wear outlandish clothes. They got
most of their clothes from the Free Store an establishment that
received donated clothes and passed them on to the hippies.
They were generally ill fed, underweight and in poor health. If any
of them became seriously ill, there were free clinics in the area. The
places where they lived were unclean and sometimes overcrowded.
Once I slept with 22 people in the same small room for two
nights, said Kreinberg. No one slept on a bed. I never slept on a bed
the whole time I was there.
The hippies lived anywhere. One of their favorite places to live was
an old 1930 bright orange, Fageol ItaliaSi bus.
The bus ran fine. I lived in it for a week and a half, said
Kreinberg.
They usually slept until noon and were off the streets by 10.30
p.m.
The streets werent safe at night, Kreinberg added.
When it came time to leave San Francisco, Kreinberg had to write
his parents for some money. Unhappy with the whole escapade, they
immediately wired him planefare home, relieved that it was over.
Being a hippie is not a permanent existence. Kreinberg said that
90 per cent of the hippies go back to society.
Hippies were the closest things to real human-beings that I ve ever
experienced. I saw them from the ground floor; I lived with them.
Even living such a low level of existence, it was the happiest time o
my life. I gained a new outlook.

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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator.

Page 15-B



.The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 16-B

Weimer Reflects On 18 Years

Editor's Note: Following his
resignation as dean of the college
of journalism, Weimer was
appointed as full-time
troubleshooter for UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Feature Writer
The portly man with the
twinkling lively eyes leaned back
in his revolving chair and placed
both feet on top of his desk. His
greying hair showed traces of the
red hair that he had in younger
years. The man placed his folded
hands on his stomach, stared
vacantly at the wall and laughed
in his reminiscences.
Rae O. Weimer, dean of the
College of Journalism and
Communications, must certainly
find plenty to laugh about in his
reflections of his past 18 years at
the UF.
Dean Weimer came to UF in
1949 and founded the School of
Journalism, which then had only
29 enrolled students. As of last
July 1 the school earned the
rating of a college, and enrolls
644 students this year.
Dean Weimer, who is soon
resigning his position as head of
the college because of his age,
talked about his experiences
with UF since 1949 in an
interview last week.
No other school in the US
has grown as fast as this one
has, he said, his bow tie
juggling on his neck with each
word. This is the largest college
of journalism in the country if
you dont count grad students.
If you want to count grad
students then were about the
second largest. Were only the
second school in the nation to
be given the rating of a college,
he said.
He paused and gazed out the
window, carefully selecting what
he would say next. The wall to
his right was literally covered
with citations and certificates of
achievement.
I founded the School of
Journalism started it, began
it whatever you want to call
it. When I came here in 1949
they *had a Department of
Journalism, he said.
They had two or three
professors out in Building E, and
a combination lab and
classroom. They had only one
dictionary and a few old
typewriters that they had picked
up from the Army.
He shook his head and
chuckled to himself. In '49 we
moved into Building K. There
they had a classroom, reporting
labs and offices. We expanded
that and got a typography lab
and another classroom, he
continued.
In September of 1955 we
moved to the stadium, where we
added radio and TV to the
school. Since then weve grown
at an unbelievable rate, until
now were one of the biggest and
the best, he said.
When the stadium
classrooms and offices were first

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM FOUNDER

built we had no blinds, hardly
any doors and no air
conditioning. That west sun
would come shining in here and
it got hot! In those days the
university wouldnt even allow
you to buy your own air
conditioner.
One of the early problems
was that the school was treated
as a stepchild and wasnt fully
recognized, he said. Since
those early years Ive had
excellent support, by and large.
At first our growth was slow.
After we began to grow the
university didnt realize how fast
we were growing and at that
time we lacked support.
We were frustrated by red
tape then. What was so
frustrating was the slowness with
which decisions were made.
Things have gotten better since
then, though, he said.
When asked if he had
undergone any unusual
experiences in his career at UF,
Dean Weimer laughed loudly and
rubbed his hands together.
Building K was quite an
experience, he said. God, Id
never go through it again.
Building K is an old Army
barracks that we originally used.
Many nights at 9 or 10 oclock it
would be 90 degrees down there.
You damn near froze out there in

Students Reflect Social Changes

(FROM PAGE 10B)
culture, the changing social order.
He is cut adrift, Dr. Barger went on
to say, in some degree or other, from the
security of family and friendship
relationships in a society that has cut itself
adrift by high mobility and frequent
moves.
Forms that this attitude of change and
independence may take in the UF student
or any other college student for that
matter are varied. The dissident student
gamers the most attention on the campus
because of his often outlandish activities.
Many persons are quick to point out he
does not represent the majority.
Yet Dr. Barger indicates in a publication
on the changing student that all are a part
of the social and cultural change and not
just a handful.
In all these ways he is the reflection of
our culture, and is confused, as we are
confused, is insecure as we are insecure,
and he goes forward, as we do, with faith
that somehow well muddle through to a
better life.
The hard core of activists is probably
less than fifty in the view of observers who
have regular contact with the several
groups. A question of how many does it
take? is still unresolved however.
Few would say the dissident student, a
minority though he may be, should be
taken lightly either in the present or the
future. Yet any extreme difficulty for the
UF such as experienced at Berkeley is like
tomorrow, not easy to predict.
Coed hemlines have climbed
considerably in recent years in keeping
with current fashion but so also have
academic standards.
Upgrading of standards has come about
not only because it is a desirable thing to
do in the interests of quality but also out
of necessity. A limitation of 2,800 entering
freshmen has been set primarily because
present facilities and resources simply
cannot handle more.

the winter. Its about as
uneducational a place as you
might see, Dean Weimer
concluded.
He shook his head again and
stopped laughing. He let out a
sigh and became serious once
again.
You know, one of the things
Ive missed most as
administrator of this college is
the close contact with students.
I like students and I like to
counsel them, he said.
Plenty of times students
from other schools and colleges
come over to talk to me about
their courses. Sometimes
students come in to see me just
to have a chat about personal
problems. Yes I miss the
classroom.
When asked who would be a
candidate to replace him as head
of the department, Dean Weimer
said that he had no idea.
Im conducting a ballot right
now, the dean said. The
faculty is voting on the
committee who will choose the
candidates for the position
which I am leaving. Their choice
or choices will be submitted to
the president. But I have no real
direct participation in choosing
my successor.

Administration officials say there are
over 6,000 freshman admission
applications for next fall of which 3,200
will be accepted. Attrition will take care of
the overage by the time registration week
rolls around.
The logistics of housing and feeding the
huge enrollment is itself a staggering task.
A large portion of students must live off
campus and the system is designed so that
a percentage of the enrollment will do so.
Huge apartment complexes have sprung
up to accommodate their number and
more are planned by private enterprise.
On-campus residence hall construction
continues but supply is a long way from
being equal to demand. There are now
6,900 campus housing units including
1,000 for married students. Twenty years
ago there were a total of 2,400 units.
The future seems to promise a great
many things on the academic quarter but
other projections can only be made on a
cross your fingers basis. Progress and
change at the University has generally
outstripped the most educated guesses.
A study prepared in 1960 for the
ensuing 15 years projected a peak
enrollment in 1975 of 18,000 students.
That level was reached only six years later
and was surpassed last fall by 1,000
students, a difference equivalent to the
1921 enrollment.
Since the university today has far
surpassed everything predicted for it, what
about twenty years from now? A good
question.
A typical day in a students life in 1988
might see him awaken in a skyscraper
dormitory room. Using an auxiliary device
on his study table connected to a central
computer he may review class notes while
he dresses.
Trudging to the classroom, if indeed
that should be necessary, his textbook
burden will be light because a portion of
his load will consist of computer cards. As
a matter of fact, instead of a long walk to

But, you know, I think the
College of Journalism and
Communications is a sound
organization. Its an active and
well-founded college. But, then
again, he said, winking and
giving his characteristic broad
grin. I guess you could say that
Im prejudiced.
The Nebraska-born dean said
that he spent 25 years working
for newspapers in Nebraska,
lowa, Illinois, Ohio, upstate New
York, New York City and
Indiana. Although Dean Weimer
said that he had never received a
university degree, he attended
Nebraska State Teachers College
in Kearney, and has done work
at Ohio State and Syracuse
Universities.
In his years of newspaper
experience he has held the
positions of reporter, state
editor, sports editor, telegraph
editor, assistant city editor, city
editor, assistant managing editor
and managing editor. He has also
held the positions of
vice-president and president of
the Weimer Organization, a
public relations concern in
Columbus. Ohio
The dean has been listed in
Whos Who In American
Education for the past 30
years, and boasts at least a dozen
honorary titles and memberships
in various organizations.

'M;
m. ...Jm w I I
RAE O. WEIMER
. .'J* school founder

class, he probably will ride special campus
transportation of some kind, perhaps even
a subway.
Students no longer will be faced with
the enigma of traversing up to a mile
between classrooms in a 10 minute span as
sometimes is now the case.
Iq class, the student may catch a lecture
on closed circuit television delivered by a
foremost authority located in Tokyo. Or
he may drop a computer card in a slot and
receive a class problem to work on during
the period.
Should he need reference material from
the library or other data, he could also get
that on the spot with computer assistance.
Such sophisticated education aids will
be practically indispensable because of the
pace of progress. Materials will be
automatically upgraded as changes occur.
The professor will no doubt still be a vital
part of the process but he may have to
spend part of his time in the same procedure
as the student so he can keep abreast of
new developments^
Graduates in other parts of the state
may also be able to plug into the same
computer system and use it to upgrade
their knowledge. Students will graduate
as always but it seems likely that they will
never actually stop being students.
The example is admittedly speculative
and based largely on the science fields.
However, the same techniques may well
apply to other areas in varying degrees and
perhaps actuality will be even more
spectacular.
Students will still enjoy such pastimes as
coffee Matching, sports, and boy or girl
watching. The myriad of things that
students have had in common since East
Florida Seminary came into being in 1853
are not likely to go out of style or became
obsolescent.
In the final analysis, the good old
days seem always to be here and now.



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HOME FOR THE WEEKEND?

For the student without a car getting out of Gainesville can be
quite a problem, but it doesn't have to end like the solution pictured
above.
Two commercial flights come into Gainesville daily, one going to
Jacksonville, and one to Miami via Vero Beach and Ocala. Bus
schedules are pretty regular, and go most everywhere, and if you can
figure out how to get to Waldo, Fla. (or even where it is), then there
are several trains daily going north and south.
The cheapest transportation, however, (besides hitch-hiking) is the
use of car rides. Sample roundtrip fares, generally doorstep delivery,
are: Miami/Ft Lauderdale $10; Tampa and Orlando $3; St.
Petersburg -- $3.50, and Panama City -- $6. The ground floor of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union has a complete Ride Wanted and Passengers
Wanted board where you can check on the current listings.

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ServomationNeeds Help

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Feature Writer
All week long Ive heard nothing but complaints
about the poor over-all quality of UFs food service.
At the Tolbert Area snack bar, a student sits at a
table looking at a paper plate full of french-fries. He
picks up the plate and throws the potatoes against
the wall and walks out.
At the Reitz Union cafeteria students complain
about having to bus their own trays. I paid enough
for this slop, and I aint gonna take my tray up.
What the hell do they get paid for?
Rather disturbing, not funny. I went to the top
to find the source of the problem. Robert W.
Overton, the director for University Food Service
(alias Servomation Mathias Inc. of Gville), and I
had a pleasant talk about some of the food service
problems.
There was a recent survey concerned with the
quality and quantity of food served, the attitude of
employees, and space for comments. Overton told
me the results of the survey were not yet
completed, but that he did have a general picture of
the consensus in a few areas.
ln general, the outcome of the survey was
good, he said. He told me that the complaints were
mostly about employee attitude, dirty silverware,
and bussing. Its impossible to guarantee clean
silverware because of the volume of utensils washed
daily, he said.
As far* as poor employee attitude is concerned,
Overton told me that managers are urged to keep
employee spirit high, to convince them that
students are paying customers and not just people,
and to instill a sense of pride into these dedicated
workers.
Someone failed somewhere along the line. MOST
of the employees try to do their jobs well, joke with
the students, and earn what theyre paid. Then there
are those who just dont care. And theres plenty of
them around.
Then again, what can you expect from people
who start at $1.15 an hour? That is an improvement
over last year, though, when the starting salary was

Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

OPINION

only $.90 an hour.
Perhaps things would improve if die University
Food Service raised the starting salary to $1.25 an
hour and held pep rallies for the more sullen
employees.
Overton told me that there are three rating
boards that periodically inspect the 10 units on
campus. They are the Service Activities Board (three
inspections a week); the Alachua County Health
Department (once a month); and the Florida State
Commission of Restaurants and Hotels (several
times a year).
We have fared good with the local health
boards, in general, he said. Good. Not excellent.
Just good.
I asked him about health cards. He checked on it
and told me that all employees have health cards
that are checked once a year. Once a year. Nice. I
wonder if the County Health Department knows
that syphilis can be transmitted through the
handling of food two months after its initial
contraction.
I asked Overton why, for example, an item is 45
cents at lunch and then is 50 cents at dinner. He
told me that it is a mistake and is the fault of the
human element in any business. That human
element has already cost me money which I dont
have.
Why are there price differences in some items
from one cafeteria to another? Another mistake,
according to Overton. Somebody sure makes a lot
of mistakes in that business.
Now, dont get me wrong. Ive nothing against
Mr. Overton. In fact, I think he is a very fine and
honest man. But I DO have plenty of gripes about
the organization he represents.
I think its about time the University Food
Service got on the ball and began to improve
conditions. I think its about time to start feeding
UF students something that at least resembles food,
$ and to start treating them as people and not as a
bother. University Food Service, lets have some
action to all the griping, or take your business
elsewhere.

Page 17-B



t

Page 18-B

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16. 1968

By JOE TORCHIA

They were sitting in a circle.
One student took a drag, a long
drag, inhaled deeply and held his
breath keeping the precious
smoke in his lungs as long as
possible. He passed the cigarette
to the next person quickly, very
quickly, still holding his breath;
and the next person responded
in the same manner. Its too
expensive and it burns too
quickly it mustnt be wasted.
If its possible, you hold the
smoke in your lungs until the
cigarette makes its round and
comes back to you. When you
exhale very little smoke comes
out. You inhale again and pass
the cigarette around again...
Thats the way grass is

ATTEND CHAPEL?
Students Pledge
Not To Drink

(EDITORS NOTE: This
feature story is based on an
article from the July, 1960, issue
of the Florida Historical
Quarterly.)
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The president of the UF is
asking all students and faculty to
sign a whiskey pledge. It reads
like this: We,
promise, God helping us, never
to use intoxicating liquor as a
beverage.
The year? 1923. The
president? Albert A. Murphree.
He and William Jennings Bryan,
the threetime loser for the U.S.
presidency, had a close
friendship and mutual interest in
the UF. Bryan, who conceived
of a plan to get students all over
the country to sign the pledge,
suggested that it be tried first on
the Gainesville campus.
He suggested that Murphree
get a large book with room for
several thousand names, and
inscribe the pledge on the first
page. Then, the students and
faculty would sign their names
in a public ceremony.
As it turned out, however,
students were in the process of
taking semester exams, so
Murphree decided to send pledge
cards through the mail, instead.
He also assured Bryan that as
far as the faculty is concerned,
no man could hold a position
who uses intoxicating liquors as
a beverage.
Student response was
amazing 75 per cent signed
the pledge cards, and so did the
entire faculty.

The UF won nation-wide

TRANSFER STUDENTS
THINK ABOUT COOPERATIVE LIVING
GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL
j> Economical
3 Prepared Meals a Day
* Social Activities

'... It Was Quiet And Peaceful

smoked seldom alone. Its
seldom wasted.
Its sometimes smoked in
rolled cigarette papers,
sometimes in an emptied
cigarette, sometimes without
any paper you cover a cup
with aluminum foil, insert two
holes at opposite ends, light
grass over one hole, inhale
through the other.
Its safer without paper it
cant be detected as easily. And
it mustnt be detected.
This reporter attended a
session similar to the one
described above just this past
weekend. The circle formed, the
grass burned, and effects came.
And what were the effects?
What does grass do for people?
Let the knowledgeable

applause for its stand. In fact,
the LincolnLee Legion of the
Total Abstinence Department of
the Anti-Saloon League of
America congratulated the UF
for its enviable record of
sobriety!
Bryan, who moved from
Nebraska to Florida after
retiring from national politics,
took an active interest in the
political, religious, civic, and
social life of Florida. He and
Murphree, who had been
president of Florida State
College for Women, were
actively interested in the
religious aspect of the UF.
So, UF students were
required to attend chapel twice a
week. Scripture reading and
prayer was included in each
service. And, every faculty
member had to be a member of
some evangelical church.
Murphree had some firm
ideas about in loco parentis,
too. In answering a Literary
Digest inquiry in 1921, about
college morality, he said: What
is needed to prevent the
shameless form of dancing and
the indecent costumes worn by
young people attending dances
and parties is some daddies and
mammies. The low-cut gowns,
the rolled hose and short skirts
are bom of the devil and his
angels and are carrying the
present and future generations
to social chaos and destruction.
Both men believed the UF
should emphasize its spiritual
element. Bryan suggested as a
motto for the University: Your
son is safe here.

AT LOCAL MARIJUANA PARTY

answer:
The only effect I really have
is I get flushed, hungry, and I
sometimes, well, usually get
cold, one UF student
commented.
When I take alcohol I
usually get flushed and hungry,
too.
But its not just like alcohol
if it were just like getting
POT ON
CAMPUS
drunk it would be silly to chance
five years of my life on a good
stiff drink.
He went on:
The psychological effects
are pretty much the same as
being high on alcohol, but not
being dead drunk.
Sometimes on grass I feel I
am a little more aware of my
surroundings. I remember once
when I was high I was aware of
the quietness a restful,
peaceful quietness. And I was in

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traffic; 1 was on my way home
from a friends house.
Its hard to describe it
was very, very quiet and
peaceful. Whereas, on alcohol
Im not conscious of myself in
the same way.
He paused for a moment. His
eyes were closed and his face
expressionless. He seemed to be
floating, or thinking, or
something. Then his eyes slowly
opened; he looked at me for a
long moment.
This same state occurs
frequently now this state of
calmness. Maybe I had it before
but didnt become aware of it
until I began taking grass.
He told of other effects.
Sometimes I felt I had
difficulty playing my guitar
my fingers felt somewhat numb,
uncoordinated.
This isnt true under hash

(the pollen of the Indian hemp
plant). Hash is better,
smoother.
He said he smoked grass
several times, but hed only
been really high seven times.
A lot of times I smoked
hash after marijuana.
He also said that, when high
on grass, things like certain
music seem to have a deeper
impression on you.
But it seems silly to talk
about grass when youve had
LSD.
Would he advise people, other
students, to take it?
I wouldn't advise anyone to
take it but I would say Im
glad I take it. I like it enough so
that if someone gives it to me Ill
use it but I wouldnt buy
it.
A
What about legal restriction
of the drug?
It would be much more
logical to have alcohol illegal
than grass as far as it becoming a
social menace.
If a person is a chronic user
of grass, he could function in
society so that most people
would never know it. Not so
with alcohol.
What about its use here in
Gainesville?
I wouldnt have any idea
how many people smoke grass
here; but I would say its not
uncommon.



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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 19-B



Page 20-B

r The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

THESE ARE GATOR PEOPLE
DOING GATOR THINGS

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~a-c %.JSoBHKifciJBS -M -j^R : -ms
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BT i: 3B<
i | Please reserve copies of the |
/ jj> I 1969 Seminole in my name. I
iKC&tr v*ffi3jfej> I "d-w* I have enclosed $ ($5 per copy)
jB [ VB I
jplijfjsp
lft\B *!> ,v,|jaiaaeyt£^^^l^Ba|BgS3WP^c ?< r *f_ MflGh I i
I ". BImMMIM^B/;.''L U -*> .. BHjjfj Soc. Sec. Number
|^P^. f | |
il> A-"v '
% 'JmS I
V 1 B CitY State & Zip I
Please mail my 1969 Seminole to me.
i * I Enclosed is my remittance plus $1 mailing charge. I
Gainesville



By JOE TORCHIA

The rugged-looking,
redfaced, almost-bald novelist
sat in an upholstered chair in the
special collections room of the
research library.
His wire-rimmed glasses
rested snugly against the
sunburned skin, and his
sometimes-amusing expressions
were accentuated by the
snow-white, fleecy hair which
guarded his ears.
His feet rested comfortably
on the reddish carpet, and
garters held up the black socks
which covered his stocky legs
the legs which marched in
the World War I Italian
ambulance service along with
Ernest Hemingway and e.e.
cummings.
The 72-year-old John Dos
Passos, author of Three
Soldiers and U.S.A. among
other works, informally talked
with UF students Friday as he
stopped in Gainesville before
travelling to California to see his
only daughter Lucy.
The well-known American
novelist had ben visiting in
southern Florida, and stopped
here to visit his long-time
friend, Dr. Oliver /yistin, curator
of ornithology for the Florida
State Museum.
Mr. Dos Passos' outgoing,
assertively extroverted
personality permeated the room
as he covered a multitude of
topics, including other famous
authors he knew personally.
DOS PASSOS ON MARY
MCCARTY:
Shes getting so bitchy and
spiteful. I used to like her,
though; her First book (Groves
of Agony) was very amusing.
DOS PASSOS ON
GERTRUDE STEIN:
Stein was a wonderful old
thing, she had great character,
but I didnt learn anything from
her. I think her phrase Lost
Generation is idiotic.
DOS PASSOS ON
HEMINGWAY:
Hemingways writing seems
to be a combination of the King
James Bible and journalese. As a
stylist, hes marvelously
effective: his novels seem to

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Novelist Dos Passos Visits UF

include a number of short
stories.
At one period, I was very
good friends with Ernest. Its
unfortunate he had a very bad
heredity it showed through
in later life: he became
schizophrenic obsessed with
being a V.I.P. It can destroy
anybody; it destroyed Ernest. I
believe.
DOS PASSOS ON
FITZGERALD:
The Great Gatsby was his
one truly great novel. He kept
himself out of it thats why
its so good.
DOS PASSOS ON e.e.
cummings:
e.e. cummings was a very
solid fellow the last of the
great New Englanders. We both
edited the Harvard Monthly at
one time. I remember when he
First discovered how to put his
ideas down on paper he was
quite excited. At first, I didnt
like it.
When one student told Mr.
Dos Passos he was required to
read U.S.A. for a course, the
author replied, How
unfortunate.
Everyone laughed, but Dos
Passos was serious: J!he
surprising thing about modem
education is how little time
people have to read on their
own, he said.
When asked his views on
critics, the elderly gentleman
told students, I dont pay much
attention to critics. Criticism is
very valuable, but not for the
author.
Speaking about his style, Dos
Passos said, I dont think I ever
consciously developed a style
although Im always looking
for new ways to put a novel
together.
He did, however, refer to
Sergei Eisenstein (whose Ivan
the Terrible will soon be at the
State) and likened his method to
that of the great Film director.
Eisenstein built up new
techniques with contrast and a
sort of montage effect thats
the way U.S.A. is put
together.
Dos Passos is still writing. I
usually have various projects
that have been hanging around
for years. Theres always things

TALKS WITH STUDENTS

pressing l'm trying to keep
up with the times.
He presently is writing about
a great period of Portuguese
discovery.*
History is the most
important of the arts, Dos
Passos said, and today its at its
apex if you dont know
what came before, you dont
know what youre seeing.
And the 72-year-old author
has seen a lot.
When he was very young. Dos
Passos joined the World War I
Italian ambulance service, and
since then has travelled
throughout the world.
I always thought my
education came from the war,
he said. At that time, the idea
of war was very stimulating
everyone wanted to see what
was going on. I had read about
Europe enormously; it was a
great period of effervescence for
me, and I went.
Dos Passos talked in a sort of
a hush-hush voice, very excitable

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6)
editor. But at Texas and
Grinnell, the left nuclei are
intellectual habits.
At Wisconsin and Berkeley,
the radicals of the left are
shouting down opposition,
stifling debate over the war,
student power, faculty power
and calling for the destruction of
the university and the American
corporate-military system,
which they feel includes the
universities.
Anti-war students have been
involved in clashes at both the
Madison campus and at the

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67 Campus Mood Varies

and very captivating as the small
audience listened to the author,
who occasionally lit a miniature
cigar.
As a writer. 1 want to be as
objective as possible. In Three
Soldiers' I was not very
objective: I was very young then,
but I did try to balance the
picture occasionally. But
sometimes one has to make a
fool of oneself.
What is worth being made a
fool of?
The survival of the
American system 1 think
we've established a pretty
successful system which, like all
systems, has to be fought for
every day.
Today there is difficulty in
the adaptation of the institution
to changing techniques. But our
system is fluid..
He added as a sort of
postscript: It's funny: the new
left is talking about the same
things we did in the 205... The
Communist party has dug out

Oakland induction center in the
last month.
George Mosse, a history
professor at Wisconsin, had this
to say on the worsening
relations:
Tb,e essence of a university
is the personal relationship and
dialogue between interested
students. The tactics of
confrontation will end this
dialogue. Its already becoming
more difficult.
Those tactics center now on
the draft.
Unquestionably, the majority

Friday, August 16. 1968, The Florida Alligator,

old slogans and uses them very
effectively today. It's very
frightening."
When asked to comment on
the Vietnam War, Dos Passos
said" it's terribly badly
handled."
He said, I disapprove of
much of what LBJ is doing, but
I wouldn't want to rock the boat
just now. .. How to fight this
war has not been discovered
A. 99
yet.
In a brief mention of the
Selective Service System, he
said, i favor voluntary service.
NOT conscription."
Getting back to his books.
Dos Passos said that none have
been made into films.
Would he like to see a film
version of one of his books?
"If one of these good Italians
did it, 1 really wouldn't mind."
When the discussion ended,
several students talked with him
briefly and shook his hand; it
was quite nice to talk with a
"required" person.

of students would serve in the
armed forces if drafted. The left
wishes to stall the draft by
blocking campus recruiters and
induction centers, burning draft
cards, urging men to flee to
Canada. But cooler heads would
clog the system by other means.
David Pratt of Texas, an
S.D.S. member who served in
the Army for three years, said:
File as a conscientious
objector. It takes # more time.
You cant be classified or
drafted if your case is under
appeal.

Page 21-B



Page 22-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

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TOWERS PIERCE THE SKY ...
Buildings are sprouting up among the older buildings so fast that
even students familiar with the campus can't keep up with them.
Among the more recently completed complexes are the $5 million J.
Wayne Reitz Student Union, a huge new engineering complex, a
Graduate research library, and a new College of Law Complex. The two
buildings under construction above are the Twin Towers, recently
completed dormitories for men and women students.
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Is to house the department of zoology's teaching and research
labomtpries. The building above is the first building of the complex.

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TIGERT HALL, THEJJERVE CENTER OF THE CAMPUS .
which houses the offices of the president, the vice president of academic, student, and business affairs, the registrar, and student financial aid.

Editors Note: the UF is a large, rambling campus. As a service to
incoming students, the Florida Alligator presents the map which
appears on the opposite page. The key below identifies sites of interest

to students.
KEY STUDENT SERVICE OFFICES
1 REGISTRAR: ADMISSIONS 135 TIGERT HALL
CURRENT RECORDS 34 TIGERT HALL
2 STUDENT AFFAIRS, DEAN OF MEN,
DEAN OF WOMEN, LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS
& EMPLOYMENT 124 TIGERT HALL
3 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

COUNSELING 358 GENL CLASSROOM Bldg. D.
4 COUNSELING CENTER3II GENL CLASSROOM
5 STUDENT HEALTH INFIRMARY Bldg. G
6 HOUSING GROUND FLOOR, SOUTH SOUTHWEST
WEST SOUTHWEST WING BROWARD HALL
7 FLORIDA UNION & STUDENT
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AND CAMPUS SHOPS
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THE COLLEGE LIBRARY. .
Houses the reference and literary works and period periodicals
icals periodicals available to undergraduate students. Adjacent
to it is the new Graduate Research Library which is
reserved for graduate students and faculty members.
Together, they house more than a million volumes.



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Frktey, August 16,1968, The Florida AlHgatnr, I

Page 23-B



Page 24-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

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Section C

' . ; ' \ r ' ,'"; -7.. ' r .- /
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The
Florida Alligator

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Friday, August 16, 1968



Page 2-C

the Florida

i "^' w *%*£* i*** S <; y A
JBp 3% ? r rI'JN ftkyTOT fftPljl
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His mam is Larry Rentz, and
Jhe* the nucleus of the Florida
| squad this year.
£ He lias one outstanding year
turn, and now, a final
| year ahead in which to aim for
Jthe victory lie can bring the
|tear*L
The able quarterback is f rom
| Coral Gables, Fla., where he led
Coral f rabies High School to a
£ national championship in his
£ senior year. Now, four years
plater, Rente again finds himself
quarterbacking a tram which
£ rnay find itself with the power
to rank a* the top football team
in the nation.

His rise to the position is a
unique story. Recruited in 1964,
Rente led the Baby Gators to an
excellent season as quarterback.
Yet, the following year, when he
was placed on the varsity squad,
there was a young man
occupying the OB slot who
could do no wrong. That was
Steve Spurrier, who went on to
win the Heisman Trophy,
A year later, and Rente
seemed doomed to never see
action as a quarterback. There
was a super-sophomore named
Jackie Lckdahl, and a senior*
Hannon Wages, who had played
behind Spurrier two years.

Larry Rentz

Rentz was third in line, yet the
talent was still there.
IK.
Then, in rapid succession,
both quarterbacks were put out
of commission. On October 7,
Harmon Wages was demoted to
the non-playing B-team for
disciplinary reasons. He was not
reinstated until late in the
season. A scant three days later,
Jackie Eckdahl broke his leg in a
practice scrimmage.
Suddenly, the quarterback
turned flanker found himself as
the number one signal caller.
A week later, Rentz was
responsible for a 35-0

shellacking of Tulane. The
plays used strongly resembled
the all-or-nothing dare devil
show Rentz had used years
earlier in high school, and they
shouldn t have worked on the
college turf. They did, however.
and it was the Gators biggest
victory.
i ..
Larry returned home a hero,
and has been one ever since. This
year, he is number one, and
Eckdahl has been placed on the
wide out spot. In the spring
1 Grange and Blue game, Eckdahl
pulled down some key passes

from Rentz. Still, Eckdahl is alsoj?
expected to see action as?
quarterback, but will only back?
up Rentz. ?
And thats the story of Larry ij
Rentz. Os course, he has a£
superior team guarding him and?
hauling in his passes, but the?
signal spot is the key. Rentz is§
6-2, and weighs all of 161?
pounds. He is variously?
described as toothpick and ?
the blade by his teammates.?:
As one Gator put it, When |
Larrys back there, weve just?
got to stop the line. If anyone |
ever got back there, theyd break ?
him in half. §
V



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year deep \yw?V
pattern I^^Qcv^^
pattern
turtles
mustaches, chains, beads and pen pendants
dants pendants as as campus traditional 1
The year of who's the who at Florida y^ f W W
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knows the now of what to wear and I Pfr E igJ
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knows when to wear it! And those M #** Jf SIPffF
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just think what you can with a, navy M 4
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GAINESVILLE MALL P^ rs "complete grooming ess
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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3-C



Page 4-C

:. Th Florida AMigater, FrKtoy, August 16,1968

V W ,iiW W:
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ator oton
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Friday, August 16,1968, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 5-C



Page 6-C

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16.1968

Viewing Sports

By NEAL SANDERS

$ If youre planning on doing a lot of studying next year, Florida g
may be the wrong school for you. From football to golf, UF looks K
i; like a winner, and chances are, most students will be spending a lot g
of their time around Florida Field for the first few months of the j;j
I school year. $
: Football heads off the year with an opener at Tampa, when the
y Gators meet Air Force. This will be before the quarter begins, but £
j: during orientation week for freshmen. >
Forget about classes the first week, because the first Saturday, <
UF takes on Florida State, and youll be able to hear the Florida £
j: touchdowns all the way from Tallahassee. j:j
|j: Then, the football scene finally comes to Gainesville, when £
|j: Florida meets a mediocre Mississippi State on Oct. 5. The following >j
weekend, the scene is still Gainesville, as the Gators take on £
Tulane. :ji
§ North Carolina is the next victim, but that will_ take place at
Chapel Hill. Vandy follows UNC at Nashville on the 26th, then its >
$ homecoming time as the Gators meet Auburn on Nov. 2. Nobody :j
$ gets to sleep homecoming weekend. :
v Second homecoming for the Gators will be at Jacksonville the :
following week when UF meets the Georgia Bulldogs in the Gator :j
Bowl at Jacksonville. Then, its a long trip to Lexington for a game
with Kentucky. ||
The final game comes after a week off, but it will take that :
v week to get ready for Miami, as the season closes in Gainesville. :

Gator Ray Burdened
With Grid Injuries

By GEORGE MEYER
When a football coach finds
his team is being crippled with
injuries, he begins to ask himself
why. The question seems to be
an impossible one to answer.
Ive been trying to figure
out why players get hurt, said
UF coach Ray Graves, currently
one of the most injury-burdened
coaches in college football
today. The University of
Southern California may be
crying over O. J. Simpsons leg
injury, but, in comparison, their
troubles are fly-tracks in the
swelling Death Valley on the
Gator squad.
Graves still has his offensive
backfield intact, but the
backbone of his defensive punch
has been severed.
Last year, we went through
the whole season with scarsely
any serious damage to our
personnel, said Graves. This
year, weve run the same type of
practice, with the same amount
of contact work and we turn up
with half the squad on crutches.
I think it must be the breaks
of the game. It seems to run in
cycles, one year fat, one year
lean. I hope it averages out in
the long run.
Equipment doesnt seem to
be at fault. The only recorded
injury to a player due to
improper equipment this year
was to tackle Skip Amelung of
Ft. Lauderdale. Amelung had a
pair of ill-fitting shoulder pads
for the first two games, and they
pinched a nerve in his shoulder.
As soon as the cause of the
pinched nerve was uncovered,
the situation was remedied with
a new pair, and Amelung hasnt
been bothered since.
The vast majority of the
Gator injuries have been to the
knee. Tom ligaments, severe
bruises and sprains have taken
their toll when they occurred in
the knee area. Most doctors
agree that these types of hurts
are the most common in
football.
Maybe the boys are worried
they will get hurt; so they do,

Alligator Sports Editor

conjectured Graves. Several
boys who had had operations
over the summer have been
re-injured during the season. But
what can you do about that?
And hope, along with a lot of
tape, spirit and Gatorade are
what Graves has left to rely on
this week.

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UF Blisters lllini 14-0
Behind Lefty Eckdohl

By 808 PADECKY
Critics claim that southpaws
are erratic.
But lefty Jackie Eckdahl was
consistent enough for eight
minutes at Florida Field
Saturday to lead Floridas green
but determined Gators past the
University of Illinois, 14-0.
The opening season win for
Coach Ray Graves and his bunch
was in front of 57,391 fans, a
new opening game attendance
record.
And most of the 57,391 paid
were on their feet in the third
quarter as young Eckdahl,
playing in his first varsity game,
engineered a 75-yard touchdown
drive and later ran for an
insurance touchdown.
_ But despite Eckdahls heroics,
Graves announced that the
Gators still have two
quarterbacks that will alternate
play, senior Harmon Wages and
Eckdahl.
Wages, despite sitting out the
second half with a tender ankle,
certainly didnt tarnish his
position. The blond from
Jacksonville played almost the
entire first half, knocking on the
touchdown door twice.
The first time came on
Floridas opening series. Mixing
up the running of Larry Smith
and Graham McKeel with two
passes, Wages brought UF 33
yards in 10 plays to the lllini 24.
On fourth and ten, Wayne
Barfields field goal attempt was

deflected off to the side.
Illinois ran at the Gators the
entire game and used more than
half of the second quarter
running jthe football in Gator
territory.
lllini quarterback Bob
Naponic directed his teams best
offensive showing of the day in
the second period. Starting on
UFs 49, Naponic moved his
team 39 yards to the 10. It took
eight minutes and 12 plays -11
of them on the ground.
But then came the games
turning point, according to lllini
coach Jim Valek. With third and
six on the 10, Naponic dropped
back for a pass, but the Gators
George Dean and Tom
Abdelnour were there instead
and pinned Naponic for a
12-yard loss. Naponic was hurt
on the play and missed most of
the second half.
An lllini 36-yard field goal
attempt was wide to the right,
thus ending the losers best
scoring threat of the game.
A few minutes later Wages
finally gave the Florida rooters
something to scream about as he
unveiled his much talked-about
passing arm. Coupling two pass
interference calls with
four -of four passes, Wages
sprinted the Gators to the lllini
11 with 25 seconds left before
halftime. But Wages bulleted the
next ball into the stomach of an
lllini linebacker and the Gator

offensive was over.
But Eckdahl snapped the
scoreless tie and the boring
ground game with the start of
the third quarter. Taking the ball
on his own 25, Eckdahl
commanded the 75-yard
touchdown drive in 15 plays.
Smith, tabbed pre-season
All-America material, slanted off
right guard from two yards for
the six points. Eckdahl set up
the Smith score with a
seven-yard pass to tight end Jack
Coons on a crucial
third-and-seven play.
Illinois pass interference
consumed valuable yardage for
the Gators in the drive. The
penalty was called on an Illini
defensive back for knocking
down Larry Rentz. The penalty
covered 32 yards, almost half of
the touchdown distance.
Floridas tough defense, led
by linebacker Don Giordano,
measured up to the task after
the touchdown and the Gators
took the ball over on their 49
With fourth and eight on the
Illini 49, Bob Bess fumbled a
Rentz punt and sophomore Guy
McTheny recovered on the Illini
16.
Eckdahl then buried the SEC
hatchet even deeper when he
scampered the 16 around left
end for his teams second
touchdown with 6:40 left in the
third quarter. Barfield converted
his 31st straight PAT.



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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 7-C



The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 8-C

Eckdahl Out For Season With Log In/ury
LViVUUIII WI ___ w Ve ever had including Steve Illinois.

By PAUL KAPLAN
and
808 PADECKY
UF grid hopes for a winning
season were dealt a crushing
blow for the second straight day
Wednesday afternoon when No.
1 quarterback Jackie Eckdahl

~
\
4 m y

ECKDAHL

A QB Is Born
And thats the way it happened. :
Coach Ray Graves got on Nightowl Wages for breaking :
icurfew Saturday night. Sunday, he was officially demoted to the :j
1 '
| non-playing B squad. >
For Wages, it was a let-down, and it made a lot of Florida fans i
snicker. Graves said the move was temporary. ;
But how was Graves to anticipate Monday afternoons practice ;
session? Eckdahl was performing beautifully, bolstered by the fact i
that he was undisputed number one. Then, a hasty turn on a leg :
that had given him trouble before.
Crunch. Hours later, Eckdahl was fitted for a cast, and Wages j
door was fitted with a new lock. About that time, Larry Rentz j
realized something ... now he was number one. j
By this time, it was late Monday, and there was a game on j
Saturday against Tulane in New Orleans. Tuesday, Rentz started j
calling signals for the first time since his freshman year on the Baby
Gator squad. j
Friday, the team left for Tulane ... j

Texas Stadium
is Stretched
LUBBOCK, Tex. (UPI)
Texas Techs football stadium
was expanded in 1959 from
27,000 to 41,500 seats by
moving the entire east stands
more than 10 million pounds of
concrete and steel 226 feet
eastward on rails. After removal
of 259,000 cubic feet of dirt
between the stands, new seats
were constructed at a lower level
on the slopes of the excavation.
* *
There are 52 colleges or uni universities
versities universities in the greater Boston
area.

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t THE
Featuring The
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fractured his lower leg in a
controlled scrimmage.
Eckdahl will be out of action
for 6-8 weeks. His doctors
expressed a faint hope for his
return against the University of
Miami, the Gators last game of
the season on December 9.

Mb m
m
JK m

GRAVES

l) GROWERS OF
roses i
ORCHIDS AND MOST
SEASONABLE FLOWERS
EAST SIDE WEST SIDE i
376-2514 378-2517 |i
20155.E. HAWTHORNE RD. 3409 W. UNIV. AVE.!

RENTZ NOW NO. 1

Larry Rentz will now move
from flanker to starting
quarterback for Saturdays
Tulane game.
It was only Tuesday that
Harmon Wages, the only other
experienced quarterback behind
Eckdahl, was sent to the
non-playing B-team by coach
Ray Graves for disciplinary
reasons.
Eckdahls injury occurred
when he fell on his leg after
being tackled on a 35-yard run.
Ironically, Rentz has been
working out at quarterback since
Monday after a disappointing
showing by both Wages and
Eckdahl in Saturdays loss to
LSU.
Ready or not, Larry will be
our quarterback, said a
dejected Graves immediately
after the costly practice.
Hes a versatile athlete who
has played several positions for
us, and his football sense should
make him adjust adequately.
Rentz, who quarterbacked
Coral Gables High School to a
national championship three
years ago, said during spring
practice he would relish a shot at
quarterback.
With third-string quarterback
David Mclntosh moving into the
No. 2 spot, the Gators have two
players who never have
quarterbacked one second in
college.
This is the severest loss Ive
ever had as a coach, Graves
added. Eckdahl is the main
reason why were 2-1 now; hes
gained more yardage as a
sophomore than any other soph

weve ever had including Steve
Spurrier.
Eckdahl leads the Gators in
total offense, gaining 150 yards
rushing for a 4.5 average per
carry. His 343 yards in the air
give him 493 yards total offense.
Eckdahl, a sophomore, had
wrested the No. 1 spot from
Wages on his game-winning
performance as a substitute in
the season opener against

Charmin Harmon
Temporarily Booted

By 808 PADECKY
Harmon Wages, UFs No. 2 quarterback, has been demoted to the
Gators non-playing B-team for disciplinary reasons, coach Ray
Graves reported Monday.
The action came Saturday after the LSU game.
But Graves said the move was nothing permanent.
Harmon can work his way back up to the varsity, said Graves,
whose policy is not to define disciplinary action.
IVe had some players come back in two days and others stay out
the whole season, mentioned Graves.
But its strictly up to Harmon, hell have to play his way back,
added Graves.
And in Wages absence Monday, Graves worked the team under its
third quarterback of the year, Larry Rentz.
Graves stated Rentz did a fine job, moving from flanker to
quarterback behind Jackie Eckdahl.
The Gators went through Mondays drill without the services of
right tackle J. D. Pasteris, a 227-pound letterman.
Pasteris re-injured a knee against LSU and on doctors orders,
Pasteris will be out for the next two games.
Pasteris loss hurt us, said Graves, after all, lie is one of our few
lettermen on the offensive line or he was.
Despite the black clouds of the Wages action and Pasteris injury,
Mondays practice was the years best for the young Gators, said
Graves.

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Illinois.
Against LSU, however, a
team ranked only ninth in SEC
defense, he was unable to move
the Gator offense.
But as Graves said in his
initial announcement of
Eckdahls promotion to the No.
1 spot, Jackie got the points on
the scoreboard, and thats what
counts.



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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9-C



Page 10-C

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

i%.

Another athletic season has closed its gates at
UF, and for the fifth straight year, the Gators nave
been crowned the best over-all athletic school in the
SEC.
And from here, things look just as bright for
next year. At least.
How about a look at what the Gators will have
to offer in 1969?
Three starters from the Florida cage team will be
back on the court next season. Neal Walk, Andy
Owens and Mike Leatherwood will all be back.
Walks maturation in both scoring and rebounding
should make him an almost certain repeat on the
All-America team. Hes the teams leader. When he
clicks so will the Gators; when he has an off-night,
Florida will also.
Owens Top Scorer?
Owens justified the faith and praise given him by
coach Tommy Bartlett before the season began.
With a summers practice under his belt, Owens
should battle Walk for the teams scoring crown.
Leatherwood will be the take-charge guy of the
team. He handled the ball and the club well last
year, but at times, his scoring wasnt up to what it
should have been.
Right now it appears that Mike McGinnis has the
upper hand for the fourth position. McGinnis is a
junior who shoots well, is fast and has shown that
he can handle the ball in tight situations. The fifth
slot is wide open, but Todd Lalich, leading scorer on
last years freshman team, will be watched carefully
by Bartlett next year.
It doesnt look as though the Gators will have the
power to go all the way next season unless a few
question marks come through in a big way. No team
would be bad with Walk and Owens on it, but
Florida may lack balance and experience.
The Gators look strong in football. As UPls
pre-season conference pick, Florida will field a team
of both individual stars and over-all depth and
experience.
Larry & Larry
Larry and Larry (Rentz and Smith) will lead
what promises to be a highly potent offense if one
or two men come around. The first if is Gary
Walker. Walker is a sophomore who last year was
the starting fullback for the Baby Gators. This year
he will be playing halfback due to Smiths switch to
the fullback slot.
One of the biggest surprises of the year may be
Jackie Eckdahl. When Rentz took over as the
Gators No.l quarterback in mid-season last year, it
looked as though Eckdahl might spend his next
three years watching Rentz from the bench, a la
Harmon Wages, Kay Stevenson, etc.
Then, this spring, Ray Graves decided that
Eckdahl had too much talent for that type of a
career. So Jackie was given a tryout at the Wideout
position, vacated by the graduation of Richard
Trapp, and the junior passed with flying colors. In
the Orange and Blue spring practice game, Eckdahl
led all receivers and capped the game off with a long
over-the-shoulder touchdown grab of a Rentz pass.
On defense, four starters graduated. Left end
Brian Jetter, tackle Don Giordano, linebacker
Wayne McCall and safety Bobby Downs will not bp
back. These posts have not been filled with definite,
starters at this moment, but young defensive
standouts such as John Faix, Robbie Rebol and
Donnie Williams should be able to fill the gaps ably,
at least.
*
The Gators are a definite threat to take the SEC
crown next year. Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee
all lost their starting quarterbacks and could be
caught in a rebuilding year. Auburn will be strong as
will Mississippi.
Florida and Alabama snould dominate SEC
baseball again next year. The Gators will lose three
men from this seasons starting nine Terry
Stroemer, Jack Frake and Richard Trapp.
But Floridas position looks very strong. Three
all-conference Gators will be back next season in

A Look At 1 969

BY PAUL KAPLAN

Nick Nicosia, Mike Ovca and pitcher Glenn Pickren.
The teams brightest spot will once again be
pitching. Pickren was the conferences biggest
winner with 10 victories, and the teams other
leading hurlers, Jim Courier, Steve Arthur, David
Kahn and Mike Jacobs will also be back.
Hitting Hurts
But hitting might be a problem, as the last 45
innings without a run for Florida might attest. But
on the bright side, Skip Lujack, Floridas
power-hitting outfielder who was sidelined this year
with a broken leg, will be back on the field next
season.
It looks like a winning year coming up in
baseball.
Coach Bill Potters entire tennis team will be
back next season. This years starting rotation of
Armi Neely, Jamie Pressly, Steve Beeland, Gregg
Hilley, Paul Lunetta and Will Sherwood rolled to
over 30 straight wins before being dumped by the
University of Miami. Florida will be ranked among
the top five teams in the nation at the start of next
season probably fourth behind UCLA, Southern
Cal, and Miami.
Neely, Floridas No. 1 player, is fast becoming
one of the top netters in the country. This year he
bounced Miamis Jaime Fillol in both of their
meetings. The two teams split two matches this
year.
Swimmers Best
There is not much one can say about the Gator
swimming team. They are by far the best in the
conference, and can compete with any team in the
country.
Next year will probably be the strongest team in
the universitys history. Only one senior who was
instrumental in the teams activities in 1968 will be
lost to graduation. Joe Scafuti, captain of this years
team, will go; he was strong in the 100 and 200-yard
breast stroke events.
But Florida has a young team. Freshmen such as
Mark McKee, who set a record every time his big toe
touched water, Bruce Williams and Jeff
Montgomery will have that big years experience by
next season.
Florida will also have the real backbone of the
squad returning in lettermen such as Andy
McPherson (next seasons captain), Barry Russo and
Steve Macri.
In golf, Florida lost only one of their top six
players, and the SEC champs of 6B have a highly
touted freshman coming up that is supposedly ready
to break right into the lineup as a replacement.
John Stoltz, a freshman from Coral Gables,
weighs only 137 pounds, but his little frame seems
to pack a real wallop. Stoltz will vie for the spot
vacated by starter Ed Hoard.
The five returnees from this years club are
Captain Steve Melnyk, John Dan, Wendell Coffee,
Hal Hutchinson, Richard Spears and John Sale.
Bridesmaids Again?
Florida will be strong in track in 1969, but it
unfortunately looks like the Gators will once again
be bridesmaids to strong Tennessee. And this is not
exactly shameful.
Three of the teams top performers will be lost to
graduation. High jumper Frank Saier, the first man
ever to jump 7-feet in the SEC, Don Hale and miler
Frank Lagotic will not be back.
But as the clubs second-place finish this year
implies, the team will be strong in 69. Conference
leaders such as John Morton, Mike Burton, Ron
Jourdan and Bob Lang will make up the heart of
next years club. If Tennessee is hurt by a larger
number of losses from this years senior class, the
Gators will be ready to run in and grab the
conference title.
From an over-all look, it seems as though the
Gators could easily make it six straight conference
championships in over-all competition next year.
I would predict Florida wins in tennis,
swimming, golf and baseball; second in track and
football; and third or fourth in basketball.
I want to congratulate Spurgeon Cherry and Ray
Rollyson for a fine year in their organization of the
independent and fraternity intramurals program.
Its a lot of work without much thanks. Their
banquets were also a pleasure. Thanks for the
invitation.
Have a nice summer, everyone.

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Highly touted even before the
season began, Steve Melnyk
didn't let anyone down through
the season or at the NCAA
Championship at Las Cruces,
New Mexico. UF took an

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STEVE MELNYK

STEVE MACRI

unblemished season into the
national tourney, and left that
way as the Gators took first
place over favored Houston. This
is Melnyk's first year on the
All-America squad.



Some All-Americans

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1968 proved to be good to Armi Neely. He
capped Miami's Jaime Fillol twice during the season,
once to lead the Gators to a win which snapped that

One Gator who needs no introduction is Neal
Walk. UF's 6'-10" wonder led the SEC in
rebounding last year, and will be back on the courts
again this year to push the Gators to another
successful season.

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ARMI NEELY

school's 30-plus winning streak. Neely is ranked as
one of the top players in the nation, and will be
back this year for a final season.

NEAL WALK

Walk, from Miami Beach, will be a senior. During
his junior season, he averaged 19.1 rebounds per
game to rank as the second leading rebounder in the
nation. He was also ranked eighth in scoring.

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240-pound John Morton
holds SEC records in the discus
and shot, and placed third in
discus in July in the NCAA meet
to earn a spot on the

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Barry Russo has earned his
second consecutive All-America
berth this year in swimming. He
placed sixth in the NCAA meet

Friday, August 16,1968, Thu Florida Alligator,

JOHN,MORTON

BARRY RUSSO

All-America team. Like all the
other All-Americans on this
page, Morton will be back next
year to help earn the Gators
more honors.

in the 200-yd. butterfly on a
time of 1:54.7. Russo will return
this year for his final year with
the Gators.

Page 11-C



By 808 PADECKY
NEW ORLEANS Forget
Jackie Eckdahl. At least this
year.
Remember Larry Rentz.
Like Saturday night here in
the Sugar Bowl against Tulane.
Rentz, playing his first
college game at quarterback,
woke up UFs offense, asleep
last week against LSU, and gave
the Green Wave a 35-0
nightmare.
There was no question at the
end who was the hero. Rentz, by
running for 109 yards and
catching a pass for four more,
passing for 82, gained more than
the entire Tulane offense.
In all, the Gators churned up
511 yards, most of it under
Rentz direction. Rentz had a

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Tulane Has 35-0 Nightmare

RENTZ SCORES HIS FIRST TD

cast of supporting players, most
fc of whom saw spot action in the
second half after UF built up a
21-0 halftime bulge.
Tailback Larry Smith took 23
of Rentz handoffs and galloped
115 yards with them, including
two touchdowns.
Then there was tailback
Tommy Glenn who scored two
more touchdowns while giving
Smith a rest. And defensive
tackle Don Giordano who w'as
the Gators top defensive ace as
he cashed in on nine tackles,
seven of them by himself.
Giordano also stopped a Tulane
drive with a pass interception.
But in the end. it was The
Blade. Rentz. who made the
difference.
The Gators took the opening
kickoff and on the first play

Rentz threw 41 yards to split
end Dick Trapp. But an
interference was ruled on
Greenie satety Jim Hancik. And
in eight seconds. Florida was in
Tulane territory.
Rentz then neatly combined
his short passes with the bull-like
rushes of Smith to move the ball
down to the one in seven plays.
Smith then capped the
nine-play. 79-yard drive with a
one-vard crunch for six points.
UF piddled around with the
Greenies most ot the first
quarter before moving again at
the end of the period. The
Gators grabbed two first downs
and 31 yards to the mid-field
stripe.
Then on the first play of the
second period. Rentz darted,
dipped and danced his way 50
yards down the south sideline
for his team's second
touchdown.
Tulanes offense then was
stopped again. Florida then
consumed almost six minutes of
the period driving for a
touchdown they didnt get. The
winners, 3-1 w'ith an open date
this weekend, went 56 yards to
the goalline in 13 plays. But
Smith committed one of his rare
mistakes of the night and
fumbled the ball.
The Green Wave, now 1-3,
then quick-kicked to its 41 on
second down. This time UF
meant business. Six plays and 34
yards later, Glenn, with a cast
over his broken right wrist,
pounded around left end from
seven yards for the score. Wayne

Barfield made his third of five
PATs and the Gators took a
halftime break with a score ot
21-0 as their refreshment.
The third period then
produced no real excitement
until the Florida offensive
machine started again in the
fourth period. Smith capped a

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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

13-play, 69-yard scoring march
with a four-yard sprint over a
gaping hole at right tackle.
With No. 2 quarterback Dave
Mclntosh in charge, Florida
moved from its 36 to the Tulane
32 in six plays. Glenn then took
a Mclntosh pitch and swept left
end for UFs final touchdown.



. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

By DAVID M. MOFFIT

ATLANTA (UPI) Alabama,
which relocated its misplaced
defense at midseason and earned
a bowl bid for the ninth straight
year, landed five players on the
22-man All-Southeastern
Conference football team
announced by United Press In International.
ternational. International.
The Crimson Tide placed
quarterback Ken Stabler, split
end Dennis Homan and guard
Bruce Stephens on the offensive
unit and linebacker Mike Hall
and cornerback Bobby Johns on
the defensive unit.
Orange Bowl-bound
Tennessee, Liberty Bowl-bound
Georgia and UF each had three
players on the team selected by
sportswriters and sportscasters
from throughout the seven-state
region.
Representing Tennessee, the
probable SEC champion, are
offensive tackle John Boynton,
center Bob Johnson and
cornerback Albert Dorsey.
Georgias contributions are
offensive tackle Ed Chandler,
defensive end Larry Kohn and
defensive tackle Bill Stanfill.

'*"" '"" J
RICHARD TRAPP

Delta Phi Epsilon
JJT oil i WJ/lm/L TiuillLMl/li
_ l

Three Gators On All-SEC Team

HP?:
'*"V
GUY DENNIS
The three players from UF,
which lost a Gator Bowl bid
when beaten by Florida State,
are all offensive performers
tailback Larry Smith, flanker
Richard Trapp and 248-pound
guard Guy Dennis.
Record setting end Bob
Goodridge of Vanderbilt and
versatile back Dicky Lyons of
Kentucky completed the
offensive team.
Other defensive players were
end John Garlington of
Louisiana State, tackle Jim
Urbanek of Mississippi, middle
guard Gusty Yearout of Auburn,
linebackers D. D. Lewis of
Mississippi State and Jimmy
Keyes of Mississippi and
defensive back Sammy Grezaffi
of LSU.
With most other top SEC
quarterbacks layed up with
injuries, Stabler, the conference
passing leader with 100
completions and 1,202 yards,
won by a whopping margin.
Stabler was kicked off the
Alabama squad last spring for
nonconformity but reinstated
just before fall drills began.

TRAPP, DENNIS,SMITH

Goodridge, Trapp and Homan
make up what is probably the
finest pass-catching trio the
All-SEC team has ever had.
Goodridge holds the record for
most receptions (66) and
yardage (1,009). Trapp, who set
the previous record last year
with 63-872, is 56-692 and
Homan 52-809. All three still
have one regular season game to
play.
Smith led the SEC in rushing
last season and, with 713 yards,
is only 29 yards shy of his 1966
mark.
UPIS All-SEC
OFFENSE
Pos. Name School
SE Dennis Homan Alabama
TE Bob Goodridge Vanderbilt
LT Ed Chandler Georgia
RT John Boynton Tennessee
LG Guy Dennis Florida
RG Bruce Stephens Alabama
C Bob Johnson Tennessee
QB Ken Stabler Alabama
TB Larry Smith Florida
FI Richard Trapp Florida
FB Dicky Lyons Kentucky
DEFENSE
. a
Pos. Name School
E John Garlington LSU
E Larry Kohn Georgia
T Bill Stanfill Georgia
T Jim Urbanek Mississippi
MG Gusty Yearout Auburn
LB D. D. Lewis Miss. State
LB Jimmy Keyes Mississippi
LB Mike Hall Alabama
HB Albert Dorsey .Tennessee
HB Bobby Johns Alabama
S Sammy Grezaffi LSU

wwaj,.
LARRY SMITH
The Gators' All-Sec tailback latches on to a pass against Kentucky.
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Page 14-C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Gators Bump Vandy In Homecoming rete

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Rentz Is Only One Left

By PAUL KAPLAN
Larry Rentzs fine
performance in the Tulane game
certainly proved a pleasant
surprise for Ray Grieves and the
Gridiron U. Crockadiles.
But, wait! Its Crazylegs
Carlsin on the phone with more
good news for Croca Ray.
Ringgg...
Grieves Hello. Grieves here;
if you hadnt heard Im the No.
1 football talent scout in the
United States I had the
foresight to change Larry Rentz
into a quarterback. By the way,
who is this?
Carlsin Hey, Ray! Its Crazy
legs here with great news for
you.
Grieves Hi, Crazy ; lay it on
me.
Carlsin Compose yourself,
Ray Jackie Eckdahl is out of
the hospital and ready to play.
Grieves Who?
Carlsin Jackie Eckdahl, our
sophomore superstar.

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Grieves ~ Oh, I remember;
hes the kid I took a look at just
to make sure that Rentz was No.
1.
Carlsin What do you mean
took a look at? He started
two games for us.
Grieves Well, you know I
dont like to make snappy
decisions.
Carlsin Cut the comedy,
Ray. Jackies standing right here
and hes dying to get his hands
on a football. Ill send him right
in he wants to give you a great
big kiss.
Grieves No, you duffo!
Carlsin -0. K., Ray, Ill tell
him to forget about the kiss.
Grieves No, no, no! Get rid
of him. Tell him hes been
placed on the B team for
disciplinary reasons. Do
something. .
Carlsin All right, hows this.
Ill tell him that his performance
in the first three games where he
was statistically superior to
Steve Spurrier in his sophomore
year has caused dissension on

UF Tops Georgia 17-16

And thats the way the season
went. UF took losses at the
hands of LSU, Miami, Florida
State, and Auburn, and limped
most of the season.
Where will the Gators rank
nationally this year? Thats the
big question, and there are a lot
of folks who are tagging the
Gators with Number One.
Florida has 26 lettermen
coming back, and graduated
only 15 members of the squad.

the team as to who is better
and we cant have that.
Grieves Great! Just great!
Carlsin Well, thats taken
care of- Jackie just went back
to the hospital with a nervous
breakdown. Now what about
Harmon Wages?
Grieves Who?
Carlsin You know, Night
Owl Wages, our No. 1
quarterback whos really No. 2,
but for a spell was on the B
team.
Grieves Tell him hes on the
C team for busting his 7:30
curfew. By the way, did you
take care of Peacock and
Mclntosh?
Carlsin Sure did. I nabbed
Peacock for kissing a girl
without getting a clearance from
you, and I told Mclntosh he was
gone for saying Gosh darn!
after LSU scored their twelfth
touchdown against us.

Grieves I knew I could do
it! I knew I could make a one
quarterback team like everybody
else.

WOLLENSAK

AIWA

608 N. MAIN

PH. 376-7171

However, some of those
graduating included Richard
Trapp, top end and flanker, as
well as top kicker Wayne
Barfield, who set a couple ot
records for consecutive points.
Others gone include Brian Jetter,
Mike McCann, Don Giordano,
Wayne McCall, and Graham
McKeel.
Tops among those returning
are 'Larry Rentz and Larry
Smith.

Ray Graves blonde bomber,
handsome Harmon Wages, is
now out of the doghouse and on
the football field again. Wages,
who had been kicked off the
varsity nine days ago for
disciplinary reasons, was
re-instated Wednesday by
Graves.
Wages served his
punishment, said Graves, and
Im glad to have him back.
Graves mentioned the Wages
action was blown out of
poportion by the press and that
it wasnt really that serious.

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ST.

Wages Reinstated

Our offense will be built
around Larry Smith, said Ray
Graves, Head Coach of the Gator
Squad.
Smith is a fullback, and:
should land in the All-American:
category this year unanimously.
Smith will be carrying the
ball 20 to 25 times per game,
continued Graves, and when we:
are in an obvious passing:
situation, he will play flanker.:

The senior from Jacksonville
worked No. 2 quarterback with
Dave Mclntosh Wednesday.
Harold Peacock, who was No. 3
quarterback against Tulane last
Saturday, is now splitting his
time between quarterbacking the
varsity and the B-team.
Meanwhile, the rest of the
Gators worked out and tried a
few new offensive wrinkles they
hope to have ready for their
Homecoming battle with
Vanderbilt on October 28.
With the open date this
weekend, Graves welcomes the
rest for his walking wounded.



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Page 15-C



Page 16-C

V The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

The BROWSE SHOP
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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 17-C



5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Page 18-C

Talent Drain Forces UF To Look North

By MARC DUNN
UFs athletic recruitment has
headed north this year in an
attempt to fill a void created by
other universities invading the
state.
More athletes from the state
of Florida play ball in the
Southeastern Conference than
from anywhere else.
The number of colleges
recruiting in the state has
increased greatly over the last
few years, which has made our
competition greater, said
Richard Giannini, assistant
sports publicity director. We
cannot rely entirely on the state
for recruiting purposes so we are
going after some of the best
athletes in the country.
In every sport the number of
new recruits from out of state
has increased.
Last fall the varsity football
roster listed Wayne Barfield
from Albany, Georgia, and
Eddie Foster and Alan Cole
from Decatur, Georgia. The
other 57 names all had Florida
hometowns. Even David Mann,
who came to UF byway of
Northeast Oklahoma Jr. College,
is a Florida boy.
This spring UF has already
signed two out of state grid stars
to football grants-in-aid. Gary
Bimson, Phoenix, Arizona, is a
football running back at a

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California junior college. Tony
Canadeo, Jr., Green Bay,
Wisconsin, was an all conference
defensive back as a junior and an
outstanding running back for his
high school team last fall.
More and more major
universities are recruiting in the
state of Florida every year
because of the plethora of
talent. In the Southeastern
Conference there are more
athletes from Florida than from
any other state.
UF still signs most of the top
athletes in the state but in recent
years it has been necessary for
UF recruiters to go out of state
for some of the Gator athletes.
Last fall the varsity football
roster listed three out of state
players, all from Georgia. Two
boys not from Florida have
already been signed this spring,
from Arizona and Wisconsin.
At the present there are three
other possible out of state
football players who are
considering UF.
In the other sports, as in
football, the coachs first
concern is to sign the athletes in
the state who are good enough
to play ball here and can meet
the entrance requirements. When
there is a void the talent needed
is secured from out of state.
The varsity basketball team
will list five non-Florida

members next fall, this compares
with three during the 1966-67
season. Three more out of state
boys have been signed for the
freshman team, Dan Boe,
t
Wisconsin, Gary Waddell,
Kentucky, and Tim Dominey,
Georgia. Two more basketball
players, one from California, are
still considering UF.

We make an all out effort to
get the best in the state before
we go elsewhere, but the state
has not been supplying enough
boys who can play good
r ANALYSIS "1
basketball and meet the
academic requirements, said
Dick Davis, assistant basketball
coach.
Florida is providing many
good track stars for the Gators
and consequently the level of
out of state recruitment has
stayed about the same. Seven
varsity members are non-Florida
athletes now, none of them
seniors. Recruitment of out of
state athletes in track without
increasing is still great.
We are going after boys in
New Jersey, Pennsylvania and
Massachusetts but there is such
good talent in the state that we
will sign them first, said Jimmy
Carnes, head track coach.

tWIQ

The tennis team has given out
one scholarship this spring to
Charlie Owens, Alabama. Coach
Bill Potter can release three
scholarships each year. The
varsity team has six starting
positions and a few reserves, so
the need for new recruits each
year is small, besides the entire
team will be returning next year.
Three of the starting six are out
of state plus one reserve. Potter
does not plan to sign anyone
else.
In the past the swimming
team has had a great number of
out of state scholarship athletes,
but none have been signed so far
this year. Coach Bill Harlan
claims that this is due in part to
a recent limit on recruiting by
the SEC. Many fine swimmers
are coming out of south Florida
and this area has supplied UF
with many top candidates for
scholarships.
Playing golf in Florida offers
the potential scholarship
recipient year found good
weather. UF has also been
consistently a top power in golf.
Many out of state boys can be
found on the varsity roster.
The varsity baseball team has
five out of state players, none of
them graduating this year. Coach
Dave Fuller is in the process of
recruiting two out of state
athletes now.

In football, track, basketball
and baseball the out of state
recruits major apprehension
about attending UF is being far
from home.
UF recruiters offer them an
excellent athletic program in
what is probably the best
conference in the nation. Also
the fine academic program and
good weather lure many to UF.
The tennis and golf teams
have been nationally ranked, so
that helps their recruitment
along with the weather
advantage which is of great
importance to those playing
these sports.
Recruitment for the
swimming team is a special
problem, which centers around
the outdoor pool. Most of the
big swimming powers have an
indoor pool, which is very
attractive to the potential
recruit. It is a difficult job to
convince someone that an
outdoor pool is not that bad in
20 degree weather, once you
start using it.
Due to UFs outdoor pool
and geographic location it is
difficult to schedule top teams
that are not nearby. Athletes go
to schools where they can
compete against good teams and
improve themselves.



Passes To Athletes May Violate NCAA

By BILL DUNN

Independent investigation by
the Alligator has found that UF
passes by local theatres -a
practice that may be in direct
violation of National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA)
rules.
The UF Athletic Department
has asked the commissioner of
the Southeastern Conference to
rule on the legality of free movie
passes given its athletes.
A rule in the NCAA
constitution states that special
arrangements designed to
provide arstudent-athlete with
extra benefits which are not
made available to the student

May be Athletes Deserve Passes

By JERRY SILBERBERG

The UF is a jock school. But,
so is Ohio State, Southern Cal.,
Missouri, Michigan State,
Georgia Tech, Pennsylvania, etc.
So, why the big concern
about the athletes discount?
Free passes to the flicks?
Havent we forgotten the other
side of the coin? Why hold the
department of intercollegiate
athletics responsible for the
actions of the local merchants?
Free enterprise, isnt it?
Does it really matter? With
due respect to Bill Dunn who
investigated the favors given
by the local business owners, I
think it is quite safe to say that
if the NCAA rules this action
illegal, Ray Graves wont take
the chance of having UF sports

ALPHA GAMMA
RHO
FRATERNITY FOR AGRICULTURE
*
Ssfc rouM iSlCfifl
t
WELCOMES ALL NEW STUDENTS
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407 S.W. 13th ST.

body in general shall be
considered to be violations of
the NCAA principles.
The rule included special
discounts on purchases, loans
without interest, indefinite or
special arrangements on
installment payments, regular or
periodic use of an automobile
without charge or at a reduced
fee charge...
The SEC has no specific
ruling on the discounts but
generally follows the NCAA
rule, Tonto Coleman,
commissioner of the SEC in
Birmingham, explained
Thursday.

Athletic Director Ray Graves

placed on suspension.
The NCAA is aware of the
favored practices. During
football season, players are given
tickets to do with as they please.
This is periodically checked and
sanctioned by the NCAA.
Lets not forget WE PAY to
see the team win, lose, or draw.
The department of
intercollegiate athletics takes
this money (from football
games, etc.) and uses it to
provide scholarships, medical
aid, housing, board, and books
for its charges. The department
doesnt beg, borrow, or take
from the University funds. So,
why make athletes whipping
boys?

There are a lot more prob problems
lems problems students face than to worry
about those few who get so

said the policy was no suprise to
him.
Graves said there was nothing
secret about the free passes,
calling them a historical
courtesy that had turned into a
general practice universally.
Mr v Edward C. Novak,
manager of the downtown
Florida Theatre, said his theatre
gave season passes to varsity
football and basketball athletes
at the UF.
Were glad to do it, said
Novak. We might even give the
visiting teams a half price cut
rate if they come as a group.
A ticket girl from the Center
Theatre told the Alligator that
she honored season passes given

many favors from local mer merchants.
chants. merchants. So, quit nit-picking. It
aint going to do much good!
ixn
1405 SW. 13th ST.

to basketball and football
players only when the sport was
in season. She did not know
why passes were not given to
athletes in other sports.

Several football and
basketball players openly
admitted they were receiving the
passes from the Plaza Theatre as
well as the other two movie

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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

houses. V
The pass entitles the athlete
but not his date to see movies
at the local theatres. One picture
identification card -a yellow
one for football players and a
blue one for basketball players
reads Courtesy Card Florida
State Theatres. The football
pass expired Dec. 31, 1967.

Page 19-C



Page 20-C

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

Netters Streak To SEC Championship

By MARC DUNN
The SEC Tennis Cham Championship
pionship Championship had eluded UF
for seven years, but the Gators
brought the trophy home last
weekend along with three
individual honors.
Florida edged out Mississippi
State University, last years
winner, by a score of 27-24.
Two of UFs three tennis
titles have come under Coach
Bill Potter. The first was in
1950, before Potter became
coach.
Tennessee was tied with the
Gators after the first days
competition. UF moved ahead
on Friday with MSU in fourth
place. Saturday, MSU put on a
big charge but fell short of the
Gators lead and finished in
second place.
Gators won individual honors
in No. 2 and No. 3 singles
position. Jamie Pressly defeated
Rod Cadwallader of MSU for the
No. 2 individual title, 6-2, 6-3.
Steve Beeland in winning the
No. 3 singles title avenged an
eaijly season loss by beating
Norman Holmes of Georgia, 6-1,
6-2.

I HPr p
L
PAUL LUNETTA
Netters End
Miamis 29
Game Streak
When Armi Neely, Floridas
No. 1 netter, walked into the
dressing room with his two
tennis rackets and a bottle of
champagne, his teammates
smiled nervously, and then
walked outside and demolished
Miami 7-2, for the biggest win of
their 45-year history.
Floridas win could not be
considered a big upset, because
the two teams were considered
fairly evenly matched. But the
score was unbelievable.
The Gators won all but one
singles match and dropped only
one of the three doubles
matches in compiling the 7-2
score. Neely started things off
by dump 1 * the Hurricanes top
netter Jaime Fillol, 10-8, 6-8,
6-3. It was Fillols first loss in
two years, as he and the Miami
team topped Florida 5 x A-3Vi last
season.
The most impressive win of
the afternoon went to Floridas
Steve Beeland, who pulled a big
upset by beating Miamis Peyton
Watson.

MSU kept the pressure on
during the three-day tournament
in Lexington. The Bulldogs wort
individual honors in four
divisions but only took two
second place finishes.
The Gators were second in
three matches. These extra
points were what made the
difference oyerall.
UF captured its first No. 1
doubles title in its SEC
Championship history. Neely
and Beeland defeated John
Edmond and Pierre LaMarche of
MSU, 6-3, 6-4, for the doubles
championship.
The turning point came on
Friday in the No. 2 doubles
matches. The UF team of Paul
Lunetta and Gregg Hilley were
playing Glenn Grisillo and
Cadwallader of MSU. the Gators
won the two-point match 4-6,
7-5, 64. A loss would have given
the championship to MSU
26-25.
Armi Neely, UFs No. 1
player, was upset by Tom Mozur
of Tennessee on Friday. This
was Neelys first loss in SEC
competition in two years. Mozur
went on to win the singles title
by defeating Steve Faulk of
LSU.

Bp- x
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Gregg Hilley, No. 4 singles,
lost his second match. Paul
Lunetta went to the finals in No.
5 singles before losing to
Grisillo, 64, 64. In No. 6 singles
competition Will Sherwood lost
to Mack Cameron of MSU in the
finals, 6-8, 6-0, 8-6.
Pressly and Lee Steele,
Floridas No. 3 doubles team,
were defeated by Hugh
Thompson and Cameron of MSU
in the finals, 64, 64. Pressly
and Steele had gone undefeated
in regular season play and over
the last two years UFs No. 3
doubles team had only been
defeated once.

WISLOOME
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UF Wins NCAA Golf Championship
rt.. kirAl CAMHCDC w i .

By NEAL SANDERS

Florida has been waiting a
ong time to win an NCAA title
in d when it Finally came
Saturday, not even Steve Melnyk
;ould believe it.
Steve was the last player left
out in the 100 degree-plus
sunshine in Las Cruces, N. M.
Florida had built up an
eight-stroke lead over eventual
second-place Houston, and it
seemed like it was all over
except to carry home the
trophy.
But, then, on the back nine,
Melnyk started having trouble.
He finished the first seven holes
at par, but bogeyed No. 17.

V w
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JOHN DARR
. .fired 285 for sth in NCAA

All KINDS
To Put Out The Florida Alligator
EDITORS PASTE-UP ARTISTS
STAFF WRITERS PHOTOGRAPHERS
CORRESPONDENTS DARK ROOM TECHNICIANS
SPORTS WRITERS ARTISTS
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ROOM 330, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
,

Melnyk then went on to post a
two-over seven on the final hole.
In the meantime, Houstons
final player, Hal Underwood,
birdied the final three holes to
cut UFs lead from eight, to
seven, to five, and finally, down
to two strokes. If Steve Melnyk
was sweating during the final
three holes of play, it wasnt
because of the heat from the
sun.
For the Gators, it was their
first team honors as an NCAA
winner. Last year, the Gators
were runnersup in the golf title,
and have placed among the top
ten in other NCAA sports.
In individual honors, John
Darr placed fifth in the NCAA
individual count, with a 285.
Melnyk was behind Darr at 287,
followed by John Sale at 290,
and finally, Richard Spears at
292. Spears posted the best
individual game for the Gators,
with a two-under par 69 on
Saturday.
On team counts, Florida
finished first over the 72-hole
course with a team total of
1154. As this is the first year
that such a long course has been
used, Floridas score will be
considered as a record.
Defending champion Houston
placed second at 1156, followed
by Wake Forest at 1160.
Oklahoma State finished at

FIRST GATOR TITLE

1162, tying with Texas to make
up the top five scores.
Number six was Arizona
State at 1166, New Mexico,
1171, Colorado, 1172, Michigan
State, 1175, and, at the tenth
spot, Florida State with a score
of 1180.
The Gators finish in this
tournament now stands to put
the squad in contention for
All-American honors.
As present regulations now
stand, the All-America squad is
composed on a 6-6-6-18
arrangement six each on the
first, second, and third teams,
with 18 honorable mentions.
A proposed ruling would
change the formation to an
8-8-8-18 arrangement.

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The change could push
several additional UF golfers
into contention for the first
team. John Darr, who finished
fifth in the individual standings,
is almost a sure finish on the
first team. Steve Melnyk,
however, is the best known of
UFs golfers, and was ranked

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Friday, August 16,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

highly in pre-season polls. His
showing at the NCAA
tournament left nothing to
discredit his rating as he finished
two strokes over Darr. With this,
Melnyk could also appear on the
roster, which will be released
within ten days.

Page 21-C



Page 22-C

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August

UF Track Four Years Pay Off

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By NEAL SANDERS
Track at UF has come a long
way in four years.
In 1964, when Coach Jimmy
Carnes came to UF from
Furman UFs track squad was at
best considered fair. It was able
to place well in the SEC
tourney, but dual meet
competition came strictly from
southern schools, where the
times and distances lagged
behind other sections of the
country.
But that was four years ago,
and today, UF ranks among the
top ten colleges in the country
in track.
The four year climb to
national prominence hasnt
come easily for the Gators.
Today, the South has discovered
track, and every SEC school is
out after the top tahnt.
UF has been, lucky. The
school has a lot to offer the
prospective Gator. Track
training goes on outdoors twelve
months a year, which is
something that no other SEC
school can claim. Well developed
track facilities aid the athletes
in their training, and the campus
is becoming more aware of the
track activities.
Floridas track record over
the past four years has been
nothing less than spectacular.
UF has lost three meets in four
years and went one season
undefeated. Each year, the
Gators have introduced new,
tougher schools into their
schedule, and have beaten many
of them.
This year, UF scheduled
Kansas, possibly the nations top
track school, and although losing
made a better showing than
anyone could ever have given the
Gators credit for. UF took six
first places.
UF switched frorn the Penn
Relays this year, and decided to
take on some western schools in
the Drake carnival. The result
for UF was a first, two seconds,
and a third place at the lowa
contest.
Next year, UF takes on yet

16,1968

another of the nations best
Villanova.
With UFs rise to fame, so has
come the influence of thf
Florida Relays, which arc
considered the Souths top
carnival. This year, more than 4(
colleges were entered in the
university division.
Whats in store for next year?
Nothing but the best for UF.
Two members of the team will
graduate, but Coach Carnes is
signing additional talent to more
than make up for the loss.
Frank Lagotic, injured early
in the season and unable to run,
and Frank Saier, a top high
jumper, will both be graduating.
All of UFs other familiar
faces will still be around.
Probably the best known is
weightman John Morton, who
has remained undefeated this
season in competition. Morton
has the best throws this year in
both the discus and shot put in
the SEC.
Then, there is Mike Burton,
rated as one of the nations top
javelin men. Burton throws
consistently around 228, and
recently topped this with a 234-
-9 effort.
Another of UFs top
consistent winners is Bob Lang,
who set a new school record of
1:49.9 in the 880. Also, Ron
Jourdan, UFs top high jumper is
the first, and still the only
jumper in the SEC to go over
seven feet. Last summer, UFs
Saier jumped an even seven feet.
A UF freshman who has
made a name for himsejf is
Grover Howard, who passed 47
in the long jump. Another top
fielder is Mike Flanagan, who is
near the 16 mark in the pole
vault.
In the 440 intermediate
hurdles, Jerry Fannin and C.J.
Fowlkes-have both made their
marks on the SEC. The pair
placed second and third in the
SEC meet last weekend.
If UF is considered as a top
track school, theres good reason
for it.

A. JP
BROWN
JOURDAN
: : > >
// -.
FLANAGAN
W&iFW' #v;:'ys^g
FANNIN
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FOWLKES

£ As any Gator will tell you,
|: the sports season certainly
:j doesnt end, or even slow down
i after the last football game. In
yfact, its just possible that the
twinning fever picks up just a bit.
j: There have been five
:j All-Sports Awards given by the
i:SEC, and UF has won them all.
: The reason? UF consistently
i; takes more SEC championships
: than any other school.
: In 1968, UF took the SEC
: top spot in swimming, tennis,
i; and golf, and second places in
: track, and baseball.
: The crowning achievement
: : came after most students had

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left for the summer. UFs golf
team swept the NCAA
tournament for their first team
National Championship.
A few complications have set
in along the way, however. As
the name of UF has become a
power to reckon with nationally,
UF has had to discard its light
schedules and tackle harder
ones. Most schools dropped were
expected and there was little
comment.
The dropping of FSU,
however, raised howls of protest
that still haven't settled yet. The
issue will probably not be settled
until late in September.



UF Swimmers Capture 13th SEC Title

By NEAL SANDERS

Floridas swimming Gators
made thirteen a lucky number
Saturday, as they outpaced all
competition to take their 13th
straight Southeastern
Conference Championship. The
Gators, heavily favored to take
the title again, took seven new
SEC records in the process.
The three-day meet opened
Thursday at Tennessees
enclosed Student Aquatics
Center pool. In the first days
competition, Florida set three
new records, and took the early
lead in competition. fit the 500
yd. freestyle, Bruce Williams
shaved 35 seconds off the old
records with a time of 4:25.5.
Mark McKee, swimming in
the 200 individual medley,
broke the. record held by
teammate Andy McPherson with
a time of 2:02.8. The Gators
also took the 800 yd. freestyle
relay in a new SEC time.
Friday saw three more SEC
records fall to Florida. Gators
set records in the 400 yd.
individual medley, 200 yd.
freestyle, and 400 yd. medley.
Saturday was unimportant to
Floridas final victory. The
Gators had built up a lead which
no other team could hope to
pass. Still, the team of Andy
McPherson, Jim Perkins, Steve
Macri, and Bruce Williams
combined to set a new record of
3:37.3 in the 400 yd. medley
relay. That brought the total of
new records set by Florida to
seven.

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Seven events were scheduled
for Saturday, and UF took four
of them, including the new SEC
mark. Other first places by
Florida included Andy
McPhersons 100 yd. freestyle,
with a time of 47.4; Steve
Macris 52.2 finish in the 100
butterfly, and a total of 421
points by Mike Chalbeck to take
first place in the three meter
diving competition.
In total points, Florida stood
far out in front with a team total
of 57814 points. Tennessee was
the surprise of the meet,
finishing second with 383 1 4.
Tennessee fielded a swimming
team for the first time in 13
years, and of its 18 swimmers,
15 are freshmen. Alabama
finished third with 352 points,
Georgia fourth with 278, and
Vanderbilt fifth with 130 points.
Florida, however, was not

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MARK McKEE

alone in breaking SEC titles.
Alabama's Leo French broke the
old 165(7 yd. freestyle record on
Saturday with a new time of
17:38.6. Dirk Van Hoesen. of
Vanderbilt, a freshman, broke
the standing record in the 200 yd.
breaststroke with his time of
2:15.1 The old record, set in
1964, was held by Florida's
Charlie King.
Florida's victory was aided by
the January NCAA ruling
permitting freshmen to compete
in swimming varsity
competition. This allowed
Florida's freshman talent,
including Mark McKee, and Mike
Chalbeck, who both posted first

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place marks for the Gators, to
compete in the SEC
championship.
Florida now hopes to have a
large part of its team invited to

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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

the NCAA Championships.
These will be held March 28, 29,
and 30th at Dartmouth College.
Last year, the Gators finished
eighth in that competition.

Page 23-C



Page 24-C

> Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

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The ideal UF student is truly
"a man for all seasons." And the
widely diverse activities available
to him are indicative of that
fact. In the next few pages, we
explore a few of these.
Fraternities, and sororities,
with their full calendar of fun
and games and community
work, beckon for the
socially-minded student.
A truly international flavor
emotes from the many foreign
student clubs. They offer an
oasis of friendship for the
foreign student and for those
interested in travel and
international affairs.
A veritable myriad of
organizations cater to the
business and hobby interests of
the UF students. Our only regret
is that space limits the coverage
available.

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By MICHAEL ABRAMS
Alligator Staff Writer

A iarge black ceramic bust of
a laughing Negro rests on the
des k of a high ranking UF
administrator. This may be the
only Negro he sees today and
certainly the only one he will
find laughing.
Todays UF Negro student is
in a group containing less than
one half of one per cent of all
UF students. Briefly, out of over
19,000 students registered at
this university, there are only 80
Negroes.
Even the University of
Alabama, where
former governor
yl George Wallace
symbolically
IT '3|U raised his arm in
% integration just
WHITEHEAD three y ears a S
- today has over 300 Negro
students.
These statistics seem to mean
little to the administration of
the UF which many Negroes feel
practices open racial
discrimination.
According to Richard H.
Whitehead, director of
admissions, There is no
indication on the part of UF not
to take everyone who is
qualified. Whether he is white or
black he gets the same
treatment.
We do not even learn the
race of the student on his
application form, stated
Hdtehead. We consider every
applicant Without regard to race
or color.
However, once admitted,
students are asked to fill out a
student audit form which asks
for race, he continued. This
form will appear in machine
processing and is kept for
information files.
This year the United States

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Few Blacks In UF Student Activities

Health, Education, and Welfare
Department (HEW) is requiring
statistics on Negro enrollment at
UF.
We have been held back by
computer backup, said
Whitehead, but we should have
the data by Nov. 15. This is the
first time we have had to report
a breakdown on race.
Whitehead said the reason
there were not more Negro
students at UF was that so few
chose to file college applications.
We would like to see every
student that is qualified to come
to have that opportunity, he
added.
That opportunity comes with
a score of 300 or above on the
Florida Twelfth Grade
Placement Test and a C
average in high school.
Unlike UF, Tallahassees
Florida A&M will consider
students who score below 300
but who the faculty committee
judges should have an
opportunity to demonstrate
ability to do successful work in
the college classroom. A&M is
predominantly Negro.
Most of the students at
Negro schools in Florida want to
go to Florida A&M, observed
Negro David Jackson, 3EG, of
Bonifay. A lot of them cant
meet the requirements at UF.
They dont want to take the
challenge. They have an idea its
going to be rough.

In a recent U.S. government

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APATHY OR DISCRIMINATION?

publication, Equality of
Education Opportunity, it was
shown that Negroes usually have
worse high school facilities,
worse teachers, less varied
programs, and less stimulating
classmates. These conditions are
magnified in Florida.
We just didnt get enough
funds, said Negro Stanley
Pearson, who recently graduated
from Madison High School in
Madison. Negro schools in
Florida are discriminated
against. Money is not distributed
proportionately. This is one
reason for poorer education.
4 Negro students are hesitant to
apply to organizations at UF
because they
feel they will
'f run into dis dis
dis crimination,
pa* There are a
l Ipr 1 lt f people I
IrappJ know who
wouldnt come
to UF if they
JORDAN were given a
ticket, said Negro Larry
Jordan, 2UC. Go to a football
game or any sporting event. How
can you feel a part of an ocean
of whiteness?
There are no Negro athletes
in the athletic programs at UF.
No Negro participates in
student government.
Negroes have not been
welcome in fraternities or
sororities. r

I think as the student body

matures there will be a larger
involvement of Negroes, said
Charles Edwards, president of
Blue Key. Weve never even had
an application. Ive never known
a Negro to apply for Blue Key.
If he had the necessary academic
qualifications we certainly
wouldnt discriminate.
There are no Negro religious
organizations on campus.
God help us if there were
one, mused Dr. Austin Creel of

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Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

the Department of Religion.
That would be religious
discrimination in reverse,
wouldnt it?
There have been attempts by
Negroes to form organizations
but they havent succeeded.
Weve tried to get Negro
organizations started but they
just didnt work, said Pearson,
a Negro freshman. There wasnt
enough real interest.

Page 25-C



Page 26-C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Homecoming Grows & Growls

Flemming Field was packed as 2,300 excited, screaming football
fans anxiously watched Coach (later General) James A. Van Fleets
football team defeat Missouri Valley Conference champion Drake
University by a score of 10-0.
What was the occasion?
It was the first, student-planned, University of Florida
Homecoming in 1924.
The very first homecoming was a three-day spring reunion for
alumni of East Florida Seminary in May, 1892. Shortly afterwards the
campus moved across town to its present location and in 1907 a Dads
day was inaugurated. Later the event was changed to coincide with
Thanksgiving weekend and a football game was included for the first
in the activities.
It was not until 1924, however, that UF officially recognized
homecoming as an annual event. In that year, Dr. A. A. Murphree,
later president of UF, set up the framework for a student organization
to be responsible for homecoming.
From this group of student planners emerged the Florida Blue Key,
a mens leadership fraternity, which has planned and coordinated it
ever since that time.
One of the first events of homecoming weekend that attracts a
large majority of the student body is the parade. The first
homecoming parade took place in 1924. That year a motorcade
consisting mostly of undecorated cars, left the campus, drove
downtown, around the courthouse square and then back to campus.
This year, more than 100 units have already been entered and the
parade looks like it will be the biggest yet, according to Fred Taylor,

MBSfe J

Girls on floats capture homecoming theme

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A lot of man (and girl) hours go Into float building

newly appointed parade chairman. Floats will be the integral part of
the parade and featured along with them will be some of the top
bands in the state including Florida A&M, UF, and more than 30 top
high school bands. Also included in the parade will be a great number
of amusing entries from many different student groups.
Gator Growl, now in its 35th year, started as a modest student
pep rally the night before the football game. The Alligator is given
credit for the first pep rally in 1916. Growl was originally held in the
University Auditorium, later it was moved to an outdoor setting and
fireworks were added to the program. The rally was finally transferred
to the stadium in 1932.
Campus legend has it that Growl got its unique name from a tired
Florida Blue Key member in 1931. As he was leaving a meeting in
which they had failed to arrive at a name for the rally, he remarked,
Oh, let the Gator growl.
In the more recent years, Gator Growl has been billed as the
worlds largest student-produced show. Gator Growl chairman Mike
Moore says he expects a crowd approaching 70,000 and he hopes to
have a big name emcee.
Included in Growl this year will be a spectacular fireworks display,
student skits, crowning of the Homecoming Queen, the Florida A&M

(SEE HC SLOGAN ENTRIES, PAGE 27-C)

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Even band members have to stop ana rest

During the early 'Growls, freshmen were required to
carry their own weight in wood in order to build the
traditional bonfire Boxing matches were another
popular form of previous Growlentertainment.

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This is what homecoming parades are all about

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Pretty girls tend to steal the show
(FROM PAGE 26-C)
Marching 100 plus new and different entertainment to be announced
later, Moore said.
Immediately preceding Gator Growl is Pre-Growl which is designed
to entertain the early arrivers. Andy Rafkind, Pre-Growl Chairman for
Homecoming 6B, has some new ideas to keep the
good-seat-searchers happy. Rafkind is considering such things as the
Army and Air Force drill teams, a Battle of the Bands, a contest of
some kind for sorority girls, and possibly a chariot race.

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Now let's see, what was that slogan?

HC Slogan Entries
Come Pouring In

Tht Homecoming slogan contest has become very
popular among the general public, well as the
students. The purpose of the contest is to get a
slogan which will be used as the central theme
for the big weekend.

We received approximately 2,000 entries this year, Jeff Weil,
slogan contest chairman, said. The contest ended July 31.
This years contest offered five vacation trips for the top five
slogans submitted.
Another added feature to the homecoming weekend is the
Coronation Ball. The ball takes place immediately following Gator
Growl and is held in the Union Ballroom from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
A host of door prizes have already been solicited for the
semi-formal affair according to Steve Wood, special functions
chairman in charge of the dance.
Two other events that will take place over the weekend will be the
Alumni events such as Florida Showcase, Alumni registration, Alumni
reunion, Alumni banquet, and the Alumni barbeque. Dave Coggshall
has been appointed as chairman of Alumni Events and Jake Schikel is
in charge of the banquet.
It takes a large staff to plan and co-ordinate an action-packed
weekend like the University of Floridas homecoming. Others working
behind the scenes are: Bill Wack, Assistant General Chairman; Roger
Blackburn, personnel; Bruce Boker, finance; Tom Cone, technical;
Larry Nixon, honored guests; and Patty Larot, executive secretary.

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House decorations have to start from ground level and work up

Friday. August 16,1968. The Florida Alligator,

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Break out the band

Page 27-C



Page 28-C

. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Sorority Rush: Delight Or Dilemma?

Before school opened this fall I had the opportunity
to visit the University of Alabama campus with my aunt
and uncle. While driving past the sorority houses, the
doors to one house suddenly opened and out poured 50
girls singing and clapping.
My aunt, quite amazed by the whole thing, turned to
me and said, What in the world are they doing?
Practicing for rush, I explained.
Is that what all the sororities do? she asked.
At this time I realized that to someone who has never
been a participant, rush is a very strange phenomenon 1
even though it occurs at the beginning of every school
term.
Rush, which began Sunday, January 7 with ice water

UF sororities are nothing if not busy. From service projects (right)
to less lady-like activities such as the annual Sigma Chi Derby (below),
they are active year-round in a swirl of teas, socials and service
projects.

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teas, brings up many questions for an independent.
Should I go out for rush? What should I wear to rush
parties? How should I act? What are rush parties like?
There are two main reasons why a girl would go out
for rush. One of these, obviously, is that she hopes to
pledge a sorority. The second reason is that rush serves
as a time to see the sorority houses and presents an
opportunity to learn a little more about those
organizations which involve so many women on campus.
It is important for a new girl on campus to go through
rush. How else can she learn of sororities?
Often people ask what sorority women expect of a
rushee so that they will know how to act during rush
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to be herself. When a rushee goes into a strange house to
face strange people its difficult for her to relax and be
herself. This is understood. But this is the most

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important thing to remember during rush. A girl who
pretends to be something she is not may later find that
the sorority she is in really wasnt the best for her after
all. Or she might conform so that she becomes
something that she really wasnt meant to be.
One of the most often criticized aspects of rush is the
time element. It is difficult to get to know a person in
the small amount of time alfotted. We try to get as
accurate an indication as possible of the girls
personality, tastes, etc. oy talking to them directly. The
time factor is somewhat a disadvantage for the rushee as
well as the sororitv, but in the long run, it has proven to
be adequate.
Recommendations are of course important, but they
are not the final deciding factor considered for pledging a
girl. That factor is the girl herself.



Interhall Council
helps Dorm Life

Interhall Council, a new coed
group formed from the old
Mens Interhal Council and
Womens Interhall Council, will
begin its operations early in
September.
Xhe council serves as a
channel of communication
between the area councils of the
various dormitories. Its members
represent students living in
on-campus housing in a
cross-section of campus
activities.
The council works with the
University College in providing
fWildiife Society!
fFormed At UF |
ji A student chapter of the j:j
j: National Wildlife Society was jjj
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ji spring quarter for students ji;
j: interested in the conservation ji;
j: of wildlife. jij
ji In May, the organization jij
ji was granted a charter by the jij
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j:j According to its bylaws, jij
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jjj Interested students should jij
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:j president of the chapter, at : i
i; UF Ext. 2495. jij

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films and lectures in the dorms
in coordination with several
courses.
T
The housing office and the
council work together in
improving the residence halls
facilities and activities.
The council also sponsors a
Homecoming dance and show.
Also, many dances are planned
in the living areas each quarter.
With all sophomores and
freshmen required to live
on-campus this fall, the councils
job will become more diverse
because it will have to respond
to many needs.

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Friday. August 16, 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Page 29-C



Page 30-C

> The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16,1968

Engineering Council Promotes Profession

The Benton Engineering
Council is the student
government organization in the
UFs College of Engineering. It
coordinates all inter interdepartmental
departmental interdepartmental student activities
in the college.
i
The BEC also promotes
understanding of professional
engineering that may not be
obtained in a student-instructor
relationship. The BEC through

'Flo rida Engineer:
A Student Magazine

The FLORIDA ENGINEER is an engineering magazine published
by the students of the College of Engineering. Since the first issue was
published in the fall of 1950, the magazine has been published
continuously, four issues per year. The entire publishing process is
done completely by the student staff with advice and guidance given
by the faculty advisors.
Articles, editorials, and special features appearing in the magazine
deal with a variety of topics pertinent to the college and the general
field of engineering. Some of the articles are researched and written
by staff writers while other are solicited from the colleges professors
in the form of interviews or complete articles.
The general tenor of the subject matter is also diverse, ranging from
technical material and general interest, factual information to the
expression of original views and opinions. The student editorial staff
has the only control over copy submitted for publishing.
Staff work is completely voluntary. Editor positions are chosen by
the editorial board which picks qualified candidates from the general
staff.
The FLORIDA ENGINEER presently has a circulation of
approximately 2000 copies per issue. These magazines have a wide
distribution reaching not only all UF engineering students and faculty
but also many other universities throughout the nation and every
junior college and high school in Florida. In addition, many UF
alumni and numerous industrial engineering firms receive the
magazine.

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the Student Chapter of the
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affiliated with the state-wide
Florida Engineering Society and
the National Society of
Professional Engineers, the
largest professional engineering
organization in the nation.
The BEC elected new officers
at the last meeting of the spring
quarter. They are Edwin R.
DuPont, President; Wayne B.
Wall, Vice President; Ronald B.

Dailey, Secretary; Robert L.
Cusumano, Treasurer.
Limited summer activity of
the BEC has resulted in a new
concept for the Engineers Fair
held every spring. A new

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organization will be used in the
upcoming Engineers Fair, April
18-20, 1969.
For the new students this fall,
the BEC is planning a large
orientation program. The new

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PLAYING CHECKERS WITH COMPUTER
... at annual Engineer's Fair

students will be introduced to
the officers of the BEC and to
the officers of the various
professional and honorary
societies that are members of the
Benton Engineering Council.



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AF Suits Both Sides

The Air Force ROTC Detatchment 150 at UF
has something for the military minded girl and
boy student alike.
For the coed, the ROTC unit offers membership
in Angel Flight, the coed auxiliary of the Arnold Air
Society.
The Arnold Air Society is an honorary
professional organization for the cadets.
The UF military detachment also sponsors the
Billy Mitchell Drill Team, the airmen's precision
drill team.
The Air Society was named in honor of Gen. H.
H. (Hap) Arnold, commanding general of the Army
Air Forces in WW 11. The Dale Mabry Squadron of

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AIR FORCE ROTC DOES HAVE ITS BETTER SIDE

... As these Angel Flight members can testify
3 FOLD PROGRAM OFFERED

the AAS was formed at UF in 1950.
.Angel Flight works to advance and promote
interest in UF and the Air Force: Members
participate in numerous service projects as well as
serving as hostesses at UF, civic and AFROTC
functions. Angels are chosen on the basis of interest,
personality, appearance, poise and academic
achievement.
Membership on the drill team is open on a
selective basis to cadets who must apply early in the
fall quarter. A trip to New Orleans to march in the
Mardi Gras parades highlights the drill team
activities.
For those interested it is not too late to register

Rawlings Offers
Sex Education
By PAM EDWARDS
Alligator Correspondent
The coed residents of Rawlings Hall are learning about sex from
the experts.
The dorm is currently engaged in the most extensive and
thorough sex education program yet to be presented at the UF," said
Mrs. Margaret R. Beistle, Rawlings' head counselor.
So far four programs have been presented: Male and Female
Anatomy and Physiology," Sexual Activity and the Physiology of
Intercourse." Psychological Concerns" (involving subjects such as
virginity vs. non-virginity and pre-marital sex guilt), and Childbirth,
Pregnancy and Contraception."
There have been a wide range of speakers including Dr. Carl T.
Clarke and Dr. Mary McCaulley, both clinical psychologists; Dr.
Melvin W. Heine, gynecologist at the medical center; Dr. Nell W.
Potter, infirmary physician; and Miss Jennet M. Wilson, assistant
professor of nursing.
The program is the result of a large response from the residents
involving a survey circulated throughout the dorm early in the Winter
Quarter.
The survey asked the students to check programs they would be
interested in having sometime during the year. The list included a
wide range of interests from knitting to horseback riding to sex
education.
The response was phenomenal," Mrs. Beistle said. Out of about
340 girls, 320 surveys were returned and 265 of these had indicated
an interest in the sex education program."
The second most popular topic was horseback riding with 80
responses.
We were faced with a real problem. What kind of a program could
we effectively present to 265 girls of different ages and of varied
backgrounds, experience, and maturity-levels?" Mrs. Beistle said.
She and Mrs. Ann Q. Lynch, program coordinator for Rawlings,
then contacted Drs. McCaulley and Clarke and presented them with
the problem.
What we came up with was the most open and honest program we
could possibly present," Mrs. Beistle said.
Until now, dorms would present a film on birth and have a
gynecologist answer questions following it, she added. And that was
sex education for the year,
There is absolutely no moralizing in these programs, Mrs. Beistle
said.

Friday, August 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 31-C



Page 32-C

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 16, 1968

STUDENT FOOTBALL INFORMATION-1968
HOW DO I OBTAIN A
FOOTBALL TICKET?
STUDENT SEATING
STUDENT SEATING: Each student who pays the student activity fee is entitled to admission to each home football game. He must, however,
obtain a reserved seat assignment for each game separately. These are issued at the Gate 13 ticket windows, east side, according to the following
schedule: (*)
Air Force <*> See Below
Miss. State Sept. 30 2:30 8:00 P.M.; Oct. 1 1:00- 5:00 P.M.
Tulane Oct. 7 2:30 8:00 P.M.; Oct. 8 1:00 -5:00 P.M.
Auburn Oct. 24 2:30 8:00 P.M.; Oct. 25 1:00 5:00 P.M.
Georgia Oct. 28 2:30 8:00 P.M.; Oct. 29 1:00 5:00 P.M.
Miami Nov. 21 2:30 8:00 P.M.; Nov. 22 1:00 5:00 P.M.
Thereafter, all seats will be at the regular price of $6.00 for students and general public alike.
The tickets will be thoroughly mixed and issued at random so that any seat location could be given out at anytime. There is no advantage to
be gained by forming lines early. You MUST accept the ticket issued to you. You may not exchange it later for a better one nor refuse the
ticket issued and go to the end of the line in hope of a better draw.
Each student must bring his ID cards in person to get his ticket. Those wishing to sit together must come together. However, a student with
a non-student date may buy a date ticket at the same window and receive two adjacent seat assignments. A student with a coed date may bring
both cards for two tickets. Once your card is punched, you can not buy a date ticket at a later time.
The reserved seat assignment is not good for admission; it merely gives the location of your stadium seat. For admission, you must have your
picture ID card, validated fee receipt for the first quarter, and a reserved seat assignment. A date must have a date ticket, a seat assignment
adjacent to the date's, and be accompanied by a student of the opposite sex.
AIR FORCE GAME l
- f ......
AIR FORCE GAME: Since this game is played before classes start and is in Tampa, the above procedure is modified as follows: Admission will
be by assignment. A $2.00 deposit must be made by each student wishing to see the game. A receipt will be issued and if presented in Tampa
this* deposit will be refunded -- but only to the student who made the deposit. Deposits were made by continuing students in May. New
students will receive order blanks by mail in August and may send in their deposits at that time. Date tickets may be purchased by both groups
when deposits are made. Seat assignments will be issued only in Tampa. The east side ticket windows will be open from 10:00 AM until the
start of half-time. It is your responsibility to pay your fees in time to have your validated fee receipt in your possession by game time. Both fee
receipt and seat assignment are required for admission. There will be no group seating for this game.
F.S.U. GAME
F.S.U. One ticket per student for his own personal use may be ordered by mail (no date tickets for this game). Blanks will be mailed out on
August 15th and must be returned with a check for $6.00 by September 1. Your fees must be paid before your order will be honored. You will
be mailed a receipt which must be presented at the east side ticket windows, Gate 13, Florida Field, on September 23rd from 2:30 8:00 P.M.
to receive your ticket. If we are unable to fill your order beacuse of limited supply, your check will be promptly returned. Make check payable
to the University Athletic Association and mail to Box 14485, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
GEORGIA GAME
GEORGIA GAME: Each student who plans to attend the Georgia game in Jacksonville must deposit $2.00. He will receive a receipt, which he
will present at one of the east side ticket booths in Jacksonville for a full refund of his $2.00. Each student must claim his own deposit refund.
Deposits will be made and seat assignments issued on Oct. 28th & 29th on a first come first serve basis during the hours set in paragraph one.
After Oct. 29th, ANY REMAINING TICKETS WILL BE PUT ON SALE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC. Date tickets will be sold at the same
time deposits are made and assignments picked up. They will not be sold in Jacksonville, nor will seat assignments be available.
DATE TICKETS
DATE TICKETS: Available date tickets may be purchased at the Gate 13 ticket windows at the same time your seat assignment is issued.
(Exception -- see Air Force Game) Once your card is punched, a date ticket can not be obtained at a later time. Date Ticket issue and prices
are:
Air Force (See Above) $3.00 Auburn Oct. 24,25 $3.00 (HC)
Mississippi State Sept. 30, Oct. 1 $3.00 Georgia Oct. 28,29 $6.00 #
Tulane Oct. 7,8 $3.00 Miami Nov. 21,22 $3.00
"Georgia will not agree to a reduction.
NON-HOME GAMES
NON-HOME GAMES: Tickets may be purchased at the ticket office in the lobby of the stadium on the west side. You may buy one or more
tickets, depending on supply, from the start of school until listed deadlines:
UNC Oct. 10, $6.00; Vanderbilt Oct. 17, $6.00; Kentucky Nov. 7, $6.00.
. ' ; r ... " V
GROUP SEATING
GROUP SEATING: Contact Student Government for details. If your organization desires to attend the Mississippi State game as a group, fee
receipts and money for date tickets must be turned into west side ticket office at Gate 2 before 3:30 P.M., Monday, September 30. Seats will
be assigned Tuesday and distributed on Wednesday. Your fee receipt and money should be collected by your group chairman and returned to
you within a 24 hour period. The fee receipt is not left at the Athletic Department, but is punched, counted, and receipted during a ten minute
period.