Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Possible Showers
High In The 90s
Low In The 70s

Vol. 60, No. 169

* ip s^%NliiP^r^
. :<%>V .frjffjlPj^rt^KF
'': \s \sa
a \sa V ffi : i&j||
LOIS PARKS
A MAN AND HIS MUSIC
This young lad, youngest of 250 who gathered at UF's Plaza of the
Americas Saturday to protest the Vietnam war, attempts to "finger
out" a borrowed psychedelic guitar. For the full story see page two.

Homecoming Political In '6B

Gators Reign in 6B
Campaign" is the slogan and
theme for the UF 1968
Homecoming celebiation.
Homecoming Slogan Contest
winners were announced by
Homecoming Chairman Manny
James Monday.
Contest winners, Mr. and Mrs.
Donald E. Larsson, 3459 NW
12th Ave., won a five-day cruise

Proposals Alive And Well In Mexico

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
liie voluntary class attendance
recommendation is alive and in Mexico.
Whether it is well or not is another
question.
Mexico is where UF President Stephen
C. OConnell is on vacation. Amid the
sunshine and surf, OConnell will
undoubtedly mull over what to do with
the attendance recommendation, and a
group of other recommendations that
recently were passed by Action
Conference.
' The President has several choices he
can make. First, he can make Clyde
Taylor and Student Government happy
by sending the attendance recommenda recommendation
tion recommendation directly to the University Senate for
their next meeting, September 24.

The
Florida Alligator

SLOGAN WINNERS ANNOUNCED

to Jamaica, a weekend for two
at the Holiday Inn here, and will
be the guests of Florida Blue
Key during Homecoming
weekend. Both Larsson and his
wife are UF graduates.
The winning slogan was only
one of several slogans entered in
the contest by the Larssons.
Second place winner was UF
student William Rusty Bames,
who won a four-day vacation to

Or he can first send it to the UF
Council of Academic Deans, who will
undoubtedly have several comments to
make on the recommendation.
In fact, OConnell could even bury the
recommendations under a. palm tree in
Ti afTfaha and study the
recommendation until he is 65 and ready
to retire, if he wanted.
Right now, nobody is certain of
OConnells next move. Many are
speculating, however, that aince one
recommendation that passed Action
Conference gives freshmen the right to
voluntary class attendance against the
wishes of the University Colleges Dean
Franklin A. Doty, the bill might be in for
a few changes.
Not all recommendations that pass
Action Conference have to be sent to
Faculty (University) Senate, said Rae O.

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

SG Discovers $16,537
Os Unallocated Funds

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
Student Government's
massive sl.l million budget,
slated for Student Senate debate
last week, was returned instead
to the Budget and Finance
committee for final approval.
It was probably just as well
because between Thursdays
Senate meeting and Sundays
budget committee meeting,
United-First party leaders
uncovered $16,537 of
unallocated funds.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich, after analyzing
the budget several hours Friday
night, noted that only income
from student activity fees was
included in the budget. But SG
also has other income sources,
such as student traffic fines.
The budget committee
re-worked the budget Sunday,
alloting an additional $2,000 to
student salaries to pay the top
four student officers SSOO per
quarter, $4,000 for the
newly-created position of
full-time Senate secretary, SSOO
to purchase a new electric
typewriter for SG and SIO,OOO

Nassau with his entry: Gators
Reign in Election Campaign.
Mrs. Luke Wilsons Gators
Campaign for SEC Fame got
her a third place position and a
week at Ocean Manor Resort in
Fort Lauderdale.
Fourth and fifth prizes went
to students Barry Diamond and
Skip Kedney who won three-day
weekends at Crystal River and
Cape Coral.

sNEXT MOVE OCONNELLS;

Weimer, presidential assistant for public
relations. The attendance proposal will
most likely be sent to the Faculty Senate,
but I dont know about the others.
Activist factions in the Action
Conference want OConnell to act on the
proposals immediately, without
consulting the University Senate or any
of the many University Committees.
OConnell has said he cannot do this.
Some of the recommendations that
have passed Action Conference and are
presently sitting on OConnells desk
awaiting action, include: A study on the
placement of Negroes in campus housing;
freedom of expression for Student
Publications; a university-wide
developmental program; a resolution
calling for the recruiting of qualified
Negroes.
Weimer also said that it was a strong

to campus improvements.
The reason the budget was
returned to the committee in the
first place was that Senate
leaders were concerned that if
passed last Thursday the budget
might have been illegal.
As reported in Fridays
Alligator, the balanced budget
slated for debate was the
product of Budget and Finance
Chairman Bob White and
Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett.

Vets Budget Cut ;
Bad Image SG

By DAVID OSIER
Alligator Correspondent
The UF Veterans Clubs
charter, which has been under
recent political fire, was passed
last week by the Student Senate,
but the club still will not receive
a line-item allocation from
Student Governments (SG) pro proposed
posed proposed 1968-69 budget.
The charter passed the Senate
Thursday night by unanimous
vote.
Student Body Vice-President
Gary Goodrich said review of
the clubs charter had been held
up for two months by what he
called a legislative ploy.
Goodrich said he felt the
Senate thought the club didnt
need an SG subsidy and wasnt
promoting the UFs image.
James Hollis, Veterans Club
president, pointed out that his
club is the only known UF
organization to have won the
coveted Freedom Foundation
Award.
Hollis, who was the lone
anti-demonstrator at the Dow

Inside
Ferlinghetti Speaks
At Draft Bazaar
See Story, P. 2

Tuesday, August Id. 196 S

Because the budget has to be
passed before the end of the
summer term, White sent the
completed budget directly to the
Senate to save time. He pointed
out that if committee members
disagreed with the budget, they
could debate it on the Senate
floor.
But, to comply with student
body law, the budget was
returned to the committee for
final approval.
(SEE 'SG FUNDS' PAGE 2)

Chemical protests last winter
and spring, said the club needed
funds for a planned speakers
bureau.
The charter had been in
committee since late June, and
the clubs request for funds is
not included in the new budget.
Hollis said he discovered last
week the Senate Judiciary
Committee had been considering
the charter.
Robert Glenn, Judiciary
committee chairman, said he
didnt think the UFs best
interests were being promoted
by the club since only members
benefited from it.
Goodrich said ,he classified
the club as i U
small interest OH *]'*'>*'
group. C1 bs
included in
group, Goodrich
noted, are those
that help only Majjl
their members,
He said he
the Veterans
Club was not doing anything for
vets.
(SEE 'CLUB' PAGE 2)

possibility that the attendance
recommendation would be sent to the
Council of Academic Deans. The Council
does not make official decisions on a bill,
but it makes recommendations, and since
90 per cent of its members are UF deans,
the group is a powerful one.
It would not be illegal for OConnell
to send the attendance proposal to the
Council of Academic Deans, noted
Frederick W. Conner, vice-president of
academic affairs. The Councils function
is to get matters out into the open; it is a
device for communications and
discussion.
If all the deans on campus hold
one opinion, it would be extremely
difficult to decide to go in the opposite
direction. The Council carries a great deal
of weight.



2, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 13,1968

Page 2

'Draft BazaariThe Simplicity Os It All

(EDITORS NOTE: Love-Ins
are getting better and better.
Staff writer Lois Parks dropped
in on the Student Peace Unions
Bust fjhe Draft Bazaar. Below
are her impressions.)
By LOIS PARKS
Alligator Staff Writer
I happened upon the Student
Peace Unions Bust the Draft
Bazaar Saturday afternoon
where nearly 200 peaceniks

SG Finds Funds

FROM PACE ONE jjj
The budget will be presented
to the Senate again tonight for
its first reading and will return
for its second reading at a special
meeting Thursday night.
In other action at Thursdays
meeting, the Senate approved a
new charter for Accent, the
annual speakers symposium.
It marked the second time in
recent weeks that the Senate has
rechartered Accent. The
previous charter, which called
Club Charter
ROM PAGE OUt
The club has a job placement
service, a veteran assistance desk
in the Florida Gym during
registration and a blood bank,
Hollis said. An estimated 1,100
students are veterans, Hollis said.
Goodrich said he thought
Hollis was not helping the clubs
image by charging around.
Hollis actions in the Dow
protests and his protest in
Action Conference meetings has
not help the club, Goodrich
charged.
Holl is admitted he had
alienated students in the
Action Conference because he
said he told them they did not
represent views of the student
body.
This should, not be
considered as reasons for holding
up the clubs charter, Goodrich
said. This is not even a sharp
political move, he stated.
Goodrich admitted he and
Hollis have a personality
conflict. However, he explained
he could not have made the
complaints about the club.
Only Senators can do that,
Goodrich said. He did not name
the Senators who made the
initial complaints.
Hollis said, The clubs only
chance for funds now appears to
be an application for special
request.
First Hospital
The first hospital in the
United States was built by the
Spanish at St. Augustine in
1597, according to the files of
the State Board of Hea>h.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32001. The Alligator s entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $14.00 per yaar or $4.00 per quarter.
Tbs Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone at all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator win not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertlsing
tlsing Advertlsing Manafer within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several tiroes. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

(including dogs and babies),
communed on the grass at the
Plaza of the Americas, for what
looked (to the average straight
observer) like a San Francisco,
Haight-Ashbury Love-In.
The spirit was light in spite of
the presence of plain clothes
policemen and black militant
Jack Dawkins, who sat
unobtrusively by on a bicycle,
perched against a tree for most
of the activities. The sound of

for a restructuring of the
program in 1970, was vetoed last
week by Student Body President
Clyde Taylor.
Taylor said he vetoed the
charter because Accent is a
closed, self-perpetuating
organization.
The new charter, worked out
in heated debate only hours
before Thursdays meeting,
moves Accent under the
newly-formed Board of Student
Activities, which shall annually
select the chairman and vice
chairman of the program.
The Senate also approved
charters for Inteihall Council,
the Veterans' Chib and Student
Government Productions,
formerly Lyceum Council.
Approval was also granted for
the Board of Student
Publications to give the Florida
Law Review $5700 for a special
edition and an index of the past
years issues.
Another UF
Student Held
For Narcotics
A UF student and two
Gainesville residents were
arrested Friday in the latest of
six narcotic raids conducted
since January. The raid took
place at 8:30 at 13% NW 10th
Street. 4
Lee Miller Brown, Jr., was
arrested for possession of
marijuana and is presently free
on SI,OOO bond.
Martin Horowitz, 23, also
charged with possession, is out
on similar bond. David Lloyd
Picou, 19, was charged with sale
and possession of marijuana. He
is out on $2,000 bond. Both
Picou and Horowitz live at the
site of the arrest.
According to Sheriffs
Captain Ron Stanley, police
confiscated some unlabeled pills,
capsules, tablests, syringes and
needles, along with under two
pounds of marijuana.
We will not have the
chemists analysis of the pills
contents until later in the
week, he said.
The raid resulted from a joint
investigation by the Sheriffs
Department and the State
Attorneys office. More arrests,
not necessarily related to
Fridays raid, are expected soon.

.ALLIGATOR FEATURE

rock by the Relatively Straight
String Band permeated the air.
Shoulders and heads moved
responsively to the music.
As I wended my way through
the crowd I happened upon poet
Lawrence Ferlinghetti who
chatted with students, and
faculty including Dr. Peter Lisca,
English prof, and Hollis
Holbrook, arts prof, and Dr.
Sidney Jarrards wife captured
the spectacle with a camera.
Ferlinghetti signed a few
autographs and I saw a starry
eyed girl tell him how
thoroughly she enjoyed his
poetry. He noticed an abstract
NEW HANKS
Two recent arrivals in the
UF's Army ROTC Cadre
received new ranks as well as a
new duty station. Armando
Gonzales, right, received a
promotion to Sergeant First
Class and the Bronze Star for
distinguished" conduct in
combat in Vietnam. Tommy
Smith, left, received his
promotion to Major following
service in Vietnam.

oatsun
m w
\ c tHE YEAft 1
BociV *
Cor't flir

TUESDAY
£ FREE COKE
f WITH EVERY BAR-B-Q
2 BEEF BASKET X
AT V
r ANTOINE'S )
IF* SANDWICH & ICE CREAM SHOP'

design she wore around her
neck, and in what seemed to be
a gesture of gratitude and
generosity, she placed the
trinket around his neck.
Ferlinghetti, from the stage,
told us that Mrs. Carol Thomas,
arrested for resisting an officer
without violence, is in solitary
confinement in the county jail.
He also recommended going to
jail as a part of your
education and continued:
If youre going to get busted
do it for a good cause, not for
something stupid like speeding.
During a lull in the music,
there was a short skit, depicting
the ludicrousness of American
attitudes toward military tactics
and negotiations. Os course, the
American general was the bad
guy, and Ho Chi Minh, the
victor.
The band began again, and I
met a small child, called by his
friends the Mouse.
Mouse pounded on a guitar
which had been painted with
flowers and peace symbols as the
band belted out the sound of
Satisfaction. Mouse was
obviously enjoying the whole
thing better than a three ring
circus, and I commented on
what a cute little girl she was.
Mouse is a boy, said the
recipient of my remark.
A young man offered my
companion a card which was
supposed to be for President

Johnsons information, asking
for his opinion on the Vietnam
War. He also offered the Student
Peace Unions Draft Counseling
Services.
I hat was the point of the
whole affair. But what seemed
to be of more significance was
the simplicity of a relaxing
afternoon on the grass of the
Plaza watching people, and in
Ferlinghettis words watching
and eternally waiting for the
Rebirth of Wonder.
Honor Court
Convicts Student
Alan Brunswick, former
president of Tau Epsilon Phi, has
been convicted by the Honor
Court of the theft of one sheet
of Phi Beta Kappa stationery.
Brunswick, who recently
scored one of the highest scores
ever recorded on the College of
Laws entrance exam, received a
severe reprimand penalty.
GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 5O cents to $ 1.00
604 N. MAIN
I Vacation
Clothes
I I
Sale
Prices
I I
| OPEN DAILY
I 9:00 thru 5:30
>: I
Mon. thru Sat.
i i
| i, r 1
v
I ihtilu'rsiiu ;i:
I



Si(vekman%.
ou ll be a bigger hit than the
Adposts in this red double J
00l knit by Lam. Mary f
mplete the outfit, and m
leyre sure to carry you off / \
le field on their shoulders. / \
todeled by Mary Jo. /
| j
100% cotton. In black with I
wide track stripes. Matching I I
sleeveless waistcoat, the dress 1 i
I y ; > |p Jp : M
lli V V J 1 I
w H
1 V
\ Bk |b
.'. '

Tuesday, August 13,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Tueeday, August 13,1968

Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
_ Harold Kennedy
1%8 Editor
rtU/klluh Harold Aldrich Paul Kaplan
Managing Editor Executive Editor
All Steve Hulsey Neal Sanders I
j\\lWvSM News Editor Sports Editor
&&£&ttiiS3k BritejS&Sgatejji
USA UMR "gg^Bp
"' 'v- -.

SpGQlcillQ C^Ut v* .v.v.v.v.r.w.%V :
| Welfare Vs. Bonds j
By Gil Korenblit
A A
:j: There is a lot of fantasy being passed off as fact these days jj
ij: concerning various aspects of welfare programs. That they are so jj:
ij: readily believed is due only to the fact that they uphold previous jj
ij: misconceptions. j$
iji The most common misconception is that welfare recipients are jj
$ typically lazy, non-productive, etc., ad nauseam. A breakdown of :|;
J welfare rolls will reveal that the overwhelming number of the §
j$ people listed cant contribute to society. They are too old, too£:
young, or too sick. And the bulk of those remaining have jj;
$ psychological barriers which prevent their entering into the $
Sj: productive mainstream of American society. ij:
:jj Examples of such individuals are West Virginia coal miners, and ij:
:: plantation Negroes who have come to the city without education A
ij: skills. Overall, only a small percentage of those on welfare fit the iji
§ popular stereotypes. ij:
I have always wondered why educational programs for the :
culturally disadvantaged are such a recent innovation. In a speech §
§ given Monday, July 21, Dr. Joe Frost provided the answer when he |:|
stated that no advances in the education of the culturally deprived jij
$ occured before or without the injection of federal funds. $
g Misconceptions about the intelligence and educability of certain ij;
jj: groups are being proved wrong by such programs as the Job Corps iji
and Head Start. Head Start programs have demonstrated average $
$ gains of three to eight IQ points per individual per month of £
:: enrollment. Job Corps programs have demonstrated reading skills j;:
:: gains of one-half grade per month for some individuals. ij:
:jj Where do these deficits come from, one may ask? Environment, ij
:: Studies of migrant laborers' children have shown that at age three :j
:: their intelligence is on a par with the general population of :j
:: three-year-olds. After that it drops, as a direct function of ij
:: environment. j:
* ,
:: These effeots are a direct result of local control of education : :
r #
g and other community functions. Unhampered, local control has :j
:: served to make local prejudices into cultural institutions and to ij
iji perpetuate systems of ideas that never should have existed. ij
One function of the federal government is to supplement local j:
;j; government. But if youre going to get indignant about federal j:
jij intervention, dont be hypocritical and accept road funds whiled
ij damning poverty program funds, ala George Wallace. |
:j: Welfare and related programs are not footing the bill for the?:
ij: poor and underprivileged. Rather, they are repayments of the debt 5
:j: of damage society has wrought on these peoples life. And perhaps §
ij they, and not United States Savings Bonds, are our best investment £
ij in the future of America. ij:
wMWWWW l WW l W l 8 l WW l CWsoMoWWWffl<<<^ | WOC>C ll M X l X< l K >X>X>>>>>;<< l i l C*iy

Just One More Time

Just one more time for the Summer Gator. After
the Friday edition of the Alligator, the rest is
silence. For the departing staff members, it is time
to speak or forever hold our peace.
We have tried this summer to ingrain the concept
of objective and accurate news reporting into
c EDITORIAL
Alligator tradition. But our success will be measured
only in the coming years.
We have reserved our opinions for the Alligator
editorial and other plainly marked opinion articles.
Only in these articles did we make our value
judgments about the issues plaguing this campus.
.Many of the issues will continue to plague us for
some time.
One of the most serious problems is the lack of
meaningful communication between students,
faculty, and administrators. President OConneHs
Action Conference is a brilliant attempt to solve
that problem.
But if the Action Conference proposals are
buried in a mountain of red tape, all of its soothing
dialogue may be negated in renewed student
frustration.
Administrative processes for the
recommendations should be minimized and students
should realize that change in a bureaucracy such as
the UF is unfortunately and necessarily slow.
But the proposals should be activiated as quickly
as possible. Among them are a proposal making class

California For McCarthy?

VuuwiDrew Pearson*********
WASHINGTON A skillful move by which Sen.
Eugene McCarthy will take over most of the huge
174-vote California delegation, largest at the
Democratic convention, is being planned by Jesse
Unruh, speaker of the California Assembly. He has
already set up most of his secret maneuver and was
scheduled to apply the finishing touches at a
delegation caucus Saturday.
What this means is that California, which votes
early in the roll call of states at Chicago, will cast
almost 174 votes for McCarthy and could start a
psychological trend against Vice President
Humphrey.
To put across this maneuver, Speaker Unruh has
made a deal with the leftist California Democratic
Council, with which he has always been at odds, to
support him for governor in 1970. In return he has
stacked the Democratic delegation with McCarthy
supporters and eased out most of those for Vice
President Humphrey.
He has even barred all California Congressmen
except three who are strong for McCarthy. Such an
old-timer as Rep. Cecil King, who has served longer
in Congress than any other Californian, was
dropped, together with Rep. Chet Holifield, new
dean of the California delegation of Congressmen.
At a recent meeting of California Democrats in
Washington with Speaker Unruh, Holifield protested
that he had attended every Democratic convention
as a delegate since he had been in Congress. It made
no difference. Holifield is for Humphrey, and he
was barred.
Even such distinguished Democrats as Edmund
G. Pat Brown, ex-governor, were excluded from
the delegation,
together with
veteran
Congressmen
John Moss, B.
F. Sisk, George
Miller, Lionel
Van Deerlin,
and every other
California
C ongressman
except Phillip
Burton, Don
Edwards, and
Tom Rees, who
are strong for
McCarthy.
Placed at the
top of the new
PEARSON list of delegates
when Unruh announced the change were Gerald Hill
and Martin Stone, co-chairmen of the McCarthy
California primary campaign. Both are active in the
CDC, H3l being president.
Also on the new list is Carmen Warschaw, who

Merry-Go-Round

attendance voluntary and a host of others attacking
the problems confronting racial minorities at UF.
They are important and worthy.
All the rejuvenating dialogue of the Action
Conference must not end with the conference. It
should be continued in a reapportioned University
Senate where all factions of the university should be
represented. The Senate could then become the
legislative body it was supposed to be.
The summer has also been a time of reforms of
student regulations. Curfew has been abolished for
seniors, juniors, and sophomores, and ROTC train training
ing training is no longer mandatory for males. These
changes were welcomed by students.
But other regulations still frustrate and anger
students. For example, freshmen and sophomores,
many of them veterans and other older students,
resent being forced to live on campus.
Student body officers need more time and pay to
do their jobs. Poorer students who may well
qualified cannot afford to take the time needed. Pay
for the officers should be increased and the
regulation requiring student body officers to take
12 hours of classes should be abolished.
Students are wary of the regents decision giving
the UF president the power to summarily suspend a
student pending a hearing. President OConnell
should be judicious in his use of this arbitrary
power.
These are important issues. We go, but they
remain.

********* Jack Anderson*****
came out for Ronald Reagan in the last election,
even though she was Democratic chairman for
Southern California.
Its reported that Speaker Unruh will now make
Mrs. Warschaw Democratic National
Committee Committeein
in Committeein
return for her
support in his l|j^B
campaign for
governor. Mrs. JB'
Warschaw is a
member of the
famous Harvey \
Aluminum
family, which
has been able to
wangle various
political favors
and defense Bg
contracts from
the government. BP-
The interest- |l|||P'
ing thing about
Unruhs politi- ANDERSON
cal sleight of hand is that he announced it as the
resignation of 25 delegates.
Actually some of them did not resign and are
sore as blazes at being eased off the delegation.
They were elected, and say that Unruh can not
unilaterally announce their exit.
One Humphrey delegate who found himself in
the list of those who have resigned is Thomas
Consiglio of Downey, an official in the United
Steelworkers.
At a recent meeting of labor leaders with Vice
President Humphrey, he told HHH: Im probably
the only delegate in this meeting who will be in
Chicago to vote for you.
Yet Consiglio woke up the other morning to read
in the newspaper that he had resigned as a delegate
to the convention.
Queried by this column over the phone,
Consiglio said that some time ago, when Bobby
Kennedy was still alive, he had resigned because he
was a Humphrey man and he wanted peace to
prevail in the California delegation.
Apparently he had forgotten this when he told
Vice President Humphrey recently that he was a
delegate. But the all-remembering Jesse Unruh
hadn t forgotten. Consiglios resignation has been
officially accepted.
The California delegation to Chicago will cast
about 166 votes for McCarthy, eight votes for
Hubert, and the conservative Unruh in turn will get
Liberal-Democratic support to become governor of
California.



This your first riot, Pops?
BAILEY CONTENDS

Alpers Charge Wrong

MR. EDITOR:
It looks like the ultra-liberals
are using vicious labeling once
again to support their radical
ideas.
Harvey Alper (Bailey: KKK
in Disguise, July 23, 1968)
seemvto have uncovered some
sinister plot between Robert
Shelton and myself.
Right?
Wrong!!!!
If Harvey would ascend from
the depths of hair-brained
philosophy and accusation, he
would remember that Alligator
editor (long forgotten) Eddie
Sears was all for my interview
with Shelton.
The Shelton interview
represents one of the best
journalistic endeavors ever to be
accomplished by the Alligator. It
also is one of die best (and now
most famous) pieces of
newspaper work I have done for
the Alligator. At least, I gave
Shelton a chance to express his
views more than a lot of
newsmen can say in free
speech America.
But, my interview with
Robert Shelton was for
journalistic purposes only. Alper
even said that he wished that he
had had a chance to get at
Shelton and from the way he
said it, he meant to try to keep
Shelton from expressing his
views. Is this journalism
teachings?
Harvey contends Shelton and
I have laid forth a plot and are
now enacting it.
This is not so!!!
I know Shelton just like I
know Scott Kelly, Bob Sikes,
Don Fuqua, Claude Kirk, George
Wallace, and others. Does this
mean they are Klansmen, too?
Robert Shelton spoke here at
UF under the auspices of the
Florida Union Forums
Committee. Was it Klan infested,
too?
The chairman of the
Committee, George Stuart,

stated to the Committee
members that Robert Shelton
deserved an opportunity to
speak. After all, didnt James
Farmer of CORE speak at
ACCENT?
On these grounds, the
Shelton speech was permitted. I
acted solely as an intermediary
between the Committee and
Robert Shelton because I knew
both parties.
Robert Shelton did not come
to UF as a personal favor to me
as Alper interjects. Shelton was
to come to the state of Florida
on April 7,1967, anyway.
On April 8, Shelton was to be
at a rally in Plant City and at a
state meeting in Orlando on
April 9.
Shelton stopped at UF for
one purpose: to make a speech
the Florida Union Forums
Committee had invited him to
make. I have no personal or
official or unofficial connection
with Shelton or his organization.
Alper says that I long for
membership but (am) willing to

LEARN I
SELF-HYPNOSIS I
I Areas of Work I
I 1. Step smekieg witbeut dregs. I
2. Reduce and centre! weight without dregs.
& 3. Sexeel improvement and correction.
H 4. Memory t Concentration development, etc. H
£ () 12 L.P. Record provided with .course S
1 (b) Book on self-hypnosis provided with course B
(c) First class with lecture end demonstration H
conducted by Or. Fred Adams, Licensed
m Psychoiopist end Medical Hypnotist.
(d) Alt instructions f ivea'by licensed and fully I
' qualified Medical Hypnotist.
I For enrollment, information and H
I INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC HYPNOSIS, Inc. I
jj 1219 West University Avenue |r
aGainesville, Fla. 32601 Phone 378-9666
Terms Available

OPEN FORUM:
jAdoia owl ViMwt
*
There is no hope for the complacent man."

OConnell Quote Incorrect

MR. EDITOR:
In your article in the July 12
issue of the Alligator, you
quoted me as saying that the
new summary expulsion policy
bears a marked resemblance to
passages in the UF Constitution
about the granting of tenure to
UF professors.
The above is not a correct
quote. What I said was that the
new policy of the Board of
Regents has a parallel provision
in the UF Constitution relating
to suspension of a faculty
member for cause. The provision
in this document, adopted by
the University Senate, February
6, 1964, reads as follows:
Art. V Termination of
Faculty Appointment:
Sect. (B) Suspension
Pending Formal Inquiry
for Cause

make the sacrifice if it would
help the KKK.
This, too, is not so!!!
I have no desire to become a
KKK member. And, its not
because of, as Alper advises, He
could do more for the KKK as a
non-member than as an active
member. The reason is that the
KKK has several too-radical
ideasT
However, I do agree with the
KKK on wanting a
constitutional form of
government, ideals based on a
strong belief in Christianity, and
a strong anti-communist stand.
What are three better principles
to fight for?
I agree with the NAACP on
its equal opportunity stand.
Does that make me a member of
that organization? If so, then the
late Martin Luther King was a
Klansman!
Harvey, my advice to you is
re-evaluate your position and
stop trying to publicize trash
and lies.
JIMMEY BAILEY

1. After receiving charges
and/or evidence, the
President may suspend any
faculty member, regardless
of tenure status, if in his
judgment formal inquiry is
likely to provide the basis
for disciplinary action.

The sections of the University
Constitution which follow those
quoted above provide that the
faculty member will be notified
of the charges and the matter
promptly referred for
investigation and trial to the
Senate Committee on Academic
Freedom and Tenure.
In the same issue in the
editorial entitled A Need for
Wisdom you misstated again
that I compared the new policy
to a faculty tenure case. I did
BUT
MOTHER)
THE
WHOLE
COUNTRY
UNDERGOING UNDERGOINGINFLATION],
INFLATION], UNDERGOINGINFLATION],

I "BO OGLETREE
I HOSPITAL FUND BENEFIT
DANCE
(SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1968
I G.H.S. GYMNASIUM
I MUSIC BY "THE EPICS
18:00 TO 12:00 SI.OO PER PERSON
I DONATIONS MAY BE SENT TO
I JOHN T. McGRIFF
I 1020 N. E. 3rd ST. GAINESVILLE
|H 6.
/
M- s'

Tuesday, August 13,1968, The Florida Alligator,

not make such comparison;
rather, as stated above, the
analogy made was to the
provisions quoted above relating
to the suspension of a faculty
member pending inquiry. There
is, in fact, no comparable
provision in the new Board of
Regents policy and those
relating to the granting of tenure
in the University Constitution.
At the interview in which I
called your attention to the
quoted provision in the UF
Constitution, I also stated that
there were like provisions for
suspension of public officials,
pending hearing, in our state
constitution. See Article 4,
Section 15, Florida
Constitution.
STEPHEN C. OCONNELL
PkESIDENT
WjV'yyAV.v.v.v.v.'.v.v.v.v.w.v.v.s;
I I
'i I
I Vacation
I l
Clothes
at
?
Sale
Prices |j
>: < j:
OPEN DAILY
9:00-5:30
Mon. thru Sat.
| |
I I
X !!
1 IhmuH-situ I
J r $
1 |
A* mm m ..y

Page 5



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

FOR SALE
35mm NIKKORMAT-FT SLR
Camera and case. Thru the lens light
meter. 50mm f 1.4 and 135 mm f 3.5
(telephoto) Auto-Nikkor Lenses.
Excellent condition. 378-8684.
(A-164-st-p)
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
{Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
1959 50 hp Evinrude, 16 Scottcraft.
Excellent condition. Many extras.
Call 376-3261 Ext. 2069 after 8:00
p. m., See at 1111 S. W. 16th
Ave. No. 47, Price $450.00.
(Al6B3tp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY. 466-3340. (A-154-ts-p)
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3-bedrooms, 2
full baths, living room, kitchen,
utility room carport, completely
furnished, SIB,OOO. (Al692t p)
Charming, old-fashioned home. 4
bedrooms, spacious dining room,
equipped kitchen, stepdown living
room, fireplace, 1 *4 baths. Spiral
staircase, hardwood floors, large lot,
unparalleled azalea gardens.
Workshop. Full attic, available now.
$19,700.00 or $225.00 rent with
option. Ph:3 72-2366.
(Al69ltp)
FOR RENT
3 blocks from campus. Double room
for male students. Air Conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
N.W. 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-166-st-p)
UNIVERSITY APTS, novy renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrrn.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3 768 990.
(815715 t-p)
Large, 2-bedroom apartment, AC and
Central heat. Lease required. Ideal
for 3 students. $120.00 month
includes all utilities. Phone
3/68314, after 5 p.m. or weekends.
(81692 t
For Rent Small ranch and house,
barn and good pasture, between
Melrose and Keystone Heights. Close
to lake. Phone 475-4381.
(Bl692t p)
ROOMS Men Walk to campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles, Live
* with friends, Phone 3788122 or
3766652. (B-1638tp)
Campus
Calendar
Tuesday, August 13
Dept, of Education: Dr. Muriel
Crosby, "Education for the
Urban Child," Norman Hall
Aud., 4:30 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: "Flash
Gordon," Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Senior Recital: David P. Miller,
Fr ench Horn, Constans
Theatre, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, August 14,
Fla. Speleological Society:
Meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: "Flash
Gordon," Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Engineering Dames: Meeting,
home of Mrs. Jack Smith,
3469 N.W. 11th Ave., 8 p.m.
All student wives invited.
Thursday, August 15
Painting for Fun: Painting, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Christian Science College
Organization: Meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: "Flash
Gordon," Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Yoga: Lessons, Towers C, 9 p.m.

FOR RENT
Comfortable single corner room for
rent from August 13th till Sept 13th,
Across from campus. Two suites of
rooms with refrigerator and baths for
rent for fall at 321 S.W. 13th St.
(Bl69lt-p)
WANTED
: : >asvx*x*xa%v..xvx.x.x.v.-.-x.x.x.x.x.:>:
EE Senior needs roommates and
apartment for fall. Contact Don
Glendening. Call Hollywood collect
983-5601 after 5 p.m. any day.
(C-164-st-p)
FEMALE roommate to share
1-bedroom apt. 3 blocks North of
campus. $52.75 plus V? utilities. Call
Sandy 378-6570. (C-167-3t-p)
FOURTH wanted for Camelot Apts,
(we have most spacious floor plan).
She must be a senior or graduate
student. Phone: 376-1631 Room
704. (C-167-3t-p)
WE NEED 1 or 2 Male roommates
and 2-bedroom apt. for fall. Call Bob
and Hal (4EG and 3EG). 378-1153.
(C-167-3t-p)
A Senior Coed wants 2 female
roommates to share a 3-bedroom
house, two blocks behind State
Theater. Total rent $90.00. Call
Nancy. 378-4578; No. 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. (Cl672t-p)
Wanted: experienced lead Guitarist
for work in rhythm and blues group.
Night clubs, fraternity and private
parties. Call for audition. 372-2777.
(C-167-2t-p)
Wanted-1 coed to share 2 bedroom
French Quarter Apt; with 3 seniors.
Call 376-1631, room 202, or write
Karen Gralow 12-202-B, Towers B, U
of F. (Cl692t-p)
Roommate wanted Male; Fall, win winter
ter winter and spring quarters; Write: Robert
Bell, 2001 Crystal Lake Dr., Orlando,
Florida. (C-169-2t-p)
Male medical student needs place to
live in 68-69. Write: Winston Cope,
9100 131st Street N., Largo,
Florida 33520, or Call 313-301-5643.
(Cl692tp)
A SENIOR COED wants 2 female
roommates to share a 3-bedroom
house, two blocks behind State
Theater. Total rent $90.00. Call
Nancy, 378-4578* No. 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. (C-167-2t-p)
WANTED: Fen\|ie roommate for,
Village Park Apt. 66. Immediate
occupancy. Graduate Student
leaving. 378-7849. (C-167-3t-p)
1 or 2 Female roommates wanted
Butler Apts. To share with 1 girl and
baby. Call 376-2755. Ask for Karen.
(Cl6B3t p)
WE NEED one easy-going girl as a
fourth at Village Park for Sept. Call
Chris, 372-6442 or Merri, 376-7434.
(C-167-4t-p)
vss?g.y^w > >KRWSK-x-x-;-x;%svN*vs^
HELP WANTED |
NXv.v.vx-XX'X-X'Vv-v.X'X-X'XvX'X-V'X*:
Medical Investigator needs someone
with experience to wire electronic
equipment. Will pay by hour, or per
job. Call Dr. H. L. Stewart. 376-3211
Ext. 5255. (El692tC)

I Main Entrance (
GAINESVILLE MALL j
| Carmlnellas tfanU 4 &&&
; I ? 1 1 I
l / Jl | BBS 1 _J Se Ta 9 sa*g P n Q a Qhe " [[
U /Continantal atmosphoro i per;; 1 SSSf EE /
0 / Finest in gourmat food A Erdj;j; / Homte 3)
mjx Imported Boors and Winosr B;| _ | AM-B:3OPM Mon. Sat. j |(
piKExcellont Sorvico /WS|| H i Es: SL Solving Continuously A si
j||y = jLl_Jj3jii 1 Ub |
[* ~ Gainesville's Finest j
[ and Most Intimate j

B, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 13, 1968

Page 6

r ,.v.v.v. W^
HELP WANTED £
V
£xv.xx-x*x-x-x.x.nv.vxx:*x-x x*x.:.xo
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330, J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
Immediate openings for part time or
full time male personnel. Better than
average salary and good chances for
advancement. Also, now interviewing
for full employment. Apply in
Person, Arbys Restaurant 1405 S.W.
13th St. (El692tp)
AUTOS
:':.s*x-x*x-x^-x-x.:.sxx-x*xxx*x*v. LEAVING country, 63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater.
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)
1965 GTO, Convertible, 4-speed.
Tri-power. Excellent Condition.
$1700.00 or best offer. Call
378-4657. (G-167-4t-p)
1966 Triumph TR-4A IRS. Blue with
white top and tonneau. Very good
condition. No Reasonable offer
refused. Call 372-1039. (Gl6B-3 t-p)
1953 Ford. Blue. Runs good for
around town use for student.
SIOO.OO or best offer. At 1405 N.W.
sth Ave. 378-2802 After 6.
(Gl6B4t p)
1961 VW, radio, fair condition, will
pass inspection. Must sell now.
Moving, Need cash, $350.00. Firm.
Call 372-1649 or 378-3522.
(Gl69-2t-p)
la T -&37 ijfl ACADEMY
I A AWARD
I WINNER I
yiir WKEktCHOtS
I IIC lEOMOOUK
ERAPSIIL^.I
MM MNCMFT I
also 10:46
JOS£PH £ LEVINE preswts M
The TIGER &
the PUSSYCAT-*Si*|B
^iwHjscoio^^ANnJjAwtTM

t HELDOWiYI

PERSONAL
Go with Hairy Tea to see The Jimi
Hendrix Experience in Tampa on the
18th. $5.00 round trip call 372-2728.
Leave noon from Ramada Inn.
(Jl692tp)
Going to Greenville, S.C. or vicinity?
Drive my sportscar, lease at your
convenience. Anytime after Aug. 19,
Phone Univ. Ext. 2689 anytime
Wednesday. (Jl69ltp)
.....x*x-x*x-x-x-x-x-x*x.x-:-xxx*x-x-XXv
LOST & FOUND |
Lost: Painting in brown and gold of
Mans head with hands below face.
Reward. No questions asked.
376-1631, Room 301.
(Ll69lt-p)
Found in local Movie theatre,
weekend of Aug. 3, Wrist watch. Call
372-4509 and identify.
(L-169-2t-nc)
Lost: Womens eye glasses dark frames
no case urgently needed for driving.
Call extension 60 in Library (2321)
Ludi W. Spears. (L-169-lt-p)
SERVICES
£ £
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 378-8301. 1726
NE Waldo Road. Electrical Systems
checked free. (M-153-ts-c)
smtcl \
THRU WED AT
7:00 & 9:20
ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES M.
"ZORBA f7
| THEQREEK |
THUR. 6:50-9:10
"^Mmssa
NANCY KWAN *.*fl
JAMES SHIGETA JUANITA HALL j


SERVICES
** !'
TEDDY BEAR NURSERY. Infants
12 years old. 6 complete
departments. Pick-up and delivery at
five schools. Separate Dept, for
school age children. We are open all
day Saturday. (M-167-4t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-153-16t-p)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS.
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service --
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-l 53-ts-c)
\ 13th ST. ft N.W. 23r4 RO. /
\ Ph. 378-2434 /
'
mm l in
OPEN 1:45 uJ]
Jtm
Mia farrow RTIJ
In a William Castle Production
Rosemarys .
Baby (mEk'
John Cassavetes
; Ruth Gordon Sidney Blackmer
Maurice Evans and Ralph Bellamy
1 PoOuceO Dy William Castle
Wntten Ick me Scieen and Directed Dv Homan Polanski
f ffjfti r F* novP* by Levin n. > (*#<* m.
lec'kvucutot* A Par;jrKjuft Pw t./** SrjggeMt'O * Mrttu'*- Ar*>t*"Le?
2:15-4:15-7:15-9:40 J
0? fijH jin
- JL
1
i
SI Atm MG
mckVAN DYKE
EDMMD&ROBiNSON
wrotpyPROWNE
V1:15-3:30-5:40-7:50-10:00



McHale, Thomas D,E
Top Handball Play

Residents of Murphree Area,
the universitys largest mens
residence halls, have completed
their first Annual Summer
Handball Tournament after
being rained out twice. The
tournament, sponsored by
Murphrees new housing staff,
was finally held August 9 in
recognition of the emphasis
placed on the sport by the
Florida Athletic Department as
an excellent means of keeping
both athletes and other students
in good physical shape during
the summer.
Students from Murphree,
Thomas, Yon, and Buckman
Halls were eligible to participate
in the double-elimination
tournament. A sizeable number
of the entrants were freshmen.
Ray McHale, a resident of
Murphree C, placed first in the
singles tournament in stiff
competition. The doubles
tournament, which had a
sizeable number of participants,
was won by two men from
Thomas Hall. John McPhaul of
Thomas D and Jim Nilon of
Thomas E came through on top.
Both tournaments were held
under the lights in the cooler
evening hours to avoid the
Athletic Frat?
Sigma Delta Psi
Just Honorary
Doctors, lawyers, and journal journalists
ists journalists all have societies honoring
outstanding individuals, so why
not athletes?
Sigma Delta Psi is recognized
as the national honorary athletic
fraternity. It promotes the total
Fitness of college students with
emphasis on physical fitness.
Membership is open to any
college student passing all 15
athletic requirements. They
include both good scholarship
and varsity standing as well as
good athletic ability.
At present Florida is leading
the nation in team competition
and membership.
Inducted members for 1968
are Larry Smith, Tim
Culbertson, Mike Sheehe, Paul
Maliska, Mike Upensky, Dick
Hollingswood, Ray Shoener,
Mike Healey, Tom Christian,
Ted Gotfried, Larry Hengle,
Frank Logotic, Don Hale, Mike
McGinnis, Harry Winkler, Dan
Turner, Charles Shaw, Ron
Jourdan, Scott Hager, Marion
Andrews, Thomas Fainsworth,
John Morton, and Dave
Appleton.
How
/ Your Generator
* OVERHAULED Sootiol J
UASO |
' mcuiot#
1 ...
CLEAN UNIT
TURN COMMUTATOR
NEW MUSHES
LABOR
ALACHUA
COUNTY
GENERATOR
LIKE FOREIGN CARS!
SO* NW *th AVt. GAMCSVIUf
MON.-Ht. t AM-7PM SAT. Til 5 PM
370-4011

unusually hot August sun.
Arrangements for the
tournament were handled by
Robbie Griffin of Yon Hall and
Jeff Smith of Murphree Hall.
It is hoped that the
tournament will become an
annual event. Similar
tournaments are now held
during all other quarters, with a
elimination tournament to
determine University-wide
winners.

Rollyson Steps In
As New League Boss
Ray Rollyson, ex-Gator pitcher, is responsible for a large portion
of the Intramural Departments $60,000, annual budget in his new
position as Program Director for the University of Florida Intramural
Department.
Ray originally came to the University of Florida on a baseball
scholarship in September of 1961. He received his Masters in Physical
Education last August and is presently working on his Ph.D.
Out of the 25 intramural clubs and 13 competitive intramural
sports Rays basic responsibility is for the various mens leagues on
campus which compete in such activities as flag football, handball,
and basketball.
Our division is responsible for the nine mens leagues which are
now active on campus. We have two fraternity leagues (Orange &
Blue), four dorm leagues (each dormitory area), an independent
league, engineering league and a law league. We also started a military
league this year and plan to continue it next September.
The Intramural Department spends approximately $14,000 per
year on equipment and SII,OOO in referees wages, a large portion of
which Ray is responsible for.
When Ray is not preparing an activity schedule or on the phone,
he is kept busy by engraving the large number of trophys which the
department awards each year.
There are five or six of us that can operate the engraver but when
we give out over 100 awards for football alone you can see that it
keeps us all busy.
Rays future plans include marriage in November and a possible
coaching position at a junior college or university.
...
.. .y M.-
m y -'" I KKSyHH
wf 4
RAY ROLLYSON
... marriage in future
iring coupon
P COUPON- !!
5 SPECIAL! !!
11 TUESDAY ONLY jj
89 c
? PIMM CMefcon, Colt Slaw, Mashed J J
I I Palele WHh Gravy and Rolls.
ij Kentucky fried !!
i i Norik Omanis HosprttMj Disk... I j
!; 214 NW I3tt> St. 376-6472
| J 2 locotlow |,4 NW 34tn St. 372-3649
L- MING COUPON

SPORTS
SCOREBOARD

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L PCT. GB
Detroit 74 72 .638
Baltimore 66 48 .579 7
Boston 62 54 .534 12
Cleveland 63 56 .529 \2Vi
Oakland 60 55 .522 13&
Minnesota 54 59 .478 18^
New York 51 60 .459 20H
California 53 63 .457 21
Chicago 48 65 .425 24^
Washington 42 71 .372 30Vi

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L PCT. GB
St. Louis 76 41 .650
Chicago 62 55 .530 14
San Francisco 60 56 .517 15 Yi
Atlanta 60 57 .513 16
Cincinnati 57 55 .509 16 Vi
Pittsburgh 56 61 .479 20
Philadelphia 53 61 .465 21 Vi
Los Angeles 53 64 .453 23
New York 54 66 .450 'IVh
Houston 51 66 .436 25
Sales & Service
typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
ST
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Main 376-5551

MV 90 s
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave
QUALITY FOODS
LOW PRICE
49* SPECIALS X
EVERY DAY
OSELF0 SELF SERVICE -- NO TIPPING
ERIA 1 313 W. UNIV. AVE^I
REG. $129 95
m LE'AR *JET7 S TEFtE O
- JJH
8 Trad. QQ
U g INSTALLED
CARtridge
LEAR JET
MODEL ASH-830
DURING TREASTERS. ENCO
GRAND OPENING
Th TZtc&uL Set
of Gainesville

Tuesday, August 13, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

I I
I f
I Vacation |
I Clothes i
1 I
| at |
! Sale |
I 1
I Prices I
1 |
OPEN DAILY |
i* v
9:00-5:30 |
Mon. thru Sat. ?
v
I (Lit? ;!
ij: 1 ij
I Ihmirrsitu I
1 j

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. August 13. 1968

we care HHMHJHBMIII
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG CD VCD breast a/n
Two Convenient Locations | IV I Civ OR Lb. J7C
ff' S -| W 2 .^ e LEG QUARTERS V
1130 N.E. 16 Ave.

EIGHT OCLOCK I
I COFFEE ,u 49c I
I EIGHT OCLOCK I
COFFEE 3i,,as $1.451
I A&P FROZEN LEAF I
SPINACH - 10c|
I A&P FROZEN CHOPPED I
I SPINACH ~ IOC I
I JANE PARKER BUnERMILK I
BREAD 2/49{ I
ANN PAGE RED PLUM I
preserves 1 49 c I
I SULTANA APPLE BASE I
JELLIES 3/$i .oo
I JANE PARKER GLAZED I
donuts -- 39c 1
I JANE PARKER GLAZED I
DONUTS PKG of 3 11 oz. 29cl
SUNNY FIELD I
I WAFFLES .. 10C I

ALLGOOD BRAND
BREAKFAST BACON __
l *s9c
GRADE "A QUICK FROZEN DELICIOUS
FRYER LIVERS mM t OQ
is. $1.99
I FIRM RED RIPE Jr
PLUMS 3 lbs |
WHITE SEEDLESS A A
GRAPES O7 V
FIRM RIPE SWEET [jfj
NECTARINES I §
YELLOW FIRM 1
BANANAS .... Lb 106 I
FRESH LARGE A
LEMONS 49C I
RIPE FIRM RED
TOMATOES . Lb 25C U
DELICIOUS FIRM ||
CANTALOUPES 3 . SI.QQ |
£
* irHETI
NOODLES
SOUP SALE FINE
BROAD EX. WIDE
CHICKEN W/RICE /&
ILb 3/SI.OO
TOMATO W/RICE
I CREAM OF MUSHROOM
VEGETABLE BEEF I W T F I
I ASST. FLAVOR I
A /CDjl I DRINKS I
4/59< [I ." 10c |