Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
ProbaMe Showers
Hlah In The 80s
Low !n f The 70s

Vo/. 60, No. 168

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Student Senate Debates
Million Dollar Budget

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
The Student Senate was
scheduled to begin deliberations
on Student Governments
massive sl.l million budget at a
special meeting Thursday night.
The meeting was not
completed by press time.
But the $1,077,266.10 bud budget
get budget was expected by Senate lead leaders
ers leaders to prompt lengthy debate on
the floor because several Senate
members have questioned the
way the budget was drawn up.
The Budget and Finance
committee of the Senate held
hearings during the summer on
budget requests. It then sent to
Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett a budget which
exceeded the amount of money
expected to be available from
student activity fees next year.
Burnett and Budget and

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THE POET
Lawrence Ferlinghetti, one of America's leading contemporary
poets, entertained an overflow crowd Tuesday night in Reitz
Union. The San Francisco bookstore owner specializes in "avant
garde" free verse poetry, dealing with revolt and the new wave
demanding change. Ferlinghetti, well-known for his frequent use of
four-letter words, entertained more than 450 people with a program
of "America today" poems, the latest of which was his story of the
Bobby Kennedy assassination.

The
Florida Alligator
THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Action Conference OKs
Voluntary Attendance

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
A revised voluntary attendance proposal
was passed by the Action Conference
Wednesday afternoon following over one
hour of debate.
Also passed was a proposal recommending
a developmental education program and a
resolution calling for freedom of the student
press.
The attendance proposal, a rewritten
version of the proposal turned down by the

Finance Chairman Bob White
reduced the budget to fit
expected income. It was then
submitted to Senate members
for study before Thursdays
meeting.
Senator Jack Vaughn, a
United-First party member of
the budget committee,
subsequently charged that the
balanced budget should have
been returned to the committee
for approval before being sent to
the Senate.
White defended the move,
however, contending that there
was not enough time to send the
budget back to the committee
and then to the Senate, since the
budget must be passed before
the summer quarter ends.
He pointed out that any
senators who disagree with the
budget may debate it on the
Senate floor.
The budget includes

University of Florida, Gainesville

allocations to 33 student
organizations for the year
beginning Sept. 1. Dozens of
other student groups will receive
monies from SG during the year
through the special requests
fund.
The number of organizations
financed remained about the
same for the upcoming year as
the number given money last
year because several groups were
deleted.
For the 1967-68 year, the
current one, SG financed 32
organizations, including the
Athletic Association and the
Reitz Union.
Seven new organizations were
added to the budget for
1968-69. But despite the
increased number of
organizations, the proposed
budget is about $ 1,000 less than
last years.
Notably dropped from tne
previous budget were the Board
of International Activities, the
Veterans Club and the Second
100 television series.
Added to the budget for next
year were the Billy Mitchell Drill
Team, the Collegiate Living
Organization, Course and
Teacher Evaluation, Dialogue,
Gator Guard, Meat Judging and
the Arnold Air Society.
The bulk of the million dollar
budget, one of the largest
student-handled budgets in the
country, will go to 10
organizations.
The major allotments were:
t Reitz Union,
$500369.50
Athletic Association --
$191317.75
Publications --
$67,000.00
Intramurals --
$60,674.00
Special Events Fund
$57,344.00
Student Salaries
$35,180.00
Student Government
Presents $27,980.00
(SEE BUDGET'PAGE 2)

conference last week was passed by a near
unanimous vote, 49 to 3.
The study of the developmental education
program was passed after the wording was
changed from remedial education to
developmental education and the proposal
was amended to make the study a
University-wide project. Under the original
proposal the study was to be made by the
University College.
The student publications proposal, which

called for freedom of the
student press within the limits of
the law and urged financial
autonomy for student
publications from Student
Government, was passed
unanimously.
The conference was addressed
early in the meeting by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
who expressed his thanks to the
members for efforts put forth.
I am convinced that what
has been proposed here is not a
full measure of what has been
started, he said.
He warned the members
against becoming discouraged at
the slow pace of implementation
of their proposals explaining a

OConnell Vows
Power Restraint
By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Editor
UF President Stephen C. OConnell promised Monday to use his
new power to summarily suspend or expel students pending a hearing
only when in my best judgment it is necessary to protect this
university and its members.
In a letter to the Alligator, OConnell said the suspension power
will become effective in the fall and promised to issue guidelines
outlining its use before then.
In the meantime, OConnell said, a preliminary statement may
lower some blood pressure and slow the action of some gall bladders
with a resultant improvement in campus health and digestive
processes.
But OConnell warned that he considered the authority a useful
and necessary tool which he would use if felt he had to do so.
The experience of mankind has shown that there is no way to
avoid the vesting of authority in men and no way to prevent its
occasional misuse, although today there are adequate systems to
correct any abuse, OConnell said.
OConnell said that when the suspension power is misused, it will
be time for all to speak out. Until then all the words and dire forecasts
are but windmills beating empty spaces.
OConnell said that laws are protective, not punitive, measures,
whose basic and best function is to protect society, i.e., all people,
from the few who by their actions infringe on the rights of others.
Those who exercise their rights in such way as not to interfere
with those of others have nothing to fear from any authority on this
campus, OConnell said.
The students and faculty on this campus have as much or more at
stake in and an equal if not greater responsibility as does the
administration for ensuring that this institution is not disrupted by
the actions of relatively few, OConnell said.
It seems to me that students and faculty, through their respective
organizations, have a duty to express themselves and to take firm
positions against actions disruptive of this institution and destructive
of the rights of members of this community, said OConnell.
The Board of Regents, the governing body over Floridas university
< SEE 'RESTRAINT' PAGE 2)

Inside
UF SG Takes Over
Lyceum Council
See Page 4

Friday, August 9, 1968

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. . 'change is slow'
lot of bases have to be touched.
OConnell assured the
members that the proposals they
had sent to him were receiving
serious consideration and that
action would be taken on them.
1 would offer you the
thought, declared OConnell
cautioning again against
impatience, ... change is not
for the short-winded.
The voluntary attendance
( SEE 'ATTENDANCE' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 9, 1968

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BATHROOM COMEDY
UF Butch Tully (I ) and Claude Pinkston rehearse a tear-jerking
scene from Moliere's "The Flying Doctor," which the Experimental
Theatre players will present Friday night at 8 o'clock in Constans
Theatre. Called by many reviewers a "rollicking sex romp or
bathroom comedy," The Flying Doctor will be under the direction of
Carol Nurenburg. Admission is free.
II Restraint Assured II
f FROM PA6E OHE J
system, granted OConnell the power early tms summer. Since then,
student leaders and the student press have denounced the action
because it placed too much power in the hands of the president.
OConnell again compared his suspension power over students to
an older power he has over faculty members. He quoted Article V,
Section B, Paragraph 1, the passage from the UF Constitution
authorizing the President . (to) suspend any faculty member,
regardless of tenure status, if in his judgment formal inquiry is likely
to provide the basis for disciplinary action.
The suspension power is based upon the theory that allowing the
person involved to retain his position would adversely affect the
public interest, OConnell said.
The damage which may occur to the individual removed should
it be determined on hearing that he was wrongfully suspended -- is
considered to be a necessary sacrifice to avoid a greater damage to the
many who may be affected, OConnell said.
Without this new* authority, OConnell pointed out, the
University is powerless to remove frdm its ranks pending a full
hearing, one who endangers the safety of the other member of the
community or who may prevent their enjoying the benefits of the
educational processes for which they came here.
The members of the University who are adversely affected by the
presence of such a person have a right to expect that the University
will protect them from him and prevent his interference with their
rights, OConnell continued.
While it is my hope that it will never be used, I will use suspension
when the circumstances require it be done.
But OConnell promised to wield his new weapon judiciously. It
should be used only when the evidence available indicates that the
student has committed an offense bad enough to warrant suspension
and that the students continued presence on campus would
adversely affect or endanger the other members of the University
Community.
Equally as important, OConnell said, no interference with the
orderly processes and operations of the University in accomplishment
of its mission could be allowed.
MlWi
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
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Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to tbs Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator & entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator win not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manner within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

Attendance Plan Passes

F FROM PA6E ONE J
proposal initially boggCfl crown
when it was noted that it obliged
the instructor to announce tests
at least one class meeting in
advance. This would preclude
pop-tests.
Though no faculty member at
the conference admitted use of
pop-tests, several contended that
the proposal infringed on an
instructors .right to decide
teaching methods.
I dont want to feel Im
being dictated to on my teaching
methods, argued Dr. Melvin
Fried.
Supporters of the proposal
voted down attempts to omit
the pop-test ban.
I dont believe any right is
an absolute right, declared Dr.
Hal Lewis in support of the
original proposal. The
professor, for instance, doesnt
have the right to- insult the
student. o'
The only othbr opposition to
the proposal came when
University College Dean
Franklin Doty attempted to
Budget Aired
f FROM PAGE ONE
Campus Improvements
-$16,608.65
Special Requests Fund
-$16,450.00
Florida Players
$14,680.00
Budget officials reported that
nearly every request for funds
was cut because the most recent
estimated enrollment figures
available show that the student
population will be about the
same as was projected for the
current years budget.
The current budget had to be
reduced by $12,000 this summer
because actual enrollment did
not equal estimated enrollment,
the figure annual budgets are
based on.
GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 50 cents to $ 1.00
KISERS 604 N. MAIN

SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE
men women
Men's socks mid lengths nationally YOU MUST SEE THESE VALUES!
known brands slightly irregular
were $1.75 ... now $.79 3 for 2.25
Dresses
Suits and Sport Coats sl2 to sls values .. now $4.99 to $19.99
on sale for . y 4 to y 2 off Suits
$25 to $36 values . now $9.99 to $14.99
Walk Shorts Bermudas
were $5 0 to 16 00 values now $3.99 to $4.99 were ts to sl4 .. now $3.99 to $7.99

Ties Slacks
re 9 ular *9 to sl6 value . now $2.99 to $8.99
$5.00 to $7.00 regular ... now $1.99 Sanda|s a d Loafm
Dress and Sport Shirts *' * sl6 I re9u,ar now $5.99 to $9.99
Bathing Suits
$6.00 values . now 3.49 3 for $lO sl4 $29 values . now $2.99 to $18.99
Shirts and Blouses
Swim Wear regular $4.95 to $7.95 . now $3.99 to $4.99
$5.00 to *9.00 values . now $2 99/J&4 qq Purses
c.tW4.99 $3.00 to $24.00 ... now $.99 to $14.99
Wf)t 13mbemtp

amend the bill to exclude
freshmen.
It takes a while for a student
coming to this University to get
a measure of us and of us him,
explained Doty.
The Freshman, argued Action
Conference member David
Noble, is mature enough to
make the decision on whether or
not to attend class. Many times a
student can get just as much out
of a course by not attending
classes, Noble emphasized.
Theres a lot of lousy
teachers in the University
College, snorted Noble, shaking
his head.
The next Action Conference
meeting was scheduled for
August 14 to consider' new
proposals introduced at
Wednesday's meeting. The new
proposals, from the Advice and
Counseling Task Force, include
proposals calling for:
The acknowledgement of
the important role played by
faculty members involved in
counseling and advisement.
# A policy that all
University College students,
upon declaring a major, consult
with an upper division advisor
and that those not declaring a

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major retain the same advisor
throughout their stay in lower
division.
A coordinator of advisors
within each college and the
participation of advisors i n
technique improving training
sessions.
Orientation of freshmen
by upper division colleges.
Re-evaluation of the
orientation program, especially
for junior college transfers.
Publishing a directory for
students of the counseling
services available to them.
Administrative and
financial autonomy and
functional coordination of
counseling services by a
University-wide coordinator.
Attainment of funds for
construction of a facility to
consolidate all UF helping
services in one location.
Peace Corps Recruits
Two former Peace Corps
volunteers will be at UF next
week seeking applicants for
overseas service.
The pair will man a recruiting
desk on the ground floor of the
Reitz Union from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., Monday through Friday.



PfM.i'Mi T*y in our meat dept dairy specials
Chuck Steaks 69*
Swift's Premium Proton (ion#-In) Sliced BflCOn .b. 65* Maraarine ,kV 45*
Pot KAflet |.
. 3 Corned Beef 89- Marqarine 30* KiU£&|jttU^&l
Swift's Premium Delicious Stock Cut! ...
| wee tl 10 Swm> rrenteai kM Philadelphia Brand /
London Broil ib. Bologna 29* 59* Cream Cheese 2*£ 25*
Swift's Premium Prefee tsnslsts I"'*' ****** Krafts Skiff
Imperial Roost e.B9* ** 3 Cheddar Cheese LT 75*
w^.iw r i MM i M .b,i W .cm Ham or Turkey 3 M 99 Cheddar cheese > 65
Deer ROOST Smoked Daintees 79* *~2r~ V V 1
swHfaFmniMt f.,.i..r. -.n.i., ran Cottage Cheese W I W
Short Ribs *.49' Sliced Ham i? 79* 59*
ps* ft Right in Your Own Backyard
IfsC^jokCHjtCGuntry
SIRLOIN, T-BONE, KIY CLUB JH.HZH? lo *
OR BONELESS TOP ROUND Potatoes & Peat "fC <9*
OtnalrCftHf 5wrZZZw
£S2TT bM ui OlvaKOftLC; sa__
Real X' W SSL *
P* gr,|K Jm per lb. Perch Fillet* *39*
V mIY"I£L BB Flounder Fillets JC 49*
aSSsru* '***" ** 29* I I
Seefeed Treefl | Over |
I Mrs. Bell's Peanut Butter X
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K iinifM tit m. te. leeei I
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AU swifts premium meats Jl U-J
ARE GOVERNMENT-INSPECTED Cat Food 8£ $1 I thfM Mb. ortmu I
Br ~, Libby's Tender Sweet r s idaeiree Sat Aue. IA least 3
] I delicatessen treats Garden Peas ** * LuSSSSISSSStfSftSIUSMISSSMSSMISR
I bby't Tender Cut
Fresh er Smoked Greon g #3O, $
QU VSn Liverwurst ib. 99 #
, ,,,,V,e Teuy Kitchen-Fresh Spam mT 49*
Seeltest Aset. Flevers I limit!l MdCOrOm Sfllod lb.
Jdpdm f r*nm !ni f #9 Delicts Hem b Cheese ley 2, Oet l pus wn Ceepeel $( Otty two botttos e HEINZ g| ju| J
fSPJZ&SZ! Sandwiches *.39' Heim Ketchup | KBDUnB AA S
Chase & Sanborn 49 ISwJST. 2jssi i(BBl
Asoertea Colors (\< j) Ukby, SeWUn, # 0 UTCHUPUUKUSH Ml WH fl
Hudson Towels.. 4iz 99* I. ce 3 s 1 -
Swift's Asserted Flevors ( # Beef Stew 49* IBl**- J Htwg 00 wIIL COCC> ?>BBKi
Sherbets 5.C # hral,h *< ,d tr.T.i ~r / r.vj L > ,!y (imnt lSl
Florida Punch, Cherry, Grape, Orange, Apple with Fi.ride, c.iyot. ||III IlflloTfliliPSlr^l
PlneeppleOreeje g%f%, 7 Dental Cream 49* KLU ....-w.r~A..r..*w M
Hi-CDrinks .. J :.* S 9 V rr* I H -r ,c J^ V I
Bumble Bee Green Label Listenne Use ft | Sliced Turkey I
TfIMM 9 6VI ' JtQ* Hele Reg. er litre Held I 2 lb. pk(. ]
trlllfJKll S UnU e e e w cans UP JF llair Qnraw OQf I n*R'f"*t HMI
bb/s Helved er Sliced MB,r ra V 1
Peothes J ?£? 89 Marker 57.59* ffiTildwreenStampsTO
down produce lane \ I f VaTe'lim ;!?. | I
Cauliflower mm 39' ... <*-*.- >.-.49, (| wh e re shopping is 1 I
Sweet Thompson Plantation Cremes pm ht a pleasure f ...*.!-a..aeet j
CAArllnee /awmac p*** Tbe SttaUde# Seken! MaddamaaamdddkflnaAAamssdddUff
B-T -.-,.4. l IPBBUXI BSB
Jn | d% va. Camp* Tatty B\ *" aak t | Lambrecht's Cheese Cake 1
Celery 2 t.ik 1 Beanie Weenies ...2 *, 53* 17 os. pkf.
Potatoes It 59' £. 89' Green Goddess 39* KM KM-IHw'
-IHw' Orswfd s.'.d sitMd || Swift's Premium Roll if Tarnow's Oven-Ready j: Kraft's Strawberry Preserves |; Hot Shot Insect Bomb
(Msgea, 08m. Ftohlt PtoMUet | I P i r llh S l, kl* # ' I IVI lb. Or IVI lb. j 18 * f ,r *** . 1
£ k &me> I MeWiiasun \[ |; e.c J
MomuMhaukuaaauMakM £uuwMMtfMUM*aaluMMMMMM*na*dUMM** AAAaAAAaaafnnmHHUHHknnc^ **&** naaanasaaaae^eesaasuaeas-ienenneAne
Friday, August 9.1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 9, 1968

SG Takes Over
Lyceum Council
By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
Lyceum Council onetime sponsor of UF entertainment
productions has become one of the first notable casualties in an
across-the-board budget slash by SG.
Student Government Productions, SG financed and controlled,
will assume Lyceums contracts for the fall and will arrange new ones
for the future.
Lyceum was not a profit-making organization, SG President
Clyde Taylor said, but it was using student fees and therefore had
some responsibility to hold down losses.
Officially Lyceum was eliminated because it did not submit its
charter in time for approval and budgeting this quarter.

Bruce Flower, Lyceum
business manager, felt otherwise.
Student Government has
had Lyceum on the chopping
block for some time now, he
said. The means to the end
they wanted was the charter
business this summer.
SG was also reportedly upset
with financial irresponsibility in
Lyceums contracting scheduled
non-draw performances so
there would be a large amount
of complimentary tickets which
could be given to special interest
groups.

Based on school year 1968-69 projected attendance figures SG will
have to operate with a total budget nearly SI,OOO less than last year.
Also cut from SGs financial rolls were the Veterans Club, Second
100 Series and Board of International Activities. Seven new
organizations were added, necessitating the budget belt tightening.
SG in another budget cutting move is currently trying to repeal a
1964 law which exempts the Reitz Union from normal SG budget
processes.
Flower maintained he had Lyceums charter written but, we were
waiting until September to present it. He claimed he did not know it
had to meet a summer deadline.
The change is both good and bad, Flower said. Its good that
SG is starting from scratch and getting rid of all the mistakes in
Lyceum. I just hope the appointive positions dont become political
plums.
Flower was critical of Lyceums former controlling board.
The six elected officers were merely figureheads, he said. The
business manager, house manager and stage manager all appointed
held all the power.
Lyceums business manager, a UF Hall of Fame member, also
criticized SGs approach to the problem.
SG has been chopping off things right and left and they have no
plans to replace what they chop off, he said. When you get rid of a
SIOO,OOO business like Lyceum Council, you need something practical
to replace it they dont have it.
SG wants to hold all the power, but not do any work. Everything
is going to end up in SG and they have no experience to work with.
All they have is politics.
Present plans for establishing Lyceums replacement include SGs
assuming the financial contracts. SGP will not be chartered, but will
be financed as a special organization like Accent, Taylor said.
Student Government Productions will not use any former
members of Lyceum Council for right now, Taylor said. Gary
Goodrich, Phil Burnett, Ira Hatch, Jake Schikel and myself can handle
things.
In the 1968-69 school year SGP hopes to present Van Clibum,
tenor Jan Peerce, the Hague Symphony, the Ruth Page Ballet,
Wagners Chorale and Mantovanis Orchestra.

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WHEN THE FORECAST IS
I FOR RAIN, THERES NO
NEED TO WORRY...STAY
DRY AND WARM IN ONE
I OF OUR NEW SEASON
ZIP-OUT RAINCOATS.
OUR TRENCH COAT
STYLE, DESIGNED TO
CAPTURE THE MILITARY
LOOK, HAS BUTTON-DOWN
EPAULETS, DOUBLE
STORM SHIELD, SEPARA TE
LINED YOKE BACK AND
MANY OTHER FEATURES.
THE LONDONER, OUR
I EXCLUSIVE WASH AND
I WEAR B ALMACAAN
f RAINCOAT IS A
I HANDSOME CLASSIC!
I PRODUCED IN
I WAMSUTTAS REIGNO
FABRIC, WITH 100%
I NYLON LINING FOR TRUE
I WASH AND WEARABILITY.
I EITHER STYLE IS A
SENSATIONAL VALUE!
I PROPORTIONED TO FIT SKIRTS
I OUR CLASSIC SKIRT IS
I PROPORTIONED FOR YOU
IN COMPLETELY
I WASHABLE BASIC
I COLORS. PERFECT TO
I WEAR WITH YOUR
I FAVORITE SHIRT OR
SWEATER.
I GIRLS BACK TO-SCHOOL DRESSES
I BIG FASHIONS FOR
I LITTLE GIRLS. ..A MUST
I FOR EVERY GIRLS BACK
I TO SCHOOL WARDROBE.
I ALL THE NEWEST STYLES
I IN VINYL AND WASHABLE
I PERMANENT PRESS
I FABRICS. SOLIDS,
I STRIPES, PRINTS AND
I PLAIDS. SIZES ITO 14.

OHfIROF ITI Se Ur revo v n g credit plan...
** N money down- take months to pay!

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OPEN
%
At Their lowest Price, Ivor Solids, Prints, Ja squares and Fancies Whitt or Orongo Shad* '- -r Ivtrything You'll Want And Ntod
Prices Reduced Famous Maker Gooseneck Pp "^ a n rp" __ Back-to-School I
L.P. RECORDS HAND TOWELS DESK LAMP SHIRT SHIFTS SUPPLIES
2 59 2 1 99' T 79'
' W W for A SET Pm M I
' Cam*. Value 4.t7
Our ontirt sloth ol Special purchase of famous maker towels .Metal arm,with molded hood in color , . ....
Aretha Fronklin, The Young Roscals, Otis All are first quality, discontinued patterns Wide black molded sturdy base Never-iron Dacron* Dolvester and aper on sop e remover. 1000 staples
Reading, Wilson Picket, and the Vanilla in wide selection, of wild,, jacquards. .Will not tip or tilt, perfect for any room coHon hirt shJJs with lanl .U.v t* Th AhV T""''
Fudge including their newest ond their stripe, in your house. GiveT o nice even light f*£" ,*'* ,0 fl A MV# ' P s t > T" I
greatest hi,, on Atlantic and Atco labels Pastel, as well as handsome, deeper tones The perfect lamp for reading, studying button-front, buMon-down or Hoover ** Pend pen,, long lasting. no smeOr
. Styles and patterns to suit every decor collar, in great plaid, And every,h.ng at ,ust 79c each a, F,elds!
a. Famous label on every towel Misses' lists 10 to 18
< 1
Plays on Rettery or (fectricity Renin* > transistor High Intensity, Y runs for mo r Powered T-shirts ond brief, Wave* Cottoss In Twlm mod PmM Meet
AM-FM Radio Tape Recorder Imported Lamp Mens Underwear Jacquard Bedspread I
Complete with (orphan. ond Bmttorios With tape, microphone. bmttorios. strap troso shod, mod arm Pak oh too .hope rotosstlom. a* shrinkage *M"rooa look. Completely Washable
14.88 R BB 097 0 si_ 097
*!?* Jr StoH.eT W s** 2 tor JL l/T-sT** <~P Vehrn 4*B I
. Mack vinyl leatherette cabinet, wood trim £!££?**' h m# Kho#t *' lomp come, in Ivory or beige with square 100*. cotton in men', sites S, M, l ond XI Ch * pink b,M *' lilae or W
AFC, large telescopic antenna Compl# with mitropW tope, batter- be arm. Bulb included
1 r'sAVR / v fe Jhl \*f? I
limit t Per Customer O Press Monger, 4* Ml
Os*. Solid State Stool strings, stool-rointorsod nosh 39s Hill Buys A lot At Holds V Incredible Closot Voluod VfllTD riIATPr
Phonograph Folk Guitar Health&BeautyAids Storage Aids IHS&ySSHff'
Wido-rongo Sound Inloid-yosition marker, Bottor Shop forty Keep, Your Clothe, Neat and Clean Smoking Stand or Retard Rath
23f? 8 88 qqo vo 4.Q0 77
jr&r ?r:?e l r choice O7 choice *X t7- Curlitu olin bra
* jt* P T*f ' omo,,c changer, 45 rpm ,p.n- Mahogany finish, white spruce top Gillette Super stomiess. brush-ond-comb Visit o.r m .r.elous dose, shop a, once Smoking stand with black ashtray
die included Mouth wo,h. .Record rock holds 80 records black §
_ Dynamic A" oval speaker o nd faro
$ -eriri "ClTITnn OPEN 9AM 9 PM; SUNDAYS NOON -7 PM iriianwinSnLTifin
JgXCle JlIJuXiUm Gainesville Located NW 13th St. at 23rd Blvd.
ACRES OF FREE PARKING m

Friday, August 9,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. Tin Florida Alligator, Friday. August 9, 1968

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S.
I A Black Vnifo^^^i i
Blacks History Needed
- ass-; By David Horne

For the Kings, the Wilkins, the Carmichaels, the
Foremans, and the Dawkins, for all of us the
ultimate goal is the same.
First, we are working for a black transformation
- from a people with no distinct /feelings of
belonging, a habitual acquaintance with the bottom,
and ah all-pervading hopelessness to a knowledge of
a separate and magnificent African and American
heritage.
The symbolism of our Black and Beautiful
shouts will be interpreted into the profound reality
of racial identity and self-acceptance for what we
are.
But why this emphasis on a Black American
History? Why this pushing for a separate, divided
history??" some of you have asked.
For all of my short 21 years, plus the combined
years of all my American ancestors, the only
interpretations our standard educations gave us of
American history was Mr. Charlies distorted,
egocentric brand. But this gave us only half of the
truth (in some cases not even that much).
Our churches define a half-truth as a full lie.
Using that value, both sides of the fence have been
lied to.
Mr. Charlies numerous progeny were not harmed
by this narrow-mindedness, in fact, to them it was
and still is the Truth (maybe thats an indication of
some sort of harm though). But my brothers and
sisters were agonizingly mutilated by these
True-Lies, thus our feelings on non-cultural
achievement and non-contributions.
In my (and your) 1-12 grade texts (and onward
through college) the Black American has been
imbedded in our minds as a singin, dancin, always
happy, always content in his place darky, or the
famous tales of great American writers as a
chauffeur, maid, brute rapist, criminal, etc. Or more
often we didnt appear at all.
There was almost always the little WASP boy and
his sister and happy puppy who maybe experienced
the extreme hardship of a skinned knee, a mosquito
bite, or a smashed favorite toy, etc. Little
Fauntieroy somehow develops into Mr. Charlie and
the latter covers the media with his all-American
tales of marital problems, tax woe, great inventions,
his Wars (on poverty, rats and people), his
Operation Concerns, etc.
But meanwhile that pleasant old darky concept
maintains its hold on our attitudes toward Black
America. The stereotype describes us as
unintelligent, uncreative, just plain un-....

But we were and are important contributors to
the country and world. We discovered Arizona, New
Mexico, and the city of Chicago. We had
multiracially far physicians, by 1788, we fought
and died at Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill,
(and from that first war to every war America ever
fought). We had diplomats, cowboys, newspaper
editors and publishers, state and national
Congressmen (even two lieutenant governors of
South Carolina and for a short time, a governor of
Louisiana).
The list is magnificently and undeniably long. We
helped to build this nation with much more than
our muscle sweat and strong backs. We made
probably the first clock in America, invented com
harvesters, produced important scientific papers,
patented the vacuum cup which revolutionized the
important sugar refining methods and Elijah McCoy
(one of his inventions was the object of the phrase,
the Real McCoy) received over 57 patents for
inventions on automatic lubricating appliances and
objects pertaining to telegraphy and electricity.
A learned acquaintance of mine once told me.
David, you can stack all the Booker T.
Washingtons on top of one another and your people
still are going to be unsuccessful and white America
despises an unsuccessful people! He was dead wrong
on the first part. But he was only expressing what
his Ph.D. education had taught him. You other
Americans like him are the targets of our second
phase of producing black pride and respect for the
Black American.
We want to teach you of our history. We want to
give you the other side of the coin. You liberals and
you rednecks.. .You can never do anything for or
about a people you dont know and from your
vantage point never, ever understand. Right now
you and I speak the same words but live in two
incongruent perceptive worlds. My generation is
telling you that we will either unite into a single
country or destroy each other.
The first step toward the former is a mutual
rational look at the facts and effects of a mutual
history (which means an initial prime emphasis on
Black American History to partially compensate for
the so far overwhelming emphasis on White
American History).
Only when both blacks and whites know of their
integrated history will they be able to implement a
raceless today. The first five or six steps toward the
second alternative this country has already taken.

Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know *
Nss^// Harold Kennedy
1%8 Editor
Poa/kxJlFt Harold Aldrich Paul Kaplan
+ Managing Editor Executive Editor
Mi Steve Hulsey Neal Sanders
jygws Editor Sports Editor
Machine Politics
With Richard Nixons announcement Thursday that he
wants Maryland Gov. Spiro Agnew as his Vice Presidential
Candidate, the whole Republican Convention scenario
flickered to its conclusion.
Those suspicions which were aroused by Nixons
complacent refusal to actively campaign to get out among
the people seem confirmed by Nixons choice of Agnew
over such candidates as Charles Percy, Mark Hatfield, and
John Lindsay.
The whole Republican debacle smacked of the
conventional smoke-filled room, of government by machine
instead of government of the people, by the people and for
the people.
The overall effect was that of a gigantic marionette show,
with the delegates going through the motions of picking
the peoples choice for their candidate for the presidency
but basing their choice on old political debts instead of the
wishes of the country,
They listened to each candidate and his supporters. They
drank in the huge demonstrations.
r EDITORIAL H
And then on cue, they elected Richard M. Nixon as the
Republican candidate for the Presidency on the first ballot,
as planned.
The amazing thing about the whole convention was the
regimented, discussion-be-damned nature of it. The
emphasis was on party unity and the hell with all else.
In the name of party unity, discussion on the party
platform was silenced. N.Y. Senator Jacob Javits and a
South Carolina delegate were denied the floor, the
milk-toast, middle-of-the-road platform was railroaded
through, and the meeting was adjourned.
Party unity or loyalty if you will apparently landed
the nomination for Nixon, who spent the last eight years
working for the party and the last two intensively gathering
delegate votes.
Both Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan, who
started too late to block Nixon, were too diametrically
opposed to stop Nixon.
The heavy percentage of voters -of both parties who
liked Rockefellers proposals to extract us from Vietnam
and to ease the urban crisis at home apparently will be
§ §



OPEN FORUM:
JKL\ul mi ViMMt
* I
"There is no hope for the complacent man," I
Special Session =
LIFE 101
By Paul Kaplan

Drugs and sex are a lot alike. In both cases, the
people who advertise their experiences are usually
phony and insincere. The real doersare the people
who keep their experiences to themselves.
* *
Youre wasting your time, fellas, if, when you
call her up and ask her if you had gotten her out of
bed, she says Yes.
* *
Girls who bleach their hair blonde are usually
just trying to divert people from looking at their
faces.
* *
Youve struck oil when she says shed just as
soon watch television as go to a movie.
* *
The great majority of people who say theyre in
love, really arent. Theyre merely in love with the
idea of being in love.
** *
Shes serious about you when she starts washing
your clothes. Shes ready to get married when she
washes your clothes, and enjoys doing it.
* *
Because of their parents, most people dont learn
the truth about divorce until it happens to them.
Parents foolishly tell their children that divorce is
caused by such things as marrying before being
mentally prepared, or marrying for physical cravings
rather than true love. Parents would do better by

Pearson Lederer Messick
Us It *1 tv lir 111 of fho THE SENATOR OUR OWN WORST ENEMY SYNDICATE WIFE
f ALA Wildl 5 nCW dl lllv Linkletter Pomeroy Cooke
I 1 W,SH D SAID THAT ,N THE F,NANC,AL DISTRICT VIETNAM: The Country,
I KntQL\ # Gardner Perry the people
O* NO EASY VICTORIES PETER KAPITSA ON LIFE & SCIENCE
VHf BOOKSTORE Marshall Whyte
w w m CHRISTY THE LAST LANDSCAPE
_ v

Crossword J, y Clara Ri Cross I
BRAIN TEASER
ACROSS

1 Hackie. 45 Filthy habit- 84 Ships 110 Soak. 1
6 Three weird ations. storage 112 Periods of
sisters. 48 Stews. space. time: abbr. I
11 Hardness of 49 Postpone. 85 Put on. 113 Jibe.
character. 51 Number. 89 Insect. 114 Stake.
16 Cudgel 55 Mister: Ger. 90 Cheers. 115 Chambers,
blow 56 Rood. 92 Bay of 119 Rending.
21 Greek 57 More Fundy 121 Honey bee.
assembly. flavorful. feature. 125 Monkshood
22 Soap plant. 59 Au nature!. 93 Butter knife. and
23 Mountain 60 Singular. 94Tree wolfbane.
ridge. 61 Expunge. yielding 127 Twofold.
24 The liver. 62 A fair. caucho. 128 Middle of
25 Roman coin: 63 Remarks. 95 Float. the road
var. 65 Peccancy. 96 Attractive. man.
26 Muslim 66 Dwelling 97 S. American 129 Ethical,
bible. place. ungulate. 130 Greek
27 Secure: 68 Vehicle. 98 Historical hospitality,
naut. 69 Martin Van period. 132 Whole
28 jest. . 99 Sheltered amount.
29 Locomotive 70 Portion of areas. 135 Helper,
driver. liquor. 101 Three- 136 Sultans
31 Region. 71 Strode. decree.
33 Catchwords. 72 Stupid stands. > 137 Lobster pot. I
35 Rock person: si. 03,Capper. 138 Wear down. I
heavers. 73 Planet. 104 Mutilate. 139 Dens.
36 Caustic 74 lotas. 105 Throat 140 Bent wood
repartee. 76 Class. r \ germ: upward:
39 Implore. 77 Game colloq. aut
40 Exacerbate. points. 10 I, et 3 141 fulhtlv
41 Packaged. 79 Tailless 108e.bl.cal
42 one primate. pronoun. 142 Northern
thousand. SOWhitefish. 109 Abnormal European*, j
44 Affirmative 83 Roll up chest 143 The sloe,
vote. a sail. sounds. dial.
DOWN
1 Herring 13Teleost fish. 37 Old English 57 Archers
kegs. 14 Gr. letters. measures. distances
2 Go-between. 15 Philippine Screen. taroets I
3 Antelope. Island. 41 A lift up. co t- a fl ? t |
4 Smarter. 16 Mapped. S Hire,
5 Those who 17 Keep in 45PeHets. |1 Hires,
spin wool. check. 46 Creed. 62 Clay
Simulate.. 18- Daisy 47 Miss Dunne. mixture. I
7 r.iniH (lift up). 48 Trademark. 64 Turtle.
8 Rocky 19 Douay 49 Ground. 67 Narative
Dinnade biblical 50 Bri 9B UP E. 0 *"!*.
pinnacie. 52 With 68 Monks
9 Guidos name. oc wun .
highest note. 20 Lover. 53 Language 69 lhat.
10 Legislative meetin. Language SDeare
..g-S* 32 Measure 64 Shears. 72 Snulner,
1 y 34 Some? 56 Small 73 Burrowing
12 Handling. 36 Erect. stream. pes

their children to uncover the real cause of most
divorces -a lack of funds.
* *
If she orders scotch, be prepared for an evening
of intellectual discussion. If she orders rum, head
back to your place as quickly as you can.
* *
The song Pattern People, by the exciting Sth
Dimension, is one of the best songs to come out in a
long time.
* *
If, when shes with you, shell talk about sex
when shes drunk, but not when shes sober, then
shell do iL but not with you.
* *
Youve found someone who cares when she
insists shes not tired when her eyes are half closed.
**
You havent REALLY been lectured to until you
sit in on a Political Science 201 class taught by Dr.
Ernest Bartley.
* *
If she says youre the first, ask her why shes
telling you. If she has a good reason, then youre
not the first. J
* *
Just once Id like to hear an honest fellow say
that he buys Playboy Magazine because he gets a
rise out of the pictures.
* *
If rapei is punishable by death, then a girl who
urgps a guy Non just for the fun of it, should be given
life imprisonment, at least.

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I 775 Um 131 KT 133 134
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75 Os the 85 strudel. 96 Enclosing in 108 Polluted. 117 Voracious 123 Forever:
tissue. 86 Perfect. stays. 109 Closes Bh .
77 Headstrong. 87 Spooky. 97 Inanimate again. 118 Canonical 124 cnu^V.nmh
78 Center. 88 Apothecary object. 111 Use a small hour 126 Silk. comb.
79 shower. weights. 100 Lovers shuttle. prayers. 00 L rr !i V !J r
80 Hoods. 91 Devour. music. 113 Threefold: 120 Alert. I ,l
81 Small bay. 92 Potential 102 Section. P p ef ]JI Meti I^l Butterfly.
82 Ranch flowers. 103 Avoid. 114 Night spot. 122 Source of 133 Old English
livestock. 93 Godly 104 Dress goods. 115 Loose robe. commer- .'"*
83 Coquette. person. 106 Risked. 116 Oak fruit. cials. 134 Weight.

HI FI
LPS
*1.77
** fc&cvtd &A*
923 W. UNIV. AVE.

Friday. August 9, 1968. The Florida Alligator. I

Answers On Display
AT
THE HUB
MED CENTER
Bookstore
REITZ UNION
Bookstore

Page 7



Page 8

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 9. 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
35mm NIKKORMAT-FT SLR
Camera and case. Thru the lens light
meter. 50mm f 1.4 and 135 mm f 3.5
(telephoto) Auto-Nikkor Lenses.
Excellent condition. 378-8684.
(A-164-st-p)
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
Cast Aluminum portable barbeqte
grill and oven, used once, $40.00.
G.E. 16 oscillating 3 speed desk or
wall fan, $15.00. 8.55 x 14 tire and
wheel, $4.00. Phone 378-5736.
(A-166-3t-p)
Why Pay Rent: For less than rent
you can own comfortable 8 x 24
travel trailer. Tandem wheels, easy to
move if desired. Priced for immediate
sale. $ 1495.00 3 76-6372.
(Al6Blt-p)
For Sale: 21" Motorola Portable
T.V., IV2 year old. Excellent
condition, $60.00. Call 376-4039
anytime. (Al6Bltp)
Furniture; movie outfit, womens
magazines in Spanish; Science fiction
pbs; typewriter; Mexican art;
aquarium, child enclyclopedia (45
vols.); large study table, fish and
camp equip., thru Monday only.
372-9840. (Al6Bltp)

b&fi&b THE ORIGINAL
Ks 1936 SERIAL!
with Buster Crabbe
iSfmyi ALL 12 CHAPTERSIIII ggjjg|
SUNDAY AND MONDAY 7. 30 ONLY -AT THE UNION
DO-lt-Yourself
Mmi
DAYS TO RUN
6 To order classifieds, use the S :
form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive) 2 J
X tance to: Alligator Classifieds, O-l day $1
5 Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- O 2 days a j
S ville, Florida 32601. 3 days (*lO% discount) 9 j
d Q 4 days (*lO% discount) a
b Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over |
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount)
| DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE I
br* 1 ACCtciT-A TIOM Count the words, omitting a, an &* |
g LLMOJiriLMiiuiN the. Addresses and phone numbers }
O tor sale count as one word. Minimum charge 1
I tor rent is S l oo for 20 WOl d s For each 1
i n wanted additional word .add 3?. Multiply 9 j
help wanted the total by number of days the ad §
| O autos is to run Subtract the discount gg
1 n Dersonal (** applicable) and enclose a check 3*
n inef frmnH for remainder. For example, nj
2 ' e S^ U s nd 32-word ad to run 4 days costs W
u services $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?).
WORDING tm
S D i
o CMC
I NAME DATE 11
I STUDENT # PHONE ||
I ADDRESS I
I CITY STATE ZIP J
3tmoney cannot be refunded if ad is concelled4g>sw
_ __

FOR SALE
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY. 466-3340. (A-154-ts-p)
1959 50 hp Evinrude, 16 Scottcraft.
Excellent condition. Many extras.
Call 376-3261 Ext. 2069 after 8:00
p. m., See at 1111 S. W. 16th
Ave. No. 47, Price $450.00.
(Al6B3tp)
Free Kittens; 3-three month old
female kittens. 1-gray and white, 2
multi-colored. House broken. Call
372-3119. (Al6Bltp)
New "Martin D-35 and Hard shell
case $375.00, will trade for Motor
Cycle, 62 Buick LeSabre, Radio AC,
$700.00, 376-9906. (Al6Blt-p)
"NEVER use anything like it, say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpet. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(Al6Blt-c)
FOR RENT f
y.;.;.v*v-vx*:*>x*x x*x-x*v-vx*x*x*x*x*x*x*>:*
3 blocks from campus. Double room
for male students. Air Conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
N.W. 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-166-st-p)

FOR RENT
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./mcnth. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(B 157 15t p)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Air conditioned. 2
Bedroom IV2 Bath CBS 11 miles
S.W. University $ 125.00/mo.
Phone 495-2186 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-l 55-st-p)
ROOMS Men Walk to campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles. Live
with friends, Phone 3788122 or
3766652. (Bl63Btp)
2 BEDROOM Trailer, 55 X lz,
Mobileer Park, $104.00 per month,
Available Sept. Ist. Call 376-3261
Ext. 2269 from 8 to 5 or 378-4524
in p.m. and ask for Beverly.
(B-167-2t-p)

ODD COUPLE" TIMES TODAY ONLY 1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
$1 HELD OVER!...STHLTM HAPPIEST SHOW IN TOWN! f
Jack 8513333&Z
Lvllllllvll SATURDAY TIMES:
and Lj 111 <
l|K|tf A M )| rIN BLUE AUDITORIUM-,
VVAaLimA I J I | n L m "Odd Couple"
m m 2:00-4:02-6:04-9:41
Matthau icrl s ki a I
are | | HN GOLD AUDITORIUM-,
TtA I last year in I "Odd Couple" at 7:27
A 11V I t New York City | Sneak feature at 9:20
np PANAVISION*TECHNICOLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTURE Jh
more. 1
Downtown Gainesville
MAT. 2 P.M. .Eve. 3 P.M.
| 23J W. Uni versify 4ve. | No reserved seats -No passes accepted.
In new screen splendor... Hie most magnificent picture ever!
"GONE WITH THEmNET
''' C
ISs* CLARK GABLE
WIEN LEIGH
LESLIE HOWARD OLIVIAdeHAVII,LAND

r.:.x*s:-v.v;YW : :*:ox%x?x<-:-Nssv:YX*x*:*X.: ;
WANTED
.>.ssvx*x*x-:*svx*x*x'x*x-v.v:*xsx*xx*
EE Senior needs roommates and
apartment for fall. Contact Don
Glendening. Call Hollywood collect
983-5601 after 5 p.m. any day.
(C-164-st-p)
SENIOR Co-ed needs place to live in
68-69 write Rita Perkins, 37 Edmund
Rd., Hollywood Fla. or call collect
983-5041 after 10 p.m. (C-164-4t-p)
WANTED: 1 or 2 female roommates
for Fall Quarter. Landmark. Call
378-5809. (C-166-4t-p)
FEMALE roommate to share
1-bedroom apt. 3 blocks North of
campus. $52.75 plus >/2 utilities. Call
Sandy 378-6570. (C-167-3t-p)
FOURTH wanted for Camelot Apts,
(we have most spacious floor plan).
She must be a senior or graduate
student. Phone: 376-1631 Room
704. (C-167-3t-|)
WE NEED 1 or 2 Male roommates
and 2-bedroom apt. for fall. Call Bob
and Hal (4EG and 3EG). 378-1153.
(C-167-3t-p)

/jp%iitusSr/
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________ -- ww m m m TrnTn>-.r < vrtfVfWWW
* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS*

WANTED
ffiyivX*X?X?X*t*>*&*XSTX!fcX*X*X*iX*X£*X?X*XX
WANTED: Female roommate for
Village Park Apt. 66. Immediate
occupancy. Graduate Student
leaving. 378-7849. (C-167-3t-p)
WE NEED one easy-going girl as a
fourth at Village Park for Sept. Call
Chris, 372-6442 or Merri, 376-7434.
(C-167-4t-p)
A SENIOR COED wants 2 female
roommates to share a 3-bedroom
house, two blocks behind State
Theater. Total rent $90.00. Call
Nancy, 378-4578; No. 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. (C-167-2t-p)
1 or 2 Female roommates wanted
Butler Apts. To share with 1 girl and
baby. Call 376-2755. Ask for Karen.
(Cl6B3t p)
Wanted: 1 coed roommate to share
French Quarter apt. with 3 seniors
for fall. Call or write Karen, room
202, Tower B, 376-1631.
(Cl6BIt p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR THREE-BEDROOM HOUSE,
919 N.W. Bth Place, $33.00 per
month, Please call or write Ginny
Hartmann, 970 Dakar Dr., Merritt
Island, Florida. (C 163 3t p)
WANTED: One old, second-hand
tennis-racket. Call 376-7045 after 5.
(Cl6Blt p)
WANTED: Ride to Washington, D.C.
area after finals. Will share expenses.
Call 376-7045 after 5.
(C-168It p)
HELP WANTED f
LISTENERS wanted will pay $3.00
for IV2 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
University ext. 2307. (E-167-4t-c)

August 9,1
6:00 9:20 rrir nnUGUS liURENCEOIiVIER JEANSIMMONS I
Saturday, I rmf usnvv johh uvin |
August 10, | I TONY CURTIS
Main Entrance \1
GAINESVILLE MALL tt
CarmlneUa's SwJm of
/ffiiyti \\\ I \ I
ti /Continantal atmosphere i ps' ! i I ii lllir 31
7 Finwt ingourmotfood | ||ll ||
|zhnportlfcw..lW i "Kg! ; (7=ji|i=i| Serving Continuously A 4/
|| = j jjj Jl*|J
{P 1 I* 1 * ,J 11 Gainesvilles Finest JJ
if and Most Intmate |
wM w

W -.-.-...-e-e:4We%V.%%V.%*W;vX*XN>V.%*..V;V^
HELP WANTED I
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330, J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
AUTOS
ALFA rome O Red Sprint GT,
1965 DOHC HEAD, 1.6 Liter, 130
HP, 5-speed. Excellent Condition.
One Owner. 378-7581. Eves.
1963 Cadillac Sedan DeVille. Racing
Green. Factory Air. $1675. Call
3782949. (Gl63st p)
LEAVING country, 63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater,
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)
PONTIAC Bonneville 9 Passenger
station wagon. 1965 Automatic
Transmission, power brakes and
steering, AC, luggage rack, many
other extras, Original owner. $2150.
Phone 378-5736. (G-166-3t-p)
1960 FORD FAIRLANE, 6-cyl.
Economical and dependable
transportation. Good condition and
inspection sticker. Call 378-8552
from 10:00 to 2:00 5:30 on.
(G-166-2t-p)
1965 GTO, Convertible, 4-speed.
Tri-power. Excellent Condition.
$1700.00 or best offer. Call
378-4657. (G-167-4t-p)

Friday, August 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

>#-'*s*x x*x*>x-x.x.:.:.:.xis x*:ss*ix*>!*x*:!.SC
| AUTOS
Mercedes-Benz, 2205, 1961, Must
sell, excellent condition, SI2OO or
best offer, also, mans racing bicycle
best offer. Call 376-0428 Evenings.
(G 168 It p)
1966 Triumph TR-4A IRS. Blue with
white top and tonneau. Very good
condition. No Reasonable offer
refused. Call 372-1039. (Gl6B-3t-p)
1953 Ford. Blue. Runs good for
around town use for student.
SIOO.OO or best offer. At 1405 N.W.
sth Ave. 378-2802 After 6.
(Gl6B4t p)
,;.^-.-x*x*x*x-x-x\x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x>x-Xv
I LOST & FOUND |
* <:
.x.r.v.vxsX-x-x-x-x.v.:.%\%v.-.-:vx-x-:-x-:-:-:-:
LOST: One K and E 10 Inch slide
rule vicinity McCarty Hall and Home
Library July 24. Finder please call
Dempsey 378-8165. (L-166-3t-p)
LOST: Watch, Diver type. Bless Aud.
Tuesday, 30, a.ra Phone 372-6527.
(L-167-2t-p)
Lost: Cat, Siamese. White Scar on
right front leg. In vicinity of N.W.
16th St. 1 S. Fourth Ave. Phone
378-4373. Reward. (L 168It p)
SERVICES
TEDDY BEAR NURSERY. Infants
12 years old. 6 complete
departments. Pick-up and delivery at
five schools. Separate Dept, for
school age children. We are open all
day Saturday. (M-167-4t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-153-16t-p)

Page 9

| SERVICES |
l x*x x*v.v. .v;-:-;-x-x*x x.x*XsX*v*v.v.v.v;Â¥
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 378-8301. 1726
NE Waldo Road. Electrical Systems
checked free. (M-153-ts-c)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS.
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(M-153-ts-c)
WANT
ADS

I
iacle rgiffj
I The Company that brought you
I HELLS EELS ON WHEELS" mmSMSSI
now ngs you...
ABfL, l
I '''
I TQM STERN__ARI£NEMARTEL
I _==_
jj%J|

**
Cooling It
NEW YORK lUPPBabies
arent the only ones to suffer
from prickly heat. Mom. Dad,
teen-agers and little leaguers
know the hot weather annoy annoyance
ance annoyance of itchy chafed summer
skin. too.
Authorities recommend bor borrowing
rowing borrowing baby powder for the
ailment. Its high absorbency
and light fresh scent help see
you coolly through the most
humid days. Dust the powder
next to all of you right down
to your toes before you dress.
at-*,, 'W academy
I MfiSfii 1
p3o£PHtlWK*^'



Page 10

I, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 9, 1968

/~\y>o
'-' i and Qn Female Visitors?

BLUE
BULLETIN
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, August 22, at 1:30
p.m. in Room 235 Tigert Hall.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduating, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
RECREATIONAL AREAS:
The following University
recreational facilities are being
reserved to host Operation
Concern participants Saturday,
August 10, from 2-4 p.m.:
Murphree Area Tennis Courts;
Murphree Area Handball Courts;
Fleming Field Soccer Fields;
Fleming Field Volleyball Courts;
Women's Gymnasium; Florida
Gymnasium, and the Main Drill
Field. Persons wishing to
participate in recreational
activities during that time should
plan to use other areas.
ROTC CEREMONY: The
Joint Army-Air Force ROTC
Commissioning Ceremony will ~
be held August 27 at 2:30 p.m.
in the J. Wayne Reitz Union
Auditorium.
FINAL EXAMINATION
SCHEDULE: Students are
expected to report for the
following examinations and each
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil.
Students will be required to
use their Social Security
Numbers. For additional
information and for anv courses
not listed, students should
consult the Schedule, of Courses
Summer Quarter 1908 or their
instructors.
CSS 11 and CSS 112:
Monday, August 19, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.

On All Loans... '^|Wsjgipl|fedd
Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement I
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION JgOfc I
sth Avenue of the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 qjti. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday I

CPS 121, CPS 122 and CPS
123: Saturday, Aug. 17, 1 p.m.
in Walker Auditorium.
CEH 131: Thursday, Aug. 22,
7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 and CLC 143:
Tuesday, Aug. 20, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171 and MS 102:
Friday, Aug. 23, 7 p.m. in
Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251: Wednesday, Aug.
21, 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CBS 261: Saturday, Aug. 17,
7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets for the Music
Department presentation
H.M.S. PINAFORE will be on
sale at the Union Box Office
on Friday, August 9. The Box
Office will close Monday,
August 12, for the summer.
GENERAL NOTICES
FALL RUSH: The
Panhellenic Council has set
August 15 as the deadline for
continuing students, incoming
freshmen and transfers to sign
up for fall rush. All incoming
students will receive the
necessary forms by mail and
continuing students may obtain
them by writing the Panhellenic
Office, 315 Reitz Union.
Payment of a $2 fee makes the
students eligible for the fall
rushing program beginning Sept.
18. Students who have been
through rush and paid the fee
will remain eligible.
ORANGE AND BLUE
DEADLINES: Duringthe
summer term the Orange and
Blue will be run once a week
on Friday. All notices must be
received by 9 a.m. Wednesday
prior to publication. Notices
should be typed and signed by
the person submitting the notice
and sent to the Division of
Information Services, Building
H., Campus. Items for the
Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office
Reitz Union.

INDIA CLUB: During the
summer quarter the India Club
will hold regular monthly
meetings on the second Saturday
of each month. Documentary
films on Indian life will be
shown at each meeting. A
Feature Film Show will be held
on the last Sunday of each
month. Meetings will be held in
Room 349, Reitz Union. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
CAMPUS CALENDAR
Union Movie: "Spartacus,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Men's Interhall: "Gypsy,"
Towers Rec Room, 7 & 9
p.m.
Dept of Music: Gilbert &
Sullivan's H. M.S.
PINAFORE, P.K. Yonge
Aud., 7:30 p.m. Family Night
Special: the entire family for
$2.00.
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing,
217 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
Saturday, August 10
Union Movie: "Spartacus,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Men's Interhall: "Gypsy,"
Towers Rec Room, 7 & 9
p.m.
Union Dance: Union Ballroom,
8 p.m.
Dept of Music: Gilbert &
Sullivan's H.M.S.
PINAFORE, P.K. Yonge
Aud., 8:15 p.m. UF Students
50 cents. All others SI.OO.
Sunday, August 11
Program Office: Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m. Graduate Piano Recital:
Larry Graham, Constans
Theatre, 4 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: "Flash
' Gordon," Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Monday, August 12
Florida Cinema Society: "Flash
Gordon, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.

By R. B. SALOMON
Alligator Correspondent
UF fraternities may soon
make their own rules about
having girls in frat houses.
The Dean of Mens Fraternity
Action Conference recently
resolved that each fraternity
should set up its own procedure
for -any visits including family
and girl friends, unrestricted by
school authorities, according to
Morton Wolfson, co-chairman of
the action conference.
The idea needs administration
approval, but Wolfson expects
no opposition from Tigert for
the plan.
Wolfson, faculty advisor to
Tau Kappa Epsilon, said that the
proposal seeks to avoid
restrictions and thereby
encourage responsibility. One of
the objects of the fraternity
system, he said, is to develop

Pep Rally, Free Games Set
For Fall Orientation Week

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
An Open House at the J.
Wayne v Reitz Union, including
free games and a pep rally for
UF football players departing
for the Florida-Air Force game,
will be part of freshman recrea recreation
tion recreation activities planned for orien orientation
tation orientation week in the fall.
Coach Ray Graves is
scheduled to introduce the
football players at the pep rally,
and freshmen will have a chance
to practice traditional UF
cheers, directed by the Florida
cheerleaders.
Two bands have been engaged
for the dance following the pep
rally. Planned for the Union
Terrace, psychedelic projections
will be flashed on the pond, the
trees, and the buildings walls.

WHATS
HAPPENING

By LORI STEELE
Alligator Features Editor
IN BENEFITING: Friday and
Saturday, Gilbert and Sullivans
H.M.S. Pinafore will be
presented for a music
scholarship benefit at P.K.
Yonge High School at 7:30 p.m.
The price is $2.00 for the entire
immediate family of
participants. UF students, 50

leadership and responsibility in
young men.
If you make the rules
yourself, youre more apt to
observe them, Wolfson said.
The differences in physical
layout of fraternities require
different open-house rules,
according to Wolfson, asst.
professor of comprehensive
logic.
Wolfson thinks the men
would be strict on themselves;
he does not expect that very
liberal rules would be written.
The Dean of Mens Fraternity
Action Conference is made up of
both students and faculty. Its
purpose is to review policies
and regulations affecting
fraternities with the thought of
removing things that were
outdated and insure that all
policies in effect were pertinent
and still useful, according to
Wolfson.

The open house is scheduled
for the entire day September 20.
Various offices in the Reitz
Union will be open for
examination and three hours of
free bowling, ping pong, and
pool will be provided.
Campus organizations" will
also set up exhibits to explain
their function and to recruit
members.
The Union Board needs
people who will work in the fall,
too, said Harlan. If freshmen
see anything they are interested
in, we can find a position for
them on the Union Board. They
can work on publicity,
organization, or help set up
bridge classes, dance classes
anything they want.
All recreational activities
planned for orientation week are
free.

cents, all others, $ 1.
IN DANCE NOW: FLUNK
LATER: Saturday, there will
be a dance in the Reitz Union
ballroom at 8 p.m.
IN INITIATIN: Sunday, Eta
Kappa Nu will hold initiation
ceremonies in room 349, p.m.
IN PEACE, MAN, PEACE:
Monday, the Peace Corps will
recruit at the Service booth
across from the Hub.



kFMoviel
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'Never A Dull Moment

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Never A Dull Moment
currently playing at Plaza II and
starring Dick Van Dyke, Edward
G. Robinson and Dorothy
Pro vine, unfortunately fails to
unveil the usual Disney magic.
The story is faintly reminiscent
of the old Disney style, but in
spite of all Dick Van Dyke can
do, it doesnt quite measure up.
More than just a touch of
violence makes the plot, and
even though it is lightly handled,
one wonders if Walt Disney
would have approved. From
Tony Bills, Bedda I should
make his dead? to Dick Van
Dykes never explained touch
of death, violence is seen
everywhere.
The story line is entertaining
and laughter comes readily and
easily. A struggling New York
actor, Jack Albany (Dick Van
Dyke), from the true live
theatre and disgusted with TV
semi-talent, is quite accidentally
enmeshed in an underworld plot
to steal a priceless painting from
the New York Museum.
Mistaken for a hired killer
who is to kill two guards during
the stick-up, Albany is taken
forcibly to the gang leader, Joe
Smooth (Edward G. Robinson).
Fearing the consequences if his
true identity is revealed, Albany
goes through with the
masquerade successfully until
the real hired killer arrives.
A duel to the death is
arranged to unmask the true
assassin, and, needless to say,
Van Dyke makes the most of the
scene. Sally Inwood (Dorothy
Provine), an art-instructor being
held against her will, runs in
with her go-go boots and saves
the day.
Albany proceeds to sickenly
fall in love with Sally within the
space of 3 minutes and becomes
concerned for her welfare. She
tells him to take care of himself.
Sally escapes (no one known
how) while the plot thickens at
the museum.
r Pinafore l
Sails Now
Gilbert and Sullivans H. M.
S. Pinafore will be presented
tonight and tomorrow night in
the P.K. Yonge Auditorium.
This production is being given
by the UF Department of Music
as a music scholarship benefit.
Tonight features a family
night special which begins at
7:30 p.m. and the entire
immediate family will be
admitted for $2. Saturday night
general admission will be sl. and
curtain time is 8:15 pjn.
Sales & Service
'typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
11a?
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Mnin 376-5551

The boys are quite a group,
Florian (Tony Bill), as you
probably guessed from the
name, is a rough, tough punk.
Cowboy Schaeffer (Slim
Pickens) is a Tex Ritter gone
bad. Frank Boley (Henry Silva)
is his usual sadistic self. The
remainder of the boys are
has-beens Smooth has used on
other jobs.
Melanie Smooth (Joanna
Moore) is a retired ice skater
who was once pictured on the
coyer of Life magazine. She is
starved for company and keeps
trapping Jack into looking
through her scrapbook with her.
After a hilarious romp
through the museum with Jack
hiding in the most obvious
places imaginable, the police
arrive and the gang is captured.

Srot/i&id
GAINESVILLE MALL
r
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miT \\wHbl

Herein ends the laughs.
Violence is not for children,
but laughter is.

END OF YEAR DANCE
"SPLIT ENDS
No. 1 in the State
r>-.
Sat. nite Aug. 10 B-12 P.M.
Union Ballroom
25t per person
Sponsored by Union Board

JBKo- 4 I HUP^t^Usk
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Hr % JjjjMjaHHHBP:- *E&S jk WMHT7
i-y-MII /^jl^Hj| '. : |* ;; M ' amb*
DICK VAN DYKE .. .is his usual zany self.

Friday, August 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 9, 1968

'Petes Smash Tigers
To Cop Softball Title
The P.E. Petes successfully defended their Summer Intramural
Softball Championship Monday afternoon by defeating the Flavet
Tigers twice, 7-2 and 11-1.
Late last week the Petes and Tigers captured their respective
bracket championships. The Petes smashed the Losing Streak 12-2,
while the Tigers defeated Diamond Village by the same score.
In the first game on Monday, the Petes broke open a scoreless game
in the top of the sth with 3 runs as winning pitcher Fred Ruby singled
across 2 runs and scored the third himself. The Tigers rallied for 2
runs in the sixth on an RBI single by Tim Toler and a sacrifice fly by
Frank Crowder, but the Petes salted away the game with a'4 run
seventh. Winning pitcher Fred Ruby was the star of the game as he
knocked in 4 runs and scored 2. Danny Turner had 3 singles for the
Petes while pitcher Cook had 2 hits for the losers.
The Petes wrapped up the second game by scoring in each of the
first four innings. A six-run third highlighted the 15 hit attack. Ron
Creese, Dave Huskey, and Herb Hart each had two hits for the winners
while Toler had 3 singles for the Tigers.
A double elimination tournament featuring the top teams was held
Saturday and Sunday August 3rd and 4th on the drill field.
FINAL STANDINGS
Bracket I Won Lost Bracket II Won Lost
P.E. Petes 8 1 Flavet Tigers 8 1
Latin Americans 7 2 Leftover Lammies 7 2
The Losing Streak 6 3 Dunkin Donuts 7 2
Sugar Kings 6 3 Physics 6 3
Poage Hounds 5 4 Frappes 5 4
Microbiology 4 5 M.B.A. 3 6
Renovators 4 5 Diamond Village 3 6
Old Timers 3 6 R.B.s 3 6
Delta Theta Pi 2 7 Newman Club 2 7
Deadlegs 0 9 Flavet 2 1 8
Scoreboard 1 i pwiwijiiiiyw
AMERICAN LEAGUE
w l Pet gb my] y lyitWiWW
Detroit 70 41 .631 WHtfUIIyISW
Baltimore 63 47 .573 614
Boston 60 51 .541 10 W HflVt
Cleveland 60 54 .526 1114 Your Generator \>
Oakland 56 54 .509 1314 f OVERHAULED Sotcifll 1
New York 51 56 .477 17 ; ( # RA
Minnesota 51 58 .468 18 V 9
California 52 60 .465 1814 INCLAIOK
Chicago 47 61 .435 21 14 mr**^"*
Washington 40 68 .370 2814 FAST SERVICE
NATIONAL LEAGUE CLEAN UNIT
W T Prt CR TURN COMMUTATOR
x NEW BRUSHES
St. Louis 73 40 .646 # aro
Atlanta 59 54 .522 14 A|
Chicago 59 54 .522 14 ALACHUA
Cincinnati 56 52 .519 1414 IKITV
San Franci ;o 57 54 .514 15 V-L/UW I I
Pittsburgh 54 58 .482 1814 GENERATOR
Philadelphia 51 59 464 2015 WE LIKE FOREIGN CARS!
New York 52 63 .452 22
Los Angeles 51 62 .451 22
Houston 48 64 .429 2414
iPiKiiSsiiipipir br;ng coupon iaiauiiaifj
COUPON a
1 SPECIAL! S
2 complete FRIDAY ONLY i
jSHRIMP . |
!DINNER 99< i
n
I (REG. $1.35) i
I Kentucky THd #kickH |
fl/ori/i Amicas Hospitolito Vtok... jj
i . 214 NW I3tfi St. 376-6472
S 2 LoeohoM 114 NW 34tn St. 372-3649
iipipmspipii bring couponiipibipipipib*

wetuie ||Hf|||H
Irjf L'm Warn I^upe^gh^eav^wester^ende^
DELMONICO
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG A V $1.59
Two Convenient Locations O I Kir D I fc/Vlx
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SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN MEATS
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BOTTOM ROUND BONELESS ROAST I
RUMP ROAST BONELESS Lb 98<
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BEEF RIB STEAK BONE IN I
EYE ROUND ROAST -$1.29
PORK CHOPS % PORK LOIN SLICED avg. -69
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BEEF LIVER SLICED 39<
CAPN JOHNS QUICK FROZEN
PERCH FILLETS ...... 39<
(PRODUCE ABiP vacuum pack
coffee > -99<
FIRM RIPE BARTLETT LIMIT ONE WITH $5.00 OR MORE
PEARS -19{ J^ORDER^EXCLUDUSIG^CIGARETTE^^^^^^^^
FRESH FIRM VINE-RIPE SA,L GIANT SIZE
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