Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
ProbaKle Showers
Hiah In The 80s
Low In The 70s

Vol. 60, No. 167

______
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RAIN, RAIN, GO AWAY

These UF students are probably feeling what nearly all other
students were thinking during the past few days. Despite the heavy
deluge of rain, classes go on as usual -of course. Neither rain, nor
sleet, nor...

Rocky Offers Imaginative Leadership

$
; Worldwide, 1968 has been a year of change.
Alienated and disillusioned by the inequalities and
injustices of their societies, students have sounded an
| international call for upheaval -in Czechoslovakia,
Jj Germany, France, Italy. And America.
>
But the changes grudgingly and painfully
attained -- have been meager, little more than a
:jt raindrop in a swirling storm of disdain.
America, the worlds showpiece of industrial
affluence, has yet much to do, much to change.
$
v Her cities are blighted by ghettoes, the birthplaces
of frustration, crime and violence. Her black people
shake angry fists and throw Molotov cocktails, trying
$ to destroy that which they cannot share.
$
Her economy is rapidly mushrooming into
>: inflation, her dollar losing four per cent of its value
i; each year. The deficit in her balance of payments is
staggering.
Her people are deeply troubled by her
jj commitment to a tiny nation in Southeast Asia. Her
mothers and fathers are anguished by the deaths of
their young sons in a war they cannot justify or
| believe in.
Her poor stand alone and frightened on the
shadowy fringes of affluence, bitter that they cannot

Florida Alligator

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

NICK ARROYO

AN ALLIGATOR EDITORIAL

also enjoy her industrial bounties.
Her youth seeth with dissatisfaction over the
hackneyed promises of the self-centered leaders of
the Old Politics.
In the face of her massive problems, America cries
out for leadership.
Tomorrow, the Republican party will nominate its
choice for President of the United States.
Later this month, the Democratic party will
respond with its nominee for the presidency.
The leading contenders from both parties
Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey offer
America nothing more than the same old politics, the
same old problems, the same old promises, the same
old- and meaningless solutions.
The so-called renegades Nelson Rockefeller and
Eugene McCarthy offer new blood, new ideas, new
leadership, new and imaginative solutions. And,
hopefully, a new society.
Rockefeller has made a valiant bid for the
Republican nomination, as has McCarthy for the
Democratic. The difference between the two, though,
is that Rockefeller has a far better chance of winning
the nomination than does McCarthy,
If so, it appears that Americas hopes for a better
nation are riding on the crucial balloting tomorrow

The

IN ACTION CONFERENCE

Four Proposals Set
For Vote Tomorrow

A proposal calling for
freedom from external control
for the campus press and
another urging modification of
required physical education head
the agenda for Wednesdays
Action Conference meeting.
The Conference will convene
at 2:30 p.m. in room 361, Reitz
Union.
Other proposals slated to
come up for vote Wednesday
include a suggested study by the
University College into a
remedial education program for
disadvantaged students.
The proposal, sent to the
conference by the Curriculum
Task Force, suggests that the
study should determine cost,
length, staffing and minimum
content of a remedial program.
Another proposal scheduled
for vote calls for university
sponsorship of bus pools for
non-academic personnel living in
rural areas of Gainesville.
The proposal says the
university should purchase and
maintain small buses, which
would be placed in the custody
of one person in the pool, who
will be responsible for getting
the other employes in the pool
to work on time.
The proposal on required
physical education urges that
male freshmen be allowed to
enroll in either physical
education or basic ROTC, but

not both. It also suggests that
one hour credit per quarter be
granted for either course.
The longest proposal, a
resolution from the Freedom of
Expression Task Force, calls for
freedom of the campus press so
that it be neither more nor less
free than a privately financed
commercial newspaper,
magazine or other media.
The resolution states that
limitations on the press should
be only legal, such as for libel,
obscenity, lottery, contempt of
court, etc.
It adds that the restrictions
should be applied only by the
Board of Student Publications
(BSP) as the recognized
publishers of the campus press.

Kirk To Annou nee
HC Slogan Win ner
Floridas Gov. Claude Kirk will end the suspense Monday about
this years Homecoming Slogan.
The winner of the biggest slogan contest ever will be named from
the governors office, which received the top five slogans from a
record 3,066 entries.
The greatest number of slogans came from Gainesville and
Jacksonville, Jeff Weil, contest chairman said, but entries came
from as far away as California.
Weil said that as of the midnight, July 31 deadline, the contest
office had received 3,066 entries, making it the biggest response
ever.
Representatives from the student body, faculty and various alumni
organizations narrowed the number down to the final five.

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NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER
*"
night in Miami. ::
We urge UF students who care about America's $
future to beg, borrow or steal a ride to the $
Miami'Beach Convention Hall and let the Republican
delegates know that Nelson A. Rockefeller is the best
man for the White House. §
We students started this roar for change. Lets finish ;j;
the job. ;5

Inside
UF Coed Tries
Topless Dancing
See Story, P. 2

Tuesday, August 6, 1968

The resolution further urges
that the BSP be allowed to
control the internal finances of
student publications rather than
being forced to follow a
line-item budget approved by
Student Government.
M^nwhile, action by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
on the four proposals passed at
the last meeting, one of which
called for an Office for
Minorities and Disadvantaged
Students, is expected soon,
Conference Chairman Russell
Ramsey said Sunday.
The reason these proposals
on disadvantaged students were
brought out as soon as possible
was so they could be
implemented by the fall
quarter, Ramsey emphasized.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 6, 1968

Topless Dancing 'ComesNatural

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
MIAMI I was lucky enough to have visited one of Miamis
many topless nightclubs recently and there I received a pleasant
surprise.
Who should I happen to see but a lovely UF coed I know who is
in Miami for the summer. What made it even a nicer surprise was
: that she was not a member of the audience. Rather, she was on the
.. __ .. - *.
stage dancing topless.
| After a quick check with the waiter and a brief but convincing
: talk with the manager of the club I was ushered backstage to her
j: dressing room. She had OKd my visit and was expecting me when
v the manager knocked at the dressing room door. She was dressed,
y After exchanging pleasantries 1 asked if she would grant me an
: interview for the Alligator. She agreed on the condition that her
: name not be revealed for fear the article might cause her to get
j: into trouble with UF administrative officials,
j; Ive been working here since around the middle of June, she
!*; said. The pay is great and I really dont see that much terribly
j*: wrong with my job. I was embarrassed a little at first, but I got
£ used to it in about a week.
$ The audience is a nice one and if once in a while a customer
J
% gets smart hes quietly thrown out, if you know what I mean.
$ She said she came to Miami from the spring quarter at UF and

ALL OUT IN THE WASH

With the Republican Convention underway,
people are making their political opinions known in
the strangest ways and places. Well, the truth of the

NSA Gets Ford Grant
For 'Quiet Revolution

NEW YORK The National
Student Association, the
nations oldest and largest
student government
organization, will receive a
$315,000 grant from the Ford
Foundation to coordinate and
assist student-initiated
educational reform movements.
A major objective of the
program, according to the
N.S.A., is to generate quiet
revolutions instead of ugly ones
on U.S. campuses.
In, announcing the N.S.A.
grant, F. Champion Ward,
Foundation vice president for
Education and Research, said
that while Foundation
assistance to higher education
has been concentrated on

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR 1> the aCfldel student newspaper of the University o t Florida
and la published five times weekly except during June, July and August when it is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions at their authors. Address correspondence to tbs Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union BuUdlng, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator s entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
invoivlt* typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Adverting
ting Adverting Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

faculty and administration
supported projects, it is also
important that student groups
be aided directly in their efforts
to contribute their special
perspective to the improvement
of educational programs. We
hope that the N.S.A.s new
effort will stimulate thoughtful
student involvement in the
advancement of higher
education on campuses
throughout the country.
The grant will support two
principal activities of the N.S.A.:
a national dissemination
program to inform students
about the possibilities of
educational innovation and
'change, and an advisory program
to enable N.S.A. staff members

TO UF COED

matter is this beach towel with the Confederate
colors embossed upon it may have no significance at
all. It's just been hung out to dry.

was unable to find a secretarial position right away. A giiltiiend
who works at" the club suggested that she come down tor an
interview and try it out for a week or two.
I was kind of scared at first. she said. But the manager was
very understanding and nice and all. and I couldn't believe the pay.
So I decided to try it and if I didn't like it 1 could quit and keep
looking for a job as a secretary.
During the rehearsal there was only the manager and one other
guy around, so it wasn't so bad. My first night on stage I was scared
silly, but I sort of detached my mind from what I was doing and
relaxed. It all came natural after that." I agreed she had appeared
quite natural on stage.
She said she was paid SISO a week tor 30 hours ot dancing and
10 hours of practice, which is darn good tor a novice in any
profession.
My parents live in Central Florida and don't know about the
job, she explained. 1 live with two girlfriends. My tolks would
kill me if they ever found out but, hell I'm 21 and dancing
topless sure beats typing or taking shorthand for 575 a Cveek.
She had to get back on the stage then. I thanked her, told her 1
would see her, and was escorted back to my seat, I certainly
enjoyed the show, and thats a bare fact.

to participate actively in student
reform movements.
As part of the dissemination
program, the N.S.A. will compile
a list of speakers and consultants
who would be available to
student organizations. It will
survey reform movements who
would be available to student
organizations. It will survey
reform movements on selected
campuses and assemble
step-by-step chronologies of
successful and unsuccessful
campaigns for specific reforms.
CAMPUS
SEX SEXan
an SEXan Important
e New (Report
A definitive report on a two twoyear
year twoyear study by a major uni university.
versity. university. Vance Packard de describes
scribes describes the revolution in sex
attitudes and behavior of
college students here and
abroad. Just how far stu students
dents students have come and will
gowith sex. His docu documented
mented documented findings, based on
thousands or questionnaires
distributed throughout the
world are revealed in an
authoritative look at what
the "now generation thinks,
feels and does about sex.
Dont miss this challenging,
direct and important feature
SEX
On The Campus
in August
McCalls
at all newsstands now

UF Sports Facilities
Set For 'Concern

UF recreational facilities are
reserved to host Operation
Concern participants Saturday
from 2-4 p.m.
This phase of UF
participation in Operation
Concern is under the supervision
of the College of Physical
Education and Health.
Facilities to be used include:
the Murphree Area tennis and
handball courts, the Fleming
Field area, the Womens
Gymnasium, Florida
Gymnasium, and the Main Drill
Field.
Persons wishing to participate
in recreational activities during
that time should plan to use
other areas.
Students with outstanding
ability in handball, soccer,
volleyball, or modern dance who
wish to act as instructors during
this two-hour program should
make their desire known at
Room 227, Florida Gym.
All Operation Concern
participants will be between the
ages of 15 and 18. Both male
and female participants will be
involved and, both male and
female instructors are needed.
In addition to the above

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Approximately 10 volunteer
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Movie Prices
Unreasonable ?

UF students have a legitimate
complaint on movie prices
around Gainesville, according to
a manager of one of the lesser
charging theaters.
Considering the size of the
local market, Bill Henderson,
manager of the State Theater
said, the prices around town
have unquestionably reached a
ridiculous saturation point.
Henderson said except for
independent theaters who price
for their own market, admission
is determined by centralized
chain movie companies like
Wometco Enterprises.
Individual theaters in a
chain have little or no control
over pricing, Henderson said.
The manager of one of
Gainesvilles older theaters
described the distribution of
motion pictures as a bidding
situation.A filmmaker puts his
picture on the market and the
highest bidder gets it, he said.
It is the students and other
movie-goers who suffer from this
competition, Henderson said.
They are cheated.
The only protection
consumers have against movie
pricing is the U.S. Department
of Justices Consent Decree.
The decree, an antimonopoly
measure, gives newly entering
theaters a chance to compete in
a market.
Teachers
Placement
Promised
A new Teacher Placement
Service has been established at
UF.
Delegate Assembly of the
Florida Education Association
instructed the FEA Board to set
up a Teacher Placement Service
at its meeting in April.
That service is now a reality.
It is offered to prospective
teachers in Florida, according to
Mrs. Edna Tait. Registration will
be free to FEA members;
non-members will be required to
pay a nominal fee.
The Teacher Placement
Service will be a full-scale
placement service not just a
job-listing service, said Mrs.
Tait. It is hoped that it will be in
full operation this summer.
More Needed
WASHINGTON (U P I )
Some 8.000 college student vol volunteers
unteers volunteers in 40 states have been
helping out in state mental
hospitals, but the Public Health
Service says more are needed.
The volunteers work with
patients in many ways. In rec recreation.
reation. recreation. they help with ward
parties, games, square dances,
special entertainment pro programs
grams programs and song tests. They
also serve as companions, tak taking
ing taking patients on excursions into
the community or to the col college
lege college campus for plays and
sporting events.
Sales & Service
typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
~
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Main 376-5551

R. Fries, manager ot
Wometcos Plaza Twin, refused
to comment on distribution,
pricing and bidding procedures.
The Plaza Twin now charges
as much as $2 for standard
first-run films. The State
recently boosted its admission
from $1 to $1.50.
Fries pointed to the theater
overhead and capital investments
as necessary and sufficient causes
for pricing.
In Gainesville, said
Henderson, the., bi g
competitors are Florida State
Theaters and Wometco. Florida
State owns the Florida Theater
and the Center Theater. The
State Theater is an
independent.
The big question, Henderson
continued, is whether the'
quality of a movie should
determine how much the public
is charged to see it.

Hume Library One
Os UFs Biggest
By FLETCHER HOWE
Alligator Correspondent
Hume Library is one of the largest divisional libraries at UF
and second in size only to the Health Centers research department.
The library was built in 1957 and is located in the rear of Dan
McCarty Hall. Its prime purpose is to provide reference material for
students of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
The library also serves as a repository for agricultural journals and
letters produced by the various agricultural experiment stations in the
South.
Library director S. F. Bennett said the librarys reference service is
an invaluable aid to various members of the Agricultural community.
Many of the experiment station and agricultural agencies cant
send someone here to do the necessary research so we do it for
them, Bennett said. We have 14 people on our staff, five of whom
are professional librarians.
We are rather unique as far as the university is concerned in that
we have a separate budget from the main library system. Out of our
$140,000 allotment about $27,000 is spent for books and journals.
Although we are somewhat separate from the main library system we
work closely and all our matierals are listed in the main catalog.
The library has a set of manuscripts dating back to the 18th
century.
The set is not complete but the books we do have are in relatively
good condition. Os course we keep them in a safe place but anyone
with good reason may have access to them; Bennett said.
Several members of the staff have been with the library for some
time. Janie Lee Tyson started working with the library in 1929 and is
still active in library affairs.
Miss Tyson has been with us for some time and knows the library
inside and out. If she cant find whatever youre looking for, I doubt
if we have it, Bennett said.
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Tuesday, August 6,1968, The Florida Alligator,

pond. Here a mamma duck looks over the water
traffic before taking her feathered fledglings out for
supper.

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 6,1968

'ltalian Straw Hat'
?
Presented By Players

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Rosemarys Baby
Is Religious Movie

By DANA PREISLER
Alligator Reviewer
Although Rosemarys Baby is called by many
a spooky, horror show it appears to delve below the
facade of shock to give John Moviegoer a message
he had better heed. Roman Polanskis movie is
actually a religious rather than a horror show.
Adapted from Ira Levins book of the same
name, Rosemarys Baby comments on the world
about us in much the same way as the Theatre of
the Absurd makes its statement. Man no longer puts
his faith in a God but rather he is buffeted about by
the forces of evil surrounding him. The devil and his
legions are about and ones soul and sanity need
protection.
The story centers around a young married couple
(Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes) who fall into the
clutches of a Manhattan witches coven. As the
husbands friendship with the garish couple (Ruth
Gordon and Sidney Blackmer) next door thickens,
Rosemarys fear for her unborn baby grows in like
proportion.
Parts of this review will be a refutation of Jim
Camps statement in the Gainesville Sun. He pans
the movie for its foul language, nudity and other
trashy trappings foisted on a long-suffering public.
Since the movie seems to involve a loss or lack of
faith in God then we see that God has become no
more than profanity -a God-damn or Jesus to be
uttered in anger.
While dining with her neighbors, Rosemary
becomes uncomfortable as the couple and her
husband ridicule the Pope. When asked if she is
religious, she replies, I used to be Catholic, but
now I dont know. It is probably Rosemarys
uncertainty that helps lead her into their trap.
Uncertainty is as good a breeding ground for evil
as is hate and greed. Greed for success is what prods

Florida Players, under
the direction of Richard
Green, romped through
An Italian Straw Hat this
past weekend in Constans
Theatre.
A hilariously funny
French comedy, this
summer production was the
product of weeks of
rehearsal.
In the picture at the left,
Claude Pinkston (Fadinard)
and Carol Nurenberg (Clara)
deal in anguish as the
conniving groom tries to
talk the gullible hat maker
into seeing things his way.
During Fadinards frantic
search for a duplicate hat
the characters at the right
were met by the audience.
Yvonne Dell (the Baroness
de Champigny), a
sex-fearing creature, reasons
with her giddy young
dandy, Don Jackson
(Achille).
The cast of this
old-fashioned French farce
set in Paris was rounded out
by Melissa Shepard, Beau
Smyth, Gary Neely, William
Beasley and Bob Boyd.

the husband into selling his soul and his unborn
baby to the Castevets and their coven.
Probably the one thing that has prompted so
much discussion on the subject of Gods validity is
the Time magazine article, Is God Dead?
Toward the end of her pregnancy, Rosemary picks
up this copy of Time while she is in the
obstetricians office.
Mr. Camps objection to the nude scenes also
seems unwarranted. Although Rosemary is a
spiritual character (metaphorically speaking) she is
also bound up in her material self her flesh. It is
her flesh that ultimately leads her to succumb to the
devils raping.
This dualisrri struggles between the forces of the
spirit and the flesh, and the powers of good and evil.
The cinematic images support this premise as
Rosemarys apartment is in colors of gold and white
denoting purity and goodness, while the Castevets
abode is in dark reds and murky browns.
The acting is exceptionally fine in this movie.
There is already speculation that Mia Farrow will
win a nomination for her role. John Cassavetes, as
her actor-husband, plays a part that seems
undefined but it is the undefined man who is most
easily abducted by evil. Ruth Gordon, the
loud-mouthed witch next door, is fantastic.
The rest of the performers are spookily and
perfectly cast and include such names as Sidney
Blackmer, Maurice Evans, Ralph Bellamy, and Patsy
Kelly. The only criticism is a rather heavy-handling
of some of the images and scenes. Certain
techniques used by Polanski are reminiscent of
those used by Fellini but Polanskis lack of the
touch of finesse which Fellinis project.
Enter into a world of frightening fanatics and
shocking realization and see if you can squeeze
Rosemarys Baby between your supper and your
prayers. Now showing at Wometcos Plaza 1.

Ik 1 K
-qfjsy A 4smP :
*f|P
I

9
-1-
I

No Formal
Graduation
Graduating seniors other than
those from the College of Law
will have no opportunity to take
part in commencement exercises
at the end of this quarter.
Although this is the first
summer under the quarter
system, no changes are planned
in the University policy of
holding only one campus-wide
commencement a year. The
campus-wide ceremony takes
place in June of each year.
Individual colleges and
schools may hold their own
ceremonies each quarter at their
own expense. Only the College
of Law does so.

Mechanical Brain
Registers Students
IBM 1401, the mechanical brain behind the UFs computerized
registration system, won 8,500 new fans during advanced fall
registration last week.
In the air-conditioned basement of Tigert Hall, students breezed
through registration in the tim£ it takes to work through an easy 15 to
30-minute quiz.
Vernon Voyles, director of records and registration, said after a
student s schedule is compiled, if the card is correct, processing can be
accomplished in less than 15 minutes.
Features that have made friends for the new system include:
Master course status board, a lighted screen on which an
overhead projector flashes the numbers of all course sections closed.
--One-card registration. The necessity for a card for each section,
activities, address, etc., is eliminated.
Computer s ability for instant error detection. A schedule card is
rejected for the wrong code number, failure to record a lab that
accompanies a course, conflict of time and if the section is filled,
among other things.
The course status board, hooked to the computer, reacts the
instant a section is closed. Permanent listing of those courses
simplifies scheduling for students starting the process, Voyles said.
Under the old system, a student often waited in long line to sign up
for a course, hoping it would not be filled. If so, he would have to
return to his department for approval of a substitute.

V
W HATS
HAPPENING
By LORI STEELE
Alligator Features Editor
IN HAVING EVERY REASON
TO BE CONCERNED: Tonight,
University Concerned Democrats
meet in room 346, Reitz Union,
7:30-9 oclock.
IN SOFTLY SOOTHING
SILVERY SOUNDS: Tonight,
the University Summer
Symphony will present a free
concert in the University
Auditorium at 8:15.
IN MEETIhr BACK AT THE
UNION: Tonight, the Student
Senate meets in room 349, Reitz
Union, from 6:30-11 oclock. A
little earlier, Union Board meets
in room 150 D, Reitz Union,
from 4:00 oclock to 5:30.
IN BLACK MAGIC OR WILL
THE DARK HORSE WIN?:
Wednesday, Young Republicans
meet in room 347, Reitz Union,
from 8-10 p.m. In the same
building, American Independent
Party meets in room 361 from
8-9:30 p.m.
IN INVOLVEMENT:
Wednesday, SAMSON meets in
room 316, Reitz Union, from
7:30-9:30 p.m. The Action
Conference meets in the union
from 2:30-5:30 p.m.
IN THOSE /tfHO MAKE
ENTERTAINMENT POSSIBLE:
Wednesday,AJnion Board meets
in room PSO F, Reitz Union,
from 4:15-5 p.m. Then the
Programs Office of the Union
Board meets in room 150 B,
Reitz Union, from 4:15-6 p.m.
IN FASHIONABLE
DRESSINGS: Thursday, the
Junior Medical Guild will have a
fashion show in rooms 121,122,
and 123, Reitz tJnion, from 8-10
p.m.
IN PROJECTS: Thursday, the
University as a Community Task
Force will meet in room 316
Reitz Union, from 7:30-10:30
pjn. \
IN CHILDREN: Thursday, the
Association for Childhood
Education meets for dinner at
6:30 p.m. in rooms 150 C and
D, Reitz Union. Dr. Eugene
Todd will speak at 7 p.m.
IN HIS MAJESTYS MUSICAL:
H. M. S. Pinafore, a Broadway
musical, will be presented
Friday, at 7:30 p.m. in the P. K.
Yonge Auditorium. Tickets are
vailable at the door.



f Taken from the elegant look / a w-^np^-Jp
g of the 18 th century is this g
g \ Lam dress for cocktail wear. g \
/ black and white crepe its J Jjjjjjp
§ \ Villager pumps. Modeled by m 1 \
M o r ' M
I ' [ I Country Sets On the I I I
I button collection brings I !
I I coordinated orange short I 1
I sfeirf with button down front I
I and a button front vest. Both I < i'lls I
I V of orange and charcoal. The 1 J
1 I shirf is trimmed in white eye 1 % I
| let and is a dacron and cotton 11 f
1 I stripe. The leather-like fabric 1 ; ,iW M
A/orftifd
fl K i I ss
~ Modeled by Marcia.
yjy Photos by Barry Bust?No

Tuasday. August 6,1968, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator. Tuesday, August 6, 1968

PttMKflJttV
Mt
jAmmm.

With the Action Conference
passing its first four proposals,
there is a great deal of talk of
making it a permanent institution
at UF to facilitate communication
between student, faculty and
administrative factions.
We think that such a step would
only dodge the real need at this
E" editorial 3
campus -a truly representative and
committed governing body.
A permanent Action Conference
would become only one more
committee among a multitude of
committees. The eagerness and
power of the present conference
would age, sag and finally die of old
age as it became part of the
establishment.
The conference was created to
inaugurate a powerful, in-depth and
rapid study of the problems
plaguing this university and to
suggest changes. Its members are
campus leaders, who are involved
with a multitude of important
activities. To accomplish their
mission those leaders are letting
their other duties slide, while they
take on the campus ills.
To hope to institutionalize such
a concerted drive is not practical.
Even if campus leaders were willing,
they could not stand the pace.
But that is not to say the
communication and leadership
gained by the Action Conference

ABCs Os Rioting

The ABCs of creating riots:
A. Tell people they can no
longer be discriminated against,
then let one cocktail lounge refuse
them service, even though they
meet all legal requirements for
service.
B. Tell people city government
is in business to protect them, then
refuse to require other citizens to
C EDITORI/p
treat them fairly. Instead,
scrupulously obey all federal laws
that force you to treat people
fairly, but do little more than is
required of you.
Instead, when the people, bitter
and frustrated at being treated
badly, begin to make noise and to
protest, order them off the streets.
Lock up some of the young ones.
C. Now youre ready. Add only a
few militants, some frustrated
veterans from Vietnam who have
jecently comq back to your sick

Alligator Staff
Ted Remley Lori Steele
Entertainment Editor Features Editor

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
News Editor

A New Senate

The
Florida Alligator
"To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

should be forgotten. It cannot be
overlooked that much good has
come from this coalition of
students, faculty, and
administrators, of left, liberal and
conservative.
The Action Conference has
shown that problems can be solved
by giving all factions on this
campus a part in decision-making.
j
Such should be
taking place in the University
Senate. It is not.
The Senate consists of mostly
tenured faculty members and senior
administrators. Only 50 senators
are non-tenured. The Senate is
badly malproportioned, highly
conservative, and quite lethargic.
It does not even adequately
represent the faculty, let alone the
rest of the campus.
It was largely the lethargy of the
Senate that made the Action
Conference necessary. Had it, as the
UFs legislative body, been more
attuned to the needs of the campus
and met them as they arose, there
may have been no need for the
conference.
But there was a need for the
conference. And there is still a
. desperate need for a legislative
body which reflects the whole
campus.
If the University Senate wont
meet the need, then the Action
Conference must conceive a
legislative body that will.

society, and a few rifles and
homemade bombs.
Simple, isnt it? What does it
spell? Cleveland? Or maybe
Gainesville.
Only one cocktail lounge in
Gainesville still refuses service to
Negroes. The ABC Cocktail Lounge
on NW 13th St. and sth Ave.
The owner can get away with it
because his establishment, not
serving food, is not covered by the
1964 Civil Rights Act, and because
the City Commission claims they
have no authority to order the
lounge to serve everyone over 21.
The city commission can,
however, seek action in Tallahassee
when the legislature reconvenes.
When the civil rights acts were
being pushed through Congress we
heard much pleading for Congress
to leave action to local government.
What might happen if local
government fails to meet the needs
of the people in this case is as plain
as ABC.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

Coming, Ted? Somebody?

Reds Fear Czechs

*"* Drew Pearson"*
WASHINGTON President Johnson
has used great skill in handling the
present crisis between Czechoslovakia and
the Soviet, the most serious crisis Eastern
Europe has seen in this decade.
If he had talked of liberating the
so-called captive nations as did John
Foster Dulles, or allowed his Vice
President to tour the Hungarian border as
Richard Nixon did in 1956, it would have
been used as an excuse by the Red Army
to take over Czechoslovakia long ago.
Instead Johnson has initiated a new air
route between New York and Moscow,
concluded a new Soviet cultural
agreement, won Soviet assent to a
discussion of missile disarmament. Aware
of the split inside the Kremlin regarding
Czechoslovakia, he has been careful not
to give any ammunition to the Kremlin
rightists who want to blame all Soviet
problems on American imperialism.
When Pravda or Izvestia has blasted
him he has wisely not replied.
Meanwhile the situation inside Eastern
Europe continues to be full of dynamite.
The Red Army has 22 divisions in East
Germany, the biggest concentration of
troops anyplace in the far-flung socialist
orbit.
They are there partly to pacify Walter
Ulbricht, the communist boss of East
Germany and No. 1 Stalinist of the
communist world. Were it not for
Ulbrichts die-hard hatred of the West
there would be no great problem between
Moscow and Czechoslovakia.
However, public opinion in
Czechoslovakia is running strong and
there are signs painted on the walls of
Prague in English, reading Russkis go
home
Romania, Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia are
individualists. But they are so small that
they cannot exist alone. They need the
cooperation and protection of their big

Merry-Go-Round

"Jack Anderson*"*
neighbor in Moscow just as Central
America needs the cooperation and
protection of its big neighbor in
Washington.
Actually the Red Army has been a
great economic boon to these East
European countries, for it gives them
protection without draining their
budgets. Their situation is similar to that
in the United States if we could transfer
the S7O billion we spend for defense and
use it on education, slum clearance, and
our big cities instead.
This is what has happened in Eastern
Europe.
In return for the protection of the Red
Army, however, Moscow has demanded
unswerving loyalty to the communist
system. And with the exception of the
Yugoslavs, who 20 years ago kicked over
the traces, Moscow has got it.
This is the basic controversy between
Russia and Czechoslovakia today. The
new Czech government wants to desert
orthodox communism for democratic
socialism, arrived at by elections rather
than by party decree.
This is what Yugoslavia has come
around to. It is also pretty close to what
West Germany enjoys -a socialism voted
by the people. Actually West Germany is
a long way from having a capitalist
system. So is France, especially under the
new De Gaulle promise of worker
participation in factory operation and
factory profits.
In brief, what the Czechs want is the
protection of the Red Army without the
domination of the Red Army; a socialist
system voted by themselves, not imposed
upon them.
If left alone, the Czechs and the
Russians will probably work out their
problems. This is the basic Johnson
policy, to keep hands off.



w| 1 r s|B*3Pf|k
p'
3 T ( 1 flp flp*
* flp*
Gov. Kirk, would you please repeat that recipe for
chicken soup?"
Writers Had It
With Alligator
MR. EDITOR:
Ive had it with the Alligator and gun control.
Between the Alligators mass psychoanalysis editorial of July 9 and
Steve Hulseys wild life eulogy of July 19 Im literally sick.
Both editorials do an excellent job of expressing utter ignorance of
the situation, especially Mr. Hulseys collection of typewriter ink.
The Alligator editorial of July 19 can be credited with making a
few, very few, valid points and the method of presentation was not in
the practice of responsible editorialism. The statement that man
stores his deadly toys, hording them ... seldom used until the man
becomes enraged or insane or both, grabs his well-loved toy and goes
out to kill someone borders on the brink of being pure yellow
journalism as well as ridiculous.
Anyone who is remotely familiar with f "ms knows that they are
not toys. I venture to say that anyone plan to kill or subsequently
being killed with a firearm knows, or did know, that guns are not
toys.
Both editorials develop the idea that there is some mystical
magnetism between man and gun and when the hand of man reaches
out and touches his marvelous toy some all-consuming force takes
possession of his senses as he goes forth to slaughter the populations,
both human and animal, of the earth.
This is just not true. Firearms are interesting pieces of inanimate
equipment and thats all. Guns dont kill people; people do.
The propagation of the idea that all guns are an immediate threat
to our society is very dangerous indeed; even more so than the guns
themselves. If firearms do present an immediate threat to society we
are in one hell of a fix.
With a thunderous roar of hot air Steve Hulsey almost had great
big donkey-tears streaming down my cheeks with his brilliantly
ignorant defense of the wild kingdom.
I strongly suggest that Mr. Hulsey channel his energy into the
investigation of wild life management and to the reasons as to why
there are controlled hunting programs in all 50 states.
If this fails to quench his thirst I then direct him to solving the
Vietnam problem where people are killing people along with animals.
There is a definite problem concerning people and guns in the
United States today. I feel that the problem lies more with people
than guns.
Lets license people.
FLETCHER HOWE, 2UC

SPEAKING
FRRNKLESS
X Dont knocj WHV
Wflt-tftce BOTHERS m££FV£u"
TO he ll '£££& *W
Neucr get anV votes.

OPEN FORUM:
Addiaml ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

The Conservative View

The Miami Story

I have long expressed the view that it is
dangerous to coddle criminals, and that firmness in
dealing with lawbreakers is a necessity if we are to
reduce our disgraceful rate of crime.
But our society today seems to be filled with
theorists who charge our diligent law enforcement
officers with police brutality at every
opportunity and seek to lay the blame for our
increase in crime at the feet of society -- not placing
the blame on the lawbreakers themselves.
With assistance from our highest judiciary, which
appears bent upon protecting individual criminals
rather than victims of lawless acts, these theorists
have received much attention and backing from
intellectuals, as well as from those who want to see
crime flourish.
It is refreshing, therefore, to study the case
history of a chief of police who decided that it was
time to get tough and to impress upon the lawless
element in his city that law enforcement means
business.
Near the end of last year, Miami Police Chief
Walter Headley took note of a deplorable situation.
Crime was rampant, especially in certain sectors of
the city. There were rapes, muggings, robberies, and
other crimes of violence, and these had increased
alarmingly in the past few years. Taking stock of the
situation, he decided that law enforcement must
either triumph or surrender -- and he had no
intention of surrendering.
In late December he started using dogs and
shotgun-armed policemen in areas where crime was
worst. The Miami story has been told widely, with
some people rejoicing and others highly critical of
the chiefs action.
The Washington Evening Star noted that three
weeks after the new, tough policy was instituted,
No Confidence
MR. EDITOR:
It was with sad amusement that I read in Fridays
Alligator of the massive lack of interest in the
Presidents Action Conference and the inane
attempts by various action conference personalities
to explain this lack.
The reason for the lack of interest is a lack of
confidence that the Conference will propose, and
the president support, anything approaching the real
reform which is needed.
The Administration has several times
demonstrated its opposition to reform by getting rid
of the dissident person who js advocating such
reform.
I suggest that when the administration is ready to
admit its error in firing Marshall Jones, Ed Richer,
Farhang Zabeeh and Paul Hahn (all names that are
apt to apoplexy in Tigert Hall), then that is
the time to have an action conference which will be
supported by students and faculty.
BILLY S. THOMAS
ASST. PROF. OF PHYSICS

He rinV EUEN
DISCUSSED THE
war vex rnd
THe 6o|R#? ON PeueRJY
OR OPEN HOUSIAi&OR
INTEGRATION op

SO, WHOR6 TO yjoxe FOR THIS
ececrioN?

Tuesday, August 6, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

By Jimmey Bailey

Crimes of violence have fallen off from 60 to 65
per cent."
At that point. Chief Headley was quoted as not
being sure whether the criminal element had left
Miami or had simply gone underground and decided
to cool it" until the heat was off. In either event,
the tough policy had achieved desirable results by
reducing crime.
The American Civil Liberties Union, as might
have been expected, bitterly assailed Chief
Headley's war on crime and the criminal elements jn
Miami, and has threatened to seek an injuncture
against the methods being used.
But Chief Headley maintained that he was not
upset over this threat, for in three weeks he had
received 4,500 letters and telegrams endorsing his
policy and only 22 opposed to it.
The Mobile Register also commented editorially
on the Miami effort to reduce crime, using even
stronger terms to castigate the apologists for law
breakers.
Here are exerpts from an editorial about Chief
Headley's crackdown on crime:
When firmness of policy is proposed or used in
law enforcement to curb crime, the sparrow-brained
and muddle-headed rush to the side of the lawless
with cries of police brutality and infringement upon
rights.
Don't dare approach a ruthless mugger, rap;bt,
or killer with anything more equal to the need than
kid gloves.
Treat the victim with contempt but apologize
to the criminal for putting them to the slightest
inconvenience.
Things must be done differently now. This is
not the America of old, remember. It is the new
America.
Do you want to reduce crime in the United
States? You cant do it by coddling criminals. But
you can by following the example of Miami, and
really cracking down in such away the lawless know
that you mean business.
This is a presidential election year and we
Americans are offered an opportunity to stand up
and speak at the ballot box against the criminal
element in our society.
Only one candidate has taken a really outspoken
stand against the criminals here in the United States.
The candidate I am talking about is the former
governor of Alabama, George Wallace.
Wallace has stated, The breakdown in law and.
order is encouraged by people in high places who
break the law. Some college professors are being
paid $40,000 a year to lead mobs which assault and
kill people.
Wallace has continually advocated a strong
enforcement of the law, and the crowds that gather
to hear him speak and continuing upsurge of
Wallace in political polls indicate that millions of
Americans are for stronger enforcement of laws.
Most Americans are sick and tired of riots* looting,
and the continually rising of the crime rate in
America.
George Wallace for president in '6B!

oCkjoui
FIRST AMD LAST
CHOICE.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuasday, August 6, 1968

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
M
XX<*X<<*XX%%SVW**X*X*X->^X.VX*>K*!'
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH.
GUN DEALER ,' MICANOPY
4*663340. (Als4^trp)
35mm NIKKORMAT-FT SLR
Camera and case. Thru the lens light
/neter. 50mm f 1.4 and 135 mm f 3.5
(telephoto) Auto-Nikkor Lenses.
Excellent .condition. 378-8684.
(A-164-st-p)
MARL BOWLING BALL. Can be
customed to fit anyone; also bag and
shoes. Very cheap! Come see at
Buckman Hall, Room No. 821.
372-9317. (A-167-lt-p)
MERCURY outboard motor. 60
Horsepower. Mark 75 model. Electric
starter. Excellent condition. Must sell
immediately. $350.00 or make offer.
372-3955. (A-167-lt-p)
FOR SALE: Federal enlarger, timer,
trays, developer, tanks, etc. Good
condition, Baker 475-2276 evenings.
(A-167-3t-p)
HONDA S-65 6,000 Miles, 66 Model
4-speed constant, mesh trans. 60
mph, tool kit, helmet $165.00. Call
Jim 372-9715. (A-167-lt-p)
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
1967 YAMAHA 180 CC like new;
less than 3,000 miles, 2 helmets
included. $475.00. Call 378-3389 or
come by Flavet 111 209-B after 6:00
p.m. (A-164-3t-p)
Cast Aluminum portable barbeqie
grill and oven, used once, $40.00.
G.E. 16" oscillating 3 speed desk or
wail fan, $15.00. 8.55 x 14 tire and'
wheel, $4.00. Phone 378-5736.
(A-166-3t-p)
FOR RENT
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 376 8 990.
(8157 15t-p)
3 blocks from campus. Double room
for male students. Air Conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
N.W. 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-166-st-p)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Air conditioned. 2
Bedroom IV2 Bath CBS 11 miles
S.W. University $ 125.00/mo.
Phone 495-2186 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-155-st-p)
ROOMS Men Walk to campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles, Live
with friends, Phone 3788122 or
3766652. (Bl63Btp)

\
M'T" t u-urr*^
i Mia Farrow
In a William Castle Production Cassavetes
PACAfYIOn/c EJ Gordon i
nUbvl I fell y O
Rflhv Evans f/JJ
UCIMj Ralph Bellamy
2:15 4:45 7:15 9:40 HH
V PrbduceS by William Castle Written lor the Screen and Directed by Roman Polanski I
From the novel by Ira Levin pioouckx' n /v Paramount Picture S' 'vx*oh m->. f> AuO*ences^^
[ MITCHUM "ANZIO" 1:303:35 5:45 7:55 10;ool
a meet the mob that Set crime 0
Released bi> BlfaW
-nU/ARH ft MRflflUY BUCNAVISIA DISTRIBUTION CO INC
stM.nwt.DlCn VIMiVlt. 1%/ Wall Otsney Prodi>CtK)o%
VVAN DYKE ROBiNSON PRCHfiNE Technicolor. /

:>sxw?>xcx*x*x*x*x!-x*
FOR RENT I
V A
GOT A DOZEN roommates in a one
bedroom apt cause you cant afford
gracious AC living? Would you
believe AC, wail to wall carpet, twin
balconies, and walk to class at dorm
prices: Call 376-0056 to reserve your
suite for Sept. La Fontana Apts. 207
NW 17 St. (B-164-3t-p)
2 BEDROOM Trailer, 55 X 12,
Mobileer Park, $104.00 per month,
Available Sept. Ist. Call 376-3261
Ext. 2269 from 8 to 5 or 378-4524
in p.m. and ask for Beverly.
(B-l 6 7-2 t-p)
i*X X!VvX X X W*X X X XXXN*X*X X X Xf
WANTED
rw*i | W 4< i ;.x.x.x.;w:*x EE Senior needs roommates and
apartment for fall. Contact Don
Glendening. Call Hollywood collect
983-5601 after 5 p.m. any day.
(C-164-st-p)
WANTED: 1 male roommate for fall
quarter. Gator Town Apts. Call Lee
372-9435. (C-164-3t-p)
SENIOR Co-ed needs place to live in
68-69 write Rita Perkins, 37 Edmund
Rd., Hollywood Fla. or call collect
983-5041 after 10 p.m. (C-164-4t-p)
WANTED: 1 or 2 female roommates
for Fall Quarter. Landmark. Call
378-5809. (C-166-4t-p)
NEED RIDE to Atlanta or Athens,
Ga. Leaving August 9, and returning
August 11. Please call Pam Clark,
372-9311. (C-166-2t-p)
ROOMMATE wanted: to share two
bedroom Starlight Apt. SIOI.OO per
quarter pius V* utilities. Call Judy
3 76-6680 after 5:00 .p.m.
(C-166-2t-p)
WAN I ED: experienced Drummer for
work in rhythm and blues group.
Night clubs, fraternity ana private
parties. Call for audition. 372-2777.
(C-167-2t-p)
FEMALE roommate to share
1-bedroom apt. 3 blocks North of
campus. $52.75 plus V 2 utilities. Call
Sandy 378-6570. (C-167-3t-p)
FOURTH wanted for Camelot Apts,
(we have most spacious floor plan).
She must be a senior or graduate
student. Phone: 376-1631 Room
704. (C-167-3t-p)
WE NEED 1 or 2 Male roommates
and 2-bedroom apt. for fall. Call Bob
and Hal (4EG and 3EG). 378-1153.
(C-167-3t-p)
FEMALE roommate needed to share
2 bedroom Village Park Apt. with 3
others, Starting Sept. Call Judy
'378-8153. (C-167-lt-p)
WANTED: Female roommate for
Village Park Apt. 66. Immediate
occupancy. Graduate Student
leaving. 378-7849. (C-167-3t-p)
WE NEED one easy-going girl as a
fourth at Village Park for Sept. Call
Chris, 372-6442 or Merri, 376-7434.
(C-167-4t-p)

;;.v-x-%:-sv*x xY:'XXX*xx>!>V"Vv;*;v,
WANTED I
'W^WWfXWWX-X-imiWiS
A SENIOR COED wants 2 female
roommates to share a 3-bedroom
house, two blocks behind State
Theater. Total rent $90.00. Call
Nancy, 378-4578; No. 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. (C-167-2t-p)
.y.'y.sv.*.v.*;*X ; X*X*X"X<4*sfft'P'SV.'V*iSV;
HELP WANTED |
Jv:-s?x-x*x*x*x*xx*vi?i x*x w<*x*!*;*x*xx-S''
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330, J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
LISTENERS wanted will pay $3.00
for IV2 hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Harriet Wilkerson,
University ext. 2307. (E-167-4t-c)
AUTOS
ALFA ROMEO Red Sprint GT,
1965, DOHC HEAD, 1.6 Liter, 130
HP, 5-speed. Excellent Condition.
One Owner. 378-7581. Eves.
(G-166-3t-p)
1963 Cadillac Sedan DeVille. Racing
Green. Factory Air. $1675. Call
3782949. (Gl63stp)
LEAVING country, 63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater,
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)

AA l^ilf
HERE TONIGHT
LA WHENCE FERLINGHETTI
to lecture on
"CONTEMPORARY POETRY AND LITERATURE
AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO TODAYS SOCIETY
8:00pm REITZ UNION AUD.
STUDENTS 7 5(
FACULTY STAFF, GENERAL PUBLIC SI.OO
PRESENTED BY
FORUMS COMMITTEE OF UNION BOARD FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES

j4r:?x x-x x x x-x x-xx.v.v.v. x : x*xxx?:|
AUTOS
Sx x*xx"xvx*;*x*x*x x*xvx*x x x*x x*y-*
PONTIAC Bonneville 9 Passenger
station wagon. 1965 Automatic
Transmission, power brakes and
steering, AC, luggage rack, many
other extras, Original owner. $2150.
Phone 378-5736. (G-166-3t-p)
1954 CHEVY. Excellent Mechanical
Condition. Economical
transportation. Best cash offer. Call
372-4405. (G-166-2t-p)
1960 FORD FAIRLANE, 6-cyl.
Economical and dependable
transportation. Good condition and
inspection sticker. Call 378-8552
from 10:00 to 2:00 5:30 on.
(G-166-2t-p)
1962 Tempest LeMans, Convertible,
newly rebuilt engine, Air
Conditioned, $425., also Lambretta
Scotter, 125 cc, dependable $45.00.
Call 372-1603. (G l634tp)
1965 GTO, Convertible, 4-speed.
Tri-power. Excellent Condition.
sl7 00.00 or best offer. Call
378-4657. (G-167-4t-p)
MGA 1958 sports coupe. In running
condition. Must sell for $125.00. Call
Nancy 378-4578. (G-167-lt-p)
,%e%*X # X # X*X*X # X*X*X*X*X*X # X # >X # X*X # X*X*X # X #
| LOST & FOUND f
LOST: One K and E 10 Inch slide
rule vicinity McCarty Hall and Home
Library July 24. Finder please call
Dempsey 378-8165. (L-166-3t-p)
LOST: Watch, Diver type, Bless Aud.
Tuesday, 30, a.m. Phone 372-6527.
(L-167-2t-p)
CLASSIFIEDS

/ i'
**.- W i
Starring JAMES WHITMC



CLASSIFIEDS

lT
| SERVICES |
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGOsIQ,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16 t-p)
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Cali J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
checked free. (M 153 tf c)

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, August 6
Program Office: bridge lessons,
150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Forums Committee: speaker,
Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Union
Aud., 8 p.m.
Norman Lecture: Dr. James E.
Wheeler, "Some Problems of
General Education," Norman
Hall, 8 p.m.
University Summer Symphony:
Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Admission free.
Wednesday, August 7
Fla. Speleological Society:
meeting, 346 Uniam 7 p.m.
Union Board: movie, *'The Sign
of the Pagan," N. Side
Constans Theater, 9 p.m.
Thursday, August 8
Christian Science College
Organization: meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Painting for Fun:, painting, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Yoga: lessons, Towers, Bldg. C.,
9 p.m.
Friday, August 9
Men's Interhall: movie,
"Gypsy," Towers' Rec.
Room, 7 & 9 p.m.
Union Movie: "Spartacus,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Dept, of Music: Music
Scholarship Benefit, "H. M.
S. Pinafore," P.K. Yonge
Aud., 7:30 p.m. Family night
special: the entire immediate
family admitted for $2.00.

I At the (
Main Entrance (
GAINESVILLE MALL
taminella's SaU 4 &£&
ggJ L..J.J-..1 1 I I .1 I 1 I 1,1, * 1
0 elax \\JI
In. - .~n lil Iglj ?t~ Ro '' i |i pi I
I l HI Hit IÂ¥ / Hovnc--1i 1
l|lmporJLr..ndWmJl:!! BBS AM.B:3OPM Mo W j
mII i II I nmi ILJb || ggy^-JLJyli
j Gainesville's Finest j
[ and Most Intimate )]

- .VT.- Tv7rr.r. waroaoccoor
SERVICES
WAwwmw.v...v.'.v.v.% v : :
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M-ls3tf c)
TEDDY BEAR NURSERY. Infants ~
12 years old. 6 complete
departments. Pick-up and delivery at
five schools. Separate Dept, for
school age children. We are open all
day Saturday. (M-167-4t-p)

Florida Folk Dancing: dancing,
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Forums Co mm ill e e
presentation, LAWRENCE
FERLINGHETTI, 75 cents
for students, SI.OO for all
others; Music Department
presentation, H. M. S.
PINAFORE, $2.00 per family
(Friday night only), 50 cents
for students, SI.OO for
general public; and Florida
Cinema Society subscription
tickets.
FASHIONETTES
Lately men have been rush rushinn
inn rushinn into beads, jewelry, formal
turtlenecks, Nehru tunicsto be
different. But so many men
followed these fads that al almost
most almost at once, they again are
conformists. What will happen
to these innovations in male
apparel? Th£ American Insti Institute
tute Institute of Mens and Boys Wear
answers the question this way:
Ljke all'gther new trends, the
b£st will stay with us. the worst
will wear out its welcome, and
the male fashion scene will still
be keynoted as it always has
beenby elegance, dignity and
good taste.
I JT ACADEMY
I ~ A AWARD
I Enim.rvn.ll UHBIRICD
ft WINNER
Bryr mmt (ocmols
I VIE aDMCOUK
PHRLaI
JOSEPH LLfWfp** W/INI
The TIGER
the
W nmm*cat Anfl-MAKGRtT m

%V.V.VAV.-.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.%V.V.W.^,
i
I
I
% ft
| \
i aw ipk'i
!: f| $ s < i; iili $
: : :
i

THE COMPLETE
ORIGINAL
FLASH GORDON
SERIAL (1936)
+*
IS COMING SUNDAY!

IN DOUBLE-OVERTIME

Lowery Leads South
To 79-76 Cage Win

By JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondent
Double overtime action was
needed at Florida Gym Saturday
to crown the winners in the
state's 19th annual state high
school All-Star basbetball game.
The South topped the North
79-76 as Greg Lowery of West
Palm Beach Rossevelt pumped in
a record-breaking 36 points.
Lowery, a 5-11 guard who led
Roosevelt to the state Class A
high school championship, kept
the South in the game in the
first quarter as he scored 12 of
his team's 14 points.
The North led after the
opening quarter, 16-14, but as
the second period opened, 6-9
Cyril Baptiste of Miami Curley
tied the score and opened a
three point lead following a free
throw by Chris Plant of Tampa
Plant.
The South began scoring
more freely in the second
period, but Florida-bound Cliff
Cox of DeLand kept the North
in the game with long
one-handers from the corners.
Walter Smith of Wymore
Tech tied the score for the
North with 1:28 left in the half
before missing two shots at the
go-ahead basket.
South guards Lowery and
Ron Glover of Pompano Ely
then pounced on North mistakes
to end the half with a 10 point
spurt in the closing 44 seconds.
Lowery left the floor with 22
points for the first half as his
team led 41-31.
The third quarter brought a
rally by the North squad as they
outscored the South 16-9 behind
the speed of Florida-bound
Harold Houston.
Action quickened in the final
period as Walter Smiths two
free throws slashed the South
lead to two points with 6:29 left
in the contest. A long fall-away
jumper by Lowery and a three threepoint
point threepoint play by Glover opened the
gap again, however.
The two teams traded baskets
until Union Countys James
George again pulled the North to
within two points of the lead at
2:08 before the buzzer and Lake
City Columbias Houston tied
the game at 66-66 with 1:32 to
go.
Lowery, who describes
himself as ability, agility and
humility, squirmed along the
North baseline to dump in a
layup with 47 seconds showing
on the clock.
The South went into a
full-court press. It appeared to
pay off when North player was
Bp? U
K I jMp:,
B W
Pr
A- t M
CLIFF COX

Tuesday, August 6, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

called for a floor violation and
the southerners called time.
But when the ball was
returned to play, Houston
fouled Lowery with nine
seconds left. Lowery missed his
free throw.
SCOOTER' HOUSTON'
The scrappy northerners got
the ball down the floor to Cox
who tossed up a long jumper
which missed, but the forward
fought his way in to follow it up
and tie the game at 68-all at the
buzzer.
Jeff Trammell of
Blountstown kept the North in
the game in the first overtime as
his four points matched four by
Lowery. Cox and Baptiste both
hit for two. The three-minute
period ended at 74-74.
Fatigue began to take its toll
in the second overtime. Baptiste
hit a short hook, which was the
only score for the first half of
the period. Key Wests guard
Ronald Harris opened the South
lead to four.
Trammell tried to spark a
rally by the North but all it
netted was two free throws for
him with 21 seconds to go. That
made it 78-76, South, and South
co-captain Darryl Ceravolo iced
the cake with one point to end
the game.
Cox, who led the North by
pumping in 20 points, and
Lowery, who still hasn't signed a
college scholarship, were voted
most valuable players for their
respective teams.
After the game, Lowery
revealed that he hopes to attend
an out-of-state school, possibly
Creighton, the Nebraska college
where his all-star teammate
Baptiste is bound.
Concern Here
Various University
recreational facilities are being
reserved to host Operation
Concern participants Saturday,
August 10th from 2:00 p.m. to
4:00 p.m.
This phase of University
participation in Operation
Concern is under the supervision
of the College of Physical
Education and Health. Facilities
to be used at this time include:
t) the Murphree Area tennis
courts, 2) the Murphree Area
handball courts, 3) the Fleming
Field area, 4) the Womens
Gymnasium, 5) the Flbrida
Gymnasium, and 6) the Ma
Drills Field. Persons wishing iu
in recreational
activities during that time sh Id
to use other areas.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 6, 1968

TO BE SEEN!!
August 16, 1968 -*
IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
Call Extension
\. ***y
-C v VX ko ** r I U ,ft vs i* ol O^ 1 vnfc e ir
| ta^ c > n £ n*- vJ t \ Yv v \jvct vo^ e 0 eiflvet* ._ \tv tM
VV l^cor.t^^ dt vve *\r e a, V0 U 'Te sd^ct^' vVttv irotn lYv lot ce V !,g\e
s^=s
" "J 1 sell \e^ eT \s P uS 'L c 7
M V.'jT <** sVtv ce \ tf* v\ seVtt* ol ve
r-
NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!! I
fw?wc IT Tiu h n M m!^ Y PAGES we S,i haven,t attem P ted t 0 COUNT THEM! Fascinating and Awe-Inspiring iV*
NEWS of the Day, Illustrated, Illustrated, Illustrated. Illuminating Features All in the English Language to So*
c^r!T a r nd lnform ,he Mind. Matters of Monumental Interest to All New Florida Students are <3H
EXPLA! NED for the Edification of All. Vital Messages Communicated, Provoking Opinions Given Voice,
Stimulating Artwork to Titillate the Intellect and the Sense of Humor, in COLOR, in COLOR, in COLOR! fiStf
I THE FALL PREVIEW i? EDITION OF OF|
| OF| The Florida Alligator |



On J 3-7 Grid Victory

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. . talks strategy during game

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I SOUTH QUARTERBACK JOHN REAVES
. . hands off to Carlos Alvarez

Reaves: The Next Larry Smith?

By JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondent
Hes big, hes intelligent, hes
an All-American, and what
makes Gator fans even more
happy hes signed to play his
college football at Florida.
John Reaves picked the
UF over every other school
in the Southeastern Con Conference,
ference, Conference, Notre Dame, Pur Purdue
due Purdue and most of the rest of
the Big Ten, Florida State,
Miami and about fifty others.
Why? Ive followed the
Gators for as long as I can
remember, the 6 foot 3,
205-pounder said, and
Gainesville seems just far enough
away from home without being
too far away.
Home for Reaves is Tampa.
He attended high school on the
south side of town near Mac Dill
Air Force Base. The name of the
school is Robinson. Larry Smith
there too.
Physically, Reaves looks a lot
Smith did when he first
eported to the Gator team,
statistically, Reaves is also as
[repressive as big Larry, only
rm a different position:
luarterback.
He passed for 2,443 yards in
jrgh school and connected for
touchdowns, 22 in his senior
ear And he can run, too.

Eleven TDs were chalked up by
Reaves on the ground.
With credentials like that,
Reaves was all-everything in high
school from All-City on up the
line to All-America. But he also
has brains.
Reaves maintained a 3.27
average at Robinson, was
selected for the National Honor
Society, scored above 400 on
the Florida State Twelfth Grade
Test, and scored very high on
college boards.
In between books and
football, he managed to squeeze
in enough basketball, baseball
and track competition to rack

QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49{ SPECIALS X
___ every day
\SFmm stLF sERV,CE NO t,pp,ng T
| 313 W. UNIV. AVE^^

DOMINGUEZ, ALVAREZ TOP GAME

By*NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Some people say that there
are two different brands of
football played in North and
South Florida. The southern
end, so it is said, plays
wide-open college style ball
while the rest of the state uses a
gentlemans approach that serves
as long as the opposition is also
from the north.
That theory may well have
won over a few converts last
night as the South football made
the sports sweep complete with
a 13-7 win over a North team
that just couldnt get fired up.
The first quarter was spent
trading the football back and
forth as neither team was able to
mount a successful drive. Then,
with, 4:14 to go in the quarter,
Coral Gables quarterback Craig
Curry hit North Miamis Carlos
Alvarez for a 30-yard pass that

up a total of eleven athletic
letters by the time he graduated.
All-City and All-Conference
honors came his way in
basketball and baseball plus an
All-State in baseball his junior
year for good measure (as well as
a .500+ batting average).
The only pressure John
Reaves appears to feel is the
pressure to do well academically.
Os his football prowess, hes
modest. Os his academic ability,
hes shy.
He knows the ability is there,
but hed much rather be just
another football player.
Another Larry Smith?

was called back on a clipping
penalty.
It was the first major penalty
for the South, and perhaps it
was the spark the South needed
to swing in with their first score.
Three minutes later, George
Dominguez climaxed a 68-yard
drive with a dive over center for
the first score of the game. John
Reaves, quarterbacking for the
South along with Curry, kicked
the extra point for a 7-0 end of
the quarter score.
The second score for the
south came deep in the second
quarter as Alvarez took a North
punt at midfield and returned it
to the 16.
On the first play of the series,
UF-bound Reaves hit Miami
Norlands Joe Letter at the two,
and Letter walked across for the
score. The kick bounced off the
goal post, and the halftime score
was 13-0.
The North had two
opportunities to score in the
first half, but lost them both on
fumbles. In the closest effort,
the North squad marched 30
yards down to the South 16
before a fumble by Daytona
Beach Lopez Ernie Cook.
A duplicate situation occurred
late in the second quarter, with
the Cook fumble being
recovered by Tampa Kings Mike
Gee on both occasions.
In the second half, the North
controlled the ball most of. the
time, outdistancing the South in
first downs 11-4. North
quarterback Hal Dunbar, bound
for Alabama, carried the load for
the North throughout the
second half.
The single North score came
Indoor Football
NEW YORK (UPI)
Fordham and Marquette will
meet in an indoor football game
at Convention Hall, Atlantic
City, N.J., on Saturday, Nov. 23.
It will be the first indoor
football game ever played by
both schools and only the
second time Fordham and
Marquette have met in football.
Their first contest ended in a
13-all tie in Milwaukee in 1954.
Knocker Outer
NEW YORK (UPI) For Former
mer Former light heavyweight cham champion
pion champion Archie Moore holds the
record for most knockouts with
141.

LEARN I
I Areas of Work I
I# #T9p SIMKHIf *Nfl*Wwwf :^jSt
liipi A meieM UflsLamA Ja^jiai
dee RwwwCw BWi CWWwl wFwIJIIi WlFnewf wiF^oe
I 3. Sexual improvement end cerrectise. $|
4. Memory & Concentration development, etc.
|jj () 12" L.P. Record provided with .course J?
M (b) Book on self-hypnosis provided wMk coorso 11
(c) First clou with lecture end dentoestrotio I
conducted by Dr. Fred Adams, Licensed
Psychelofist end Medical Hypnotist.
(d) Alt instructions fiven'by licenud end fully B
qualified Medical Hypnotist.
. r ||||||||
S For enrollmont, information and
I free brochure write to: I
INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC HYPNOSIS, Inc.
H 1219 Wont University Avenue
Fla. 32601 Fhene 371*96661
I Terms Available B

Tuesday, August 6, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

early in the fourth quarter. A
South fumble on a Curry
handoff set up the scoring drive
at midfield. The North ground
out four first downs before
coming down to the South ten
for the first and goal. Three
plays later, Cook took a handoff
two yards for the Norths score.
UF-signee Jim Getzen kicked the
extra point to make it 13-7.
A fired up South team took
the kickoff, with Alvarez
returning the ball 29 yards from
the four. Three long runs, two of
them by Miami Springs
Dominguez, put the ball well
into the North territory, but a
fumble by quarterback Reaves
ended the drive on the North 22.
Most valuable player awards
went to Dominguez and Gee for
the South team, and Dunbar and
Ray Nettles for the North.
Dominguez led the South in
rushing, gaining 65 yards in 11
attempts. Gee recovered two of
the Norths four fumbles.
Dunbar completed 16 of 27
*
HAL DUNBAR
. . North quarterback
GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 50 cents to SI.OO
KISERS' 604 N. MAIN

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 6, 1968

wc^are
SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS FULLY COOKED CENTER J jjj
1959-1367108 YEARS YOUN6 #> | | APM II A Ail AA
Two Convenient Locations | t |j tw\ Jr Jr (
601 S.W. 2 Ave
1130 N.E. 16 Ave.

is?
!. A & P VACUUM PACK u
| COFFEE 99{ |
sir 1
!;, ASP FROZEN 1
I ORANGE QQ> I
!j juice 6P yy n
jI i I
:'[ ?
'jj: ANN PAGE j
| MAYONNAISE 79{
J |j LARGE 1 qt. 16 oz. JAR j
/
PEACH PIE, lb ~
LEMON PIE Mb. Boz. 3/SI.OO
PINEAPPLE PIE^J
LEMON POUND CAKE llb 59(
RING
SUGARED DONUTS 2oz 45(
GOLDEN DONUTS 45<
flip ANN PAGE Ca t'i
it* SOUP SALE l
I',-
' CHICKEN w/RICE . j
i TOMATO w/RICE '* |
'!? I
jl: CREAM of 1
,; MUSHROOM if
": |
'(j VEGETABLE BEEF
L -

ALLGOOD BRAND SUGAR CURED SLICED
BREAKFAST BACON B 59<
SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN SELECT SLICED
BEEF LIVER 39<

# aTp 1 f§ AUTOCRAT
E BREAKFAST T 11
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| SEEDLESS GRAPES n>. 29 <1
j| RED GRAPES
' b 29 <1
ill BARTLETT PEARS 2 lbs. 29 J
ls CELERY ,
I'J LETTUCE EAD 19C
j| GREEN CABBAGE LB. nil
I KETCHUP \ f apple base
i 14 If JELLIES
|| s

iMiafcTlaMllKiyl aow spaghehi i 2/43d
STRAWBERRY PRESERVES 2ib 79< SPAGHETTI SAUCE 2ib. 59<
RED PLUM PRESERVES 2 Lb. 49< REG. FRENCH DRESSING i6oz. 39<
PURE GOLDEN HONEY 3 lb. 95< CHEF FRENCH DRESSING i6oz. 39<
ELBOW MACARONI llb 2/43< ITALIAN DRESSING 16z. 45<

if DRY A routed J
VIRGINIA 1
i PEANUTS J
i i3oz. 59t 3
DRY ROASTED j
JfcASHEWS -I
all 6 3/4 oz. 59<
|| SUNNYFIELD
i WAFFLES
soz. 10*
iCU,
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B TOPPING ]
jLo, 49* j