Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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DAWKINS ASKS TO BE SERVED
. . lounge's refusal sparked trouble
Sit-Ins Warm Up
A Cool Summer
(EDITORS NOTE: Gainesvilles racial fires are apparently being
stoked up again. For the last five nights bands of young Negroes have
demonstrated on N.W. sth Avenue, the center of the trouble last
spring. The new trouble has centered around the refusal of the ABC
Cocktail Lounge to serve Negroes. Wednesday night the
demonstrations were declared unlawful assembly and five youths were
arrested.) By RAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
The first racial sparks of a surprisingly cool summer in Gainesville
flew early this week, and matters have gotten warmer each night.
Demonstrations, rock-throwing and two arrests have resulted from
the refusal of ABC Liquor Lounge to serve Negroes at their bar. The
ABC Package Store, adjacent to the lounge and part of the same
building, does serve Negroes.
Last Friday, a small group of Negroes entered the lounge at N.W.
13th Street, and asked to be served. The management refused, and
though the Negroes did npt drink, they sat around the bar in
anticipation of having the owner give in.
The bar was closed early at 11 p.m.
Saturday night a larger group went to the lounge, and this time
Irvin Jack Dawkins was with them. Dawkins has had several run-ins
with local authorities in the past year.
Once again, the men were not served and matters remained
peaceful. Monday night Dawkins entered the lounge at 10:10 p.m.
and sat down and immediately made his plea to be served. Once again
he was refused, but this time there were a number of resulting
incidents. Dawkins became boisterous while approximately 75 Negro
men, women and children gathered outside in protest.
At around 10:45 p.m., Dawkins left the bar after Richard Zucker,
a white acquaintance of Dawkins, spoke with him briefly. When
Dawkins left the bar, he was taken to the County Sheriffs Office
where his bond was placed at S4O.
Officially, Dawkins was not arrested for the Monday night
incident, but instead for a charge that was lodged against him after the
(SEE "SUMMER" PAGE 2)

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AMOPY YOUTHS DEMONSTRATE
. protest "discrimination"

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 60, No. 166

BUT DISCRIMINATION RAPPED
Voluntary Attendance
Voted Down, 30-18

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
An Action Conference
proposal to make class
attendance voluntary was sent
back to its sponsor, the Minimal
Conduct Expectations Task
Force, for further study,
Wednesday afternoon, even
though most conference
members said they favored some
form of voluntary class
attendance.
But the conference
unanimously passed four
proposals aimed at easing
relations between the UF and
racial minorities.
The four successful proposals
were introduced to the
conference by the Task Force on
University Responsibility to
Minorities and Disadvantaged
Groups, and will now go to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
for action.
The first proposal introduced
by the Task Force called for the

Student Senate Repeals
Union Budget Freedom

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
A bill rescinding financial
freedom for the Reitz Union
over its massive $500,000 annual
budget mushroomed into an
apparent battle Thursday with
Student Government and union
officials exchanging verbal
barrages.

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

UF to openly declare its
intentions of non-discrimination.
It was passed after being
amended to name OConnell to
personally make the statement.
The conference passed
another proposal recommending
the creation of an Office of
Minorities and Disadvantaged
Students as soon as possible.
The office would provide for
recruitment, remedial education,
and personal, tutorial and
economic assistance of minority
students.
A study of University
Housing in regard to black
students being placed in single or
double rooms alone when this
was not requested was also
authorized.
A recommendation was
passed calling for the Alligator
to refuse advertisements for
apartments whose owners arent
listed with Off-Campus Housing
because of their discriminatory
practices.
Before the minority groups

The bill, passed by the Senate
Tuesday night, repealed a 1964
law which exempted the union
from normal SG budget
processes.
The change in procedure was
questioned by Assistant Union
Director Bill Osborne, but
vigorously defended by Marc
Click, one of SGs leading
proponents for greater student
use of the union.
Whats the purpose of this
bill? Osborne asked. If there is
dissatisfaction with the
management of the budget, why
wasnt it expressed through
proper channels, such as to the
Board of Managers? If there are
no indications of poor
management, then why this
bill?
Click contended there are
no complaints about the fiscal
operation of the union.
But, he indicated, there are
many complaints and doubts as
to whether this union is really
for the students or for
outsiders.
Osborne noted that placing
the unions budget under normal
SG budget channels with line
item control would make it
difficult to administer the affairs
of the union. There are already
purchasing and policy controls
established by the state cabinet,
the Board of Regents, the Board
of Managers and the universitys
business office which govern
spending.

Friday, August 2, 1968

' 'sj H
BUSH! yll' _w
IhUF 1 JjBH . BF
KITTY OLIVER
. . urges proposals
proposals were debated and
voted on Mrs. Kitty Oliver,
chairman of the Task Force,
read a statement summarizing
the history of segregation at the
(SEE 'DISCRIMINATION'
PAGE 10)

Osborne also pointed out that
additional budget controls by
the Student Senate will create
unnecessary bureaucracy, delay
and inefficiency in day to day
operations.
Click emphasized that SGs
primary concern with the union
is its apparent lack of interest in
students.
Its about time someone
started taking a look at how this
union responds to students.
Students put $500,000 every
year into this joint, and you tell
me what the hell they get out of
it?
Not a half a million dollars
worth, thats for damn sure, he
declared.
Click conceded, however,
that some conditions regarding
student use of the union have
improved because of the
interest shown by the vice
president for student affairs
(Lester L. Hale).
But he sharply charged union
officials with a general lack of
interest in students:
The way things stand now,
it is a serious question if more
than 40 per cent of the students
use this mausoleum. It might be
well for the union people to
remember that their money
comes from the students. But as
it is, this place is the most sterile
on campus.
It would seem almost as if
(SEE "CONTROL" PAGE 2)



!, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2,1968

Page 2

BSP Autonomy
Near Fruition?
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
The Student Senate has passed autonomy for student publications
-for the second time in three weeks.
At its Tuesday night meeting, the Senate'passed on first reading a
law granting financial autonomy to the Board of Student Publications
(BSP).
But it took two hours of detailed debate, during which the bill
came under bitter attack from Student Body Treasurer Phil Burnett
and was vigorously defended by Student Body Vice President Gary
Goodrich.
The new law, which requires a second reading next week when
amendments may be made, provides that the BSP, the governing
board for the Alligator, Seminole and Florida Quarterly, be allowed to
manage its internal fiscal affairs after receiving annual lump sum

allocations from student activity fees.
The amount of the allocation will be negotiated
by the BSP and Student Government, the new bill
says. But the legislation provides that the minimum
amount allocated to student publications may not
drop below $1.26 per student per quarter.
. The bill does not contain many of the
controversial provisions which were in an autonomy
resolution passed several weeks ago. That resolution
came under fire from the BSP, which termed many
of the provisions unnecessarily restrictive.

Notably missing from the new bill are requirements that the BSP
be reapportioned to six students and three faculty members, that the
records of student publications be audited each year by an
independent auditor in addition to the universitys audit and that the
BSP return 80 per cent of excess reserve funds to Student
Government.
Burnett attacked the bill during the floor debate, calling for
assurances of BSP financial responsibility.
He told the Senate that if the BSP is granted autonomy by a weak

fpK
BURNETT

remove publications from the threat of student political control
through line item budgeting. 1
In his emotion-charged rebuttal, Goodrich contested Burnetts
claim that giving money to a worthy student publication was a
misuse of authority.
Goodrich also strongly challenged the Senate to end the three-year
battle for student publications autonomy.
Automatic 4-apaad from
Solld-Stata Instant Play
PORTABLE COUCH'S
PHONO
SEE THE COMPLETE LINE OF
ZENITH PRODUCTS TODAY
AT
mi irux eos n. main
LvULM O PH 376-7171
YOUR ZENITH DEALER SINCE 1933
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
aad is published five times weakly except during June, July and August when it is prttllshed
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Bonding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 31601. The Alligator s entered
an Oeoond class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 93601.
Unlisi rlpUnn rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
An Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
lavolvlag typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Adverting
ting Adverting TTf-~r~- within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
apt hp responsible tor more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to nm several times notices tor correction must be given before next insertion.

bill, SG will have no way to insure responsibility.
He noted that, in his opinion, the BSP has not
shown itself to be responsible. He cited a recent
decision by the board to give the Florida Law
Review $5,700 to publish a special edition and to
index the past years/issues. He said the request
should have been sent/to the Senate for approval.
But Goodrich, relinquishing the Senate
chairmanship to /President pro-tem Ed Tolle,
rebutted Burnettes charges and urged the Senate to

GOODRICH

MW

FROM PAGE ONE
students arent even allowed to
sit on the furniture in some of
the union lounges, let alone be
permitted into the lounges, he
continued.
Glick also charged that
students have a lower priority
for use of union facilities than
do other groups.
As far as being for
students, he said, this place is
frigid. A student union without
enough student activities is like a
heart without enough blood
its worthless.
Osborne explained that a new
charter for the Board of
Managers was ratified recently
and that students have an 8-6
majority on the board.
Under the new charter, the
board is responsible for
determining policy of the union
and for maintaining services and
facilities.
Glick said, however, that the
Board of Managers has rarely
been willing to listen to student
interests in the past and is not
likely to start now.
The question that must be
answered, Glick said, is
whether the union is here to
make Mr. Rions (Union
Director) budget sheet balance
or here to provide activities for
the campus community.
Glick also predicted that
union officials will oppose the
move to put the unions budget
under greater SG control
because they are afraid of their

Stop looking at life through
scratchy, glary glasses
got new scratch-resistant, glare-reducinq
OPTI-COAT LENSES
or have your present glasses Opti-Coated
BECKUMS OPTICIANS
22 WEST UNIVERSITY AYE. GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Phone 376-3516

'Why More Control?

OSBORNE
... defends
union

own little dynasty being looked
into.
And they dont want to be
responsive to students because
its too much trouble to be
concerned about students.
Glick sharply condemned
Osbornes statement that the
new bill will create inefficiency:
As for inefficiency around
here (the union), Glick said,
maybe we ought to look into

Summer Warms Up
FROM PAGE ONE
Saturday night incident.
Meanwhile, the protest continued after Dawkins was taken away.
One Negro youth, James Ward, who is admittedly well under the
drinking age, led a group of Negroes, whose ages varied from around
14 to 18, in a shouting walk around the lounges parking premises.
Well get him out; well get Jack out, Ward and his friends
shouted. I dont know how, but well get him out.
Dawkins was released a short while later when Zucker paid the S4O
bond.
I wouldnt to this for any Negro who got himself thrown in jail,
Zucker remarked at the Sheriffs Office. But Jack is a friend of mine;
and anyway, 1 have access to the money.
Evelyn James, a young Negro woman who claims to be Dawkins
fiancee, waited with Zucker for Dawkinsrelease. I think they just
want to pick on the Negro, she said. All they want to do is give us
trouble.
Matters were broken up at the lounge about 11 p.m. when about
10 local police and a handful of state beverage agents came in to
restore quiet.
At one point a bottle was smashed against the ground in the
parking lot, and the ensuing sound was one which resembled a
gun-shot. The police scattered behind their cars and the walls of the
lounge, but soon returned to clear the area.
Rock-throwing and sign-carrying began Tuesday night. A light
rain-shower halted what threatened to be a destructive evening.
Dawkins led the demonstration outside the lounge at around 10
p.m., and for nearly one-half hour, a small group marched back and
forth in front of the lounge in peaceful order.
The rain broke up the demonstration. Only one person, Joe Frank
Lee, a teenager who was arrested and then released of arson charges a
few months ago, was arrested on vagrancy charges.
Early Wednesday morning the rock-tossing began. Police vehicles
received damages of over SIOO, and a window and a plate-glass door
were smashed at the lounge.

some of the instances of
featherbedding on the union
staff, too.
He refused to elaborate or
cite a specific example,at this
time.
But, he said, its time
somebody started looking out
for the students against special
interest groups. The Student
Senate has been the one to do it
and in this case is the one to
do, he concluded.



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GATOR GJRL
Today's Gator Girt is "CiCi" Norden, 3BA. CiCi is a finance major
with a good head for figures. She is a water-ski nut and can be found
almost any afternoon at Camp Wauburg.
Post-Grad Students
Should Plan Ahead

Anyone preparing himself for
admission to graduate school
should be sure he has fulfilled all
the requirements in advance.
Among other things, many
graduate schools now require
scores from the Graduate
Record Examinations. This test
is offered on October 26 and
December 14 in 1968 and on
January 18, February 22, April
26, and July 12 in 1969.
Individual applicants should
be sure they take the test in time
to meet the deadlines of their
intended graduate school or

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Friday, August 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Shops

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Page 3



I, The Floridi Alliwtor. Frktay. Awwt 2.1968

Page 4

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WHAT IS IT?
If you give up already, or are through rubbing your eyes, look
again. This time you should recognize, if you're a car buff, the
reflection of the grillwork in a 1958 Plymouth isn't it?

/gfes Whats MEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
Crossword * by Alvin Ashby

1 Honestly. 50 Artificial 81 Roadway 108 To shorten.
7 Tokens of channel. pavement. 112 Covered
affection 52 Siamese 82 Spanish with ever ever-16
-16 ever-16 Worships. measure. execution. green trees.
22 Grumbling. 53 Highest 83 Feasts. 114 Erases with
23 Singer in points. 84 Small solid. a knife.
a group. 56 Cutting tool. 85 Wired 118 An enzyme.
24 Comparison. 57 Mortal dispatch. 119 A deck above
25 Church remains. 86 Morsel. the spar,
celebration. 59 Printing 87 Wading bird. 121 Portable
26 Dwelling press. 89 Holiday lodges,
house. 63 Talk: suffix. 122 Bare.
27 Plant spike. colloq. 90 Raves. 123 Farewell.
28 Sacred bull. 64 Cog wheels. 91 Noun suffix. 124 Grate
29 Hebrew 65 A savory 92 Peacocks. harshly
letter. sauce. 94 Detriments. upon.
31 Proselyte to 67 Masc. name. 96 Hirsute. 126 Lacking in
Judaism. 68 Sinclair 97 Receive: warmth.
32 Assistant. Lewis hero: poetic. 128 Cheer word.
34 Nearest. var. 98 Smooth. 129 Rail.
35 Hurried. 69 Flush with 100 Went with 130 Fuse partly.
36. Arab fabric. success. difficulty. 131 Whole.
37 To hash. 70 Headland. 101 Peer. 133 Bright-red.
39 The hub. 71 Malayan 102 Finest 136 Ability.
41 Light tree. middlings: 138 Drama parts,
breeze. 73 Wing. Brit. 139 Cosm.os: pi.
42 Fragrantly. 74 Modern. 103 Conjunction. 140 Hap.
44 Glosses 76 Frequenter 105 Wrong. 141 Spanish
over. of a place. 106 City: Gr. shawl.
46 Planet. 78 Composed comb. form. 142 Scenic
48 $5 bill. inverse. 107 Sibilant Gr. shows.
49 Elect, unit. 80 Saline. letter. 143 Mad."

1 Stains.
2 Ipdian.
3 Bearlike.
4 Danish
counties.
5 Repent of.
6 Fallible.
7 Land
measures.
8 Head cook.
9 Lettuce. >
10 Primitive.
11 Took on
cargoes.
12 Sandarac
wood.
13 Loud noise.
14 Apoplexy.
15 Beer mug.

BIT OF THIS AND THAT
ACROSS

DOWN

16 Affirm.
17 Immerse.
18 Arab, state.
19 Small ridge:
Fr.
20 The refined
spirit.
21 A sacristy:
Hist.
30 A song.
33 To block or
to choke.
36 Sweetsop.
37 European
blackbirds.
38 Fungus
disease.
40 Ages.
43 Equable.

44 Heraldic
bearing.
45 A sacred
place.
47 To summon.
49 Brother:
obs.
51 A titter.
53 Acclimates.
54 Evergreen
thicket.
55 Flame tree.
56 Extinction.
57 Moreover.
58 Upon: law.
60 Loving.
61 Debates.
62 Tennis term.
64 Mirrored.

Guys& Dolls Here Sunday

#
Sunday, August 4th, the
Opera Workshop of the UFs
Department of Music presents
scenes from Hansel and Gretel
and Guys and Dolls in the
Reitz Union Auditorium at 4
p.m.
Hansel and Gretel is an
opera by E. Humperdinck, with
English translation by Constance
Bache. Cast in the role of Hansel
is Diane Lopez, a music
education major in organ.
Portraying Gretel is Rose Marie
Shumate, also a music major.
The part of the mother is nlaved
by Rose Bullock, a graduate
student in the College of
Nursing.
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Cunha
FACTORS AFFECTING CALF CROP
Watkins
YOU FLORIDA GARDEN (New 1968 ed.)
Proger
THE MEDICATED SOCIETY
Wilbourne
THE WHEELS
Fuller
THE DAY OF ST. ANTHONY'S FIRE

65 Mysteries:
var.
66 The papacy.
69 Fern. name.
70 Having
cymoses.
72 Looks
searchingly.
75 Japan city.
76 Chinese
dynasty.
77 Make lace.
79 Unit of
work.
81 Atomlike.
82 Category.
84 States of in insensibility.
sensibility. insensibility.
85 Follows.

1 2 3 4 5 5 '? 89 10 11 12 13 14 UnHHIi 17 18 19 20 21
22 ~
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42 43 j|H|44 47
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131 132 l33 134 SF
I 138 Hf 39
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88 Uncooked.
90 Furious.
93 Settle.
95 Civetlike
creature.
96 Cavities.
97 Food fish.

Perrott
THE ARISTOCRATS
Coatsworth
THE LUCKY ONES
Avnery
ISRAEL WITHOUT ZIONISTS
Hills
HOW WE LIVE
Simon
HEIR

99 To nibble.
101 Coming
from a
direction.
102 Venture.
104 Bishops
jurisdiction.

Guys and Dolls, a musical
fable of Broadway, is based on a
story by Damon Runyon. Music
and lyrics were written by Frank
Loesser. The plot revolves
around a bet for SI,OOO made
by Sky Masterson, a gambler,
that he can make a date with
Sarah, who is a worker in the
Save-a-Soul mission. The role of
Sky Masterson is played by
Marvin Sylvest, a language arts
maior in the College of

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106 A cure-all.
107 Expunge.
108 Pet.
109 Employ Employment.
ment. Employment.
110 Reposer.
111 Card game.

113 Deduce.
114 Italian
gentleman.
115 Father or
v mother.
116 Make
evident.

Education.
Agatha, a worker in the
mission, is played by R ose
Bullock. Portraying Adelaide, a
dancer in the Hot Box
Review, is Diane Lopez. The
role of Arvide, also a mission
worker, will be filled by Douglas
Butler.
Accompanist for the
performance will be Doug Butler
and Jane Fosha.
_Admission is free.

Answers On Display
the at hub
MED CENTER
Bookstore
REITZ UNION
Bookstore

117 Police spy.
120 Short fly.
122 Downy.
125 The
pineapple.
127 Moon
goddess.

129 Plaintiff.
130 Apartment.
132 Fabric.
134 Dress stone.
135 West: Ger.
137 Exclam Exclamation.
ation. Exclamation.



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Friday, August 2.1968, Th* Florida Alligator,

Sale of Famous Artists
STEREO RECORDS
Comparable Value 1.29
[ 79
Lou Rawls, AAitch Ryder, Tennessee Ernie Ford
Gene Pitney, Al Martino, Not King Cole,
Annette, Ray Charles, Bobby Vee
Many, many others to choose from stock up

I I Jlw Ml I iVTiI fKI If I yup yl I M
605

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2,1968

Pia/kaltMi
Pital

Todds Raw Deal

Eugene Todd has been strangled
by bureaucratic red tape.
Todd is the UF professor who,
through official ineptness and poor
laws, was cheated out of his
candidacy for the Alachua County
District 3 School Board seat last
May.
Todd was defeated by Hal
Ingman, another UF professor, for
second place for the Democratic
candidacy for the school board seat.
Later 95 misplaced votes were found
and gave Todd second place. But he
was not allowed on the run-off
ballot.
And after two months of court
fights and heavy legal expenses for
Todd, Circuit Judge John A. A.
Murphree has refused to grant Todd
the special election he deserves, and
county officials say they can do
nothing.
Yet it is widely recognized that:
Alachua County Election

The Black Conspiracy

Drew Pearson"

WASHINGTON ~ An alarming
confidential report has been prepared by
the FBI on the undergound Black
Nationalist Movement in the United States.
It may explain the sudden outbreak of
violence in Cleveland, a city under a Negro
mayor, Carl Stokes, which had been
making great progress toward racial
understanding but where a handful of
Black Nationalists began shooting police
last week merely because they were towing
away a parked car.
It definitely explains some of the
extremist moves by Negroes in Washington.
Finally it gives a key to the tremendous
upsurge in the popularity of George
Wallace of Alabama, who represents a
latent American fascism whose answer to
Negro violence is white violence.
What the FBI has found in Washington
is that the Black Militants have worked out
a secret plan to take over the nations
capital. The militants argue that Negroes
are now in the majority and that given
home rule they can take over the city.
At present Washington is governed by a
Negro mayor, Walter Washington, an able
executive, who is supported by a city
council, half Negro, half white. Mayor
Washington, however, is considered much
too moderate by the Black Militants. They
have worked out the following secret
strategy to take over the capital,
neighborhood by neighborhood.

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
News Editor

Merry-Go-Round'

x\lligator Staff

Ted Remley
Entertainment Editor

The
Florida Alligator
"To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Supervisor Alma Bethea found 95
misplaced ballots that should have
guaranteed Todd second place in the
election and a place in the run-off
election.
9 The ballots were found by Mrs.
Bethea well after the legal deadlines
set by the election laws, Therefore
Todd could not have complied with
them.
9 County officials found the
ballots only a week before the
run-off, then delayed two days
before telling Todd. By the time
Todd hired legal aid and found out
what he had to do to get on the
ballot for the run-off, it was far too
late.
Despite this, Todd has been twice
turned down in his bid for a special
election. Twice bureaucracy has
trampled the individual.
However, Todd has one last hope.
Gov. Claude Kirk can order the
special election Todd deserves.
And if Kirk wants to prove that
this states justice is not blinded by
inept bureaucracy, he will.

'Jack Anderson

First they will try to persuade the
moderates to become militant, and if they
fail, then bury them with frustration and
harassment. When the moderates hold
meetings, the strategy is to break up the
meetings or be so unreasonable that the
moderates will have to disassociate
themselves from the meetings.
This was the explanation ot the recent
meeting in the African Methodist Episcopal
Church to discuss neighborhood control of
police where the Black Militants demanded
that all whites leave. The whites present
had been strong supporters of Negro
progress. When they left, moderate Negroes
walked out with them in protest.
Stokely Carmichael sat quietly in a back
row of the meeting. He had been one of
the chief architects of the new secret
strategy. Another was Chuck Stone, former
assistant to Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.
Both militant and moderate Negroes are
burnt up over the double standard of
ethical conduct in Congress, whereby
Powell, a Negro, was expelled, and Rep.
Mendell Rivers of South Carolina, who has
had inexcusable bouts with alcohol and has
used government airplanes almost at will,
remains a power in the white
establishment.
This has caused far more resentment in
the black world than Congressional leaders
realize and appears to moderates to be a
legitimate case against Congress.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

Lori Steele
Features Editor


Mbr
Only A Jackass Would Pass Up A Place Like This

Fifth Colum n
Alice Long?
=i^=!^^^=^=^^^=^=: Jason Straight

Q. What did you love?
A. What I knew.
Q. What did you know?
A. Very little...
I knew a truthful smile and
long clean fingers. (Restless
nights and a perfume that
lingers.)
I knew strange places, once
visited and never forgotten.
This eyelid, and that chin.
Her sensuous laugh,... and
oh, of course,... that nose.
(I would draw her and I never
could get that nose.)
Long serious talks studded
with giddy tenderness. Its so
much fun getting to know
you. (Ed. Note: Ill give it a
week.) I knew shaky hands
and muscles rippling; catching
breaths and hearts pounding.
This Id known before .. but
not like this.
(Breaking the silence ...
What are you thinking?)
While I knew all this, I knew
nothing else. I didnt know
before -for I wasnt there.
Give me ten minutes of your
family, thats all I want to
hear.
Youve been in love before?
. . Thats nice.
You like to go out and meet
people? We wi11... cmere.
While I knew her, I knew no one
else:
I dont care what people
say is easy to say as long as
people arent saying. (Love

cant live without others
praise.)
Mothers and fathers are fond
memories that send
checks ... and stop sending
them. (Your Mother and I
have agreed...)
Roommates are for lying to.
(Where are you going? Out
to study.)
Soon, too soon, my emotions
betray me. Pr e vious
protectiveness dwindles to
irrational possessiveness.
Conversations become
bittersweet and are spoken in
the past tense. Lasting looks
change to suspicious glances.
Casual questions are now
entrapping accusations. We ha*te
what we are doing to each other,
but it cant be helped...
Can it?
It never had a chance.
Did it?
Well never know, but oh lofdie,
I think so.
I thought so. (Oh hell, who
am I kidding?)
I woke up this morning and you,
(it) were, (was) gone. Same face,
same hands, same clothes, same
voice;... different feeling.
Study, eat and wonder.
Look out the window and
ache.
Once in a while
remember.
REMEMBER WHAT?
We never ever had a song.



Model Heart
Wasnt Stolen
MR. EDITOR:
Once again the time has come to attack the journalistic accuracy of
the Alligator. The object missing from Flint was neither a human
heart nor a model. This misrepresentation of facts is only one element
in the irresponsible journalism at Florida.
I do not wish to criticize the author, but rather to criticize the
pressure under which the news item was procured. It is my
understanding that a newspaper is to report facts to the public. The
journalist is to accept this responsibility.
The student who wrote this article is not a journalism major, but
his major required a journalism course. His instructor assigned his class
on Thursday the task of writing and turning in for publication in the
Alligator a news item. The student in question was told he must get a
story from the CBS Department and have the item prepared by 4:30
of the same afternoon. The consequences of failure are obvious.
Certainly this is not a competent manner for procuring news items.
Students must produce a story or fail. If these are the circumstances
under which news articles are attained for Alligator publication, it is
no wonder that exquisite factless essays overrun its pages.
If the journalism department puts such demands on would-be
reporters, may I suggest the Alligator secure future news articles from
the creative writers of the English department and discontinue the
publication of original essays under the guise of responsible reporting.
SUSAN HOSTETLER, 4AS
(EDITORS NOTE: The authors source of information on the
story was a student in the biology department. The report was
confirmed by Lt. V. K. Holliman of the University Police Department.
Our guess is Lt. Holliman knows as much about the theft as there is to
know. We will continue to rely on police records for accurate
information.)

Exams
Repeated?
MR. EDITOR:
I must ask you to allow me to
correct the impression left by
the article on University College
C-course examinations which
appeared in the Alligator on
Friday, July 26.
We do indeed repeat the use
of individual test items,
especially those on which a high
validity rating has been
established. But these are
individual test items, and a
reasonable time must elapse
before such items are used in the
construction of a subsequent
test. Validity and difficulty
ratings help us to construct a
better evaluation instrument.
Exceptions to the above
procedure may occur in the
summer terms when a severely
reduced faculty makes it
impossible to construct new
final examinations and the final
examination of a previous term
may be used again. Final
examinations, of course, are not
released to students as the
progress tests are.
FRANKLIN A. DOTY
DEAN, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
Moon Over Miami

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

! Speaking Out =

Bailey Discredits Conservatism

The Alligator, ever on the lookout for
I new and inspiring journalistic talent has
clearly made a valuable contribution to
its editorial page with the addition of
Jimmey Baileys column.
Dubiously entitled The Conservative
View, the column of the Alligators new
Klansman-in-residence offers readers a
bi-weekly dose of racial slurs of the
crudest sort accompanied by all the
hackneyed remark: and backwoods,
redneck philosophy (not to mention an
equally insidious assault on the English
language) to which his readers have grown
accustomed.
The title of Baileys column does no
credit to the bona fide conservative
viewpoint voiced in this country by those
such as William Buckley Jr., Barry
Goldwater, and the late Senator Taft.
It is noteworthy that even one so far
Right on the political spectrum as Mr.
Buckley (and virtually every other
responsible conservative leader in this
country) has denounced Jimmeys idol,
George Wallace, as a fraud whose
conservatism is nothing more than a
thinly veiled appeal to racism.
And if Wallaces approach is indeed
one of thinly veiled racism, as it has
been so generously described, then what
can be said of Jimmey Baileys other
avowed prophet, Robert Shelton,
Imperial Wizard of the United Klans of
America. Bailey has made no secret of his
admiration of the ex-tire salesman from
Tuscaloosa, whose approach to the racial
issue has taken the form of church
bombings and wholesale murders.

VXXZP you Baim?...
'Z THEgEAGE SOO,OOO,COO NUbtSTS
ffp fJ JUljk rK_ IN ThE UNITED STATES/
mmcwcuswuak
business tycoon. HAS NBiK touched MY OF m ULt ,N ue-mx/
his secretaries, w nu of his xo business cafft
WARS/ fHH
...ALUHS Seceemgies sure mev. rue sieis B£*/d SjMf-
MX Ase fitsMUGHTEHS. WHO HELP H/M/hm/AHrs ,Cl(E^S£>
OFFICE MOI&E&TQSrnv/N HIS MU..
OPEN FORUM:
ViMmt
"There is no hope for the complacent man. 9

In a time and at a place where
fanatical lunatics and race-baiters like
Robert Shelton are invited to speak to
students while Adam Powell and Tim
Leary are denied such permission by the
Regents of this University, one cannot be
terribly surprised when a Jimmey Bailey
is made the student newspapers chief
conservative pundit.
At any rate, a brief response to
Baileys refutation of my earlier
comments on his opposition to
responsible gun legislation.
Again he asserts the notion that the
Second Amendment is concerned with
the inviolate right of the private citizen to
keep and bear arms. Once again he makes
the same error. Without going into a
full-blown argument on the entire issue of
the necessity of stronger gun control
legislation, and with reference only to the
Second Amendment argument, Mr.
Bailey, please direct your attention to the
Supreme Court decision, United States v.
Miller, 307 U.S. 174(1939).
This decision established the
constitutionality of the National Firearms
Act of 1934. Here are the Courts own
words: In the absence of any evidence
tending to show that the possession or
use of a firearm, as herein defined, at this
time has some reasonable relationship to
the preservation or efficiency of a well
regulated militia, we cannot say that the
Second Amendment guarantees the right
to keep and bear such an instrument.
That language is quite clear and says
what my previous remarks said in effect.
That is, that the Second Amendment

Friday, August 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,l

! By Jeff Raffle 1

does not guarantee the private citizen the
unqualified privilege of keeping and
bearing firearms, but rather is concerned
with the right to keep firearms to the
extent that such firearms bear some
reasonable relationship to a well-regulated
militia. (Again, the Courts own words).
This view remains the law in 1968, and
illustrates conclusively that the Second
Amendment poses no obstacle to the
establishment of effective firearm
legislation.
Finally, Jimmey, I believe I referred to
you as a Super Patriot. You took that to
be a compliment, i.e., a loyal American.
Again Jimmy, as with the Second
Amendment, you ignore the first half of
the phrase.
The word Super precedes the word
Patriot, and thus the entire term derives
its meaning from the first word; Super, in
the sense of an overabundance or excess.
Thus the Super Patriot is distinguishable
from the patriot in that the latter
possesses a measure of virtue, while the
former in his zeal and boundless energy
to create the world in terms of his own
narrow concept of loyalty ¥o cause, or
country will allow the ends, however
noble (in his own mind), to justify the
means, however despicable and inhuman.
Thus we may distinguish between
John Kennedy or Dwight Eisenhower,
both patriots, and Adolph Hitler or
Robert Shelton, both Super Patriots.
Since you obviously are to be a fixture
with this newspaper, Mr. Bailey, why not
tell your new readers just what kind of
patriot you really are.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEAV-ER, MICANOPY
4663340. (A 154 tT p)
Household furnishings and Junqu*.
for sale very reasonable prices for
students. Call Janet 372-2429.
weekdays after 5 or anytime
weekends. (A 1614t p)
EARN MONEY IN SPARE TIME,
Small business for sale 10 candy and
nut machines $500.00. Call
3724985 for more information.
(Al 61 5t p)
35mm NIKKORMAT-FT SLR
Camera and case. Thru the lens light
meter. 50mm f 1.4 and 135 mm f 3.5
(telephoto) Auto-Nikkor Lenses.
Excellent condition. 378-8684.
(A-164-st-p)
MISCELLANEOUS Chevy parts, Plus
sl Chevy and VW floor pan. Also
body-building weights. 376-0894.
(A-164-2t-p)
Cast Aluminum portable barbeque
grill and oven, used once, $40.00.
G.E. 16 oscillating 3 speed desk or
wall fan, $15.00. 8.55 x 14 tire and
wheel, $4.00. Phone 378-5736.
(A-166-3t-p)
1967 YAMAHA 180 CC like new;
less than 3,000 miles, 2 helmets
included. $475.00. Call 378-3389 or
come by Flavet 111 209-B after 6:00
p.m. (A-164-3t-p)
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
f A-166-lt-c)

1 \ 13ii ST, I ME. 23rtl ffc. 371-2434 f |
rPf
PjijmoumiViuiesoisfoK FEATURE AT:
Mia farrow 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:40
In a William Castle Production HfeyH
0 R OSer a ai3y £jgJ John Cassavetes
n starve
Ruth Gordon Sidney Blackmer Maurice Evans and Ralph Bellamy
Produced by William Castle Written tor the Screen and Directed by Roman Polanski
From the novel by Ira Levin PioOucton Designer Ricnara SylDen Tecnmcolor* A Pa>amouni fViun
Suggested 10, Mature Audiences
(fjfjjh starry ROBERT HflTdiUMl
oh*- PETER FALK EARL HOLLIMAN MARK DAMON
wh ARTHUR KENNEDY-^ 1 RYAN as csfr
^HtTll:3o-3:35-5:45-7:50-10:00-r^PANAVISION-. TECHNICOLOR^

FOR SALE
quality food for low prices
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
140 WATT HI-FI: AR speakers and
turntable, Scott FMX tuner and
amplifiers. C. $500.00 Koss Pro-4
Headphones. $25.00 Rick Stone
376-9559. Apt. 97, French Quarter.
(A-164-2t-p)
FOR RENT
2 Bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
Student couple only. $50.00 per
month for long-term tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 3729903.
(B 1615t p)
3 blocks from campus. Double room
for male students. Air Conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
N.W. 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-166-st-p)
AVAILABLE August Ist.
Comfortable AC suite of rooms.
Across from campus, also, efficiency
apts. for fall, 321 SW 13th St.
(B-166-lt-p)
LARGE, comfortable corner room,
lavatory, 2 closets kitchen Priv. 2
blocks C.1., Garage, Day, Week t
month, $1.25 a day. 378-4645.
(B-166-lt-p)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Air conditioned. 2
Bedroom l/2 Bath CBS --11 miles
S.W. University $125.00/mo.
Phone 495-2186 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-155-st-p)

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2, 1968

FOR RENT
GOT A DOZEN roommates in a one
bedroom apt cause you caht afford
gracious AC living? Would you
believe AC, wall to wall carpet, twin
balconies, and walk to class at dorm
prices: Call 376-0056 to reserve your
suite for Sept. La Fontana Apts. 207
NW 17 St. (B-164-3t-p)
iTIWt |
sat %Sr i
grf BURTON 1
SUNDAY 3:20-6:20-9:20
WEEKDAYS 7:00-9:40

f Wocfcfnf Chair Twin "T
f
* 9:3 other days at 1:30-3:30-5:30-1*?^
! 1 7:30-9:30
wmmmmmmmm a jacK a
mIMSm f : V s Writer
Uproariously t jr l
funny! vL JS mm
- New Yerk Daily News COUfliC W
Wise, witty andflp
for everybody! more W
c Judith Crist, NBC Today Show PANAVISIQN* TECHNICOLOR
f Downtown Goinesville |
JhMiIPTJI 1 111 3 p.m.
j 233 w. University Ave. | No reserved seats -No passes accepted.
In new screen splendor... Hie most magnificent picture ever!
IHffIEMTH THEJKMir
CIL>BuXD i \
IM CIARKGABLE
\T\IEN LHGH
LESLIE HOWARD OLNIAdeHAVILLAND

FOR RENT ?
ROOMS Men WallTto campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles, Live
with friends, Phone 3788122 or
376-6652. f8163-Btp)

' / W v_ ~~
I OPEN AT 8:00
I FIRST RUN FEATURE AT 8:35 AND 12:10
lIMOTHING EVER HIT YOU LIKE
l£ hammerhead
I lAviCE EDWARDS
1 as Charles Hood
pm JUDY GEESON
I W If (Co-star of "TO SIR WITH LOVE")
I j^^^^EATU^noj2^^^ M-
I IjC DEAN STELLA ELI ANNE
I MARTIN STEUENS WALLACH JACKSON
I V ':L rY ohapirr HOW TO SAVE A MARRIAGE-
I J> STALEY SHAPIRO m RU|N yQUR upE
t -**V Lj___

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

FOR RENT
$85.00 for usual SIIO.OO Apartment,
AC, Furnished and Patio', Very Nice!
Call 378-2824. Available Aug. l'
(B-164-2t-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIED

FOR RENT <
UNIVERSITY APTS, now ranting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
EffTciency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768 990.
(815715 t-p)
FOR RENT: Nice Room, Private
Entrance, Bath, Air Conditioned,
own heat control. Four minutes from
campus. Mature Student only.
372-8374. (B-164-2t-p)
WANTED f
< >
EE Senior needs roommates and
apartment for fall. Contact Don
Glendening. Call Hollywood collect
983-5601 after 5 p.m. any day.
(C-164-st-p)
WANTED: 1 male roommate for fall
quarter. Gator Town Apts. Call Lee
372-9435. (C-164-3t-p)
SENIOR Co-ed needs place to live in
68-69 write Rita Perkins, 37 Edmund
Rd., Hollywood Fla. or call collect
983-5041 after 10 p.m. (C-164-4t-p)
WANTED: Mature female roommates
to share 5 bedroom house 5 blocks
from campus. $40.00 per month plus
utilities. Call 378-7061. (C-164-2t-p)
WANTED: Two female roommates
for fall quarter. French Quarter No.
109. Ask for Judy or Jane after five.
376-0008. (C-164-2t-p)
WANTED: 1 or 2 female roommates
for Fall Quarter. Landmark. Call
378-5809. (C-166-4t-p)
NEED RIDE to Atlanta or Athens,
Ga. Leaving August 9, and returning
August 11. Please call Pam Clark,
372-9311. (C-166-2t-p)
ROOMMATE wanted: to share two
bedroom Starlight Apt. SIOI.OO per
quarter plus utilities. Call Judy
376-6680 after 5:00 p.m.
(C-166-2t-p)
U WUMWBffiBI! S'lriMSWtt
I HELP WANTED |
.:s^sv:-xvx'x<*x*:*x;:xsx'w*x*x<#*x'x-::'
A GREAT JOB AVAILABLE for a
Student Wife in Student Publications.
A full-time position offering
challenging work in computerized
typesetting. A Job that offers variety
and valuable experience. Must be able
to type 45 WPM with 80% accuracy.
Apply in person to Mr. Barber, 9-11
A.M. at Student Publications, Rm.
330, J. Wayne Reitz Student Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
DELIVERY BOY WANTED:
Transportation furnished. Apply in
person Larrys Poreboy Sandwich
Shop. 1029 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-166-lt-p) ______
PIZZA HUT, help wanted, must be
21 years or older. Apply in person,
378-5761. (E-166-lt-p)
i u rs
BELLMAN needed, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Apply in person, Mr. ONeil, Ramada
Inn. (El633tp)
i r- "i

LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI TO APPEAR AT
THE REITZ UNION TUES AUG 6 8:00 PM TO
LECTURE ON CONTEMPORARY POETRY AND
LITERATURE
Lawrence Fertinghetti received an
North Carolina and an M.A. from Columbia U"****- jjj*
service in World War JT, he emptied w< te h £*s *i ZZJFJI
while, then lived in Paris 1947-51, where he rcce/yeda Doc
VUniversite from the Sorbonne On his return he and Martin
founded the first all-paperbound bookstore in *"£** L
Under its imprint, Fertinghetti began polishing the Pocket Poets Series
which includes work by WOliam Carlos Williams, A^
Kenneth Patchen, Kenneth Rexroth, Antordn Artaud, and many
exciting new young writers whom hr discovered.
PRESENTED BY
FORUMS COMMITTEE OF UNION BOARD FOR STUDENT
ACTIVITIES

C*:xx-x.xx?x<*x-x*x.:
1 AUTOS I
f: g
MERCEDES-BENZ 220 S must sell
1961 Mercedes in beautiful
condition. SI2OO or best offer. Call
376-0428 after 5:00 p.m.
(G-166-lt-p)
ALFA ROMEO Red Sprint GT,
1965, DOHC HEAD, 1.6 Liter, 130
HP, 5-speed. Excellent Condition.
One Owner. 378-7581. Eves.
(G-166-3t-p)
1963 Cadillac Sedan DeVille. Racing
Green. Factory Air. $1675. Call
3782949. (Gl63st-p)
PONTIAC Bonneville 9 Passenger
station wagon. 1965 Automatic
Transmission, power brakes and
steering, AC, luggage rack, many
other extras, Original owner. $2150.
Phone 378-5736. (G-166-3t-p)
1954 CHEVY. Excellent Mechanical
Condition. Economical
transportation. Best cash offer. Call
372-4405. (G-166-2t-p)
LEAVING country, *63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater,
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)
1962 Tempest LeMans, Convertible,
newly rebuilt engine, Air
Conditioned, $425., also Lambretta
Scotter, 125 cc, dependable $45.00.
Call 3721603. (Gl634tp)

NOWON
. THE SCREEN^
"All the
horror of
the novel.
-Newsweek
"A superb
and chilling
climax.
-Time

PLUS: I he ORIGINAL 1936 Serial!
CHAPTER ONE of "LLASII GORDON
Starring Buster Crubbe

1984

AUTOS
1960 FORD FAIRLANE, 6-cyl.
Economical and dependable
transportation. Good condition and
inspection sticker. Call 378-8552
from 10:00 to 2:00 5:30 on.
(G-166-2t-p)
/>sy.V.SV-v.v. .v.v,v.v.v.v.v. .*>;.:"Y.Y.v.v | LOST & FOUND |
i-x^x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x^x-x-x-x-VANYX*::
LOST: One K and E 10 Inch slide
rule vicinity McCarty Hall and Home
Library July 24. Finder please call
Dempsey 378-8165. (L-166-3t-p)
:gX*XX^VX*X*X<*X*:*XX.N*X*X*X*X-X-X<-!;>'
SERVICES
:! XX*X X*X*X-X*XX*X X-X*X*XX.NS*X*X*X*X{?!.
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGI'NG
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call. M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M 153tf c)
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Cal! J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
systems checked free.(Mls3tfc
I- TJt ACADEMY
I M AWARD
h EMummii tamiiiED
| WHVIICK
ITHE Mkr taCNOLS
pyniZL.l
also at -10c4

Main Entrance u
GAINESVILLE MALL J/
Carralnellas &a*U 4&% |
|7conln.ntd i E | | f Ravioli Pi
(g / Finest in gourmet food A j 111 lil =r / Houik Si
ij oril Ifc^Frtll
l( Gainesville's Finest n
ft and Most Intimate 1

with
Michael
REDGRAVE
Donald
PLEASANCE
Jan
STERLING
Edmond
O'BRIEN
SUNDAY
7:00 & 9:15
AT THE UNION

- m w v v'
' v' l.
jiv,
REITZ UNION THEATRE
!> Os
HRk f
; *?y ; ;<. /ytm :
&jj|gw i ; :H
?
"THE SEASONS BEST COMEDY !-urc magazine ACADEMY AWARD WINNER! Mfl
i| BEST ORIQf~ M ~
. Friday, August 2-- 7:00, 9:15
Saturday, August 3-- 7:00, 9:15 40< |

Fridiy, August 2,1968, The Florida Alligatot,

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2, 1968

Page 10

Orange a d
BLUB
BULLETIN

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMS: ETS exams will be held
Saturday, August 3, at 9:45 a.m.
in 207 Leigh Hall, in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduating, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
WORK-STUDY JOBS:
Positions are available for
currently enrolled University of
Florida students. Applicants
must be eligible for the College
Work-Study Program, which
requires parents income be less
than $7,000 a year. Please
contact Student Employment,
Room 23 Tigert Hall for further
details:
GENERAL NOTICES
ORANGE AND BLUE
DEADLINES: Duringthe
summer term the Orange and
Blue will be run once a week
on Friday. All notices must be
received by; 9 a.m. Wednesday
prior to publication. Notices
should be typed and signed by
the person submitting the notice
and sent to the Division of
Information Services, Building..
H., Campus. Items sor a the
Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office
Reitz Union.

(Low Interest Rates Still Available jfif
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds l r c per month on unpaid balance -. 'yjiiafiSfiyfflfe
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement ~ ~ ~ 7 ~ ;== -
Call ext. 2973 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 cun. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

FALL RUSH: The
Panhellenic Council has set
August 15 as the deadline for
continuing students, incoming
freshmen and transfers to sign
up for fall rush. All incoming
students will receive the
necessary forms by mail and
continuing students may obtain
them by writing the Panhellenic
Office, 315 Reitz Union.
Payment of a $2 fee makes the
students eligible for the fall
rushing program beginning Sept.
18. Students who have been
through rush and paid the fee
will remain eligible.
EXPERIENCED JUDOKA:
University of Florida Judo Club
works out from 5-7 p.m.
Monday through Friday in the
Florida Gym.
FREE PAPER CLIPS: Paper
clips may be picked up at the
Campus Mailroom, Building E,
behind Tigert Hall. Please bring
your own container.
CAMPUS CALENDAR
Friday, August 2
Union Movie: "Divorce Italian
Style," Union Aud., 7 & 9:15
p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing: dancing,
214 Fla. Gym', 8 p.m.
Florida Players: "An Italian
Straw Hat," Constans
Theater, 8 p.m.
Saturday, August 3
Florida Players: "An Italian
Straw Hat,'. Constans
Theater, 8 p.m.
I

FULBRIGHT GRANT
information is available at
International Center (south of
Walker Auditorium) for enrolled
U.S. students who will have at
least a bachelor's degree by the
fall of 1969. Grants pay all
expenses for one year of study
or research in one of many
foreign countries. In most
countries language capability is
required. English teaching
assistantsh for six countries
are also available. No
transpe. tator ar in most
cases, no maintenar ce are
provided for dependents.
Sunday, August 4
Pi Lambda Theta: Initiation &
Reception, 118, 122, 123,
Union, 2 p.m.
Music Department: Opera
Excerpts, Union Aud., 4 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: Movie,
''George Orwell's 1984,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Monday, August 5
Dept, of Education: lecture. Dr.
Marie Hughes, "A Teaching
Model for the
Disadvantaged," Norman Hall
Aud., 4:30 p.m.
Photography: lessons, 118
Union, 7 p.m. Taught by
Nick Arroyo.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Florida Players' production
AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT,
25 cents for students, 75
cents for children and high
school students, $1.50 for
faculty, staff and general
public; Music Dept,
presentation, H. M. S.
PINAFORE, $2.00 per family
(Friday night, August 2,
only), 50 cents for students,
SI.OO for all others;
LAWRENCE FERLIN FERLINGHETTI,
GHETTI, FERLINGHETTI, 75 cents for
students, SI.OO for faculty,
staff, and general public; and
Florida Cinema Society
subscription tickets.

Discrimination Rap

HQM PAGE ONE
UF.
Tens of thousands of dollars
of state resources were expended
to keep the black man out of the
university even after the
Supreme Court had spoken
several times in respect to similar
cases in other states," she said,
and even after the 1954
decision striking down the
separate but equal doctrine."
While Mrs. Oliver noted that
efforts to combat desegregation
had not been actively carried on
by the UF administration, she
also noted that no official higher
than a dean had ever made a
public statement on the
morality and the justice of the
cause of desegregation."
She stressed the alienation
felt by black people toward the
UF for past attitudes and
policies and called for a change
of image.
.. .attitudes and programs
of the UF in the past with
respect to this particular
minority group makes it
necessary that the University
take decisive steps to change its
image in the eyes of this group,
she declared.
The voluntary attendance
proposal calling for an end to
the policy of dropping students
for non-attendance was defeated
by the Conference members 30
to 18, because the conference
did not like the wording.
The proposal will now go
back to the Minimum Conduct
Expectations Task Force and
may appear in- reworked form at
the next Conference meeting
August 7.
The voluntary attendance
proposal, introduced by the
Task Force Minimum Conduct
Expectations, bogged down
early in the debate with disputes
about the proposals wording
and implications,
implications.
Objection to the proposal
ranged from over wordiness to
the fear that the UF would not
be able to keep its moral
obligation" to the Selective
Service, Veterans
Administration, and parents of
freshmen.
Some students even said the
proposal was too weak.
Director of Admissions
Richard Whitehead noted that
under the proposal a student
could spend 10 weeks not
attending classes, yet still be
deferred from the draft or be
receiving educational benefits
from the government.
Dean Franklin Doty urged
that the UF recognize its
responsibility to the parents of
freshmen and vowed to fight any
voluntary attendance proposal
that included the first year
student.
Supporters of the bill scpffed

at the objections as unrealistic.
Ive attended other
institutions that have voluntary
attendance, decared Conference
member Clyde Ellis, and none
of the horribles brought up
here have happened.
Four new proposals were also
introduced and will be debated
and voted on next week.
The first proposal called for
the UF to supply a number of
small buses for use of
non-academic employes in the
out-lying area" to use for bus
pool type transportation to and
from work.
The second proposal called
for freshmen to be given a choice
of either physical education or
ROTC in planning their
, curriculum.
Another proposal called for a
study to be made of the cost,
earlier proposal passed to
establish an Office of
Coordinator of Minority and
Disadvantaged Students.
The last proposal called for
freedom of expression for
student publications within the
limits of the law and for
publications finances to be
controlled by the Board of
Student Publications.
\
Honor Court Meets
There will be a hearing of the
Board of Masters Sunday,
August 4, 1968 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Honor Court Office, Room
364, Reitz Union.
.ViVVAVV.WVAV.'.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.
I
_ t
is
: X
§ I
ji RESULTS? §
J V
: >:
? : : :
I)
S i-j
GATOR |
\ CLASSIFIEDS I


!. 1
1 v



New Sorority
Comes To UF

By KAY USBORNE
Alligator Correspondent
Highlighting fall sorority rush
will be the addition of a new
chapter Pi Beta Phi.
According to Jean Hanna,
immediate past president of
Panhellenic Council, the Pi Phis
will only rush informally in the
fall. During the winter rush, the
Pi Phis plan to formally
colonize. At that time, their
other chapters from Stetson,
Rollins, and FSU will assist
them.
During the fall quarter,

{Afro Look In Hair |
{Symbolic For Blacks)
I Today many young blacks across the country have abandoned f.
the conventional hair straighteners and are proudly wearing their S
ij: hair in the new Afro or natural look. The Afro style is short and §
§ bushy and its name reflects both the black womans identification §
j with her African roots and her acceptance of her hair as it is.
i; Many of the proponents of the Afro look regard it as a>:
| discovery of personal identity -a re-interpretation of the hippies :ji
:j: dictum to do your own thing. Some carry out the total look
: with African-inspired jewelry and clothing for a further
£ identification with Africa as they perceive it. >:
£ Other young Negroes agree that the Afro look symbolizes black
£ identity and pride, but they also believe you dont have to go
£ natural to prove racial awareness. They view the look as just :ji
£ another in thing. §
£ They do, however, perceive the change to Afro as a difficult
£ psychological step in that it involves bucking such strong
£ traditions.. .it takes much more courage to stop straightening your >i
£ hair than it does to wear a mini-skirt or a Bonnie beret.
£ Any new style has its critics, but pro or con, it is generally
£ agreed that the Afro look is a good one partly because it is based $
on a premise that is here to stay theres no reason for a black
fe woman to be ashamed of her own beauty.

V
The Typewriter Is Mightier Than...

. .......... JB* .* jjWtfiX : *9w ;!

graduate student Martha Pettry
will organize all UF Pi Phis in
preparation for the winter rush.
The national organization has
informed the Dean of Womens
office that it plans to rent a
house near campus for
approximately three years. After
the chapter reaches adequate
size, it will move into a house
that is presently in the planning
stapes.
Another sorority, Kappa
Kappa Gamma, was also invited
by Panhellenic. It is still not
known if they will accept.

PHI GAMS GIVE BLOOD
Phi Gamma Delta President Joe Sahl gives blood at J. Hillis Miller
Health Center. The donation is part of the Phi Gam project to supply
a 5-year-old Michigan girl with fresh blood to combat a rare disease.
AGR To Hold
Rush Dinner

By KAY USBORNE
Alligator Correspondent
Alpha Gamma Rho, the
fraternity for agriculture majors,
is holding a rush dinner in
cooperation with the Farm
Bureau on Aug. 6.
Allen Hanchey, AGR
vice-president, describes his
fraternitys rush as the
opportunity to meet boys from
junior college or through 4-H
who are interested in agriculture
as a career.
AGR is a professional-social
organization, said Hanchey. It
is the only fraternity with
professional requirements,
although we do have social
functions as well.
There are about 30 active

brothers and 700 AGR alumni.
According to Hanchey, the
fraternity plans to rush 30-35
boys. The first rush function in
September will be a dance held
.at the AGR house during formal
fraternity rush.
Task Force
Meets Monday
The Action Conference
task force on University
Goals will hold an open
meeting, Monday at 3 p.m.,
Dr. Melvin Fried, chairman of
the task force announced
recently.
The meeting will take place
in room H-611 of the Medical
Center. Anyone may attend.

A Newspaper Means Many Things To Different People.
One Little Old Lady From Memphis Won A Contest By
Listing 417 Different Ways To Use Old Newspapers. You
Know .. .Things Like Swatting Flies, Lining Garbage Pails,
Wrapping Fish, Making Paper Dolls, Etc.
But Newspapers Are So Much More... Or Should Be.
They Should Defend, Extol, Criticize And Just Plain Tell
A Story.
Help The Alligator Be Better Than Best. If You Have
Talent In Writing, Paste-up, Or Advertising, The Summer
Alligator Wants Your Help.

The Florida. Alligator
Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union

Friday, August 2,1968, Thu Florida Alligttar,

Dress Sizes
Can Deceive
. NEW YORK (UPI)- That size
10 dress, like the woman who
wears it, is no longer what it
used to be its bigger.
Dress makers, working on the
theory that flattery goes a long
way with a woman, are sticking
smaller size labels on larger
dresses, reports the Health
Insurance Institute.
The proof is in last years
patterns. While ready-to-wear
sizes went down, pattern sizes
remained the same for many
years, and a woman who
thought she wore a size 10 dress
usually found she had to buy a
size 12 pattern. Now pattern
sizes are following
ready-to-wears small sizes.
As sizes shrank, however,
women continued to grow.
Todays American woman is
bigger and busier than any
generation before her. Average
Miss or Mrs. America 1968 is
five feet four and a half inches
tall, weighs 126 pounds, and
measures Compare
that with her tum-of-the-century
counterpart, a five foot two, 114
pound shortie, with
measurements of 33-3/10-24-36.
Modem women eat better all
their lives than their
grandmothers did, and they take
better care of their figures. But
as dress manufacturers worked
at standardizing sizes for the
new woman, they worked
toward making those sizes
smaller too. As a result, while
eyery day in every way women
grow bigger and bigger, dress
sizes become smaller.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2,1968

irik to be: seen::
August 16, 1968 -* /
IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
*
'' M^ X \)#V yi^ etT ll*
NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!!
SAGLUT with SO MANY PAGES we still haven't attempted to COUNT THEM! Fascinating and Awe-Inspiring c¥§
NEWS of the Day, Illustrated, Illustrated, Illustrated. Illuminating Features All in the English Language to
Arouse the Interest and Inform the Mind. Matters of Monumental Interest to All New Florida Students are
EXPLAINED for the Edification of All. Vital Messages Communicated, Provoking Opinions Given Voice, %L
Stimulating Artwork to Titillate the Intellect and the Sense of Humor, in COLOR, in COLOR, in COLOR!
p THE FALL PREVIEW i? EDITION OF l
I The Florida Alligator |



Ran XvX;£: : xk
fPfr :;: r : x * '2001: A Space Odyssey'

By NEAL SANDERS
Guest Reviewer
Five years ago, Stanley
Kubrick and author-scientist
Arthur C. Garke, backed by ten
million dollars, took to the
northlands of England to begin
the filming of 2001 : A Space
Odyssey.
Technically, the movie is
flawless, and for all purposes was
filmed in space 33 years from
now. Kubrick and Clarke tell of
a time a third of a century from
now. when space travel is as
common as air travel is today.
Our travelling scientist is on his
way to the moon, on board a
space rocket bearing the
logotype of Pan American. His
stops include a space station
with a Hilton Hotel and Howard
Johnson's dining room.
But the plot of the movie is
far more serious than this light
satire on the creeping
at
the
flicks ..
UNION FILMS
COMMITTEE: Divorce Italian
Style Fri.&Sat. 7 & 9:15
CINEMA SOCIETY: 1984
Sun. 7 & 9:15.
GAINESVILLE DRIVE-IN:
The Graduate & The Tiger,
and the Pussycat.
SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN:
Hammerhead & How to Save
a Marriage and Ruin Your
Life.
CENTER: The Odd Couple
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 1:30, 3:30,
5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30 & 9:30.
PLAZA I: Rosemarys
Baby Fri., Sat. & Sun. 2:15,
4:45, 7:15 & 9:40.
PLAZA II: Anzio Fri., Sat.
& Sun. 1:30, 3:35, 5:45, 7:50
& 10:00.
STATE: To Kill A
Mockingbird Fri. & Sat. 7 &
9:20. Becket Sun. 3:20, 6:20
& 9:20.
FLORIDA: Gone with the
Wind Fri., Sat & Sun. 2 & 8.
i

SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE
men women

Men's SOCks mw lengths nationally
Known brands slightly Irregular
were 5i. 75 ... now $.79 3 for 2.25
Suits and Sport Coats
on sale for . % to % Q ff
Walk Shorts
were $5.00 to $6.00 values . now $3.99 to $4.99
Ties
$5.00 to $7.00 regular . now $1.99
Dress and Sport Shirts
$6.00 values. . now 3.49 3 for $lO
Swim Wear
$5.00 to $9.00 values . now $2.99/$4.99

Wi)t Umbersttp ££>fjop
1620 W. University Ave.

commercialism with which the
director diverts the audience. On
the moon, a sentinel has been
found, and it is definitely the
work of an advanced culture. It
is the first evidence that man is
not alone in the universe.
Thus begins the voyage of the
Discovery. Keir Dullea and Gary
Lockwood portray the two
astronauts who guide the vehicle
on its journey. Also aboard are
three additional crew members
placed in suspended animation,
and an intelligent computer
called Hal (short for Hal 9000).
Doubtlessly, this movie will
have several academy awards
deservedly coming its way. The
cinematography and special
effects alone are worth the price
of admission. Kubrick has
offered his audience some deep
commentary on life today and
tomorrow. It is a life in which a
death is noted by the activation
of a life functions terminated
sign, and stewardesses have
found their way onto the
commercial space flights.
The cinerama production is
not showing in Gainesville, due
to facilities. The closest showing
is in Jacksonville, at the Five
Points Theatre on that citys
west side. The movie is worth
the trip. It is an epic production,
and a milestone to the coming of
age of space in dramatic
entertainment.

HE FIXI E S EM FOR A LOT LESS
THAN YOU KNOW WHO... THEY
THINK THATS SORT OF DIRTY.
And besides being a heck Os course, he's fully
of a lot closer, he's factory trained.. .Who
usually a lot faster, too else would you let work
If you want, he'll on your very own bug?
pick your car up and
deliver it when fixed.
(No need to mention he's
equipped for a n vw i I
repair and maintenance.)
_ ^ 5555

YOU MUST SEE THESE VALUES!
Dresses
sl2 to sls values . now $4.99 to $19.99
Suits
$25 to $36 values . now $9.99 to $14.99
Bermudas
were $8 to sl4 . now $3.99 to $7.99
Slacks
regular $9 to sl6 value . now $2.99 to $8.99
Sandals and Loafers
$8 to sl6 regular . now $5.99 to $9.99
Bathing Suits
sl4 $29 values . now $2.99 to $18.99
Shirts and Blouses
regular $4.95 to $7.95 . now $3.99 t 0,54.99
Purses
$3.00 to 524.00 . now $.99 to $14.99

Ferlinghetti Here Tuesday

Lawrence Ferlinghetti,
author, poet, playwright,
publisher, scenarist, and noted
lecturer will be here Tuesday
night at 8 p.m. His performance
will take place in the 2nd floor
Auditorium of Reitz Union.
Lawrence Ferlinghetti was
bom in Yonkers, New York in
1919. He received an A.B.
)
Degree from the University of
North Carolina and an M.A.
from Columbia University. After
Navy service in World War 11, he
emptied waste-baskets at
Time for a while, then lived in
Paris 1947-51, where he received
a Doctorat de lUniversite from
the Sorbonne.
On his return to the United
States he settled in San
Francisco, where he and Peter D.
Martin founded the first
all-paperbound bookstore in the
Country, City Lights. Under its
imprint, Ferlinghetti began
publishing the Pocket Poets
Series which includes work by
William Carlos Williams, Allen
Ginsberg, Kenneth Patchen,
Kenneth Rexroth, Antonin
Artaud, and many exciting new
young writers whom he
discovered.
Ferlinghettis second book of
poems, A Coney Island of the
Mind, which New Directions
published in 1958, may well be
the best selling poetry volume of
our time. It is now going into its
sixteenth printing, with a
quarter million copies in print so
far. A novel, Her, was

published in 1960, and is now in
its seventh printing. Starting
From San Francisco, another
book of poems, came out in
1961, in December, 1963 and
Routings, further ventures
into unconventional,
revolutionary theatre, on
December, 1964 Unfair
Arguments With Existence.
Ferlinghetti has given many
poetry readings both in this
country and abroad, including
the Spoleto Festival, the Berlin
Literary Colloquium, and the
historic poetry evening at the
Royal Albert Hall in London. He
has written Film scripts for
avant-garde productions and
recorded his poetry for the

MV 90 s
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave
Since its never in, its never out.
Each year the new cars come rolling
out with the latest frills.
Wow.
And each year the old Volkswagen
rolls out looking just the same.
Ho hum.
But when the year goes by, new fads
soon outdate the old fads. And the hottest hottestlooking
looking hottestlooking car last year is just that: the hot hottest-looking
test-looking hottest-looking car last year.
But a VW is still just a VW. Not looking
up-to-date, but not looking out-of-date
either. (So youll never have a Has-Been
on your hands when you want to sell it.)
Instead of wasting time making the VW
look better, we spend our time making it
work better.
I y
And this year there are dozens of ways
it works better. (Including one that makes
it work easier: the automatic stick shift.*)
In the end, the choice is yours: pay a
big price fora year of glory.
Or a small price for a VW.
Cf-ticrol Extra Lett you D'ive Without A Clutch Pedal.
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC. SE
4222 NW 13th Street DEALE

Friday, August 2,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Fantasy label. His plays have
been widely produced in college
theatres.
The Union Board Forums
Committee is sponsoring this
event. Tickets are 75 cents for
students and $1 for faculty and
genera] public; and are on sale at
the Union Box Office and will
be available at the door.
GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 50 cents to $ 1.00
KISERS 604 N. MAIN

Page 13



Page 14

t, Thi Ftorkfc Alligrtor, Friday, August 2,1968

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Something happens at sunset
at UF. The hectic, helter-skelter,
to class-to lunch-to class pace
slows perceptively.
Classrooms are forgotten and
books are pushed aside for a
game of tennis or for a call on a
girl from Yulee Hall.
In the Plaza of the Americas,
where by day students
congregate in the sun, is empty
and ghostly in the unnatural
light cast by street lights.
But even at night, work goes
on. Some unlucky students have
night classes. And some offices,
like the NASA building which
houses the computing center, are
open for business 24 hours a
day.
This is the campus at night
the blackness of evening pierced
by bright lights as the gathering
and utilization of knowledge
goes on.
Photos By
Nick Arroyo

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dept Purple PllimS 10 for 39* FfW| ES ISI Marinated Artichokes 39* UJLJ" .jToT a 5, b lllllM^GreenStampsn
f MeaUH a..-,, Potatoes 49*
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Deodorant 49* Collect Royolton's jMpMM|funnnnfrr rnnass*
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Jr" 01 11 hmll * I pim. i /A 125 SW 34th St.
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1 Remover s t w, ott*. sau, oreu.mwiei'> Si Funny Face 1 ; Swift's Franks a
I 3-* 11 ligTifgL. II 5 rog. pkp. 49 I 1-lh- pkg. |
VflTi'u.Si me, J iim.immM.sM ft*- il uam,. ams.a. ] **~ * *~* *mm
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Friday, August 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 2, 1968

Page 16

Craig Curry: Talent
But No Scholarship

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Craig Curry is easily the most
talked about quarterback in high
school circles today. His
college-hopping experiences of
the past few months have finally
ended, and he is settling back for
his final appearance in the high
school all-star game tomorrow.
There werent too many
colleges in the country that
didnt come knocking at Currys
door. The Coral Gables
quarterback did more travelling
between September and
December than he had ever
covered before in his life.
Meanwhile, his skill engineered
Coral Gables High School to a
state championship and a
co-championship on the national
level.
fS|H 111 Ifck
mm 11

CRAIG CURRY
When Curry announced his
intention to go to Miami, the
other colleges dropped their
wining and dining, and Curry sat
back to wait on an acceptance.
Things didnt work out quite
the way they were supposed to,
however. Currys Senior
Placement Test score was below
the Miami acceptance level, and
UM Coach Charlie Tate started
talking about having Curry take
the Scholastic Aptitude lest.
From there, it was a matter
of pride. Curry came out of

WEEKEND SPECIAL
ALL 45 SINGLES
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ONLY
** fctcvtd 3a*
\
376-1042 823 W. UNIV. AVE

Gables with a fair average, and
the school doesnt hand out
grades to anyone; not even
quarterbacks. Curry announced
that he was no longer Miamis
possession, and a new chase was
on.
Now, however, it was Curry
looking for a college. He finally
found one Minnesota. The
college offered Curry a
scholarship, but only after the
successful completion of his
freshman year. Also, Curry
would have to take the
American College Test, a
requirement of all entering
students.
Curry agreed, and turned his
back on the UM scholarship. His
only aid during his first year at
Minnesota will be a campus job.
Curry will be doing construction
work at the university.
Curry said he had no hard
feelings against Tate, but felt
that Miami just wasnt ready to
accept him on his own merits.
Coach Tate gave a story to
the papers that hinted that I was
afraid to take the SAT, said
Curry, but I dont think that
anything could be further from
the truth. I have to prove myself
to Minnesota, and the only way
I can do it is to take the ACT
exams. Im taking them next
Friday.
Curry has followed the Sports
Illustrated series on the black
athlete, and said that most of
the information it contained was
new to him.
Os course, at Gables, he
said, the Negro was a very small
percentage of the student body,
but I dont feel that there was
any real hostility between ethnic
groups within the school. As for
my own college life, I want to
make it or lose it on my own
skill, and that means both
mental and physical.
The All-Star football and
basketball games will both be
held tomorrow. The basketball
game begins at 4 p.m. in Florida
Gym, and the football game is at
Florida Field at 7:45.

we core |IfI|SIMWJVIRPi
V jP SUPER RIGHT FULLY COOKED DELICIOUS
HAM
1J59-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG SHANK PORTION Lb. 49<
Two Convenient Locations WHOLE OR BUTT Lb. 55<
fi30 S N W E. 2 i 6 Tv'e. CENTER SLICED Lb. 99<

SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
BEEF CHUCK ROAST BONE IN Lb 48C
SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
FULL CUT CHUCK STEAK Lb. 58<
SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
BONELESS SHOULDER ROAST Lb. 88C
SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
CUBED CHUCK STEAK Lb. 88<

ijlMSniL OF CTGWNsh
I DRINKS i4 q o 2 3 / 89c j |
9 MRS. FILBERTS GOLDEN / W
OLEO lIT " 29c 1
I GRAPE JUICE 2/69c |H
V SULTANA SANDWICH SI
f SPREAD qt. 49c ( ]
B SULTANA STRAWBERRY 1J
H PRESERVES 2* Lb. 89c ll
I BATH TISSUE 4s 2/69c(l
m BATH TISSUE 10 SEA 79 C I
V DINNER NAPKINS EACH 35c!

j MARVEL j FAB | | CRISCO \
I ICE J InFTFPrcMTi I cooking!
I CREAM I IDETERGENTI I O L 4
1 % 9*l I 1 KING SIZE I I IQt 16 02 f
\ 59({ J \, 89$ J \ x 69C J
| JANE PARKER 7
I APPLE J
V PIES 4
I BUY 2 GETI FREE I
\?£r- 3/98<

*- FIRST-DAF
FIRM RIPE
PEACHES 4Lb 49*
SWEET CAUFORNIA
NECTARINES 3Lb.$l.OC
WHITE SEEDLESS
GRAPES 3 Lb. SI.OO
RIPE CALIFORNIA
PLUMS 3 Lb. SI.OO
FIRM GOLDEN
BANANAS 2 Lb. 29*
POTATOES Loose 59*
FRESH CRISP
LETTUCE HEAD 23*
FRESH GREEN
CABBAGE Lb. 8*
1