Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 90s
Low In The 70s

Vol. 60. No. 165

SmfS? ffbjSjJlt
%w : -; HI % 1 1 ij>[ y, 1 I,
A* k i x M
x;
w* W*kaL. \ I^'.s\X
&SiaiMM|sgM 11 #
THEIR OWN HISTORY
Plans are under way at UF to start a course of Negro-Americar
history. See Page Two for the Story.
UF Minimum Pay
Pushed To $1.50

Personnel director R. A.
Button announced Monday that
starting Thursday 1,800 UF
employees in 68 different
classifications will receive no less
than $ 1.50 an hour.
This will directly involve all
UF personnel who are currently
listed in the first six grade levels.
UF is still 10 cents below the
minimum wage as set by federal
government under the Fan-
Labor Standards Act of 1966.
Under the provisions of that law,
UF has until 1971 to bring its
minimum wage in line with
federal requirements.
Contrary to what the public
thinks, Button said, we
werent given any money to
accomplish this. Were going to
have to somehow come up with
half a million dollars.
Button said the personnel
office is currently examining the
state univerity system to see if
there are some reserve funds
which would help bear the brunt

Disillusioned Todd Blasts Election Laws

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Editor
Dr. Eugene Todd, disillusioned and a
little bitter, has given up his fight for a
special run-off election between himself

{k
Tooe

months against what he calls antiquated
election laws and inept election machinery
to regain a chance at the school board seat.
Todds second appeal for a special
run-off election between himself and
Enneking, who won the May 28 run-off for
the Democratic candicacy for the District
Three School Board seat, was denied
Friday by Circuit Judge John A. H.
Murphree.
Todd is chairman of the UF College of
Educations Department of Secondary

and Dr. William
Enneking for the
Democratic candidacy
to the Alachua County
District Three School
Board seat.
Todd, one of four
UF professors seeking
the District Three seat,
fought futilely for two

The
Florida Alligator

of the new expense.
If that fails, Button said,
were going to have to increase
our lapse factor. That is, were
going to have to gain money by
not filling those positions and
vacancies that we had intended
to.
The new pay increase will
take effect Thursday for
monthly paid personnel and
Saturday for bi-weekly people.
The new appointment rates
not only brought the minimum
up to $1.50, but many within
the six grade levels affected will
also receive raises
proportionally.
Anytime you raise pay at
the bottom, Button said, you
create inequities at all levels
affected.
The new pay raise brings the
UF into line with the job
competitive level in Gainesville.
Prior to the Fair Labor
Standards Act the UF had a
$1.15 minimum wage.

Education. Enneking teaches surgery at the
UF College of Medicine. Hal Ingman, who
defeated Todd for second place by a
meager two vote margin, is an assistant
professor of mechanical engineering.
The Republican candidate for the
district three seat is Dr. Robert Cade, the
inventor of Gatorade.
Todds fight has brought state-wide
attention down upon Alachua Countys
government. Governor Claude Kirk, who
was petitioned by Todd to intervene, is
said to be considering ordering a special
election.
The governor is apparently Todds last
hope, he and county officials believe. Todd
said in a prepared statement that he has
run out of money and hope.
I can no longer continue to guarantee
the payment of legal expenses when 1 can
only foresee a bottomless pit of county
opposition. I do not have unlimited access
to tax funds to pay my legal casts as the
county has to pay Mr. (Wayne) Carlisles
(county attorney) fees.
I now realize, Todd continued, that
an individual citizen cannot take on the
county commission and its employes by

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Five Proposals Tops
On 'ActionAgenda

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
The Action Conference will
debate and vote on five
proposals, which were submitted
at the last meeting, at 2:30
Wednesday afternoon in the
Union Auditorium.
The first proposal is for
voluntary class attendance; the
other four aim at improving
relations with the disadvantaged
and minority group student. If
endorsed by the Conference on
Wednesday, the proposals will be
sent to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell as recommendations.
The voluntary class
attendance proposal calls for an
end to the policy of mandatory
attendance and the dropping
from courses with the grade of
EW of students who have
absences over a set number. This
proposal was introduced by the
Minimum Conduct Expectations
Task Force.
The other four proposals
were introduced by the Task
Force on the Universitys
Responsibility to Minorities and
Disadvantaged Groups.
The Minority Groups Task
Force also plans to present a
history of segregation at the UF
from 1949 till today.
This History steps very
much on the toes of a lot of
faculty and administrators that
are still around, explained Task
Force member Ed Tolle, and
they wont like it.
One proposal requests that
OConnell create an Office of
Coordination of Minorities and
Disadvantaged Students as soon
as possible.
This office would provide for

himself when they are committed to
vigorous opposition.
Apparently an average citizen seeking
political office needs to hire an attorney in
order to ensure that the infinite legalities
are observed, Todd said.
Todd lost out in a three-way race
between himself, Enneking, and Hal
Ingman in the May 7 Democratic primary.
Enneking polled 42 per cent of the vote,
while Todd and Ingman each polled 34 per
cent each. Ingman received two votes more
than Todd.
Then on May 21 a week before the
Ingman-Enneking run-off, the Alachua
County Elections Supervisor, Mrs. Alma
Bethea, discovered 95 misplaced ballots.
Todd had actually beaten Ingman for
second place and for a place in the run-off.
But Todd has not been able to gain a
chance at the Democratic candidacy.
Friday Circuit Judge John A. H. Mur Murphree
phree Murphree denied Todds second appeal for a
special run-off.
Not until May 27, the day before the
Ingman-Enneking run-off did Todd file
suit, Murphree noted. And then the suit
was only that the new found votes be

recruitment, remedial education,
and personal, tutorial, and
economic assistance of minority
students.
A study of University housing
in regard to black students
being placed in single or double
rooms alone when this was not
requested, is also proposed.
A strong recommendation
asks the Alligator to refuse
advertisements for apartments
whose owners arent listed with
Off-Campus Housing because of
their discriminatory practices
to some students.
And a resolution calling for
the UF to openly declare its

Action Conference

Proposals At A Glance

The Action Conference will vote on five
proposals Wednesday:
Voluntary class attendance so that students
may not be dropped from a course for
non-attendance. /
Creation of an administrative post to
coordinate recruitment, remedial education and
personal and economic assistance for
disadvantaged and minority groups.
Study of university housing procedures of
placing black students in rooms by themselves
when they have not requested it.
Recommendation that the Alligator refuse
to accept advertisements from off-campus
apartment units which are not listed with the
Off-Campus Housing Office because of then thenfailure
failure thenfailure to comply with federal open housing
laws.
Efforts by the university to strongly
condemn discrimination and actively seek
qualified Negro students.

The resolution asks the
University to pledge itself to
supporting minority groups on
campus and off in their right to
a fair share in University life" as
UF students.
Pete Zinober, chairman of the
Minimum Conduct Expectations
Task Force, feels confident of
the voluntary class attendance
proposal passing.
I think its something that
has been long overdue," he
declared.
intentions ot non-discrimination
and to positively seek to admit
qualified black students is also
among the proposals.

counted. The Ingman-Enneking run-off
which Todd should have been in came

and went. Not
until June 6, did Todd
sue for a new run-off,
Murphree noted.
Murphree cited two
Florida statutes setting
time limits for election
protests which he said
Todd failed to meet.
One was for 10 days

after the elections; the other was for five.
The county elections office did not
inform Todd of the miscount until well
past the official deadline. Todd could not
have complied with them.
Todd chided the County government
for waiting two days after finding the
uncounted votes before telling him.
Had the officials not been so slow in
telling him, he might have been able tb get
his name on the May 28 run-off, Todd said.
As it was they told him at a Wednesday
May 22 meeting. It took him until Friday
to hire a lawyer and it was noon Monday,
May 27, before his lawyer could file suit. It
was too late to stop the election
machinery.

Inside
New Director
Os UF Libraries
See Page Two

Tuesday July 30, 1968

... decides
ZINOBER
. recommended
proposal

CAD.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 30, 1968

Black History
To Debut At UF
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Correspondent
A special black American history course will make its debut at UF
next spring and plans are in the mill to make it a regular by 1969.
G. Selden Henry, assistant professor of history, is slated to teach
HY 599, the initial course concentrating on Negro history.
Henry, who teaches two courses dealing with black history, said the
course was still in the formative stage and he hasnt decided what
factors to focus on yet.
Dr. John K. Mahon, head of the history department, said it was
possible that a course would be added in 1969 on Negro history, but
we cant teach a course as such unless its listed in the catalog.
Mahon said there is usually a one year lag between the time a new
course is submitted to committee and the time it is actually offered to
students. The department committee which must approve new courses
meets next fall.
I think my own particular area of knowledge is mid-19th
century, Henry said. But I think that we would want to go back
and look at certain African backgrounds, the origin and nature of
slavery, the Negro and the Revolution, etc.
The major problem Henry has encountered is in relating the course
to contemporary Black American history.
To what extent can we take it into the 20th century? he asked.
Can we take it up to the 1954 Supreme Court decision and stop?
To solve this problem Henry will attend a summer workshop at
Duke University, August 18-24. This workshop is designed to aid
college teachers of new courses in Black American history.
He said he hasnt received any pressure from either individuals or
groups to start such a course. If there was pressure, I havent felt it.
'Pot' Suspect
Out On Bond
By MARGARET O'BRIEN
Alligator Copy Editor
UF graduate student Edward James Fine, 7ED, is out of jail on
$ 1,000 bond after his arrest last week iri Hawthorne by the Alachua
County Sheriffs vice investigation unit on a charge of possession of
marijuana.
Fine and Richard Lee Donald of Hawthorne were arrested after a
search done with a warrant of the rented house they were sharing
revealed marijuana growing in the yard and present in the house,
according to Capt. Ron Stanley of the sheriffs office.
Fine is not related to former UF student Robert M. Fine who was
arrested in Gainesville on similar chaiges in June and faces trial in
September.
Fine was arrested at the time of the search. Donald, according to
his attorney Gerald Schackow, turned himself in several days later to
the sheriff after learning of a warrant for his arrest.
Both men intend to enter pleas of innocent in their upcoming
arraignment before the Alachua County Circuit Court. A trial date has
not been set.
lleilllllr BR:NG coupon jsihibibibihi
B COUPON i
! SPECIAL! I
s complete FRIDAY ONLY i
jSHRIMP 00 i
IDINNER 99
a i
a (REG. $1.35) |
1 Kstitudcu Tried (Jkiiken I
| Mmw m. w P nnwnim n uiun iumk
North Qjwim Hospitality Did... a
i 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
* 2 Loea,lons ||4 nw 34tn St. 372-3649
Snaif gsaian bring coupo niiwibibwW
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is pstdlshod five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
mi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32801. The Alligator s entered
seoind da matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 22801.
Subscription rate is 914.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements aad to re vine or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
IBs Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice 1* given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Managhr within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ran several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Phi Gams
Give Blood
A Five-year-old girl in
Pontiac. Mich., suffering from
a rare blood disease called
plastid anemia, is being kept
alive by transfusion of 50
pints of whole blood each
week.
And the brothers of Plii
Gamma Delta fraternity at
the UF are helping provide
the massive amounts of blood
the little girl, Sally
Harrington, needs.
Doctors, who believe a
cure for the youngsters
condition is in sight, began
administering blood
transfusions to her daily last
fall.
Pontiacs Junior Chamber
of Commerce has collected
more than 300 pints for the
child, but the Harringtons are
still about 700 pints of blood
in debt.
Phi Gam President Joe
Sahl learned of the familys
problem and began organizing
a statewide drive among the
organizations graduate
chapters.

C VOUSVAOEN or AMERICA. INC.
V
I ".v'.'"';::
* >:
Have you been mistaking it
for a station wagon?

This seems to be the standard first im impression
pression impression of our anything-but-standard
Squareback Sedan.
People just don't expect to see a
sedan running around with a small steamer
trunk and 6 suitcases inside.
Or a stack of water skis. Or 4 passen passengers
gers passengers anti 2 TV consoles.
It's more the sort of thing theyd expect
of a station wagon.
Which of course fits in perfectly with
our plan.
We designed the Squareback for
people who sometimes wish they had a




MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC. @
Mmwan
4222 NW 13th Street

Harrer Named Head
Os UF Libraries

Dr. Gustave A- Harrer is
joining UF trom Boston
University where he is presently
Director of Libraries and
Museums. He will assume his
duties here on August 1.
After receiving his Pli.D. in
Germanic Languages at the
University of North Carolina in
1953, Harrer studied at the
University of Illinois, where he
received an M.S. in Library
Science.
He has held teaching and staff
positions at Millsaps College in
Jackson, Miss., the University of
Tennessee, and Stanford
University.
Harrer. will fill the
directorship of UF libraries
which was originally vacated by
the retirement of Stanley L.
West last summer.
West will become Director of
Libraries at the University of
Hawaii on August 1. He has held
a faculty position there since his
departure from the UF.
Dr. Margaret Goggin, who
was acting director of libraries
here until early this summer, left
the UF to become Dean of the
School of Library Science at the

station wagon. Just by squaring off the
part that goes to waste in most sedans.
What we got was over 40 cubic feet
of storage space withuthe back seat
folded down. Twice as much as conven conventional
tional conventional sedans.
Not to mention the unconventional
space up front. In the trunk. (The engine
is where any respectable VW engine
should be. In back. Underneath it all.)
So after you finish sliding your dozen
valises into the back and a couple more
into the front, just keep repeating:
"If sa sedan. If sa sedan. If sa sedan..

University of
Denver.
As U F
Director of
Libraries, Harrer
will be respon responsible
sible responsible for the
overall adminis administration
tration administration of the
university's 1.2
million volume
library system.

million volume library system.
A native of Chapel Hill, N.C.,
Harrer is 47 years old. He is
married and has two sons and
two daughters." His main
leisure-time interests are
woodworking, sailing and music.
Sales & Service
Typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Main 376-5551

WEST



M I & m I
V JB .. J? Ni jff JBt/
a 8 ,;#M
f isl m m rngm^^mmsm
'^j^^^pj^^pupp^^ppppppip^pp

UF Scribes Learn
On St. Pete Times
These 11 UF journalism seniors and their instructor are taking a
full load of courses while working for the St. Petersburg Times and
Evening Independent.
They are, left to right, top row, Bob Padecky, Jeff Alford, Virginia
Dillin Hallgren, Mike Abrams, Mike Marzella, John Wolfe, Jerry
Silberberg and Roy Mays. Bottom row, James Baggett, Diane Mims,
Prof. Hugh Cunningham, and Steve Bosch.
Actually, they are taking the same courses they would be taking on
campus. The St. Petersburg paper is providing classrooms, teaching
resources and practice.
The students work on the regular staffs of the Times and Evening
Independent two days a week, attend classes and seminars and spend
one day on management training tours.
For this they receive 15 hours credit five hours in applied
journalism; five hours in public opinion and editorial writing and five
hours in senior seminar.
This is the first time the senior block of courses has ever been
offered off-campus, Cunningham said. As far as we know its the
first time any program similar to this has been offered by a journalism
school in connection with a newspaper.
The experimental program is being underwritten by the Poynter
Fund, named in honor of the long-time publisher of the Times and
father of the present editor-publisher, Nelson Poynter.
The Fund pays the salary of the instructor, underwrites all
expenses of the course, gives each student a $250 scholarship and pays
each student for work he has published. Students provide their own
living quarters.

The Typewriter Is Mightier Than...
One
K- Listing 417 Different Ways To Use Old Newspapers. You
Know . .Things Like Swatting Flies, Lining Garbage Pails,
Wrapping Paper Dolls,
aj^i But Newspapers Are So Much More ... Or Should Be.
I if They Should Defend, Extol, Criticize And Just Plain Tell
Mm A story.
I Help The AlUgator Be Better Than Best. If You Have
I Talent In Writing, Paste-up, Or Advertising, The Summer
[V Alligator Wants Your Help.
bbbbhbbbbhiii^^^v
a


The Florida. Alligator
Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union
- * I ii_ ~ - '*

At your
newsstand
NOW
JOAN BAEZ
plus
A LARGER ROLE
FOR THE SMALL COLLEGE
Among other things the presi president
dent president of Sarah Lawrence says,
good-bye to dormitory living.
THE NEW RACIALISM
by Daniel P. Moynihan
Who gets hurt by the quota system?

FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Briefings Ready

Several hundred college
students who will transfer to UF
this fall were invited to attend
orientation sessions on the
campus this week.
Students will receive
individual counseling concerning
their schedules for the fall and
will meet with representatives
from the Office of Student
Affairs.

*T£N£TH SHIRT POCKET
PORTABLE RADIO
from
I COUCHS
Compact, powerful shirt shirtpocket
pocket shirtpocket radio travels "out of
sight", plays up to 75 hours
on 2 penlite batteries. Comes
with earphone attachment,
batteries and gift box.
BEST YEAR
YET TO GIVE
V J THE BEST
095
W
COUCH LOW PRICE
BE PREPARED FOR THE
HURRICANE SEASON WITH
A DEPENDABLE ZENITH RADIO
COUCHS $T
YOUR ZENITH DEALER SINCE 1933

Tuesday, July 30,1968, The Florida Alligator,

A pilot program to acquaint
transfer students with the
campus was conducted last year
with about 550 students
participating.
Following the orientation, a
questionnaire was sent to, 100
students to determine the effect
of the program. The respondents
unanimously agreed that the
program should be continued.

Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Julv 30, 1968

r 1 r ~ .. *' y .-.
I i* iT(i3P*iffirrf9 * 4. a .
if&Wt .; "*X ** .iff i.M : WL \. *
%£, > v Miir
. *" T** * I
.#
Tv' ; T -7
** : > |pjPW|P^
;i : .j| 9
Miy
I.
* ? ,;\ _v -^-C*'\- : ,. I ;*v/;- I -fV: -v* *. *V 9l H I B !*

TO SLEEP. PERHAPS TO DREAM ...
... now a subject of psychological studies.
UF Awarded $285,000 Grant
To Study Mental Disorders

By KAY USBORNE
Alligator Correspondent
A $285,000 grant recently
awarded to the University of
Florida by the National Institute
of Mental Health will be used to
study psychiatric disorders
caused by sleep disturbances.
According to Dr. Ismet
Karacan, one of the
co-investigators, such sleep
disturbances as insomnia and
dreams will be studied to
discover their emotional and
physiological effects. It is hoped,
he said, that the knowledge
gained will be of predictable
value for future illness.
Sleep research has been
conducted by the university for
the last six years. It was on the
basis of this research and plans
for further study that the grant
was awarded.
The recording and analyzing
of sleep processes has been of
value in the predictions of
nervous breakdowns,
commented Dr. Karacan. It is
because of these findings that we
are investigating the possible

TUESDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
T-BONE STEAK
14 $2.50
17 $2.95
Served With
I* BAKED POTATO
CHOPPED SALAD
ROLLS & BUTTER
FREE
BOWL OF SOUP
WONDER
house:
14 S.W. IST STREET
LOOK FOR 99C SPECIAL MON-FRIDAY

causing of nervous breakdowns
by sleep disturbances.
Usually used as subjects for
the research are a group of
patients already sick and a
n on-sick control population.
Comparisons between the sleep
patterns of the two groups are
based on dream analyzation,
response to stimulus and the
effects of medicine.
Common measurements are
temperature, pulse, and muscle
tension. Different reactions are
recorded for response to stress
given before sleeping and
stimulation invoked while
sleeping.
Dreams are analyzed for
content, length and number.
Students and other subjects are
awakened and asked what they
are dreaming. Tape recordings of
their answers are later studied
for normal or abnormal sleep
processes.
Another form of study
involves the patient who is
predicted to have a nervous
breakdown. Experiments are
then conducted in conjunction
with this prediction.

Often we can use the
analysis preventively, said Dr.
Karacan, for the observations
are made under controlled
conditions and therefore, are of
significant value.
Dr. Robert L. Williams,
chairman of the Department of
Psychiatry in the College of
Medicine and Dr. Wilse B. Webb,
chairman of the Department of
Psychology in the College of
Arts and Sciences, along with
Dr. Karacan, associate professor
in the Department of Psychiatry,
are the principal investigators.

WHAT SHAPE IS
YOUR WORLD IN?
If Youre Not Satisfied
RESHAPE IT WITH
ROCKY
The Republican Convention
in Miami is the first hurdle.
YOU CAN HELP
Contact Rockefeller Volunteer
Headquarters at Antoines Ice Cream Shoppe.
Univ. Ave., across from Murphree Area
(paid political advertisement)

Rocky Seeks
Convention Aid

By JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondent
Gainesville supporters of Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller are
climaxing their efforts on behalf
of the New York chief executive
with a drive to enlist volunteer
Rocky workers for next weeks
Republican National Convention
in Miami Beach.
Moves designed to enhance
Rockefellers chances for the
Republican presidential
nomination include an effort to
have one worker with each
convention delegate at Miami
Beach.
Workers will stay with the
delegates at all times and serve as
their aides in an attempt to win
them over to the Rockefeller
camp.
For the past several
weekends, Rockefeller
volunteers have been at the
various Gainesville shopping
areas seeking signatures on
Rockefeller-for-President
petitions.

QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49< SPECIALS X
SERVICE -- NO TIPPING T
ERIA 1 313 W. UNIV. AVE^I
11:15 am 2 pm
4:30 pm 8 pm

According to Barbara M.
Dauber, 4ED, chairman of the
Rocky Girls, the group has
found much more support than
anticipated.
Weve found that while Gov.
Rockefeller is the first choice of
many people, he is the second
choice of the majority, whoever
their first choice may be, said
Miss Dauber.
A 21-year-old registered
Democrat, Miss Dauber views
Rockefeller's support as
evidence of much less anti-
feeling against the New York
governor than against any of the
other presidential canditates.
GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 5O cents to $ 1.00
KISERS 604 N. MAIN



/ \ dirndl skirt of burnt orange J \
X \ and ton, coordinated with / \
/ f j shirt by Lady Van I f \
| sleeveless dress with stovepipe 1
I P! neck, empire self belted waist, 1
wide gold buckle, in flam- 1
1 ing fire engine red. Its a cool 1
1 ,; v 4 I wool knit. Modeled by Susan. 1 I
B m ||| m
m WHftW M M
blend is available in sizes 5-13.

Tuesday, July 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

Alligator, Tuesday, July 30, 1968

P(MktJu/l/
m
ACC
Auicmkm

Information Needed

One of this campus real needs has been
exposed by the Action Conference.
Everyone -- faculty, students and
administrators agreed that a great
communication vacuum exists.
The conference recognized that need by
endorsing the idea of a second newspaper. It
was saying that additional means must be
found for information about faculty,
students and administrators to be
transmitted to all members of the UF
community.
The conference itself is an illustration of
how myths and bogeymen disappear when
meaningful communication begins. Already
it appears that some form of voluntary class
attendance and an administrative post to aid
minority groups will be endorsed by the
conference. And much more is likely to
come out of it.
But when the conference is over, the
communication needs will still be there.
At present, the UF relies upon the
Alligator, the professional daily press and
local radio and television stations to fill its
communications needs.
Because it is the only daily publication
that reaches the entire UF community, the
Alligator receives the brunt of the burden. It
is expected to fill the major communications
needs within the community.
No newspaper can fulfill its function
unaided, and the Alligator is no exception.
In fact, its small student staff is naturally
more impeded than its full-time

r EDITORIAL 1

f yjff
1 wEfk* -v^Sj n3L
CiagglSjMr'

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
A 'ews Editor

counterparts.
The Alligator has always depended upon
the UFs Information Services for assistance
in covering campus news.
Lynchs office makes an attempt to do
this now, through the Orange and Blue
Bulletin. But a simple list of official notices
is not enough. What is needed is a constant
flow of news releases, features, and
announcements to help the local news media
cover the campus better.
What is needed is a Student Information
Service, manned by part-time student
journalists and maintained by Student
Government as a non-partisan news service
for all student activities.
It could help close the communications
gap.
But the four offices of Information
Services the central news office, health
center relations office, the Agricultural
Extension Services editorial office, and the
sports publicity department are geared for
supplying the needs of the state press not
the intra-campus needs of the UF.
The UF needs an information office
designed for feeding the needs of its own
community. It needs an office to supply
news about scholarship and registration
deadlines, about deadlines for getting
football tickets, about the myriad of student
activities.
The Alligator, and any other news media,
cannot hope to fill all the communications
needs of this community. And it cannot even
begin to do so with any thoroughness
without help.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

b!blilj_ Merry-Go-Round
No Conspiracy
Drew Pearsonss,=Jack Andersors
WASHINGTON It now looks as if the FBI has exploded the
generally prevalent theory that the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King
involved a conspiracy.
The conspiracy theory has long been held, as a result of the large
amounts of money spent by James Earl Ray, the suspected killer, and
the manner in which he was able to travel around the United States,
Canada, and Europe.
It was believed his operations would have been impossible without
help from other conspirators who were out to murder King.
For instance, Ray rented a safe deposit box in the Birmingham

Trust National Bank, August 30 of last year, and
suddenly began passing out crisp S2O bills. He paid
$499 for dancing lessons. He also paid $395 for
mail-order photographic equipment that he didn't
know how to operate.
His white Mustang cost $1,995, which he paid for
in cash. He drove it from Mexico to Montreal, from
Los Angeles to New Orleans, and always seemed to:
have enough cash.
All told, Ray spent an estimated SIO,OOO in seven

months. Yet during this time he never held a job. After the King
murder, the suspect went to Canada and then to England where he
also seemed to be in the dough.
So the big question was: Where did he get the money?
For a long time the FBI toyed with the possibility that Ray was
financed by a white supremacy ring. He had boasted to fellow
prisoners that he intended to make a big score on the outside and
that he might try to collect a rumored $1 million bounty that a
business group supposedly had offered for the death of Dr. King.
Now, however, the FBI has found a robbery where Ray probably

got his money. On July 13 the Bank of Alton, in
Upper Alton, 111., was robbed of $22,000. Alton is
across the Mississippi River from Missouri, and it was
from the Missouri State Penitentiary that Ray'
escaped on April 23, 1967, three months before the
July 13 robbery in Alton.
The holdup was pulled off by two robbers who
wore stocking masks. Their faces could not be
identified. However, the FBI has been checking very
carefully, and one of the robbers answers the

description of James Earl Ray. He had the same long hair, the same
height and the same physical makeup.
At first the FBI was inclined to be skeptical. However, rechecking
the Alton bank robbery has convinced them that Ray was involved
and that this was where he got the money on which he lived so
extravagantly prior to the King murder.
The idea that a group conspired to murder King and paid Ray to
do it has now been dropped.
Note 1: The FBI has also traced a British baiik robbery to Ray
from which he got more money. Note 2: Arthur J. Hanes, the
American lawyer who turned up in London to defend Ray has been
connected with various other cases involving racial violence.
He was the attorney defending the Ku Klux Klansmen in the Viola
Liuzzo case, has a flair for publicity and its believed he went to
London on his own. There is no evidence that he is being paid by
conspirators.

PEARSONi

ANDERSON



* Kly
taken polliTp iMwt ihre/nam
Sfc elcctioj
_e*!UL;tly \* h^
in\ thl oulcoiV \ V >llc V
5 ye\l% fell Wiy yr.Thc JBcntf vu*ed Ik
-uwedyfluinde witVallO
cae B w //' th ,ht a
McmfcK ieclUie it gASk #< 1
xaranbt <1 a bandwagon^Jy Subsidiary I
tor s pe3le refused to by irl
, e embkiled in the ft polling place \
T H C ,TZ I T* o b-K co :er\
i'eJtons i Mve .hen-, a 1 *.A
fa' t,ve b IZL
than jJFun R wm
?rs.t |A\
1 summ A
- f
appeal 10 wmbers and
r system Registratior
thority fr m. in the *rT^
x Cour *ool parkin; \ / \
i a O driver's met \ l \ fw,^
i occasio e first car wi \ f\ \ n
ctud I To obt. 11 \\ U^ff'yr '*
ely thr* formation cal. I / \\
You, Sir, Make Us Sound Hostile. /J

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Amerika ber Alles: A New Anthem

MR. EDITOR:
1968. Say the secret phrase and divide the United States
electorate, whats that you say, George? Law and order? Thats it!
Folks, George has come up with the secret phrase.
1968. Simple, isnt it. Law and order. Three words, four syllables.
Anyone with an IQ over 30 can remember it. And vote.
1968. Everyone is on the law and order kick now. Who cares what
the ramifications of its unswerving implementation will be. Listen.
Theres a rumor that our national anthem is being changed to
Amerika ber Alles.
1968. Law and order is better than Communism since the two are
at opposite poles. Ask Strom. Hell tell you the same thing. After all,
Abe Fortas is Jewish.
1968. Call your neighbor a Communist today. That is, call him one
before he can call you one. That way you will have the upper hand in
declaring your purity of patriotism.
1968. If someone tells you that Communism and Americanism
differ in essence, not in economic philosophy, but in philosophy

Korean Orphanage: Woeful Plight

\iR. EDITOR:
The people love peace and
liberty and enjoy those to the
full. All of them are so diligent,
honest and sympathetic for the
poor. Nothing is cruel and
miserable there. This is the
country, America, in my dream
from my childhood.
Now I as an adult, know well
that your nation does the very
best as the leader of the world.
And I have been feeling very
close to you.
And yet I am going to write
this appealing letter tor your

THEY MAY BECOME THIEVES ... If their school doses.

OPEN FORUM:
Aitiiaimi
There is no hope for the complacent man.

help. I keenly feel it is very
shameless a deed but I can not
help appealing to save my
children. I do hope you would
be kind enough to read of my
work though you are busy.
I am a woman who runs a
tiny vocational school and now I
am in a woeful plight. There is a
danger of closing the school and
I can hardly sleep at night
with my bitter anxiety that they
would run away to be beggars or
thieves on the streets again.
I used up all my personal
fund to build the present two
rooms and run the school until

Special Session

Nothing In Your Laps

I spoke vyith Dr. Marshall
Jones a couple of weeks ago, and
even though he sounded happy
being away from Gainesville
after a five-year stay here, he
still expressed quite a bit of
concern for the university.
Its all up to the students,
now, he said in reference to the
point he made that there was
very much wrong with the way
things are run here, and that
someone would have to do
something about it.
I can only feel for Dr. Jones,
for he is a dedicated person
whether his philosophy be right
or wrong, who is leaving the
work that took five years of his
life in the laps of a group of
students and teachers who really
couldnt give a damn what
happens to Marshall Jones, what
happens to the UF, and actually,
what happens to anyone but

concerning individual rights, that the two philosophies are not related,
and that candidates such as George are close to Communism in their
mutual ignorance of justice, hit Thats the American way to
disagree with someone when you feel he might be right, and you just
cant cope with the truth. George would be proud of you.
1968. Ask your neighbor the origins of his family nanpe. If he
answers you, but his answer doesnt jive with your preconceived
notion, bum a cross in his front yard. If he cant answer you, lynch
him. Robert would be proud.
1968. Question your neighbors Americanism. That should put him
off guard; besides any reaction he might make would be defensive and
therefore highly suspect. Better yet, after you ask him this oil the
phone, hang up before he can answer. The lady who called me and
pulled this Kindergarten stunt would be proud.
1968. For in the dew of little things, the heart finds its morning,
and is refreshed.
GIL KORENBLIT, 3AS

today. I have no regular income
and my school is not associated
with any church, and gets no
financial assistance from
religious organizations.
I beljeve we are the same sons
and daughters of God
transcending color and the
board, and the same members
trying to build a world of peace
and good will. So I can appeal
for help to you.
Would you extend your
heart-warmed sympathy for the
poor children who are thirsty in
love and bum with the desire for
learning under these miserable

themselves.
A while back, student Body
President Clyde Taylor
organized Intercourse program
in the Plaza of the Americas in
order to permit UF students and
administrators to come out into
the open and discuss the idea of
voluntary class attendance for
students.
Nobody came, naturally, and
UF President Stephen
C.OConnell and the other
scheduled speakers migrated to
the shelter of a cool palm tree
where they sat and discussed the
idea themselves.
The right to voluntary class
attendance would represent the
greatest freedom ever given to a
UF student; greater than the
right to decide whether or not to
take an ROTC course; greater
than the right to drink on
campus; greater than the right to

circumstances.
The pen is mightier than the
sword.
Wont you wield a facile pen
so that your students may
participate in helping these poor
ones? I entreat you again that
my school will be affiliated with
your college and my children
will get your help and
friendship.
Any help from you will be
welcomed by the children and
even a cent contributed will
make them smile happily and fill
them with hope in the successful
future. If this appeal would be
brought to your student council
and they could raise
subscriptions, it will be of great
help to save my children from
the extreme difficulties.
If you want any more
information of our school,
please communicate with The
Breen Technical High School,
852 Boogokdong, Tongnaeku,
Pusan, Korea, which American
Korean Foundation operates.
Please be so kind to let me
hear from you. All the best
wishes for your colleges
prosperity. park OK SUN

Tuesday, July 30,1968, The Florida Alligator,

sy Paul Kaplan

decide ones own curfew; and
nobody even showed up to
discuss it.
This is the group of persons
Marshall Jones has left his hopes
with. I feel for you, Marshall.
The UF student is not a
leader; he is not even a follower;
he is a.. .student. Thats all.
The UF student is like a child
nourishing itself innocently on
its mothers teat without
realizing that it is receiving a
warm, comforting, loving favor
that it will never again be able to
have. The child is ignorant of the
favor. It wants nothing more
than to nourish itself enough to
be comfortable.
Like this child, the UF
student sucks on the breast of
his university, wanting only
enough knowledge to get himself
through college and on the road
to prosperity. Other things dont
concern him unless they are for
his enjoyment. Even his
enjoyment is not enough to
drive him to action, if the action
requires a little work and/or
time.
The UF student is a
scavenger. The university is
merely a wet nurse who is
overjoyed by the fact that its
students are apathetic. If the
students dont complain, the
university does things its own
way.
I write this about the
students as a body because I care
about the university. I have not
done anything comparable to
the work of Marshall Jones. But
UF is as much my school as it is
his, and when I graduate in a
month, I too will be concerned
with it.
The student concerts me. He
worries me becau e he can
demonstrate against Dow
Chemical, but not fight for his
rights as a student. He worries
me because he can plead for the
right to make love and not war,
but he is indifferent to the
greatest right that can affect his
life as a student. He worries me
because he fights for what he
cannot win, but turns a deaf ear
to the matters in which he can
be easily and deservedly

victorious.
The univer university
sity university concerns
me also. It is
not getting
better, but
instead, is
becoming
progressively
worse a? are
most colleges in

America. Even the Association
of American Colleges and
Universities has admitted this.
But our university seems to
be doing nothing about it. The
university does not encourage its
students to fight for their rights.
On the contrary, it allows the
Board of Regents to pass a
regulation which permits the
university president the right to
expel any student for
harmful demonstration. And
instead of complaining, the
student makes more love and
less war.
So I leave UF on an unhappy
note. It had to be this way. It is
the way of the university. It is
the way of the student.
I worry about you both, but I
leave nothing in your laps.

Page 7

flllL
KAPLAN



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

FOR SALE |
FOR SALE: Girls bike, 26" 3-speed
Ounelt, fair condition. $20.00. Call
3728790. (Al632tp)
FOR SALE: STAUFFER
RELAXACIZOR, Reasonable.
3720328. (Al632t-c)
FOR SALE: COLE-STEEL METAL
DESK (Light green). 372-0328 after
6 p.m. (Al632tc)
1966 SUZUKI 80, will sell or trade
for step through" model or equal
value. Solid-state 4 track recorder.
Can be used with Stereo system as 4
track tape deck. $75.00. Call Lynn,
3785943 after 5. (Al 63
FOR SALE: Tape Recorder AIWA
Executive, Portable/with attache
case, slimness, battery and Electric,
full 7 reels, auto. vol. control,
perfect for lectures or general usage,
10 weeks old Cost $140.00 new,
Only $99.50 cash. Call 3727172
between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
(Al632tp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
Over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
O.UN DEALER, MICANOPV
4*663340. (Als4-^rp)
Household furnishings and Junque
for sale very reasonable prices for
students. Call Janet 372-2429
weekdays after 5 or anytime
weekends. (Al6l4t p)
FOR SALE: 1965 Yamaha 150 cc,
girl student owner, $165.00.
378-2863. (A-162-3t-p)
ADORABLE Basset Hound Puppies
Registered with American Kennel
Club. Shots, Wormed. $55.00 and
$65.00. Call 372-1504 after 5:00
p.m. (A-162-3t-p)
2 Bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
Student couple only. $50.00 per
month for tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 3729903.
(Bl6lst p)
EARN MONEY IN SPARE TIME,
Small business for sale 10 candy and
nut machines $500.00. Call
3724985 for more information.
(Al6lst p)
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
MISCELLANEOUS Chevy parts, Plus
51 Chevy and VW floor pan. Also
body-building weights. 376-0894.
(A-164-2t-p)
1967 YAMAHA -- 180 CC like new;
less than 3,000 miles, 2 helmets
included. $475.00. Call 378-3389 or
come by Flavet 111 209-B after 6:00
p.m. (A-164-3t-p)

Main Entrance (i
GAINESVILLE MALL
J fctrmlntUa's <& |i ~7conlinntal atmosphara i|| J|| S!!t =c 1 Ravio ' Pizza
Isl /Finaat ingourmatfood \il!jj
)p j7:lmportad Baan and Winatr pj'|l ,. ,=, | 11: AM-8-.3OPM Mon.-sat. s|(
IfcKExcallanfSarvka SB! Hi IT|l =jt Sarvinp ConHnoootly A jff
lim ii !i 1 rm UU | |^QL]Ljyyf|
j Gainesville's Finest |
| and Most Intimate |

FOR SALE
'*. V
140 WATT HI-FI: AR speakers and
turntable, Scott FMX tuner and
amplifiers. C. $500.00 Koss Pro-4
Headphones. $25.00 Rick Stone.
376-9559. Apt. 97, French Quarter
(A-164-2t-p)
35mm NIKKORMAT-FT SLR
Camera and case. Thru the lens light
meter. 50mm f 1.4 and 135 mm f 3.5
(telephoto) Auto-Nikkor Lenses.
Excellent condition. 378-8684.
(A-164-st-p)
.;x*xy*7vx*:' x'x*x x*x*x*x*xxx*vx ,, ;*x*x x
FOR RENT
*
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(815715 t
FOR RENT: Nice Room, Private
Entrance, Bath, Air Conditioned,
own heat control. Four minutes from
campus. Mature Student only.
372-8374. (B-164-2t-p)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Air conditioned. 2
Bedroom IV2 Bath CBS 11 miles <
S.W. University $125.00/mo.
Phone 495-2186 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-155-st-p)
7:00-9:15
last x
fVHff TIMES )
yini> TODAY
I STEINBECKS (
) 'THE GRAPES f
f OF WRATHS
-' r WED-SAT 7:00j)^0_3 k
% F Winner of Three Law)
#1 Academy Awards! aI^^II
If To kill a w Jf
>! Mockingbird 1
/ GREGORY PECK 1

In honor of the Florida Players
opening night play
ITALIAN STRAW HAT
the only fun Wednesday activity
will be the Bowling Special c.
t KUO
in the UNION GAMES ROOM 7

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 30, 1968

Page 8

FOR RENT
TRAILER LOTS, A few choice
locations for mobile horqes. High,
Dry, Shady, Cool. $25.00 per month.
The Prince Trailer Park. Telephone
591-1190, P.O Box 217, Orange
Lake, Fla. (B-162-3t-p)
.V V, I
GOT A DOZEN roommates in a one
bedroom apt cause you cant afford
gracious AC living? Would you
believe AC, wall to wall carpet, twin
balconies, and walk to class at dorm
prices: Call 376-0056 to reserve your
suite for Sept. La Fontana Apts. 207
NW 17 St. (B-164-3t-p)
ROOMS Men Walk to campus, AC
and CH, 8 singles, 5 doubles, Live
with friends, Phone 3788122 or
3766652. (Bl63Btp)
$85.00 for usual SIIO.OO Apartment,
AC, Furnished and Patio, Very Nice,
Call 378-2824. Available Aug. 1.
(B-164-2t-p)
WANTED
v ;!
WANTED: Two mature female
roommates for Sept. Landmark Apts,
Phase 11, $45.00 plus At utilities per
month. Call collect or write Lynne
Rodgers, 1302 L Boxwood Dr.,
Huntsville, Ala. 205-837-4113. (C (C---163-2t-p)
--163-2t-p) (C---163-2t-p)
WIN FREE
GAMES
RED PIN
BOWLING
8:00 pm to 10:00pm
TUES. AUGUST 30
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI
POET & PUBLISHER WILL APPEAR TUES AUG 6
8:00 PM REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM TO LEC LECTURE
TURE LECTURE AND DISCUSS THE RELATIONSHIP OF
CONTEMPORARY POETRY AND LITERATURE
AND TODAYS SOCIETY
Presented By
FORUMS COMMITTEE OF
UNION BOARD FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES
13H> ST. I.W. 23H M. sh. 371-2434
Av JAMES GARNER^DEBBIE REYNOLDS
fiifil 2:10-4:10-6:10 ~T~^
'mm' Technicolor 8:10-10:10 |
jg ...where the end of World War II began!
ROBERT NEITGHUM AN 210 ~
FEATURE AT TECHNICOLOR Q
1:30-3:35-5:45-7:50-10:00
IW. 13th St. at 23rd RO J
T 2434 her |
jJh j | ||J s
Wffiw: 13th sTT 3^Ss2^B
LAST TWO DAYS
Elvis Presley & Nancy Sinatra Also
"Sp..dway" "Fir.ball 500
I STARTS THURSDAY!
- IRVING ALIEN S Production starring J
VINCE EDWARDS JUDY DEESON I
as Charles Hood ( co-star of "To Sir With Love )



iv.w*v.%\v.vAv.vw.v.v.w.v.v.vv.wwyv
GATOR CLASSIFIED

aXX*v*v*v.yx x x*x*x x*x*x*v.vx x*x*x*.;.
WANTED
t^sss<<>x-xN%vx*: x*x*x.v.v;x*x*>>:.j
Adventurous coed to travel out ot
U.S. share expenses. If interested call
Mary at 3781078. Call after 5 if
possible. (C 161 5t p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR THREE BEDROOM HOUSE,
919 N.W. Bth Place, $33.00 per
month, Please call or write Ginny
Hartmann, 970 Dakar Dr., Merritt
Island, Florida. (Cl633tp)
WANT TO BUY EXERCIZOR
(electric) Have Stauffer Relaxacisor
to trade if interested 3720328 after
6 D.m. (C-163-2t-c)
MALE roommate wanted for fall
term only. I will assume all lease
responsibilities and will keep apt.
with new wife after Dec. 378-8225.
(C-164-lt-p)
FEMALE roommate needed for fall.
Camelot Apt., Poolside, fireplace,
Sauna, etc. $60.00 a month Call
378-7858 Vicki or Jan. (C-164-lt-p)
EE Senior needs roommates and
apartment for fall. Contact Don
Glendening. Call Hollywood collect
983-5601 after 5 p.m. any day.
(C-164-st-p)
WANTED: 1 male roommate for fall
quarter. Gator Town Apts. Call Lee
372-9435. (C-164-3t-p)
SENIOR Co-ed needs place to live in
68-69 write Rita Perkins, 37 Edmund
Rd., Hollywood Fla. or call collect
983-5041 after 10 p.m. (C-164-4t-p)
WANTED: Mature female roommates
to share 5 bedroom house 5 blocks
from campus. $40.00 per month plus
utilities. Call 378-7061. (C-164-2t-p)
WANTED: Two female roommates
for fall quarter. French Quarter No.
109. Ask for Judy or Jane after five.
376-0008. (C-164-2t-p)
WANTED: Mature female roommate
to share expenses in two bedroom
mobile home. Available now. Call
376-8133 after 5 p.m. (C-164-lt-p)

*DO-lt-Yourself
gs CLASSIFIEDS
fr DAYS TO RUN
3 To order classifieds, use the
form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive)
* tance to: Alligator Classifieds, | 1
| Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- 2 .. |
I ville, Florida 32601. 3 *O% d scount) )
* E] 4 days (*lO% discount) a j
x Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over | J
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount) 1
I DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE f
1 <- Count the words, omitting a, an 4 |
& LIAdoINL. A 11U IN the> Addresses and phone numbers ffl J
count as one word. Minimum charge 2
U for sale Js for 20 words. For each
e for rent additional word add 3 I wanted the to tal by number of days the ad
| help wanted to run Subtrac t the discount | j
autos applicable) and enclose a check j
8 personal for the remainder. For example, | j
R lost-found a 32 word ad to run 4 days costs g j
services $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?)- g
I WORDING f ||
1 NAME DATE |
8 STUDENT # PHONE. |
1 ADDRESS I
I. CITY STATE Z' p
SjgLmoney cannot be refunded if ad is cancel led-

:*:-x*x*:.%v.v.*;*x*x*x*x*:*x*x*x*xy.v.v.*.v;v.
WANTED |
*NN%v.%vx*x*x*x:*x*x*:*x*x*xx*xx*x*yvi*.
WANTED: 1 or 2 roommates for fall
quarter. Landmark. Call 378-5809
(C-164-4t-p)
COED Live off campus for $37.50
per month, plus utilities. Share two
bedroom AC trailer starting Sept.
Call 3722607 after 6 p.m.
(C 1632 tp)
Female graduate student, preferably
with interests in the humanities, to
share a large house near campus. With
or without child. Total rent $115.00.
1736 N.W. 3rd Place. 3788320.
(C 1632t p)
Mature coed to share IBR Poolside
Landmark for fall. Dishwasher, AC,
Central heat, fire side lodge, sauna
bath, study area. 3782257 or write
1049 Chevrolet Ave., Flint, Michigan
(C l632tp)
; :f.NNV.y.v.*; : ;x*x :*x*x x x x*xxx*>v.Vi%';.
HELP WANTED f
vv. .vXvivX*XX*X%VV* X X*X' X # X*X*XX!!"'
BELLMAN needed, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Apply in person, Mr. O'Neil, Ramada
Inn. (El 633t p)
AUTOS
* !!
Auto for Sale: Red Triumph Spitfire,
1964, with top tonneau. Must sell
Got married, need money Great deal
3723940 or 3763211 Ext. 5120.
Jennifer. (Gl6l3tp)
1962 Tempest LeMans, Convertible,
newly rebuilt engine, Air
Conditioned, $425., also Lambretta
Scotter, 125 cc, dependable $45.00.
Call 372-1603. (Gl634t-p)
1956 CHEVY Pickup, V ton, VB,
radio, heater, spotlight, backup
lights, some rust. New tag. $225.00.
378-5774. (G-162-3t-p)
1963 Cadillac Sedan DeVille. Racing
Green. Factory Air. $1675. Call
3782949. (G-163-stp)

AUTOS
WANTED:*- A.C. Bristol. Call John
Snead 967-0577 Area 305 -Collect.
(Gl6ostp)
1963 FORD Fairlane 500, Six, white,
excellent mechanical condition. New
seat covers, new Brakes, 2 new tires
Body Good, Original owner,
$650.00. 372-3946 after 5:30 p.m.
(G-164-3t-p)
LEAVING country, '63 MGB
Convertible, Yellow, new top,
Tonneau, Cover, Radio, heater,
EXCELLENT CONDITION. Best
offer 372-2024, French Quarter 14.
(G-164-6t-p)
PERSONAL

;x x*x*x*x*v*vx*x*:*x*x*xx:.%w.%%v.v;vx*/"
WHAT the "Leftover Lammies
really need to win was to get rid of
Marty (the one without the pockets).
(J-164-lt-p)
| LOST & FOUND |
: :-x<*xx*x*x*x*x*x*x-x*x-x*x*x*w.r.y. .-.yx'!
FOUND: Shirt, Tie clip and clip on
sunglasses, Call 372-6477 after 5:30
p.m. (L-162-nc-3t)
: : ;x*x-v.. .. ww>xsvkwxw>:.!;:;
SERVICES |
::x%NNyxx*x*x*%NYX*x*x*x*x*v.*.v;*;*;:-x*x < A
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
systems checked free. (Mls3tfc)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service*
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (Mls3tfc)
BABY CARE. 311 NW 15th Terrace.
Mon-Fri. 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. $3.00
per day, $.75 per hour. Mature,
experienced, Christian home. Phone
376-2072. (M-162-lt-c)
DISSERTATION Figures, graphs,
illustrations, etc. Professional
Gtaphic Artist. Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-162-3t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Ca" M and R Tennis Services. 378-
£489. (M-153-16t-p)
Campus
Calendar
Tuesday, July 30
College of Education: NASA'
Lecture Series, Norman Aud.
William Nixon, "Orbits &
Satellites," 9 a.m. Robert E.
Wilson, "Satellites," 10 a.m.
Opera Workshop: Opera Scenes,
Union Aud., 3:30 p.m.
Everyone invited.
College of Education: lecture,
Dr. Paul I. Clifford,
"Developmental Problems of
Disadvantaged Children &
Youth," Norman Aud., 4:30
i p.m.
J Program Office: bridge lessons,
150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Lyceum Council: The Karlsrud
Ensemble, Union Ballroom,
8:15 p.m. Vocal music from
t classical, folk, and popular
favorites, accompanied by
piano and harp.
Wednesday, July 31
Florida Speleological Society:
meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Players: "An Italian
Straw Hat, Constans
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Thursday, August 1
Christian Science College
Organization: meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Painting for Fun: painting, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Players: "An Italian
Straw Hat, Constans
Theater, 8 p.m.
Yoga: lessons. Bldg. C, Towers,
9 p.m.

Research Seeks
To Clear The Air

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Correspondent
Research now going on at UF
may alter the entire make-up of
the nation's pulp and paper
industry.
Conducted at UF's Pulp and
Paper Laboratories, this research
is designed to eliminate air
polluting odor from the pulp
making process.
The project, sponsored by
Health. Education and Welfare,
is headed by Dr. William J.
Nolan. Chemical Engineering
professor.
Asked if the project would be
successful, Nolan said, It's hard
to say. I know we can make the
pulp, but whether its going to
be economically feasible will
take more research to
determine.
After we prove we can make
the pulp odorless, which we will
do this year, then we will apply
to the government for a new
contract, to prove the process
is economically sound.
Pulp-making is a complicated
process. The high cost of wood
and other expenses has shot mill
operating costs upward. Many of
the chemicals used in the process
have to be recovered for later
use. And the cost of an average
size recovery boiler is $1 million.
With these facts in mind,
you can't tell a mill to scrape
their equipment simply because
you want to take out the odor,
Dr. Nolan said.
By the end of this year Dr.
Nolan hopes to have proven pulp
can be made by the odorless
process. The next step is to
prove that we can use present

CLINIC OPENS TODAY
All-Stars March
The Florida All-Star High School Marching Band Clinic will be held
on the UF campus Tuesday through Saturday and reach its climax
when students perform pre-game and half time shows for the All-Star
football game.
Clinician for the group will be Kelly James, marching band director
for UCLA. Hell be responsible for getting together acts for the band
and majorettes during Saturdays show.
The clinic, which is sponsored annually by the Florida Bandmasters
Association, is in its 11 th year.
Students were selected by high school band masters and
recommended to the Bandmasters Association who selected the ones
for the show.
223 students will arrive Tuesday and begin auditions for drum
major, head majorette appointments and other key positions.
The game Saturday will feature North Florida All-Stars against the
South, as selected by Florida sports writers. Game time will be 7:45
p.m. at Florida Field.
Unions Got Answer
To Stuffy Libraries

If you are tired of studying in
cold, impersonal libraries, then
the J. Wayne Reitz Union has a
solution for you.
In the northeast corner of the
second floor there is an unusual
study lounge.
It is fully carpeted, with large
soft chairs and couches. One
section is divided into a
browsing room. The books
many donations from students
and faculty are an old and
different vintage.
This is the main study area
with several round tables in one
pomer. The browsing library also
hak a collection of current
magazines and daily

Tuesday, July 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

equipment so that there will be a
minimum of expense to the mills
converting to the process.
Pulp mills pollute the air
because of the odor of chemicals
used to process the wood.
Sodium sulfide combines with
the organic elements in wood
and forms mercaptams. These
mercaptams are the same type of
chemicals that give a skunk his
odor.
Besides being odorless the
new process will yield a higher,
more predictable quality of pulp
than the present process.
Tickets Here
Coaches who have picked the
all-star basketball squads over
the years have done a
remarkable job. There has been
little difference in the two
squads as two one-point victories
and five two-point triumphs
have been recorded in the 18
game history.
Tickets for the games will be
on sale at three locations in
Gainesville. They may be
purchased at the University of
Florida Athletic Dept., The
Gator Sport Shop, 1724 W.
University Avenue, and Jimmy
Hughes' Sporting Goods, 1113
W. University Avenue.
Tickets for the basketball
game will be 75 cents for
students and $1.50 for adults.
Football tickets will be SI.OO
for students and $2.00 for
adults.
The basketball game is slated
for 4:00 p.m. in Florida Gym,
and the football game at 7:45
p.m. on Florida Field.

newspapers.
The other part of the lounge
is furnished with colorful
furniture. This room has music
piped in from the main desk.
The lounge has its own
collection of records mostly
quiet, modem sounds. Many of
the records are lent by students
who study there.
Adjoining the lounge are
individual music booths.
Students, or faculty, may bring
their own records to listen to, or
they may listen to any in the
librarys collection.
Music may also be piped in
the study room at a students
request.

Page 9



Page 10

l The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 30, T 968

Odd Match In 'Odd Couple

By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
What kind of a relationship
could one possibly expect to
develop between all
ilkriatched, but well-meaning
pair of guys? Jack Lemmon and
Walter Matthau as The Odd
Couple, certainly do form a
unique match, and they are very,
very odd.
Lemmon, as Felix Unger, is in
the process of being divorced,
and is convinced that life
without marriage is futile.
Matthau, sloppy host of the
Friday evening poker club,
rescues Felix from his
suicidal despondency, and
invites him to share his
eight-room bachelor pad on
Mathattans Riverside Drive.
Oscars life with roommate
Felix quickly becomes an
uproarious, slapstick parody of a
very unsuitable marriage. Felix
becomes the effeminate partner,
spending hours in the kitchen
burning meat loaves, and
following Oscar from room to
room with ash trays and
disinfectant spray. He brings so
much order and cleanliness into
Oscars apartment that the poker
club disbands in disbelief. After
all, whoever heard of sanitized
poker cards?
In an attempt to save their

SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE
MENS SHOES DRESSES
LOAFERS PENNY AND TASSEL sl2/$55 value NOW $4.99 to $19.99
miJOO to $19.00 VALUES NOW $6.99 SUITS
(SIZES AVAILABLE IN SALE SHOES) $25/$36 Value NOW $9.99 tO $14.99
* 6 7 7 8 8X 9 9X 10 IPX 11 11X BERMUDAS
| 1 11 SOLIDS AND TATTERSALLS
; 3 ; ; ~ r~ were SB/sl4 NOW $3.99 to $7.99
SKIRTS and CULOTTES
cwnA/r UirCAP SOLIDS AND TATTERSALLS .
SWIM WEAK JlO/Sl6 value NOW $4.99 to $9.99
BOXERS, STRETCH & JAMS
$5.00/s9.ofr value NOW $2.99/4.99 SLACKS
SOLIDS AND TATTERSALLS
DRESS AND SPORT SHIRTS $9 to sl6 value NOW $2.99 to $8.99
PERMANENT PRESS & ALL COTTON QATVTYAT Q A un T OAFFPQ
SHORT SLEEVES AND LONG SLEEVES oAfMDAEb AND EUArEKo
SOLIDSSTRIPESTATTERSALLS $8 /SI6 value NOW $5.99 to $9.99
$6.00 value NOW $3.49 3for SIO.OO (LIMITED SIZES)
TIES BATHING SUITS and COVER UPS
$5/s7.oovalue NOW $1.99 sl4/$29 value NOW $2.99 to $18.99
WALK SHORTS also on sale
$5.00/$6.00 values now $3.99/4.99 A FINE SELECTION OF GALS
BUTTON-DOWN SHIRTS
SUITS AND SPORT COATS $4.95/$7.95 value now $3.99 a $4.99
. ; E
1/4 1/2 OFF THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
1620 W. UNIV. AVE. CAROLYN PLAZA
-- l

RFWiW.

marriage, Oscar proposes an
evening with two British birds,
the Cuckoo-Pigeon sisters. These
incessantly giggling twins bring
reminiscences of the kids, and
reducing everyone to such tears
that the whole evening is
drowned.
* Finally Oscar becomes fed up
with the whole affair. Hes too
much of a carefree slob to enjoy
living with a Mr. Clean, and has
run the gamut of his patience
by attempting to decipher little
notes left on his pillow. How
am I supposed to know that
F.U. stands for Felix Unger? he
roars.
Felix is evicted, only to wind
up in the Pigeon sisters nest,
much to the amazement and
jealousy of his old poker-playing
buddies. Oscar, left to his former
bachelor habits, suddenly
assumes Felixs phobia for
neatness, and the whole show
ends with a series of phone calls
from nagging, ex-wives. (Women
always have to have the final
word, you know.)
The Odd Couple, adapted
from Neil Simons smash
Broadway hit, is probably one of
the most near-perfect comedies
yet. The sucess of its rollicking
antics is to a large extent due to
the unique humanness of the
plights of Felix and Oscar. They
remind one of that idiosyncratic

bachelor next-door, or that
kooky friend down the street,
and this believability of
character makes the shows
meandering madcap even more
of a comedy.
Lemmons acting is a bit
strained at times, but his
performance is constantly
overshadowed by Matthau, who
must be one of the finest, and
funniest, comedians of all
time. The Odd Couple is
worthwhile entertainment for
everyone itll start you
laughing from the minute it
begins. Its definitely the most
hilarious show to hit Gainesville
this summer dont miss it, now
playing at the Center.
'ltalian Hat'
Opens Wed.
An Italian Straw Hat opens
tomorrow night in Constans
Theatre. Richard Green directs
this Florida Players summer pro production
duction production about a fantastic
marriage that is complicated
when the groom loses a straw
hat. Veterans of UF theatre such
as Claude Pinkston, Melissa
Shepard and Bob Boyd have
leading parts. Tickets are on sale
at the Reitz Union Box Office or
may be purchased at the door.

WHATS
HAPPENING

By LORI STEELE
Alligator Society Editor
IN LYCEUM COUNCIL
PRESENTS...: Tonight, The
Karlsrud Ensemble will perform
vocal music from classical, folk,
and popular favorites with
accompaniment by piano and
harp. The place is the Reitz
Union Ballroom at 8:15 p.m.
IN WHILE THE HUSBANDS
ARE AWAY THE WIVES
PLAY..Tonight, the Law
Dames will play ... bridge from
8-11 p.m. in room 150 C, Reitz
Union.
IN STUDENT AFFAIRS:
Tonight, Student Senate meets
in room 349, Reitz Union, from
6:30-11 p.m. There also will be a
conference in room 355, Reitz
Union, from 6:30-8 p.m.
IN STUDENTS GOVERN GOVERNMENT:
MENT: GOVERNMENT: Tonight, Student
Government meets in room 316,
Reitz Union, from 4-5:30 p.m.
IN WALLACETICS, ER,
POLITICS: Wednesday,
American Independent Party
meets in room 347, Reitz Union,
from 8-9:30 p.m.
IN ODDIE KAY: Wednesday,
Omicrom Delta Kappa meets in
room 355** Reitz Union from
7:30-10 p.m.
IN* EVALUATIN AFTER
MEDITATIN: Wednesday, the
Goal Evaluation Committee
meets in room 150 B Reitz
Union, from 3-5 p.m.

IN PLENTY OF ACTION:
Wednesday, Action Conference
meets in the Reitz Union
auditorium from 2:30-5-30 p.m.
IN BOARDIN IT: Wednesday,
the Union Board meets in room
150 F, Reitz Union, from 4:15-5
p.m.
IN TWO DAY TASKS:
Thursday and Friday. The
Community Task Force meets
Thursday in room 316, Reitz
Union, from 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Friday, room 331, Reitz Union,
from 2:30-5 p.m., is the time
and place.
IN INITIATING AND
RECEPTING: Sunday, Pi
Lambda Theta will do just that
in rooms 118, 122, 123 of the
Reitz Union from 2-5 p.m.
IN SHOCKING LUNCHES:
Monday, Electrical Engineering
will have a luncheon in room
150 B, Reitz Union, from 12
noon-1:30 p.m.
IN SUMMER HANDBALL FOR
MURPHREE AND YON HALL:
Wednesday at 8 p.m. a doubles
tournament with singles to
follow, Thursday at 8. Robbie
Griffin of Yon Hall and Jeff
Smith of Murphree are handling
arrangements.



All-Star Cage, Grid Games This Week

The best of 1968s graduating
athletes from Floridas high
schools will meet this Saturday
in Gainesville in the annual
North-South basketball and
football games.
9k: : :*g : SES* V
''^ :: ss ; iaat- ; I
"** m rnt^Mr
jbPPHHw|h 9 Bj^k
**'
JOHN REAVES

SPORTS
Junior Peek UF Bound

In Gainesville, theres a gath gathering
ering gathering of football players for next
Saturdays High School All-Star
game. Ten months ago, these
athletes were facing each other
on the football field and basket basketball
ball basketball courts, but now theyre
playing on the same side, and for
all it is their last game before
beginning a college career.
Most of the day, the gridders
are out on the practice field, but
theres a taste of university life
to be sampled, so housing is
done strictly on a university universitystyle
style universitystyle basis: pot luck.
One product of the random
pairing off done by the Univer University
sity University of Florida has put two of
the top names on the north
squad together. One is David
Peek, brother of UFs notorious
Gene Peek. The other is Fletcher
Highs Ken ONeill.
The pair have had three days
to examine college football,
where only the best are able to
compete. They will have seven
more before next weeks All-Star
game. Both were offered scholar scholarships
ships scholarships to Florida, but only one
will make his college home in
Gainesville.
The future Gator is Dave
Peek, and if^ his high school
career in Ocajia is an accurate
yardstick, some
big tri trihis
his trihis
bruther^^fc^s,
My left me alone on
whether to play or not, and I
tried both basketball and foot football,
ball, football, he said. Football seemed
to be the better of the two, so I
concentrated on that. I played
both ways on the Ocala squad
on offense I was a tight end, and
on defense a linebacker.
1 guess I was expecting an
offer, he said, and when it

IS YOUR CAR SICK?
We repair all makes and models of cars. Our
service is backed up with over 30 years of
experience.
You'll drive safer with our brake and tune-up service,
too.
We're the student's friend, so stop in and save money.
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 S. MAIN 376-7771_

On the basketball squad, four
of the players on the Rebel
squad received all-America
recognition. Ron Harris of Key
West, Raul Quesada of Miami
Senior, Cyril Baptiste of Miami
Wt ifllfenf-
_
ANDY CHENfcY

came I still hadnt made up my
mind on whether to accept it.
With one Peek already setting
records, I wasnt sure whether I
could be up to what they would
be expecting from me.
Dave also received bids from
Georgia, Duke, and FSU. A few
schools pointed out that perhaps
too much would be expected
from the younger Peek.
I finally decided on Florida
when I came up for a visit. I
knew Gene wanted me to go
here, but he never said anything.
I guess he knew Florida was my
first choice, and of course, it
always had been.
ONeill also was offered an anathletic
athletic anathletic scholarship to Florida,
but turned it down in favor of
Georgia.
The facilities there helped
me make up my mind, said
ONeill, but so many of the
guys here have so much good to
say about UF, Im beginning to
wonder.
The players day starts every
morning at 7, with a breakfast
that Peek called too big and
too greasy.
Its the bacon that got me,
said Peek. We have to be out on
the field at 7:45 for workout,
and that just isnt enough time
to digest so much food like
that.
After breakfast, there is a
three-hour workout, usually in
shorts. Only two pad sessions are
scheduled during next week, in
an attempt to keep down in injuries.
juries. injuries.
%gfow is at but enter entertaifawHH
taifawHH entertaifawHH ir4earce in Gainesville
anyway. You kill yourself out
on the field all day, said O-
Neill, and then theres nothing
to do but turn in and wait for
tomorrow. It gets real boring.
But no one would consider
that their ten day enforced bore boredom
dom boredom wasnt worth it.

Curley, and Darryl Ceravolo of
West Palm Beach are the boys
who earned the coveted award.
In addition to the four
all-Americans, three other
players were named to the
all-state squad. Steve Nicholson
and Greg Lowery of West Palm
Beach Roosevelt and Roy Glover
of Pompano Beach Blanche Ely
received the state honors.
Harris, a 6-4 185-pounder, led
Key West to the State Class AA
crown. His high school coach
Dave Fedor will head the South
squad.

UFs Andy Cheney
Almost Wasnt Here
He was only two days late, but Andy Cheney Finally showed up for
practice Saturday.
The Live Oak High graduate was one of two players still missing
from the High School All-Star squad Saturday, and his appearance late
in the afternoon eased a lot of worries that the ground-covering
tailback might pass up the game.
Cheney, it turned out, had been in bed with the flu since last
Monday, and was still under medication when he arrived.
Ive been half sick since the first of the month, said Cheney,
but I think Ive got the flu licked now. The doctor loaded me up on
medicine all last week, and I think that did the trick.
Cheney still complained of dizziness, but said he expected to be
ready for Monday morning workout.
My Dad wanted me to come if I thought I would be all right,
continued Cheney, and I wouldnt pass up the game for anything.
A lion-sized share of the two football squads is bound for UF this
fall. Cheney is included in the count.
The opportunity to play football has made a big difference in
Andys life. It even made him change high schools.
Cheney lives in Branford, in southeast Suwannee County. For ten
years, he attended the Branford School, which spans grades 1-12.
Then, in his junior year, he made a decision that was to enhance
whatever plans he would make regarding his future in football. He
applied to change from Branford to Live Oak High School.
I could have stayed at Branford and played every position on the
field, said Cheney, but no one outside of Suwannee County would
have ever known I existed.
The Live Oak school is also in Suwannee County, but is Class A
ranked, compared to Branfords Class C standing.
Going to another school meant a 25-mile drive every morning.
Andy generally was up at 6:30 a.m. for his 8:30 classes, and driving
50 miles a day was an expensive proposition.
But the change paid off, as Cheney received more than fifty offers
of athletic scholarships, including ones from Florida, Georgia, and
Tennessee. There couldnt have been too much doubt on Andys mind
as to where he was going, as he signed on December Ist, the second
day he was eligible to make the college contract.
6M9o's
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave
HE FIXES EM FOR A LOT LESS
THAN YOU KNOW WHO... THEY
THINK THATS SORT OF DIRTY.
And besides being a heck Os course, he's fully
of a lot closer, he's factory trained. .Who
usually a lot faster, too else would you let work
If you want, he'll on your very own bug?
pick your car up and
deliver it when it's fixed. MMM
(No need to mention he's
equipped for all V V
repair and maintenance.)

Quesada led Miami Senior to
an 18-8 record and became the
First player since 1958 to average
better than 20 points a game for
his school. The 6-5, 215-pounder
will add plenty of strength to
the South team.
who is 6-9 and
weighs 220, will be the largest
member of Fedor's team. The
Tree, as he is known to his
friends, led Curley to an 18-2
record. The Memphis
State-bound star scored 44
points in a single game last
season.

Tuesday, July 30,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Last year the prep stars from
the North defeated the South in
both games. They upset the
Rebels in football 21-12 and set
a scoring record in basketball by
swamping the Southerners,
102-72.
The South still leads in the
series that dates back to 1949.
In football they hold a 12-7
edge, and in basketball, 12-6.
The biggest winning margin in
the football series was in 1950,
with the North taking a 50-0
victory. The South's biggest grid
victory came in 1953, 33-6.
There have been five shutouts
recorded, with the South
claiming three and the North
two.
n
' Havt
V Your Generator \
if OVERHAULED Special §
|US J
FASf sJf^E
CLEAN UNIT
TURN COMMUTATOR
NEW BRUSHES
LABOR
ALACHUA
COUNTY
GENERATOR
WE LIKE FOREIGN CARS!
501 NW Ifk AVI. GAINtJVIUf
MON.-FRI. AM-7PM SAT. 11l S PM
371-4011
Announcing
a new stay-up
stocking!
ttXVV***
JhRR, y# V
An entirely new kind of
stay-up stocking. It rises
hip-high and gives all the
pleasure of panty hose
and none of the problems.
No sags or wrinkles be because
cause because the special stay-up
top works no matter what.
And HIP-POSE wont ride
down.
Its more economical,
too. Now you-wont have
to throw out a pair if one
leg runs.
And youre free to make
your own decisions about
what kind of panty you
wish to wear.
This is it. The ultimate
way to wear your legs since
stockings were invented.
SZOO a pair
Jentral Charge
The Mall, Gainesville

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 30, 1968

we care
* *.
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG
Two Convenient Locations
601 S.W. 2 Ave.
1130 N.E. 16 Ave.


SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
gFULL CUT STEAK
TOP ROUND STEAK
\PP XW' SULTANA ALL VARIETIES
NwS FRESH TENDER SWEET W QUICK FROZEN EACH
JÂ¥ BLUEBERRIES sp*. SI.OO PL 11ot QQ>
Â¥ W D NNERS pkg only oy v
>8 /WHITE SEEDLESS jy, i-***
if GRAPES 3Lb SIOO \1
I r TT \ r \
| NECTARINES 3Lb SI.OO J | MOtr \ 5 flavors V
ill FRESH HRM RIPE RED Tl 11 ft SOFT ft
Splums 3Lb SI.OO m I COFFEE 1 I DRINKS I
jwr LARGE DELIOOUS RIPE if | ILb IV 6PK I
PEACHES -4* It 69< f \ 2/79< f
jM HARVEST FRESH GREEN M[
/ J\ PEANUTS 19< WS
( x -\/
/JANE PARKER\ /jANE PARKER\ \j <~l IIP lw
1 WHITE I 1 APPI I II \ PKV
I BREAD i 1 mcc 1 i/ PAGE C
I iviLb LOAF I I I i FRENCH DRESSING .I6- 39<^;
I II RUY 9 i 11 CHff 1
P 4/99 f t GET 1 FREE f EfRENCH DRESSING 39< |
|i ITALIAN DRESSING 45< ||
I I "1 tjELBOW MACARONI iLb. 2/43
ANGB. SOFT SULTANA FORD Ip, n!! 1
ELBOW SPAGHETTIiLb2/43<7f'
FAC/AL SANDWICH HOOK Q> IV 4f
T/SSUE 200,5 2/35< SPREAD LtAIAS SAUCE 59< rK
AAP co!^!5 H ONA PURE HONEY 3 Lb 95<)fX
BABY FR,ED PORK & X M/ vXAI
L/MAS 2Lb 594 POTATOES 3- 39< P' !0<

SUPER RIGHT FRESHLY J I
GROUND BEEF $199