Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Draft-Age Dilemma: Cool It In Canada?

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
MIAMI Tony Coughlin, Richard Williams and
Alfred Hicks are all degree-holding graduates Jdf the
University of Miami. They all come .from
middle-upper class backgrounds, all
earning powers of $12,000-15,000 and by August
all three young men will be living as draft dodgers in
Canada.
The situation is a familiar one its happening at
all universities in America. That is, the student
spends years of studying and work to get an
education and when he graduates he finds that he
cannot go to graduate school or into his chosen
occupation all the deferments have run out.
Tony Coughlin leaned back in a chair and
propped his feet on a desk in his fathers plush
house in Coral Gables. He spoke casually about his

Weather
PnbaMe Showers
Hiah In The 80s
Low In The 7 0s

Vol. 60, No. 162

IN PLAZA TODAY
Intercourse Examines
Voluntary Attendance

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Student Body President
Clyde Taylor said the main
objective of the Intercourse
program slated for 1:30 today in
the Plaza of the Americas will be
to get some discussion going on
the implementation of the
proposed voluntary class
attendance program.
Mainly everybody seems to
be in favor of it to a great
extent, declared Taylor,
referring to voluntary
attendance. Its the how of
implementing it how we get
around the fact that certain
classes arent structured for
voluntary attendance.
Mick Callahan, moderator of
todays program, said this would
be a chance for the students to
tell the deans and the
administration how they feel.
Scheduled speakers are Deans
Harry Sisler, Franklin Doty,
John Paul Jones, and Action
Conference member Dave
Wilson.
Callahan plans to keep the
gathering informal and said
speakers will be open to
questions at any time from the
audience.
.v.v.v.vv.v.v.v.v.vw.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.i;
|'Gator Confab;!
| Set Tomorrow i;
: Methods for increasing :
$ communication with the
£ campus community will be ;j
£: considered at the Florida :
| Alligators first Communi- £
cations Conference
| Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. in :
:;i Room 349 of the Reitz j:
ij! Union. j:
Heads of all campus £
organizations, including £
I academic deans, student and :
faculty organization heads £
and top officials of the £
administration have been |
invited to view a slide :j:
§ presentation and to discuss 5
% improving cooperation with :
the Alligator. j:

The
Florida Alligator

Previous Intercourse
programs, in Taylors opinion,
have been successful.
Os course, weve only had
about three or four, he said,
but the one with OConnell, for
instance, was a big success.
Taylor feels the popularity of
the Intercourse programs show
the support of the student body
to a responsible approach to
campus problems.
Just on the type of program

Slogan Contest
Closes July 31
As the July 31 deadline approaches more than 1,000 entries have
been received by Florida Blue Key in this years Homecoming slogan
contest, according to Jeff Weil, contest chairman.
Weil noted that entries seem to be centered around the 1968
National Elections which will be held three days after the
Homecoming festivities.
The winning slogan will be used as the central theme for the Nov.
1-2 Homecoming celebration.
Five prizes await the top slogan writers ranging from Caribbean
cruises to visits to Florida resorts, Weil said.
The grand prize will be a five day, all-expenses-paid cruise to
Jamaica for two.
Entries should have a general Homecoming theme with a
maximum of seven words.

h
BOAZ

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University of Florida, Gainesville

weve had, he declared, the
attendance has exceeded that of
the SBI (Student Board of
Investigation) with their flair for
the dramatic.
Taylor was cautious in his
prediction of attendance at the
first summer Intercourse
program.
It remains to be seen
Tuesday, what with the heat and
all, what kind of a crowd well
have.

ROTC Enrollment Drop
Expected For Fall Term

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
UF ROTC chiefs anticipate an estimated 50
per cent reduction in military science enrollees
under the newly established voluntary program
and agree the new program will have advantages
% and disadvantages.
Col. Arlo W. Mitchell, senior officer in the Army
I program, commented, As far as our own cadre
I goes, we plan to maintain our current strength until
I we get a feel for what the enrollment and the
I situation will be.
I Any reduction in personnel, Mitchell said, will be
I decided at a higher level.
Air Force ROTC senior officer, Col. William N.
Boaz, bases his expectations on what has happened

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ABOUT 50 PERCENT

plans for the future, in a manner that placed
draft-dodging in a realm of near-respectability.
I plan to go to Canada with Dick (Richard
Williams) and A1 (Alfred Hicks) at the end of the
month or early August, he said. I cant speak for
the other guys, but my motives for going are simple.
If I stay in this country and go into pharmacy Ill be
drafted thats two years of my life wasted and a
possible risk of death in Vietnam, where there is a
war in which I have no interest whatsoever.
Call me selfish if you like, but just what kind of
society is it that can take two years out of a mans
life and waste it for him?
In Canada the three of us will get in touch with
contacts who will help get us jobs well be safe
there and we wont have to worry about being
drafted what a relief that will be.
Coughlin was asked if he was aware that under
(SEE 'DRAFT DODGERS' PAGE 2)

at other universities.
Its been the experience of other institutions,
he said, that enrollment has dropped from SO to 60
per cent.
Obviously this means a curtailment of staff. I
have already diverted two new officers to other
locations that had been assigned here.
Boaz predicted other changes may be made after
the start of the Fall quarter.
Both officers agree that the ROTC cadre like
their assignments. The cadre personnel for both
services are volunteers for ROTC duty.
Stressing the advantages to the military personnel
of living in an academic community, Boaz pointed
out the educational facilities available.
(SEE 'ROTC' PAGE 2)

Inside
Students Favor
Curfew Ruling
See Story,P. 3

Tuesday, July 23, 1968



Page 2

. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Draft Dodgers In Canada

PA6E ONE^J
current laws draft dodgers could not return to the
U.S. or any of its possessions without risking arrest
and punishment. The punishment for draft dodging
is up to five years hard labor and/or up to a SIO,OOO
fine.
I realize the move Im making, he replied. As
far as not being able to return to this country goes
well, the only thing Ill miss will be my family and
the weather. However, my family can afford to
make frequent visits to Canada, but theres not
much I can do about the Canadian cold. My father
is backing me in this thing, and with a pharmacy
degree I can get a good job eventually in Canada,
Cougjilin said.
The 23-year-old Coughlin said he expects a draft
notice in the mail any day now and added that he
will be glad to live in a truly free country soon.
Richard Williams is going to Canada to dodge
Uncle Sam because, as he phrases it, there is no
freedom for individuals in the United States.
Ill be short and sweet for your paper, he said
as he waxed a surf board at Miami Beachs surfing
fiasco, South Beach.
I am opposed to the war in Vietnam for
personal reasons which I wont discuss. I am
opposed to mandatory conscription it is
unconstitutional and absurd.
It simply reduces itself to this: I am going to
another-- a better country where I can live
without the fear of being forced to do something I
do not wish to do.
I desire individual rights and liberty, and these
concepts no longer exist in this country. Like Tony,
I have my degree in pharmacy, and Im sure I can
survive in Canada comfortably, Williams
continued.

ROTC Drop Seen

f FROM PA6E ONE
A lot of the fellows are able
to upgrade their education and
even get their Masters during
their tour here, he said.
Boaz emphasized the high
quality of the officers in the
ROTC program.
Since its a faculty job,
were highly selective, he said.
The officers you see here have
really had to pass muster.
One of the main
disadvantages of the new

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tho offlcUl student newspaper of tho University of Florida
and la published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is polished
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator s entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is 914.00 per year or $4-00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

program, according to Mitchell,
is there may not be enough basic
ROTC personnel to help train
the advanced students.
We may have too many
chiefs, he speculated, and not
enough Indians.
On the other hand, Mitchell
sees some positive aspects in the
new program.
It will keep people who
oppose ROTC from bothering us
as they have in the past, he
explained. And its better as far
as the esprit and the morale of
the unit goes.

*Theie seems to be no sense in resistance in this
country any longer if you resist youre classified
I-A and sent to Vietnam to die its like a complete
dictatorship, and I refuse to worry about it any
longer, thats all I have no desire to either remain
here or come back once Im in Canada -- we have it
made once were there, he concluded.
Alfred Hicks, the third member of this migratory
party, is the mastermind behind the escape plot he
is the man who knows the contacts in Canada he
is the one who has studied the draft laws and he
knows just how significant his act of desertion will
be.
Itll have consequences, theres no getting away
from that, he said. Once were in Canada therell
be no coming back.
On the other hand, once were there, things will
be so golden, who will want to come back? Dick
and Tony have confidence in me to set them up
once were there. I know enough people in Montreal
and Ontario to set the three of us up with no
sweat, Hicks said.
Im leaving the United States because it is a
dictator country ruled by a fanatic who hasnt a
brain in his head. Im leaving because I believe in
democracy and freedom, and they just arent
around in this country any more, he continued.
Im opposed to the Vietnam war, to forced
conscription, to forced integration, to forced taxes
- Im opposed to being forced to do insane things.
ID never be able to get along in a dictatorship, so
Im leaving its that simple and Im happy Dick
and Tony are going with me the financial backing
will be helpful, he said.
So around the end of the month or in August the
three degree-holding young men will drive north and
cross the border into Canada. Unless laws change
they will be unable to return. Only they as
individuals will know if the choice was wise

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Ltk*a*Y=Gets Grant

5126.503 grant
Department && 'jBF^P l *
Education and t&jpfre t'>r
purchasing books sf nd
materials. £.
The library was given
$40,000 to aid in the
compilation of Latin American
serial documents. For the past
five years the library has been
compiling bibliographies of the

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principal serial documents of
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There is nothing to while away a lazy summer
evening like a concert under spreading oaks.
These pictures aptly prove the point, as UF
students and their families ~ lounge on the lawn
in front of University Auditorium to enjoy the

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Students Favor Curfew Ruling

By LINDA TIDWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students favor the recent
announcement of abolishment
of curfew for sophomore and
junior women by a more than
two to one majority, a recent
Alligator poll on the street
showed.
Only 10 per cent of the
random sample of 50 students
from all classifications felt the
curfew should remain. The
following cross-section was
discovered:

Music Clinic Underway Here

The Division of Continuing Education and the
Department of Music are sponsoring the Ninth
Annual Gatorland Music Clinic on campus this
week, July 21-27.
Attending will be over two hundred high school
music students from around the state. They will
participate in rehearsals, music theory classes, stage
bands and ensembles.
One feature of the Clinic will be a series of daily
chamber music recitals presented by the faculty.

SUMMER RELAXATION

IN ALLIGATOR POLL

More males felt the curfews
should remain than females. The
females felt the division should
be drawn between sophomores
and juniors.
More freshmen thought the
curfew should remain than any
other group. Sophomores and
juniors both felt 2 to 1 that
curfews were unnecessary and
seniors went unanimously for
the abolishment of curfews.
As one student said, the
lifting of curfews creates a
burden on the maturity of the

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sounds of the Gator Summer Band at a concert
last week. Alligator photographer Doug Case caught
the un-action.
If you want a little break Saturday evening,
catch the twilight concert at & 30.

The recitals will be at 4:00 p.m. today through
Thursday in Walker Auditorium and are open to the
public. Admission is free.
Saturday there will be a piano recital beginning
at 11:00 a.m. followed by the student Ensemble
Recital at 3:00 p.m., all in Room 122 of the Music
Department. This also is open to the public.
The climax of the weeks events will be the
Gatorland Music Clinics Gala Twilight Concert
Saturday at 6:45 p.m. on the lawn of University
Auditorium.

individual which is not bad; on
the contrary, it is a very good
thing.
No one in the sample thought
that incoming freshmen girls
should be without curfews but
some advocated no curfews for
second quarter coeds.
When asked about curfews
for freshmen males, the
reactions received were
something like Impossible, it
cant be done or the natural
superiority of males at an equal
age...

Engineers Save
Taxpayer Funds
By MARK LEIBOVIT
Alligator Correspondent
Florida taxpayers unknowingly save more than $350,000 in
sanitation control each year, because of research data obtained from
the UFs Department of Environmental Engineering.
The department, headed by John E. Kiker Jr., is singular in the
state and was the first of its kind in the Southeast.
Kiker said that one of the department's first objectives was to
reduce the cost of waste treatment to Florida taxpayers. Up until
that time," said Kiker, all designed criteria for such treatment was
based on information gathered in northerly climates.
I certainly think, said Kiker, the savings would be higher now
since this estimate was made a few months ago by the now retired
State Sanitary Engineer.
The department, formerly called Bioenvironmental Engineering,
concentrates in the study of water, air and environmental pollutions.
More than 80 per cent of the funds used for these studies are
provided from either federal or private grants.- The state supplies less
than 20 per cent, said Kiker.
One example of important research also underway is concerned
with the eutrophication or overfertilization of Florida lakes.
The ultimate goal of the study is to evaluate the physical, chemical
and biological changes inherent in lakes and to find out at what stage
of pollution the lake reaches a point of no return. Rehabilitation
processes are also being evaluated.
Kiker pointed to noise control as another research area. He
thinks that next to pollution, noise control will soon become one
of this countrys most researched fields.
In this department, Kiker continued, we have spread ourselves
so thin trying to solve these problems, that I think it behooves us to
concentrate in the future more in depth than in breadth.
He said researchers can do much toward realizing that the problems
faced are interdisciplinary. They must be worked out by joint
effort to be successful.
Orientation Program
Sights Responsibility

By HELEN WATT
Alligator Correspondent
Responsibility is the main
focal point in college life today.
And it will be of major
importance in the fall
orientation program for new
students here at the UF, says
assistant Dean of Men, Donald
Mott.
The new orientation
program is designed to place
more responsibility on the
students from the start, said
Mott, director of fall
orientation.
In previous years, the new
students were divided into
groups with group leaders. These
leaders met with their groups
before each test or function.
And then they vanished.
This kindergarten type of
setup has been eliminated, said

Indian Club Presents Film

The India Club and the Board
of International Activities will
present an Indian feature film
Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Reitz
Union Auditorium.
The film is reported to be one
of the best India has ever
produced and has been shown all
the world.
Entitled WAQT (TIME),
the color movie is the drama of a
family and the impact of time
and life on two generations of
the family.
Some of Indias greatest stars
are featured, such as Sunil Dutt,
Sadhana, Raj Kumar, Shashi
Kapoor and hundreds of others.
Admission will be 25 cents.

TtMKfay. July 23, 1988, Th* Florida Alligator,

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SADHANA
... Indian film star

Dale B. Willingham, assistant
director of fall orientation.
Activities will be coordinated
through housing.
Each student will be given an
individual schedule when he
checks in at the beginning of
orientation. The only group
meetings will be those that the
individual sections in
dormitories call on their own.
The students will not have
group leaders telling them what
to do but section advisors, big
sisters and orientation staff
members will be available at all
times to answer any questions
and help students more so
than in the past, said Miss Carol
Freedman, staff consultant.
4500 students are expected
2800 freshmen, 1000 lower
division transfers and 1300
upper division transfers,
according to Dean Mott

Page 3



Page 4

L The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 23, 1968

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Once again Scarlett OHara is
pursued by Rhett Butler, life at
Tara and Twelve Oaks is
destroyed, and the panoramic
tragedy of the Civil War invades
American life in the re-release of
Gontj With the Wind by David
O. Selznik.
The movie was adapted in
1939 from Margaret Mitchells
best-selling novel. It was
considered, at the time, one of
the most expensive and
technically advanced motion
pictures ever made. The efforts
at realism (a 40-acre section of
MGM re-created Atlanta, 1864,
meticulously) and new camera
techniques, such as the longest
pull-back in the history of
motion pictures during the
railroad scene of wounded
Confederate soldiers, were
heralded by the industry.
Conversion of this picture
technically for modem theatre
showing has been done so
perfectly that the viewer is not
aware-of the age of the film or
the inferior techniques used
then.
As for why Gone With the
Wind has captured the hearts of
millions for almost 30 years I
believe it is a combination of the
afore-mentioned technicolor
panorama, the imagination of
the viewer captured by the epic
movie which overwhelms him by
its scope, the historical
backgrounds and the
performances.
The setting is Georgia,
1864-68. The screenplay follows
religiously Miss Mitchells spirit
and portrayal of her South
before and after the War.
Running parallel to the pre-war
Georgia of plantations, balls,
slaves, gentlemen and ladies and
with pride and arrogance, the
war itself and the tragic fall and
eventual defeat, finally
Reconstruction and humiliation
of the defeated is the life of
Scarlett OHara.
A pragmatist believing in
expediency and adhering to the
philosophy of the end
justifying the means, only the

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'Gone With The Wind

land, her Tara, is important to
her. How she can keep it and get
anything else she desires at the
moment transcends all history
and tragedy around her. Selfish,
unscrupulous, and unloving, she
gains her strength as all around
her loses strength. Scarlett
represents the strong-willed who
survived the war, profiting by it.
Adjustability without
concern for morality or pride is
her rule. Since the movie stresses
her second generation Irish
lineage it makes her a member of
Southern society and yet devoid
of its heritage. Ashley Wilkes,
whom she chases professing love
throughout the movie, is the
Southern gentleman, and his
wife Melanie is the ideal
Southern lady.
"" PIS
GABLE
Ashleys world is destroyed
by the war and with the
destruction of his plantation life,
he loses all roots. The future
holds promise of success for
Scarlett and further heartache
for Ashley, a broken man.
Rhett Butler is the cynical
opportunist who realizes the
unrealistic world Ashley loved
and yet cannot condone
Scarletts unscrupulous nature
and yet he loves her because she
does have the spirit to continue.
He is a Southerner, yet he knows
that if the South is to survive it
must change, or be changed.
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Therefore, he represents a
compromise between the two two
- two yet he loses in the end.
Vivien Leigh as the selfish,
contemptible, yet alluring
Scarlett is masterful and strong
in the protrayal. Olivia de
Havilland as the ideal Melanie
plays her part to its sticky-sweet
hilt. Clark Gables Rhett is
humorous and brilliantly
dramatic as he suffers with
Scarlett.
However, the portrayal of
Ashley by Leslie Howard is
bland and he recites his lines
tediously. He does not convince
the audience that he is the
meditative, philosophic baron of
Twelve Oaks and good Southern
gentleman, so his fall after the
war is not nearly as poignant as
it should be.
One finds it difficult to
understand just what the spirited
Scarlett saw in him that caused
her to devote so many years to
him although he spurned her!
One must remember,
however, that in 1939
Hollywood was interested in
making stars, not actors, and so
it did. And so did Gone With
the Wind. Eventually, though,
all succumbs to the vastness of
the Civil War era, the devastation
of war and the personal
fortitude needed to withstand it.
This theme certainly transcends
all years and generations. And so
does and will Gone With
the Wind.

STAFF NOTICE
The Board of Directors of the Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit
Union now has a plan whereby University Employees may request payroll
deductions for Credit Union share or loan payments.
Credit Union members have already been notified of this but employees
of the U of F who are not already members of the Credit Union may visit
our offices and make the necessary arrangements.
U of F ers like the Credit Union because it is so easy to save and borrow
there Dividends are credited semi-annually with current rate 5%% per
year. The Credit Union is owned entirely by U of F employees and their
families and is operated for them exclusively -- You can count on quick
sympathetic help when you have money problems.
insurance is provided on eligible loans. Savings accounts
carry life savings insurance, insuring each eligible member up to $2,000 of
his savings based on his age at the time the deposit was made.
Remember, if ou are a full time employee of the U of F you and your
family may be a member of this $4,000,000.00 Credit Union.
Write or call for information on payroll deductions, and
SAVE FROM THE TOP OF THE PILE!!
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA Ig&JillHliiBlB.
CAMPUS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION
Hours: 8:00 A.M. 3:30 P.M. Monday Through Friday
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street
Ext. 2973 Health Center 5107

** ... searches through war casualties
MV 90 s
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave
QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49< SPECIALS X
EVERY DAY
a SELF SERVICE NO TIPPING I
I 313 W. UNIV. AVE^^



Silvehman'A
Classic comfort marks this f
f burnt orange culotte with J X
M \ coordinated burnt orange and
M UPS \ navy long sleeve turtleneck WSmk Jhi
/ \ pull over top. Tip-toe BHf
\ kilted tassel ll'eejuns. iVB BP k
Modeled by Mary Jo. i JBjf %
I Soft, sleek and sleeveless I
f I Befty Lane white lace bodice I
. I cocktail dress l f
I skirf and orange silk 1 I
i PHp I sasL. From the new after-five \ I
$ coi/ecfion. Modeled by Susan. M
IHr o
i r jBBm
and cotton are the latest from \ X
X W sportswear. Modeled by
S^jL J Photos by Barry Bust?Ilo
-.* . ... ,4k - -4 . *. .** \4h -k. . *,-.k-l*- *..A.-~ * <* -

Tuesday, July 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 23, 1968

Putfatlw/
md
Ad
Amlwm

Kirks Shenanigans

(Reprinted from the Gainesville Sun)
Governor Claude Kirk is at it
again . practicing politics with the
subtlet> of a blacksmith milking a cow on a
cold and frosty morn.
We refer to Kirks shenanigans in staffing
the Florida Supreme Court.
Kirk once boasted his judicial
appointment would not only be cleared with
the Florida Bar, but it would be based on
real qualifications, not personalities, not
party, not past support or past
opposition... The appointment, said
Kirk, will be the one visible remainder of
the administration. Hell be on the bench
long after I'm back in private practice in the
sense of banking.
Kirk got his big chance last year when
Stephen C. OConnell stepped off the court
to assume the presidency of the University
of Florida.
He appointed Alto Adams.
Alto Adams is a fine gentleman, a former
justice, and a millionaire from Ft. Pierce. He
also is a politician during the gubernatorial
campaign, he switched to Kirk with great
ballyhoo, then followed this with another
publicity blast when he joined the
Republican party. But this is incidental to
the other facts:

/*
Come along Harkins.
History is beckoning!

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
.Yews Editor

GUEST EDITORIAL

The Fifth Column

This has been an unbelievable election
year, probably the most turbulent in our
nations history. Its funny remembering
how amazed we were when George
Romney dropped out. That original
bombshell may even rate an asterisk in our
future history books.
hor the one iesson 10 uc gICSHCd ffOUl
this election year is to beware the folly of
predictions. Nevertheless, Paul Kaplan, the
Alligator's answer to Scotty Reston, has
confidently predicted that Hubert
Humphrey will roll over Richard Nixon
come November.
Indeed, Mr. Kaplan was
condescendingly surprised that students on
this campus were not only unaware of this
imminent landslide, but that they actually
believed the current campus distaste for
the present administration could be
reasonably interpreted as an indicator of a
loss for the Democrats this fall.
Mr. Kaplan chides us for not going
beyond our own backyard to determine
the realities of the current American
political scene. One wonders just how far
did Mr. Kaplan go; Micanopy? High
Springs? Perhaps all the way to Time
magazine? Lets take a look.
27 per cent of all the registered voters in
this country are Republicans. Almost 50
per cent are registered as Democrats with
the rest officially designated as
Independents.
The polls indicate that Tricky Dicks
pulling power among the Independents is
less than average. So, on the surface Mr.
Kaplans analysis verges on the uncanny,
even though it is grounded in the obvious.
After all, 50 per cent to 27 per cent is a
landslide, isnt it?

- Mr. Adams had not practiced law for 15
years.
- Mr. Adams was within two years of the
courts mandatory retirement age of 70.
- Mr. Adams was rated as unqualified
by the Florida Bar.
Making the rounds was an interesting
theory about Kirks willingness to break his
highfalutin promises. His real choice for the
Supreme Court was his aide, Wade Hopping,
but Hopping had not been a member of the
bar for the required 10 years. Adams was
selected to warm the seat until this summer,
when Hopping became eligible.
Today, Hopping is eligible and is the
Republican nominee for the Supreme Court.
And this week Alto Adams resigned,
according to schedule.
Like the director of a cheap Hollywood
scenario, Kirk now can put his crony
Hopping into office- thereby giving
Hopping the advantage of running as an
incumbent supreme court justice.
Perfidious politics may seem a harsh term
for such maneuvering. But it was Claude
Kirk himself who once said, Anyone who
looks like a duck, walks like a duck, hung
around with ducks and talked like a duck, is
a duck.
Quack, quack.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

Fools Rush 1n...

Well, now. In every primary held this
year after New Hampshire, the nominees,
delegates and stand-ins representing the
Johnson Administration (i.e. HHH),
consistently failed to win over 35 per cent
of the vote.
And by the time .the last primaries were
held (Oregon, California), the trend was
clear-cut: from coast to coast the
Democratic electorate has overwhelmingly
rejected the Johnson-Humphrey
administration.
Approximately 70 per cent of the
registered Democrats allowed to vote in
open primaries do not want Hubert as their
partys nominee. This translates into 35 per
cent of the national vote. Even if one is
generous and assumes that half of these
rejected voters will return to the party fold
in November, this still gives Mr. Humphrey
just 32 per cent of the vote.
' The Independents traditionally split
fairly even, so we hardly have what has
been described as a bulldozer leading the
Democratic party.
Added to this is the unknown but
potentially calamitous candidacy of George
Wallace. Capitalizing on the uneasiness of
the American people over law and order
(whatever that means), he trumpets the
politics of fear. No basis in reason is
necessary for this type of candidacy, no
new programs are brought forth, rather he
scares people into voting for him.
Last week he was placed on the
presidential ballot in Maryland. In 1964 he
gathered 40 per cent of the votes in the
DEMOCRATIC primary in this same state,
in 1964 when everybody was up for civil
rights.
Wallace got 35 per cent of the vote in

yjhj. m?]
Alligator Staff
\r Margaret O'Brien
Copy Editor
Ted Remley Lori Steele
Entertainment Editor Features Editor
Staff Writers: Caron Balkany, George Cunningham,
Susie Halback, Joe Knight, Kitty Oliver.
Staff Photographer: Nick Arroyo
Staff Artist: Lois Parks
L

By Jason Straight

Wisconsin four years ago in the Democratic
primary. Just one month ago over 7,000
residents of Jacksonville PAID to hear him
speak in the City Coliseum. Thats twice as
many as Nelson Rockefeller drew on our
own campus for free.
Finally there is the very real possibility
of a fourth party, headed by either
McCarthy or seine ether national figure of
the Anti-War, New Politics ilk. (Would
you believe.. Arthur Schlesinger?) And
that fourth party would easily garnish 20
per cent of the vote when you consider the
large number of voters, be they
Republican, Democratic or Independent,
who want neither Humphrey nor Nixon.
The point is this nobody is going to
steamroller anybody in November. As
Kaplan astutely pointed out, the chances
of Ted Kennedy running as the
VicePresidential nominee are remote to
the point of non-existent.
The Republicans have Chuck Percy,
(who, by the way is not tall, dark and
Handsome. The last time I saw Percy he
was 5 8, fair-skinned, and somewhat
pleasant looking). John Lindsay, Mark
Hatfield, Ronald Reagan, and even George
Romney (my guess) are also potential GOP
veeps. A far more attractive line-up
than John Connally or George Smathers.
For as Tom Wicker pointed out, we may
be in for the biggest bombshell yet. He
suggests that none of the nominees will
succeed in getting a majority of the electoral
votes (as far as this election is concerned,
you can forget the popular vote). Come
January, not November, our next President
will be picked by the House of
Representatives, with each state having one
vote.



Bailey : KKK In Disguise

MR. EDITOR:
As a newsman-who has in the past worked within
the UF community I would like to impart several
pieces of information not opinion to the campus
about your columnist Jimmey Bailey.
During my tenure as managing editor of The
Alligator last year I had several long conversations
with Jimmey, whom I have known for several years,
behind the closed doors of my office.
At these conversations Jimmey told me, among
other things, that:
1- He has been personally advised by Robert
Shelton, high honcho of the Ku Klux Klan, not to
join that organization but instead to work for it in
the guise of a concerned conservative.
2 He could do more for the KKK as a
non-member than as an active member. (Jimmey
said he longed for membership but was willing to
make the sacrifice if it would help the KKK.)
3 The Negro is biologically inferior to the white
and should be returned to Africa.

OPEN FORUM:
jAduo'wimi tyiAAmt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

MR. EDITOR:

I happened to begin reading
Fridays Alligator before my Psy
309 class. After looking
adoringly at my name in print
(one of the three cardinal
reinforcements of writing letters
to the editor, the other two
being (I) being able to reduce
tensions or frustrations and (2) a
healthy chance to be self
righteous), I glanced down and
noticed that there was Jimmey
Bailey again.
After examining my' past
motives for commenting on
Jims previous sermons, a
thoroughly worthwhile endeavor
as the Psy 309 course concern''

>#' \rf

Justice Abe Fortas Too Liberal

MR. EDITOR:
The defeat of Senator Tom Kuchel. who was appointed b\ then
Governor Earl Warren to fill the seat vacated by Richard Nixon,
probably precipitated Chief Justice Warrens "resignation. Warren
confided to President Johnson his fears that a conservative tide was
rising in the nation that would sweep into office a Republican
President, most probably Richard Nixon.
Warren wanted someone to continue in his liberal tradition and was
happy that LBJ wanted to appoint his old friend. Abe Fortas. In the
1966-67 term, Justice Fortas agreed with Warren on 97 out of a
possible 112 decisions. \
Some Senators feel that Fortas should not be appointed by a
Lame Duck President. The other reason given is "cronism.

We Need Patriots

itself directly with various
aspects of personality, I decided
that I was becoming vindictive
towards another individual due
to his opinions, a trait which I
deplore; but, being human, a
trap I fall into.
Os consequence of that
discovery, I have decided not to
address my remarks directly to
Jim; rather, I shall center them
around the last paragraph of his
most recent epistle.
Much of the division in
American society can be
attributed to the conclusion of
many that their particular
political configuration puts them
at least a silly millimeter

4. Jews are all communists. However. Jimmey
was nice enough to tell me I was a "special Jew
with whom he could talk.
5 Catholics naturally are suspect since America
must be ruled by its true owners, the White
Anglo-Saxon Protestants.
It should also be noted by the university
community that Jimmey personally brought Robert
Shelton to the UF several years ago. Shelton came
as a personal favor to Jimmey.
In the past Jimmey wrote several columns so
offensive to Negroes and other minority groups that
they were deemed unprintable.
My personal conviction, and this is opinion, is
that Jimmey should be allowed to say what he
thinks. However. I also firmly believe that his
readers are entitled to know more about his
background and political affiliations. Certainly,
conservatives can only be insulted when their
battered name is attached to Jimmey.
HARVEY ALPER

above anyone else in terms of
patriotism. Individual
differences become a buried
concept in this rush towards
Americanism.
To them the statement My
country, right or wrong reads
My country, right. Mistakes in
American policies in the past are
often claimed by them to be
construed as such only because
history books are written by
Communists or others of that
ilk.
Most of us have encountered
such a psychology at one time:
The PTA president who
denounces Communist-written
textbooks, gubernatorial candi candidates
dates candidates who swear theyll elim eliminate
inate eliminate Commies and pinkoes
from the educational system,
Congressmen who label anything
that they can not accept or
understand as Un-American.
They all fall into the same
hole. And its a dark one. But
their voices can always be heard
in a unified roar casting insults
about the patriotism of those
who walk by their abyss instead
of jumping in.
This nation needs patriots.
HO! blind ones. It needs
patriots strong enough to
weather internal strife without
becoming self-righteous.
America has a mandate for
change, a modern manifest
destiny. To ignore this would be
absurd, but ignorance can be
eliminated. To denounce and
work aeainst it. however, w'ould
in the end be disastrous. And
there is no reined) for finality.
GIL KORENBLIT. 3AS

But Fortas should not be denied appointment for these reasons. Me
should be denied appointment for hi'* ultra-liberal decisions. For
example. Fortas was the key vote in the Miranda decision (5-4) which
virtually barred even freely given confessions from being used in a
Federal or State court as thev had been since the founding of the
Republic. File Congress in tne leecntiv passed Crime bill overturned
this court decision.
Fortas voted to strike down a section of the 1950 Subversive
Activities Control Act which banned a Communist from working in a
defense plant. Fortas also voted to allow unions to levy fines on
workers who refused to strike despite the Taft-Hartley Act which
guarantees union members the right not to participate in strike action.
. DALE ANDERSON

The Conservative View

Taxpayer Power
By Jimmey Bailey
Recently Thurman Sensing, executive vice-president of the
Southern States Industrial Council, wrote an editorial called
Taxpayer Power.
At a time when all sorts of slogans are being employed, Mr.
Sensing wrote, such as Black Power' and Student Power, it is
no doubt fitting that the true forgotten people in America-the
taxpayers coin their own slogan and get organized in an action
program.
Taxpayer Power* is a slogan that should catch some attention.
For years, the taxpayers have been an oppressed group in the
United States. They have been discriminated against by Big
Government and cheated by those who want to live on handouts.
The mobilization of taxpayers is very much overdue.
Just think what the taxpayers could achieve if they stood
together, or even marched on Washington to demand a break
from the government. Taxpayers are the great unorganized
majority in this land. They could take a cue from the highly
organized, militant minorities that push the government around.
Certainly there is just cause for taxpayer action. They are
being ground down by a combination of bureaucrats, reliefers,
and left-of-center types. This unholy alliance threatens the
taxpayers with ruin.
Consider what is happening in New York City, the nation's
biggest city. In that metropolis, the welfare situation is virtually
out of hand. In the summer of 1966, New York City had 572,251
citizens on relief rolls. By the summer of 1967, the monthly total
of reliefers was up to 742,953. The cost to the taxpayers had
gone up 40 per cent. On an annual basis, welfare cost to New
York taxpayers has gone up almost $1.5 billion.
It is believed that the sharp hike in welfare is largely due to a
campaign by the Poverty-Rights Action Program, the national
organization of welfare recipients. This outfit is trying to get as
many people as possible on welfare and increase the cost to the
maximum.
This rising tide of welfarism isnt inundating simply in New
York City. It is lapping at the solid municipal structures built by
taxpayers around the country. If there isnt a taxpayer revolt
against this welfarism, the productive citizens of this country will
be drowned in the high cost.
How to rescue the taxpayers, how to organize taxpayer power,
are questions that should engage the attention of responsible
leaders. In this connection, a welcome development is the
statement by George Champion, Chairman of Chase Manhattan
Bank, that the nations welfare system is in need of a complete
overhaul.
Champion indicated that welfare has become away of life for
many Americans, with third and fourth generations taking their
place on the relief rolls. Mr. Champion recommended the
adoption of an incentive welfare program based on motivation,
training, and job opportunity.
Very simply, such a system would demand that all adults who
receive aid would be required to work for their money. Though
hundreds of thousands of Americans live on relief, few programs
require their reliefers to do anything constructive to help the
communities in which they live.
The reliefers sit at home, while the streets of their cities arc
often filthy and litter fills the countryside. If they cant do
anything else, the reliefers should be required to cleanup the
cities and towns in which they live.
The public should not subsidize idleness or public
irresponsibility. One of the worst features of a generation of
welfare laws is that they contain no provision for requiring
greater social discipline on the part of welfare recipients.
The reliefers in the United States have the idea that society
owes them a living, but that they don ! owe society anything in
return for assistance granted to them. In short, the reliefer* JISVC
no gratitude to the taxpayers who are making a sscrifice to help
support those who are not gainfully employed.
If the taxpayers start organizing and exercising their power, it
should have a profoundly beneficial effect not only on the
country's finances but on the very tone of our national life.
Indeed, the taxpayer has become the downtrodden American,
and it is time that the millions of taxpayers band together to
assert their rights and make themselves heard in the halls of
government.
After all. they are paying the bills those the government is
noi on inflationary credit.

Tuesday, July 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers* names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
V *,
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (A~ls4^tfp)
TRAILER, 2 bm, bath, refrig., etc.,
$350. cash plus $67.00 monthly,
immaculate. Phone Gloria Marlin,
3762081, or come inspect at Town
and Country Trailer Park.
(Al6l4t-p)
At Historical Cross Creek, Florida,
Large 19th century frame residence
on paved road, Approximately 10
acres young fancy citrus, 40 acre
pasture bordering on marsh of Lake
Lochloosa. Mr. G. Hugh Williams.
Phone 4663454. (Al6l4tp)
ADORABLE Basset Hound Puppies
Registered with American Kennel
Club. Shots, Wormed. $55.00 and
$65.00. Call 372-1504 after 5:00
p.m. (A-162-3t-p)
HUNTING RIFLE, Model 99F 300
Savage. Like new. $70.00, 372-4847
after 5:00 p.m. (A-162-lt-p)
1960 RAMBLER American,
Excellent condition throughout.
Dependable, good tires, standard
transmission 25 mpg, $225.00,
372-4847, Craig, after 5:00 p.m.
(A-162-lt-p)
FOR SALE: 1965 Yamaha 150 cc,
girl student owner, $165.00.
378-2863. (A-162-3t-p)
FOR SALE, MOVING OVERSEAS,
SELLING RCA VICTOR TV, 2
YEARS OLD. MUST SELL AT
ONCE. NEW $175.00, NOW $75.00.
CALL 372-8204 AFTER 5 p.m.
(A-162-lt-p)
For Sale Honda Scrambler 250 cc
1964 $325.00. 3766764.
(Al6l 2t-p)
36 x 8 Trailer. Very good condition.
Air Conditioned. $1750.00. 3101
S.W. 34th St. Lot 41 or Call
378-6910. (Al6l 3t-p)

*DO-lt-Yourself
paws CLASSIFIEDS mm
a To order classifieds, use the
§ form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive)
Itance to: Alligator Classifieds, LJ 1 da y SOS
Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- 2 days
ville Florida 32601. 3 <*** < no% discoun > f|
v ]]4 days (*lO% discount)
Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over W
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount) |j!
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE ||
_. AfcinrATiAM Count the words > o mlttin 6 a, an &
C LAbb IrILA 11 L> In Addresses and phone numbers jgj
i count as one word. Minimum charge #8
for sale ls *I.OO for 20 words. For each fig
for rent additional word add 3?. Multiply 9g(
wanted t o tai by number of days the ad ax
help wanted run subtract the discount Sj J
autos /jf applicable) and enclose a check g j
personal for rma inder. For example, E i
lost-found R 32 _word ad to run 4 days costs g j
services $4.90 5#44 less 545).
a> a |
WORDING fS
D $ 1
[ om
@ I
jg 1
fls >' a
fiS) iidjttMuari
NAME DATE I
R STUDENT _PHONE |j
g ADDRESS ||
jM CITY STATE ZIP jj
money cannot be refunded if ad is cancelledaHgySj

f6r SALE
j:: jir. x
, vw.v.w^w; ;v;'X >>Xvv:v"v"vy-v.'.''V.'
:I I
EARN MONEY IN SPARE TIME,
Small business for sale 10 candy and
nut machines $500.00. Call
3724985 for more information.
(A 161 st p)
J'
QUALITY FOOD FOR LOW PRICES
Lunch and Dinner Specials. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue, Down Downtown.
town. Downtown. (A-152-20t-p)
SURFBOARD, Reef, 96, nodings,
all green, $60.00. TROMBONE, Olds
Ambassador, 5 years old, perfect
shape, $40.00. Call 376-7133 (A-161-
lt-p)
FOR RENT |
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(Bls7lstp)
1 Bedroom Apartment, furnished
and Air conditioned. 15331535
N.W. sth Avenue. 5 Blocks from
Campus, available immediately. Call:
37 6 8475 or 376 1065.
(B 160 5t p)
2 Bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student couple only. $50.00 per
month for long-term tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 3729903.
(Bl6lstp)
TRAILER LOTS, A few choice
locations for mobile homes. High,
Dry, Shady, Cool. $25.00 per month.
The Prince Trailer Park. Telephone
591-1190, P.O Box 217, Orange
Lake, Fla. (B-162-3t-p)

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 23, 1968

WANTED |
&x*x*x*x*x*x*%vx*x*:x*x*x*xxx-vx*x*x < i:
WANTED Volunteers interested in
YMCA youth work, under privileged
areas, 2-3 hours/week at your
convenience, must have
transportation. Call 372-5621,
378-6208. (C-162-2t-p)
Wanted: 1 or 2 female roommates for
fall quarter. French Quarter Apt. 72.
CALL 3787858. (Cl6l 4tp)
Three coeds need one roommate to
share 2 bedroom Tanglewood Apt.
beginning Sept. 15, Must like cats!
Call Judy, Room 1008 Towers.
(C-1613tp)
Adventurous coed to travel out of
U.S. Share expenses. If interested call
Mary at 3781078 4 Call after 5 if
possible. (Cl6lstp)
3 Female roommates. House Five
min. walk from campus. Own
bedroom, No Lease, Furnished, Rent
$25.00 month each plus utilities. Call
3723940. (Cl6l3tp)
DESPERATE : Student needs 3 BR,
2 bath house. SIOO or less D.P. and
assume mtg. at low interest rate.
Occupancy before Sept. Call
372-7177. (C-159-st-p)
4 BR Furnished house wanted year
lease starting September faculty
family ownership care write
Buskirk, 3324 St. Antoine,
Kalamazoo, Mich. 49007.
(Cl6ostp)
Wanted roommate for French
Quarter, for month of August or all
year. Student preferred, Call Barry
3725500. (Cl6l2tp)
£xxx*vx*x*x*x*x*x*x*x:-x*x.x.x.:wwx;;
AUTOS
>: &
'###( JJ " -**** >
1956 CHEVY Pickup, Vz ton, VB,
radio, heater, spotlight, backup
lights, some rust. New tag. $225.00.
378-5774. (G-162-3t-p)
1962 VOLVO 122-S 4 door, 40,000
miles, excellent condition, new tires
one owner must sell $695.00 or best
offer. 378-5184. (G-162-3t-p)
FOR SALE: 1968 Tempest Station
Wagon, AC, Power steering, Power
brakes, 9,400 miles. Make an offer,
Campus Credit Union 1200 SW sth
Ave. (G-162-st-c)
65 VOLKSWAGEN Sedan. Leaving
on Fulbright Fellowship and must
sell. Bahama Blue, Sunroof, Radio,
Shoulder Belts, New Tires, VW
-maintained, Excellent condition.
$970. 3 76-2304. 5-7 p.m.
(G-161-3t-p)
1962 TBird, all power, AC and
radio, very clean. Cost SIOOO six
months ago, will sell for $750. Call
3762180, in Diamond Village.
(Gl6l3tp)
Ford Galaxie 61 $290, Air
conditioned, power steering,
autotransmission. Call 3761478.
(Gl6l 2tp)
Auto for Sale: Red Triumph Spitfire,
1964, with top tonneau. Must sell
Got married, need money Great deal
3723940 or 376-3211 Ext. 5120.
Jennifer. (Gl6l3tp)
Wanted: A.C. Bristol or similar sports
car call Cary 376 6764.
(C-1612tp)
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 8:00
THE MAGNIFICENT!
I SEVEN I
I Yul Srynner 1
times^^B
.7:00 A o-1
Â¥ 'SPLENDOR
IN THE GRASS!
| WED-SAT AT 7:00 & 9:15 I

AUTOS
1966 Triumph Spitfire, white, red
interior, soft top, and tonneau,
luggage rack, one owner, excellent
condition SI3OO. Call 3768322.
(Gl6l4tp)
;:j x*x*xx*!vvi*x x*x*x x xxvvx*x x x*x'
PERSONAL
V
>.
..v.v.wxw.v.w.w.vx.:.:.:.v.v.v.v.*rtvx*;*>:
STUDENTS: Are you interested in
learning about an unusual and
exciting opportunity in direct selling?
Mr. T. Noffsinger will be giving four
lectures on July 30th. Contact your
Placement office for more
information, G-22 Reitz Union.
(J-162-2t-p)
| LOST A FOUND |
, **X*X***'*X'!''*!'X*!**'!*!*! !*X*! # !*!*!***!*! !*!*V*V***%Y
FOUND: Shirt, Tie clip and clip on
sunglasses, Call 372-6477 after 5:30
p.m. (L-162-nc-3t)
LOST: Leftover Lammies Lost bag
of softball equipment on upper drill
field. We need it to win. Call Marty,
376-8059. (L-162-lt-p)

FREE MOVIE
EVIL of FRANKENSTEIN
PRESENTED BY THE UNION BOARD
\
THE FILMS COMMJTTEE WISHES TO
APOLOGIZE FOR NOT SHOWING KISS OF
THE VAMPIRE LAST WEDNESDAY NIGHT.
THE MOVIE WAS LOST IN THE MAIL
BETWEEN HERE AND OKLAHOMA.
13* ST. N.W. 23rd HI. Ph. 378-2434prrt Z£Zvn
1 1
FEATURE AT: 2:10-4:10-6:10-8:10-10:10 joPEN 1:30
JAMES GARNER DEBBIE REYNOLDST t
QMjjSfr MAURICE RONET X
ITrwr,.l...x *=*.
l -1 icnr\imuiviMs jic -urn;., | Panavision* W |
THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR" 1
1:45-3:50-5:50-7:55-10:00
WEDNESDAY! "p
ROBERT MITCHUM
o, PETER FALK EARL HOLLIMAN MARK DAMON,
,mARTHUR RYAN &,* IECI L ty 7*

SERVICES
'^V.SvWWSI.SVY-vJXWXOX-Y-ViVW'IS'WI
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING;
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
systems checked free. (Mls3tfct
DISSERTATION Figures, graphs,
illustrations, etc. Professional
Graphic Artist. Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-162-3t-p)
BABY CARE. 311 NW 15th Terrace.
Mon-Fri. 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. $3.00
per day, $.75 per hour. Mature,
experienced, Christian home. Phone
376-2072. (M-162-lt-C)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service Service
Service 603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M 153tsC)
Use our handy
mail in order
form.



IN SPEECH HERE .1
Urban Expert Hits
Eduation Myths
A broad attack on the myths of education which have perpetuated
the depressed lot of the big city ghetto and a gloomy forecast for the
future of mass living were declared last week by A. Donald Bourgeois,
associate director of the Urban Coalition.
In a speech before students and faculty at the College of
Education, Bourgeois said, Mass living is rushing toward a
confrontation with the truth, a confrontation that will be costly, all
the more so if we procrastinate until it is too late to forestall a bloody
revolution.
Bourgeois, who until earlier this month was director of the St.
Louis Model City Agency, urged educators to avoid the pitfalls of
easy, cookbook solutions and of defining urban problems as
unsolvable.
He attacked what he called The Big Myth that ghetto children
cant leam. This, he said, has become a self-fulfilling prophecy: By
the time ghetto youngsters reach the age of 10 or so, they have heard
it so often they believe it.
This myth is supported by another, said Bourgeois. The reason
ghetto children are termed unteachable is because they come from a
deprived culture handed down by their parents.
Think for a moment of what might happen if we focused instead
on the richness of ghetto culture rather than on its inadequacies.
Consider the resourcefulness and initiative required daily to survive,
he said.
In many respects the ghetto child is more self-sufficient than his
suburban counterparts.

WHATS
HAPPENING

By LORI STEELE
Alligator Features Editor
IN ORGANIZING FOR
COHESIVENESS: Tonight, the
InterOrganizational Council
meets in room 357, Reitz Union
at 7:30.
IN SMALL TOWN SENATES:
The Student Senate meets
tonight in room 349, Reitz
Union, at 6:30.
IN SWEET STRAINS OF JAZZ:
Wednesday, the Gator Variety
Band will swing on the union
terrace at 6:45 p.m.
Wednesday, the Gator Variety
Band will swing on the union
terrace at 6:45 p.m.

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, July 23
Gatorland Music Clinic.
Chamber Music for Strings
and Piano, Walker Aud., 4:00
p.m.
Union Board: Bridge Lessons,
150 C Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gatorland Music Clinic:
Chamber Music for Winds and
Piano, University Aud., 8:15
p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: movie,
"Son of the Shiek," Union
Aud., 7:00, 8:30, & 10:00
P.M.
Wednesday, July 24
Gatorland Music Clinic: Florida
Baroque Ensemble, Walker
Aud., 4:00 p.m.

SPECIAL
COUPLES BOWLING
6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
2 FREE GAMES FOR EACH CO-ED IF LANE IS
CHECKED OUT USING HER I.D. CARD AND
DATE BOWLS AND PAYS FOR 2 GAMES
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA

IN ROCKY REPUBLICANS:
Also Wednesday, Youth for
Rockefeller meet in rooms 361,
362, 363, Reitz Union, at 7:30
p.m. At 8 p.m., the Young
Republicans meet in room 347,
Reitz Union
IN GUILDING IT: Wednesday,
the University Medical Guild will
have a reception in room 121,
Reitz Union, at 8 p.m.
IN UNIONIZING: Wednesday,
the Union Board meets in room
150 F, Reitz Union, at 4:15
p.m.
IN TAKING STOCK:
Wednesday, the Goals
Evaluation Task Force meets in
room 150 D, Reitz Union, at

Florida Speleological Society:
meeting, 346 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Thursday, July 25
Gatorland Music Clinic: Florida
Woodwind Quintet, Walker
Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Friday, July 26
Men's Interhall: movie, "Torn
Curtain," Towers Rec. Room,
7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Lyceum Council presentation
KARLSRUD ENSEMBLE, 50
cents for students, SI.OO for
faculty, staff and general
public; and Florida Cinema
Society subscription tickets.

2 Medicine/Professors
Join VA Hospital Staff

Two more key faculty
members of the College of
Medicine have accepted
positions at the Veterans
... -y.w: Jg
If
B
JURKIEWICZ

3:30 p.m.
IN HOW TO BECOME AN
ART EXPERT IN ONE EASY
LESSON: Thursday, Dr.
Robert Carson will speak on So
You Want to Buy a Painting in
Room 117, Little Hall at 3 p.m.
This talk is part of the
Humanities Department
enrichment program.
IN WHAT WAS THE COLOR
OF THAT KEY?: Friday,
Florida Blue Key meets in room
316, Reitz Union, at 2:30 p.m.
to work on Homecoming.
IN TWILIGHT TIME: Saturday,
the final twilight summer band
concert will be performed by the
high school members of the
Gatorland Music Clinic in the
Plaza of the Americas at 6:45
p.m.
IN BEING CONSTRUCTIVE:
University Community Task
Force meets in room 316, Reitz
Union, at 7:30 p.m. Friday, the
group meets in room 331, Reitz
Union, at 2:30 p.m.
IN WOCKING, ER, ROCKING
AT WAUBURG: Saturday, there
will be an 8 p.m. dance at Camp
Wauburg sponsored by the
Program Office.

)) Main Entrance ff
) GAINESVILLE MALL 9
13 / ticUlX \ JE l|| L Lasagna A- 9J
|~7coninntl i | jij * 1 T Ravioli Pilla ||
(g / Finest in gourmet food A ji IHI / Howk 3]
)| Beers end Wenesr JEM AM-B:3OPM Mon.-Set.- S
p || | |j SBndn|Cwdi|piM^
| Gainesvilles Finest )J
l\ and Most Intimate |

They
are Dr. Mauride Jurkiewicz,
professor ofWr'g'&ry, as the new
chie,f 6f Dr. William
C. Thomas Jr;, professor of
medicine, as the new chief of
medical service.
,wo
Both physicians will retain
their faculty positions in the
College of Medicine.
Jurkiewicz has been chief of
plastic and reconstructive
surgery since 1964 and a
member of the faculty since
1959. His primary research
interest has bedn into the genetic
and reconstructive problems of
cleft lip and palate.
Thomas, a faculty member
since 1957, is a specialist in
internal medicine. He has been
recognized for his work in

TONIGHT HONEST !
Do you have faith? Will you give us
ONE MORE CHANCE ? We REALLY have it
this time and we will give you
DOUBLE YOUR MONEY BACK
if we dont show
_, . 1 wC?eL
|fl
- i \>wam
sip
ONE NIGHT ONLY-TONIGHT -7, 8 GO, lOsOO
AT THE UNION 25<

Tuesday, July 23, 1968, The Florida Albgator, l

endocrinology and calcium
metabolism, and has published
results of his research in a
number Qf professional journals.
RS' : ||i|
Bl ." B :
&-
Sr ,1
BE; .':o^H
.-. HR 3H&
'?* jB JP -.; S:
J||L .***. lip
|p Ilf
: w 18
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THOMAS

Page 9



Page 10

, Tlm Florida Allifrtor. Timriay, July 23, test

TO BE SEEN!!
August 16, 1968
IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
Coll Univenity Extension
V l slri c w cT> tr*/
/ ''^ vtt M^ vA l S^v '* w t/v ,l? t T^>v tt *f
jj
. r
NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!!
SAGLUT with SO MANY PAGES we still haven't attempted to COUNT THEM! Fascinating and Awe-Inspiring c¥|?
NEWS of the Day, Illustrated, Illustrated, Illustrated. Illuminating Features All in the English Language to J5G*
Arouse the Interest and Inform the Mind. Matters of Monumental Interest to All New Florida Students are cSH
EXPLAINED for the Edification of All. Vital Messages Communicated, Provoking Opinions Given Voice, %ELm
Stimulating Artwork to Titillate the Intellect and the Sense of Humor, in COLOR, in COLOR, in COLOR!
f THE FALL PREVIEW it EDITION OF
| The Florida Alligator |



"" i .'"
f I
' C .iyC' V -' -Xj. **V
Jr 11, Ik
g3HBj <' :-:s<:\v.-. .xxjJuS^r
: v *?

It seems that
some bowling
enthusiasts feel
s b s o / u tely
helpless after they have released the
ball. A little bodyEnglish while the ball
rolls merrily down the alley seems the
only solution. This bodyovermatter
procedure takes the form of frantic hand
gestures and contortionist's body gyrations. \
Our "Italian" bowler, Leslie Lepene, 2UC, is
caught by the sneaky candid camera in some
balletlike position. The sometimes graceful, some sometimes
times sometimes ungainly form is usually topped off with some
footstomping, which is supposed- to help topple a
teetering bowling pin.

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Tuesday, July 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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BBk

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Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 23, 1968

I jL I Jljy X SULTANA QUICK FROZEN DELICIOUS II
I i-i-- I
I 1859-1967...108 YEARS yOUN6
I 60i% c w.TAve^ Locat,ons PIE b pkg 5/89<
|__ !! I"i!f m l6 A rriu _i -~

A & P COLUMBIAN
EXTRA
COFFEE special 69<
TROP-CAL-LOW
ORANGE DRINK wgi. 3/si.oo
>
BREAKSTONE
COTTAGE CHEESE m 53<
SULTANA
TOMATOES Z 2/39<
A & P FANCY
TOMATOES No. Vh Can 2/69<
CHIFFON
MARGARINE ILb OFF LABEL 39C
FOLGERS INSTANT
COFFEE >oc Z $1.35
J> SH &
FRESH SWFET WHITE SEEDLESS
GRAPES 3 ibs. SI.OO
FRESH FIRM RIPE RED
PLUMS jibs. SI.OO
FIRM RIPE CALIFORNIA
NECTARINES jibs SI.OO
LARGE FIRM RIPE
PEACHES ibs. 29C
FRESH LARGE CRISP ICEBERG
LETTUCE HEAD 19<
FRESH LARGE
BLUEBERRIES 3 p s SI.OO
JUMBO VINE-RIPE CALIFORNIA
CANTALOUPES 3/SI.OO

ALLGOOD BRAND SUGAR CURED SLICED
BREAKFAST BACON 59 SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS
GROUND CHUCK $1.99

pOOOO BBBBBBBBBOBPOOOB^
CAMPBELLS
SOUP SALE
CHICKEN NOODLE
v CHICKEN w/RICE
| CHICKEN N STARS
! CREAM of CHICKEN
X IOV2OZ. cans
I 3 for 49<
jpOOOOOOOOOBBBOBBBBBBBB
I from the BAKERY
of JANE PARKER
WHOLE OR CRACKED WHEAT
BREAD [oaf 2/39<
SPANISH BAR
CAKE LB. 3 OZ. 3/SI.OO |
CHERRY
PIE 1 LB. 8 OZ. 53* l
PINEAPPLE
PIE I LB. 8 OZ. 39C
TASTE TEMPTING
AND FRESH DAILY
X

SAMSONITE
CARD TABLE
AND CHAIRS
. EACH
$4.99
r?\cK 47
IgAgSA'Ny
OUR OWN
__ BAGS _
TEA 64ct. BOX 53<
OUR OWN RArc;
TEA iooct. box 89<
A & P GROUND BLACK
PEPPER Boz 59<
ANN PAGE SMOOTH
PEANUT BUTTER 24 0 Z 65<
ANN PAGE KRUNCHY
PEANUT BUTTER 24 0 Z. 65<
SULTANA
GRAPE JELLY 21b. 39*
SULTANA
SALAD DRESSING or. 39<
SULTANA
SANDWICH SPREAD qt.49<
A&P
MACARONI
& CHEESE 7 %0z. 2/39C
DINNER