Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Low In The 70s

Vol 60, No. 161

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UNIVERSITY REPORT MAKES DEBUT
Action Conference members study second UF newspaper

PRESIDENTS POWER PROTESTED
Education Board Upholds Ruling

The recently-granted powers
of Floridas university presidents
to suspend campus
demonstrators has been
unanimously approved by the
State Board of Education.
State School Supt. Floyd
Christian, backing the new
policy, said he was confident the
university presidents will not
abuse their newly-granted
powers.
Protesting the move, FSUs
Student Body President Lyman
Fletcher was rebuked by Gov.
Claude Kirk for speaking against
the policy for the Council of
Student Body Presidents.
Its strange when seven

Marshall Jones 'ln Political Retirement

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
After spending five years in a
constant political haggle" as a
professor of psychiatry at UF, Dr.
Marshall Jones is doing research at the
Hershey Melton Medical Center at
Penn State University.
I'm in political retirement." Jones
said in a telephone interview Tuesday.
After five years at Florida, five
decided to put myself out to pasture
politically."
I wont appeal my case to the
Board of Regents," he added. Though
Jones now sees that his fight for
tenure has failed, he does not see the
feedback of the battle ending yet.
I truly believe that the AAUP
(American Association of University
Professors) will censure the UF; for its
decision,* He said. But even tfie
censure is made, it will not mean much

The
Florida Alligator

presidents amalgamate
themselves in a power bloc,
said Kirk, rather than
representing the students who
elected them.
Fletcher answered that the
council was formed three years
ago to present a unified voice for
the students of the various
campuses. Fletcher is presently
chairman for the Council.
a
Fletcher said the regulations
granting the powers to university
presidents are illegal and
unconstitutional, and certain to
be tested in courts of law if
peaceful student demonstrations
at FSU result in President John
Champion using his new powers.

unless you at the university follow it
up and make something out of it."
Now that the struggle is over
officially, Jones last attempt at
kicking dust in the face of the
administration's power over decisions
of tenure will be directly with the
AAUP.
I've heard about Florida's new
constitution." he said laughingly. I
really don't think that it has given
OConnell any more power he
already had as much power as any man
in a similar position could have.
The powers that the new
constitution gives O'Connell merely
lay out in writing the powers that he
has actually been assuming all along.
In upholding Jones' tenure denial.
OConnell repeated that he would not
overrule the decision of UF's
Personnel Board- tp deny tenure.
Jones found this aitidsing.
Its funny that O'Connell said he

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

The provision flies in the
face of those trying to establish
law and order and a respect for
the law, said Fletcher, adding
that students will not be certain
what type of conduct could

Grant Helps College
Seek Negro Students
Dr. Emanuel Suter, dean of the College of Medicine, announced
Friday the receipt of a 514,400 grant from the Josiah Macy Jr.
Foundation to support the colleges program to increase the number
of Negro students engaged in graduate or medical studies.
The grant will allow the college to expand and enlarge its efforts to
inform qualified Negro students of educational opportunities at the
UF. Four Negro students will enter the College of Medicine in
September.

HIGH-LEVEL POST SOUGHT
Task Force Urges
Black Student Aid

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
The relationship of the UF and its black
students received the heaviest emphasis in
Task Force proposals to the Action
Conference Wednesday.
Included among the proposals were the
creation of an administrative post to aid
minority students, an investigation into
campus housing practices, an Alligator
advertising ban on discriminatory landlords
and a request for the University to take a
strong stand for non-discrimination.
These and other proposals will come up
for voting at the next meeting of the
conference July 31.
The 10 Task Forces presented their
interim reports at this second general

would not go against the Personnel
Board. Jones said. Especially when
O'Connell sits on the Personnel Board,
chairs the Personnel Board, appoints
the members of the Personnel Board,
and breaks ties on the Personnel
Board.
I guess you could say that
OConnell is the Personnel Board,
said Jones. It certainly would be
strange for him to go against its
decision.
Though the vote (3-2) by the
University Senate way a close one,
Jones said he knew how each member
would vote, and that he had predicted
a 3-2 defeat.
As it turned out. the entire decision
was laid in the hands of Dr. John F.
Baxter, a professor of chemistry, who
Jones felt would probably vote
against him. Baxter sided with the
minority,
(SEE'JONES' PAGE 2)

result in discipline.
The Cabinet has asked the
Board of Regents to consider
changing the wording of the
regulations within 30 days to try
to satisfy everyone involved.

meeting of the conference. Early in the
meeting a motion was passed to endorse
the founding of the University Report, a
second campus newspaper.
The conference received five proposals
from the Task Force on the University
Responsibility to Minorities and
Disadvantaged Groups.
One proposal requested that UF
President Stephen C. OConnell create an
Office of Coordination of Minorities and
Disadvantaged Students as soon as possible.
This office would provide for the
recruitment, remedial education, and
personal, tutorial and economic assistance
of minority students.
A study of university housing in
regard to black students being placed in

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Inside
Doty, Sisler Top
Intercourse Slate
See Story, Page 2

Friday, July 19, 1968

single or double rooms alone
when this was not requested,
was also proposed.
A strong recommendation
asked that the Alligator refuse to
run advertisements for
apartments whose owners arent
listed with Off-Campus Housing
because of their discriminatory
practices to some students.
A resolution was also,
submitted to the conference
asking the University openly
declare its intentions of
non-discrimination and to
positively seek to admit
qualified black students.
The resolution asks for the
University to pledge itself to
supporting minority groups on
campus and off in their right to
a fair share in university life as
UF sudents.
A proposal essentially
comprising Student Body
President Clyde Taylors
proposals for voluntary class
(SEE 'CONFERENCE' PAGE 2)



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19, 1968

Jones
t PAGE ONE
Jones called his case a
basically simple one and even
though brought much atten attention,
tion, attention, his description was fairly
accurate. He said a man cannot
be fired for political reasons,
but the Board of Regents said
he was wrong. Jones said it was
not the inherent power of the
president to deny tenure, and
once, again the Board disagreed.
Floridas president must be
trimmed down to size, but this is
now your fight, not mine,
Jones concluded. Im working
at Penn State, and Im not going
to join any groups or
movements.
Thats that.
Conference
f fICM PMt m S
attendance was presented by the
Minimum Conduct Expectations
Task Force.
The Faculty Problems Task
Force submitted a resolution of
its own to the conference that
younger and untenured faculty
members should become more
deeply involved in the
conference to face urgent
faculty and student problems.
They should at least express
their ideas in the individual
committees, the resolution said.
Task Force
Seeks Opinion
The Freedom of Expression
Task Force will hold an open
meeting Monday to allow
anyone who has an opinion or
recommendation concerning
freedom of expression on
campus to present ideas to the
committee.
The meeting will be in room
401, College Library, at 7:30
p.m.
Drowning Third
Drowning has been Floridas
third leading cause of accidental
death for years, says the State
Board of Health.

QUALITY FOODS
LOW PRICE
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EVERY DAY
HSELF SERVICE NO TIPPING
EBIA I 313 W. UNIV. AVE
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is tbs official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator s entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Inrolvlig typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver-
Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not iif responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

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TO LOVE A MOCKINGBIRD
Janet Johnston, 3PE, has become mother to this little
mockingbird, who cannot fly too well. She befriended it when she saw
it being attacked by other mockingbirds. There are still good people in
this world, aren't there?
Cabinet Raises
Minimum Wages

Floridas state employes will
receive a minimum wage of
$1.50 per hour beginning Aug. 1
as the result of a State Cabinet
decision Tuesday.
Personnel Director Jay
McGlon said some of the poorest
paid state workers were in the
state university system, as well
as in the State Road Department
and other agencies.
McGlon said the pay raises,
estimated to cost $2 million, will
make the salaries of clerks,
elevator operators, and others
more competitive with industrial
salaries for the same
occupations:
The present minimum wages
for the affected occupations
were from $1.25-$ 1.39, but
private employers were paying
$ 1.50-$ 1.60 per hour.
Ten per cent of the states
employes are affected by the
pay raise, which increases the
pay of 4,400 employes who earn
less than $3,000 per year.

State Treasurer Broward
Williams complimented McGlon
on revising the pay scales of the
lower occupations which has
caused us such terrific
problems in vacancies and
turnover.
Student OK
The UF student injured when
he was hit by a car on University
Avenue last week was reported
in satisfactory condition
Wednesday at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center.
John Everett Stepp, 3PH,
received serious head injuries
when he was struck by a car in
front of the Gold Coast
Restraunt as he attempted to
cross the street.
Creeping Eruption
Creeping eruption is
actually an animal hookworm
trying to live within the layers of
the human skin.

CONTINUING OUR fair
SEMI-ANNUAL OALt fcj
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Doty, Sisler Top
Intercourse Slate
Deans Franklin Doty and Harry Sisler and Action Conference
member Dave Wilson will speak at the Intercourse program Tuesday
afternoon, according to Mick Callahan, secretary of academic affairs
and moderator of the program.
The program is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. in the Plaza of the
Americas.
Callahan has been interviewing Deans about their attitudes on
voluntary class attendance. He claims to have received fairly favorable
response.
Dean Sisler. for instance. said Callahan, is in favor of voluntary
class attendance in the College ot Arts and Sciences. But, he feels
attendance should be in the hands of the faculty as does Dean
(Donald) Hart.
Doty, on the other hand, is concerned about parents, Callahan
said.
Callahan is hopeful other Deans will show up for the program to
express their ideas and opinions.
Callahan, a strong supporter of the voluntary attendance program,
said the main objective was to get the EW policy abandoned by the
UF. This is the policy where the student is dropped with a failing
(EW) grade for non-attendance.
We want to put attendance requirements in the hands of the
faculty, explained Callahan. Where a student might not be dropped
but it could have an effect on his grade.
Certain lab situations, Callahan admitted, have to require
attendance, but he feels this should be handled on a faculty and not
an administrative level.

BE SAFE
BEFORE HURRICANE SEASON
ARRIVES GET AN ALL
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376-7171



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Jennifer Dennis, a 4AS philosophy major, is today's Gator Girl.
Jennifer came north from Miami to study at UF. Jennifer likes
modeling, but prefers to withhold her charms from beauty contests.
Senate, Masters
Agreement Seen

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
The current hassle between
the Student Senate and the
Boards of Masters is almost
settled, according to Senate
Chairman Gary Goodrich and
Board of Masters Chairman Peter
Zinober.
The conflict culminated in a
Senate boycott last week of a
Board of Masters hearing at
which it was being sued to
reapportion.
The Student Senate chose
not to appear last Friday
because of a misunderstanding
between the Board of Masters
and the Senate as to the powers
and jurisdiction of a court which
was originally created by the
Senate, said Goodrich.
According to Zinober and
Goodrich, the Senate and the
Board of Masters are meeting to
write a bill which clearly
explains the limits and intents
of the Board of Masters.
The Board of Masters was
originally created as an
advisory group to the justices
of the Honor Court, said
Goodrich, but this did not
allow it to issue any legal or
binding decisions. Therefore,
when the new Constitution was

International Picnic Sunday

To promote better
understanding and closer
friendships, the Board of
International Activities (BIA) is
planning a picnic for
international students and
interested Americans.
The picnic will be Sunday,

drafted, we (the Senate)
established the Board of Masters
in a constitutional basis made
it a legal group.
According to the Senate, the
Board of Masters has
overstepped its legal powers in
its recent interpretation of the
term enrollment in the
Student Body Constitution.
The Board's decision was
based on an excerpt from the
operating manual of the Florida
Board of Regents, whose power
is vested in the state
constitution.
The Board of Masters
cannot accept suits which
challenge the Student Body
Constitution on the basis of
state law, contends Goodrich.
If the Board of Masters is going
to interpret state law, then it has
to be appointed by Claude
Kirk.
The Board of Masters has
only the power to interpret the
constitution in view of the
constitution itself, he said.
The Senate will ask for a new
interpretation of the enrollment
decision on these grounds. It will
also argue, in a rehearing, that
the Board of Masters does not
have jurisdiction over a
reapportionment case.

July 21, at Blue Springs. All
interested'should prepare their
own food and meet at the Plaza
of the Americas at 10 a.m.
Sunday.
Transportation arrangements,
soft drinks, and watermelon will
be provided by BIA.

m THE /)
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Candy Dodson
Delta Gamma
Photo by Mick Arroyo

nr

Friday, July 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19,1968

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Operation Concern, Floridas efforts to help
Gainesvilles underprivileged through state agencies,
took emergency dental care into the citys slums this
week.
Dr. M. C. Williams of Gainesville and nursing
assistant Judy Angley (upper left) examine a patient.
Dr. Williams, left, and Macon Williams, a project
coordinator, discuss scheduling (above).
Mothers and children wait their turn to see the
doctor (left), while a UF student volunteer signs new
patients for appointments (below). A dental assistant
(lower left) puts utensils in the units sterilizer.

Photos By Nick Arroyo
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OPEN 9 AM -9 PM; SUNDAYS NOON 7 PM
Gainesville Located NW 13th St. at 23rd Blvd.
ACRES OF FREE PARKING

Friday, Ally 19,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19, 1968

NBB
PtM/kcJu/l
Pdki.
Ml

P ao "*"""M err y-G O -R oU nd* BBBB Tj
I Ches Diary I
oDrew Pearsonaeaonr Jack AndersonaooM
The celebrated diary of Ernesto Che Guevara, the slain
communist idol, wasnt the only intimate document that Bolivian
troops captured when they wiped out his ragtag guerrilla band.
They also picked up several revealing mementoes, including
personal messages to Cuban Dictator Fidel Castro, and an extortion
letter to Gulf Oil.
Guevara and Castro kept in touch with each other through couriers
and underground radio. Che wrote out his messages in a tight, tiny
longhand, then transcribed them into a secret code book no larger
than a match folder.

MR
PEARSON

Castro tried to cheer up his revolutionary comrade with accounts
of his talks with Bolivian tin miners, showed great enthusiasm and
asked for money and training facilities.
Indeed, it developed that Castros Bolivian contacts were more
interested in money than in revolution. In discussion, Castro described
one Bolivian delegation in a message to Guevara as a bunch of
mierda. Politely translated, the word means excrement.
Castro was never able to mount a second front.
Near the end, after Guevara's pipeline with Havana was cut off and
he ran out of communist money, he wrote another sort of letter to
John J. Wilson, manager of a Gulf Oil drilling camp, demanding
money.
Since we know, Che wrote, that this year Gulf will gross
$1,000,000 from Bolivian oil, we consider it necessary that you
deliver the sum of SIOO,OOO to the peoples revolution represented
by our army.
Wilson sent no money. Not long afterward, in October 1967,
Bolivian soldiers arrived with bullets instead of banknotes.
' f l '>
Youre In Good Hands. ...

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
News Editor

Castro was addressed by the
code named Leche, the Spanish
word for milk. The first messages
were bright with optimism.
But Che was unable to stir up a
revolution in the Bolivian
mountains, and his secret reports to
Leche turned sour.
Guevara kept pleading with
Castro not to let up on the
creation of a second front.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor


x W&f&fe-:. &>:
ANDERSON

Pass The Proposals

The Action Conference. UF s
mini-summit conference ot students, tauilty
members and administratois. £ ave
indications Wednesday that it na\
clawing up to the peak whereon dwell
answers to serious campus problems.
The conference's Task Forces, each ot
E7 editorO
which lias attacked a major area ot UF s
operation, presented interim reports.
. Included were* the tirst ot what should
become a deluge ot constructive proposals
for cures to campus ills.
Among the proposals were:
That class attendance for students become
voluntary, except in those cases in which
attendance is directly related to academic
progress.
That a Coordinator of Minorities and
Disadvantaged Students be appointed as an
administrator to counsel racial and national
minorities.
That the housing of Negro students in
campus dormitories be studied for possible
descriminatory practices and that the
Alligator refuse advertising for nearby
apartment owners blacklisted by the UF for
discriminatory practices.
That the UF actively recruit black stu students
dents students and promote non-discriminatory prac practices
tices practices in all areas of campus life.
That more of the younger, newer faculty
members be encouraged to participate in the
Action Conference, so that their fresh
approaches to UFs problems will be heard
and that faculty complaints wont be
submerged by those of students.
These are the proposals presented
Wednesday afternoon. They will be voted
upon at the conferences next general
meeting.
We favor each proposal. They seem to
offer meaningful solutions to existing
problems. We congratulate the task forces
responsible for each and call upon the
conference members to mold them into
workable plans and to submit them to the

=MY SIDE"
' V N S
Sadistic Killers ?
V'
======BY STEVE HULSEY^b

America's wave of assassinations of recent years
has brought new attention to guns, gun owners, and
gun control laws (or the lack of them).
Gun lovers and collectors, hunters, and others
who have reasons for owning guns cry that the
government is threatening to take away their rights
to keep guns in their homes, to protect them themselves
selves themselves or to enjoy the guns through recreational
uses.
What most of them mean is that they may be
denied their privileges of determining whether a
living being, usually an animal, will be allowed to
live, or will die for their own sadistic pleasures.
With the demise of the necessity of killing
animals for their food value, Americans substituted
the concept of killing for killings sake. With a gun
and a hunting license, today's sportsman
possesses the power of God in his ability to look
down a long metal tube and sav to his target, Now
you must die because 1 will it to be so.
With' a thunderous roar his will is so, and some
living creature is dispossessed of its life spirit, its
powers ot movement and its senses of emotions ana
physical experiences.
To the hunter, it is no matter that his frec/cr K
full, that he must give the animal to someone else,
throw it away, or otherwise dispose ot it. His
satisfaction has been realized by denying the
creature its rights to live. His manhood has been
asserted through the simple act of pulling the
trigger.
It may be an unjustified conclusion to say that
Americans' preoccupation with killing animals for

president as soon as possible. I
However, as Conference Chairman R u I
Ramsey said Wednesday, much remains t*
be done and the conference must seek t I
represent the entire campus and to delve
into all problems. I
One major segment of the campus, the!
huge non-academic staff, is not directlvl
represented in the conference. I
The staff makes no policy and carries nol
books. It does, however, keep the UF glued*
together day-in and day-out. If it does not*
function well, the UF cannot function well I
Thus, long standing discontent over low If
salaries and rumored discriminatory
practices by some low-rung administrators I
must come under the study of the!
conference and concrete action must be I
proposed if the conference is to fulfill its I
' role.
The Action Conference should accept the I
recommendations of its task forces and send I
them, in workable form, to the president, I
then turn back to its studies. For the jj
problems remaining are mammoth and many H
and their cries for solution have shaken the EE
walls of even Tigert. I
Keep climbing, Action Conference; the I
summit is within sight. 1
Bon Voyage!

UFs second campus newspaper, The I
University Report, made its maiden voyage I
through the presses Wednesday and came I
out with much promised for the future. f
We welcome the campus newest paper 1
and hope that it lives up to its early shine.
With its opinion format, the Report
provided a much needed forum for
provocative discussion of vital issues facing
the university.
We wish the Report the best of luck and
urge its continued support by the campus
community.

the sake of killing carries over into its present shame
of killing people because we dont agree with their
ideas.
Perhaps some hunters are sincere in their efforts
to prevent gun control laws from infringing on
citizens rights to possess guns and use them for
legitimate purposes.
But it cannot be denied that many desire the
possession of guns purely for the sake of having the
power to play God over the lives of other living,
breathing, thinking and feeling creatures.
x\lligator
Staff
Margaret O'Brien
Copy Editor
Ted Remley Lori Steele
En tertain men i Edi tor Society Editor
Staff Writers: Carol Balkany, George
Cunningham Susie Halback, Joe Knight,
Killy Oliver.
Staff Photographer: Nick Arroyo
Staff Artist: Lois Parks
~ ;



THE rUN MOT
MirMfi
liA] 1
:
Same Salaries
(Editors Note: This letter was sent to both the Gainesville Sun and
the Alligator in reference to a Sun Editorial.)
MR. EDITOR:
My attention has been called to the editorial which appeared in the
Sun July 11, entitled Take a Letter.
It may be of interest to your readers to know that the average
salary allocated to faculty positions at the University of Florida and
the Florida State University has been the same for the past two years.
The average salary for the four faculty ranks allocated to the
Educational and General Budget at each of these institutions for the
year 1968-69 is $13,056. Prior to 1966-67 the average varied because
the Board of Regents was attempting to bring the two institutions
into a state of equality vis-a-vis each other with respect to the average
salary.
The Board of Regents makes no attempt to control the internal
allocation of salary money except to insure that it is used for the
purposes for which it was appropriated. To attempt to exercise
control over the internal allocation would be interference with
institutional authority, which is not desirable.
The Board of Regents and the Chancellor make no attempt to
monitor the reporting by the institutions to the AAUP, which
reporting is done in accordance with the terms and definitions of that
organization. Differences in reporting to the AAUP may reflect varied
institutional treatment of money allocated as well as differences in
interpretations of AAUP instructions in compiling salary data.
Salaries of the UF and Florida State University are not yet
competitive with some of the outstanding institutions in the United
States.
To infer that no progress has been made in attaining a competitive
position nationally in improving the relative positions of the UF and
FSU or to intimate that the Board discriminates against one
institution and favors the other in allocating salary funds is contrary
to fact.
.4
ROBERT B. MAUTZ,
CHANCELLOR
No Ulterior Motive
MR. EDITOR:
As a football player at Boone High in Orlando, my buddy never
seemed to be at a loss for a date. Now hes in Vietnam.
If any coed would like to correspond with him, please call me for
his address. Being married, I have no ulterior motive, but he would
like to know to whom he is writing. A photograph recent enough to
show a likeness will be appreciated.
Please call 3768194.
CLINT VAN NEST

SPEAKING OUT-

Prepare Youths To Vote

The Florida House of Representatives, in its
recent decision not to support the lowering of the
voting age in the state from 21 to 19 years of age,
implied that young adults are not responsible or
experienced enough to vote in state or national
elections.
There has been considerable debate over the past
few years concerning the reliability of the
19-year-old voter. I, personally, believe that these
young adults are qualified and, indeed, deserve the
right to vote.
If, indeed, our young people are not prepared
after high school for the right to vote, who is
responsible for their failure? What can be done to
prepare high school students, about to enter the
world on their own for the first time, for the
responsibility of casting a fair and just vote?
It is the failure of parents, professional
government officials and educators to teach these
students the essential facts needed for responsible
participation in the democratic process.
I would like, therefore, to suggest the addition of
a supplementary course of studies in the Social
Studies curriculum of the Florida Board of Public
Education, to deal with the following subjects:
Local Government This item would cover the
structure of city governments, with emphasis on the
students own city government structure. A
comparison of various forms of city government, as
well as the allocation of authority would be
discussed.
State Government Emphasis here would be on
the relationship between urban and rural areas in

OPEN FORUM:
*'There is no hope for the complacent man.

No End To Hypocrisy ?

MR. EDITOR:
As an Israeli student I have
followed with interest the
controversy concerning the
recent Arabgator publication. At
first I refrained from answering,
feeling that there must be some
limit to the Arabs hypocrisy,
but after reading Mr. Rattans
letter July 12), I can no longer
avoid replying.
I do not wish to make any
comment about the
objectivity of either Arnold
Toynbee or Sir Dinglefoot, both
of whom have openly declared
their anti-Semitic and anti-Israeli
sentiments on several occasions,
nor do I wish to comment on
the objectivity of M.T. Mehdi,
Secretary General of the Action
Committee on American-Arab
Relations.
I would, however, wish to
comment about the so-called
massacre of Dir Yasin in
1948. Whenever charges are
made against Israel, this incident
is invariably mentioned.
Rattan, however, failed to
mention that this massacre took
place during a war which was
started by six Arab nations
invasion into a hardly
one-day-old State of Israel. Why
do Rattan and his friends not
mention the massacres against
the Jewish populations of
Hebron in 1929, of Jerusalem
in 1938 and in Refar Etzion
in 1948 massacres that took
place in time of peace, Arab
style?
And lastly, Mr. Rattan, I
wonder where you got your

*
ideas about democratic princi principles
ples principles and freedom of the press?
Was. it in Iraq, whose last prime
minister, Nuri Said, was hanged
upside down in the central
square of Bagdad?
Or was it in the Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia where thieves are
still punished by having the right
arm cut off?
I do have, however, serious
doubts whether any organization
on campus has the right to use

Porkchop Humor
On College Level

MR. EDITOR:
I agree 100 per cent with a
recent letter written by R. L.
Wisniewski, 3UC, which
appeared in the July 9th edition
and give him credit for breaking
the silence.
Whatever did happen to the
humor which filled the pages of
our beloved Nations Leading
College Dailv? Its hard to
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Friday, July 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

BY STEPHEN ROBITAILLE

state politics: the relationship between local and
state agencies, their rights and responsibilities; and,
current topics of concern to the voters of the State.
Federal Government The role of the federal
government and its relations to the state would be
discussed. Such areas as federal expenditures and
loans to the state, responsibilities of state senators
and representatives and federal state-local tax
structures would be discussed.
Responsible Voting This area would be
designed to teach the student the basic essentials for
responsible voting. Such topics to be covered would
be 1) campaign practices and procedures 2) how to
judge a candidates qualifications 3) how the mass
media influences voters 4) a vocabulary of political
and governmental terms commonly seen in political
issues and campaigns, and 5) the procedures of
casting your vote.
The course should remain flexible enough to
remain pertinent and useful to the students in every
voting district of the state. Emphasis should always
be placed, by the particular districts, on that areas
unique situation.
The sole purpose of such a course is to prepare
the high school graduate for his role as a responsible
citizen. This course, if designed properly, could give
the student a knowledge of local, state and national
government far superior to (that of) the average
voter today.
Perhaps, then, we will be able to acknowledge
our 19 and 20-year-olds as responsible citizens,
having the experience and knowledge to cast a just
vote.

Student Government funds (that
come from my own fees, as well
as every other students) to
publish pure propaganda for a
foreign government. And do you
really mean to say, Mr. Kattan,
that you fail to see the
difference between such
propaganda and controversial
articles or cartoons in the
student newspaper?
ARYE R. EPHRATH, 3EG

believe such changes have
become so evident in such short
time.
With the remaining portion of
July and August before the
summer quarter ends, how many
of us do you think appreciate
this new breed of conservative
news?? Not many. I also believe
that most of the readers are
perfectly capable of picking up
the N. Y. Times, etc., etc.
Yes, we all complained about
Steve Hull and the other Pork
Chops, but we loved the
Alligator. At least it was kept on
your level and the editors did
NOT try competing with the
Tumpa Tribune.
P.S. Note to R.L.W. Your
article was quite interesting and
very well expressed. Thanks for
reminding me of a groovy Spring
Quarter.
T.H.E. KIDD

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
:ra*>x*xx*x;xK*raw*>>>x.x;ss*:*: :*>X'£
Wanted: 1 or 2 female roommates for
fall quarter. French Quarter Apt. 72.
CALL 3787858. (Cl6l4tp)
WANTED: Female student to
baby-sit for two youg children
Monday nights. 3784910.
(C 161 2t p)
Three coeds need one roommate to
share 2 bedroom Tanglewood Apt.
beginning Sept. 15, Must like cats!
Call Judy, Room 1008 Towers.
(Cl6l3tp)
Adventurous coed to travel out of
U.S. Share expenses. If interested call
Mary at 3781078. Call after 5 if
possible. (Cl6lstp)
GIRL to cook evening meal for one
man. Call 3782281 67 p.m. only.
(Cl6o3tp)

Open at 8:00 Main Feature at 8:45
| cw< = Jews/L EIViS I
"DONT RdISE THe BriDGE
LOWER THE River *
TECHNICOLOR* J
Co-Feature at 10:45
DEAN MARTIN As Matt Helm
"THE AMBUSHERS"
*DO-lt-Yourself
**
DAYS TO RUN
| To order classifieds, use the ejg
3 J forro below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive) 2 i
( x tance to: Alligator Classifieds, C 3 1 day $ |
$ Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- 2 d*y s
S ville, Florida 32601. 3 toys (*lO% discount) f (
e Q 4 days (*lO% discount) a J
X Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over X 1
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount) |
| DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE I
l 8 fl Count the words, omitting a, an & j
j j Addresses and phone numbers j
! X for sale count as one word. Minimum charge g j
1 £ n for rent ls SLOO or 20 words For each
I O wanted additional word add 3?. Multiply a
| help wanted ,he 10,11 * nuroberntdays the ad |
H autos is to run. Subtract the discount jfj
I D personal 0* applicable) and enclose a check | j
( X lost found ,or tte remalnder For example, |
1 services 1 1 > to 4 dlys sts 1 [
( | $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?). F
!| WORDING f|l
jj| NAME DATE 1!
|§ STUDENT PHONE |j
|§ ADDRESS |j
|| CITY STATE ZIP |
RjSgJwmoney cannot be refunded if ad is cancel I

Page 8

:jn ; s-wxxvX*ii*>>>NSXx*x-x.x.xwrx-x*x*x*;'
WANTED
*
3 Female roommates. House Five
min. walk from campus. Own
bedroom, No Lease, Furnished, Rent
$25.00 month each plus utilities. Call
3723940. (Cl6l3tp)
Wanted: A.C. Bristol or similar sports
car call Cary 3 76 6764.
(C 1612t p)
Wanted roommate for French
Quarter, for month of August or all
year. Student preferred, Call Barry
3725500. (Cl6l2tp)
Ford Galaxie 61 $290, Air
conditioned, .power steering,
auto transmission. Call 3761478.
(Gl6l2tp)
Auto for Sale: Red Triumph Spitfire,
1964, with top tonneau. Must sell
Got married, need money Great deal
3723940 or 3763211 Ext. 5120.
Jennifer. (Gl6l3tp)

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19, 1968

:^x*x-x.x.xxxxw.:.:-:*x*x.x.x.v.xx.xx.>:;
WANTED
I* *
:i*:.:*:.:.x.xx.x.wxxx.:*x*x*x.xx.x.xw*:'.:'
DESPERATE : Student needs 3 BR,
2 bath house. SIOO or less D.P. and
assume mtg. at low interest rate.
Occupancy before Sept. Call
372-7177. (C-159-st-p)
4 BR Furnished house wanted year
lease starting September faculty
family ownership care write
Buskirk, 3324 St. Antoine,
Kalamazoo, Mich. 49007.
(Cl6ostp)
HELP WANTED f
NX.NvivX-X.X'X'X.X.VX'X'X'I'XXX'X.y.X--"'
RELIABLE couple wanted as
resident manager of 24-unit apt.
complex. Wife must be non-working,
husband handy with repairs, no
children or pets, and to stay at least
two years. Send resume to Post
Office Drawer X, Gainesville.
(Els 9
SUNDAY ONLY
THE DEFINITIVE
MACBETH!
FOR THE FIRST TIME ON
THE GIANT SCREEN IN
BLAZING TECHNICOLOR!*
HI W
MAURICE
EVANS
JUDITH
ANDERSON
in the GEORGE SCHAEFER prod union
of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S
tnacetH
ALSO: THE BEST LOVED
SHORT FILM EVER MADE
THE RED BALLOON
SHOWS AT 7:00 & 9:15
At The Union

REITZ UNION THEATRE A
James Stewart jL Maureen Ohara
BRIAN KEITH \Jjik "|g| ||j||||
Met Mills ttMISWIiSF
Don GALLOWAY MbhM&IH
RIC HAROMAN ANDREW V McIAfiLEN Y3B TECHNICOLOR
MM A UNIVERSAL PICTURE PANAVmoII
Saturday July 20, 700, 9:15 p.m.; 40< per person

FOR RENT
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(8157 15t-p)
1 Bedroom Apartment, furnished
and Air conditioned. 1533 1535
N.W. sth Avenue. 5 Blocks from
Campus, available immediately. Call:
3768475 or 3761065.
(Bl6ost p)

1311) ST. ft N.W. 23rd Rl. Ph. 371-2434
mm\ 1
-,r. - i
' 2:10 I
4:10 k fMmt*
6:10 I msSKSS^
810 | KusSH
10:10 ltkan
4fi dU-day
u S^ er^*
/ RAUL LYNDE 1 TERRYTHOMAS j W
V ; ] is Gilbert Tilly I
m .I
1* :| iini In Scran -: : (IKY PMC
\ | GMKY MARSHALL and fBRT KISSH j Technicolor*
V Panavision*^/
CONTINUOUS TODAY FEATURE AT:
I FROM 1:30 1 I 1:45-3:50-5:50-7:55-10:00
F Steve McQueen IHUBi
Faye Dunaway,
A Norman Jewison Film t J
s. Paul Burke Jack Weston *)
Suggested For Mature Audiences "" rto by d. Lum <

V Warren Beatty
F 'SPLENDOR 1
I fM THE GRASS f j
m SUN. 3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30 M
MON-TUES Jj
7:00 & 9:IS



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.v;%%s;*;*x*x*:*x"x*x*x*x*vvx*x*x*x*xx*sv;;;*
FOR RENT
** i*
ARTISTS 3 room studio Apart Apartment
ment Apartment Center of Art Micanopy. Call
466-3459 or 372-4979. (B-159-4t-r>
2 Bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student couple only. $50.00 per
month for long-term tenant; Water
furnished. Phone 3729903.
(Bl6lst p)
WX-X.X.NNSVX-X-X-X-X-X-X-VXX-X'X-X-X-V'.'*
SERVICES
:.r.Nv. .*x*:-x*x-x.v;-;*x-xx*x.x*x.v. .'X-x*XX'N
Attention Bristish Car Owners: SU
Carbs rebuilt and tuned. 24 hour
service. Call 378 7571
(Mls93tp)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGINQ,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service
6O 3 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M 153tsc)
EXPERIENCED childcare in my
home. 18 mo. to 3 yr. Good lunch
Supervised play. Call Judy at
378-5290. (M-161-2t-p)
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
systems checked free. (Mls3tfc)
CHILDRENS CARE. July and
August, Ages 6ll, $12.00 per week
MondayFriday 8:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Experienced. Trustworthy, Christian
home, 311 N.W. 15th Terrace. Phone
3762072. (Ml6lltp)
xx-x-x-v.vx-x-x-x-x-x*:-.
AUTOS |
:\vx*x*>x*X'X-Xvx-x*x i X'X*X'V*v;sv:vXX!
*55 Plymouth, VB, automatic, new
tag., ready for inspection, SIOO., Best
offer call 3767133, See at 431 N.E.
4th St. (Gl6lltp)
1962 TBird, all power, AC and
radio, very clean. Cost SIOOO six
months ago, will sell for $750. Call
3762180, in Diamond Village.
(G 161 3t p)
WANTED: A.C. Bristol. Call John
Snead 9670577 Area 305
Collect. (Gl6ostp)
1959 Ford Sedan, good reliable local/
transportation, SIOO. or best offer;
available July 25. Call 3784750
after 6 p.m. (Gl6o3tp)
65 VOLKSWAGEN Sedan. Leaving
on Fulbright Fellovgship and must
sell. Bahama Blue, Sunroof, Radio,
Shoulder Belts, New Tires, VW
maintained. Excellent conditon.
$970. 3760304, 5 7 p.m.
(G 161 3t p)
VALIANT Signet 1962, white with
Red Vinyl Bucket seats. Radio,
Heater and seat belts, two new tires,
excellent condition. 3761760.
(G 161 2t p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire, white, red
interior, soft top, and tonneau,
luggage rack, one owner, excellent
condition SI3OO. Call 3768322.
(G 161 4t p)
| LOST & FOUND |
:-x<*x*x*x*x*x*x*xx-x*x*x*x*x*x.x*v.vw^
$50.00 reward No questions asked
for information leading to return of
all takpn from Graham Apt.
Sentimental value 0n1y... Call
376-0203. (Lls Bst-p)
:j^XAT.v.-x*x*x*x*xxx*vx*xvX*x-xx;'xo;
FOR SALE
; ; : ; x*>x*x*x.>nvw;*x-x*:*x*x*:*x.x/.xx*
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (Als4lT p)
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS.
Quality food for low prices. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (Als22ot p)
AT LAST in Gainesville, AKC Welsh
Corgi pups. 3783725 after 5:30
P.m. 3763261 Ext. 2746 weekdays.
(Al6o3tp)
LUXURY on wheels. 1968 Hillcrest
Mobile Home. 12 x 44. 1 Bedroom
furnished $3795.00. Phone
3725267 after 5:30 p.m. and ask
about the many included extras.
(Als7stp)

FOR SALE
FREE Adorable 10 week old
kittens. Part Persian. Litter trained.
Call 376-2312. See at Raileys Trailer
Park lot 11A. (A-161-2t-p)
OUTBOARD RACING OUTFIT:
Marchetti hydro and Konig A
motor. Will sell cheap for cash or
trade for VW. Phone 4663386.
(A 161 2t p)
FOR SALE: one room Carrier air
conditioner, 110 V. day ext.
2155; evenings 3784375. Jane
Hunter, $35.00. (Al6l 3tp)
TRAILER, 2 bm, bath, refrig., etc.,
$350. cash plus $67.00 monthly,
immaculate. Phone Gloria Marlin,
3762081, or come inspect at Town
and Country Trailer Park.
(A 161 4t p)
At Historical Cross Creek, Florida,
Large 19th century frame residence
on paved road, Approximately 10
acres young fancy citrus, 40 acre
pasture bordering on marsh of Lake
Lochloosa. Mr. G. Hugh Williams.
Phone 4663454. (Al6l4tp)
Carport Sale: Friday And Sat., July
19 and 20. Dishes, Furniture Misc.
Good items at low prices, 1911 N.W.
37th Blvd. 3729 7 6 0.
(A 161 It p)
JOXOFFICEOPENSAT--BjOO
Fth^magnificent
1 SEVEN I
1 Yu! Brynner 1

ond Bpm "No reserved seats No passes accepted
if| 213 W> Ui?Â¥ofnfy
<)i ivi I '.lViauiVaxi>

Friday, July 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

FOR SALE
a a

4 free kittens?' Part-Persian;
House-trained. 3511 S.W. Archer
Road, Phone 378-1717. (A-3t-160-p)
FROM wall to wail, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture. Company.
(A 161 It c)
For Sale Honda Scrambler 250 cc
1964 $325.00. 3766764.
(A 161 2t p)

j Main Entrance /
GAINESVILLE MALL
|7contin.n.l atmosphere l M 9!1 T R Violi Pi a T 1
(@ / Finest in gourmet rood \S3 jfl Hill / Hours: 3
}b Boers end Winetr HI I__ _* = 41: AM-B:3OPM Mon.-Sot. j 3
IF Service || j| J |rj| i
I Gainesvilles Finest
j and Most Intimate |

Page 9

FOR SALE
SURFBOARD, Reef, 9 6, nodings,
all green, $60.00. TROMBONE, Olds
Ambassador, 5 years old, Perfect
shape, $40.00. Call 3767311.
(A 161 It p)
36 x 8 Trailer. Very good condition.
Air Conditioned. $1750.00. 3101
S.W. 34th St. Lot 41 or Call
3786910. (Al6l3t p)
HOTEL THOMAS must sell 100
rooms Bedroom Kitchen
SilverStemware TVs Chairs
odds an Ave. (Al6lltp)

FOR SALE |
EARN MONEY IN SPARE TIME,
Small business for sale 10 candy and
nut machines $500.00. Call
3724985 for more information.
(A 161 5t p)
HOUSEHOLD furnishings and
Junque for sale very reasonable prices
for students. Call Janet 3722429
weekdays after 5 or anytime
weekends. (Al6lltp)



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19, 1968

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, July 25, 1968, at
1:30 p.m. in Room 235 Tigert
Hall.
WORK-STUDY JOBS:
Positions are available for
currently enrolled University of
Florida students. Applicants
must be eligible for the College
Work-Study Program, which
requires parents income be less
than $7,000 a year. Please
contact Student Employment,
Room 23 Tigert Hall for further
details*.
FALL RUSH: The
Panhellenic Council has set
August 15 as the deadline for
continuing students, incoming
freshmen and transfers to sign
up for fall rush. All incoming
students will receive the
necessary forms by mail and
continuing students may obtain
them by writing the Panhellenic
Office, 315 Reitz Union.
Payment of a $2 fee makes the
students eligible for the fall
rushing program beginning Sept.
18. Students who have been
through rush and paid the fee
will remain eligible.
SPACE LECTURES: NASA's
spacemobile will visit the College
of Education Monday and
Tuesday (7/29-7/30) for a series
of films, lectures and
demonstrations covering the
range of space activity to date.
The lecture series, held in Room
175 Norman Hall, is open to the
public and University and high
school students are especially
urged to attend. William Nixon,
deputy of the educational
branch of the public affairs
office at John F. Kennedy Space
Center, and Robert E. Wilson,
Kennedy Space Center
spacemobile lecturer, will
conduct the series in the
following schedule: Monday,
July 29: 9-10 a.m.
"Action-Reaction" (rocket
engines solicj, fuel, liquid),
Ni x on; 10-11 a.m.
"Propulsion" (thrust, specific
impulse, future propulsion
systems), Wilson; 11 a.m.-noon --
"What Makes a Rocket Go?"
(28-minute film and discussion).
Tuesday, July 30:9-10 a.m.

in Savings by the 10th... a
/o*\ Earns Interest from the 1 stgaHjjll WillMifl
/ V<#V *cff} \fe\ 5 1/4% per ynr dividend credited semi-annually
r jf y j/g^ Y!W\ Minimum dividend earning account only $5.00!!! ft
. Serving the full-time employees of the U of F
FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNIOnI
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street. Hours : 8:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. I

"Orbits and Satellites" (laws,
types of satellites, types of
orbits), Nixon; 10 a.m.-noon --
"Satellites" (types and
information obtained; probes,
application and scientific),
Wilson.
EXPERIENCED JUDOKA:
University of Florida Judo Club
works out from 5-7 p.m.
Monday through Friday in the
Florida Gym.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: All foreign
language functional
examinations will be given on
Saturday, July 20, in 18
Anderson Hall from 10 a.m.
12 noon.
INDIA CLUB: During the
summer quarter the India Club
will hold regular monthly
meetings on the second Saturday
of each month. Documentary
films on Indian life will be
shown at each meeting. A
Feature Film Show will be held
on the last Sunday of each
month. Meetings will be held in
Room 349, Reitz Union. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
FULBRIGHT GRANT
information is available at
International Center (south of
Walker Auditorium) for enrolled
U.S. students who will have at
least a bachelor's degree by the
fall of 1969. Grants pay all
expenses for one year of study
or research in one of many
foreign countries. In most
countries language capability is
required. English teaching
assistantsh' s for six countries
are also available. No
transpc. tatior ar in most
cases, no maintenarce are
provided for dependents.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets will go on sale Monday,
July 22, for Lyceum Council
presentation KARLSRUD
ENSEMBLE, 50 cents for
students, SI.OO for faculty,
staff and general public.
Tickets are now on sale for
Florida Cinema Society
subscription tickets.

BLUB BULLETIN

GENERAL NOTICES
ORANGE AND BLUE
DEADLINES: Duringthe
summer term the Orange and
Blue will be run once a week
on Friday. All notices must be
received by 9 a.m. Wednesday
prior to publication. Notices
should be typed and signed by
the person submitting the notice
and sent to the Division of
Information Services, Building
H., Campus. Items for the
Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office
Reitz Union.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Signup sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date in Room
G-22 in the Reitz Union. All
companies will be recruiting for
August grads unless otherwise
indicated.
JULY 19: PRESTON H.
HASKELL CO. Bldg. Constr.,
CE. Must be U.S. citizen.
CAMPUS CALENDAR
Friday, July 19
Union Movie: "The Rare
Breed," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Men's Interhall: Dance, Towers
Rec. Room, 8 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing,
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 20
Union Movie: "The Rare
Breed," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Sunday, July 21
Program Office: Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Pi Lambda Theta: Initiation,
361 Union, 3 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society;*
"Macbeth," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Monday, July 22
Gatorland Music Clinic: Faculty
Brass Trio; Walker Aud., 4
p.m. Music for brass from
Renaissance to 20th Century.

I Iron I
CLAD CLAD;
; CLAD; K' <:Sx>

Dept, of Education: Dr. Joe
Frost, "Problems of
Communication of
Disadvantaged Children,"
Norman Hall Aud., 4:30 p.m.
Union Board: Photography
Lessons, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m. Taught by Nick Arroyo.
American Institute of Industrial
Engineers: Speaker, Mr.
William Crowder, 211 Bldg.
F, 7:30 p.m.



sap"* T
wr / jh
m / . y'gSfc:
d|\ a m^mii/
IL '> ILMm / *v hI
Bv j#f f J
Hml $JsS\ a
I Bl H
lafjg > Ral J||^Bggii|^BH|^B|^^^^^H
a Jkmjm
Hy*! .*<%*,'* -^9HPPPS?
UF ARCHITECT HONORED
Local architect Arthur Lee Campbell, left, received a desk and
clock set from UF President Stephen C. OConnell Friday, in
recognition of several years of service he provided to the University of
Florida Foundation. Campbells drawings, plans and advice were
instrumental in the restoration of the late Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
home at nearby Cross Creek.
Homecoming Plans
Gaining Momentum

Major committee chairmen
for the UFs 1968 Homecoming
festivities have been appointed
and work has gotten underway,
according to Manny James.
Homecoming general chairman.
James named Bill Wack as
assistant general chairman of the
November 1-3 schedule of
UF Conducts
Sleep
Studies
The National Institute of
Mental Health has awarded a
$285,000 program grant to the
UF for a three-year program of
research in sleep and sleep
disturbances.
For the past six years,
researchers at the UF have been
recording and analyzing sleep
processes with a view to
determining the physiological
and emotional effects of sleep
deprivation. Continuing research
projects under the grant include
studies on insomnia and the
effects of sleep disorders on
mental illness, heart disease and
postnatal psychoses.

FRIMV SPECIAL
SHRIMP
BASKET
14 delicious Shrimp
Large u
Rolls and Butter
WOHDEbP
HOUSE "U
RESTAURANT W
14 SW First St. IL*
Parking For 200 Cois Within 150 Feet ~j___

events which will include the
parade, Gator Growl, special
alumni events and banquet, and
the football game against
Auburn.
Some of the work that will be
going on during the summer is
the Slogan Contest which will
determine the central theme for
the big weekend, the selection of
the master of ceremonies and
entertainment for Gator Growl,
chosing speakers for the Blue
Key Banquet and lining up
entries for the homecoming
parade.
The maximum length is seven
words. All entries should be
mailed or delivered to the
Florida Blue Key office, Reitz
Student Union, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
DONT MISS!
OUR
SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
QJIfP
Hmwraity &ljnp
1620 W. UNIV.

a Downtown
0 7jt/il*6 *"
(/if OF GAINESVILLE
Alteration
Sale
and Semi-Annual
Stocktaking
Clearance
of Mens, Womens, & Childrens Clothes
And Home Furnishing Items.
STARTING MONDAY
JULY 22 AT 930 A.M.
SAVE 1/4-1/3-1/2 & MORE
This is a store wide clearance sale,
when Wilsons cleans house of odd
lots, broken sizes & color ranges and
manufacturer discontinued styles, so
shop early while selections are good.
NEW 10 MONTH C.B.A.
Nearly 5000 families in Gainesville enjoy the
convenience of a C.B.A. (continuing budget account).
* No waiting from month to month to buy
what you need today.
* Its an open account...never n*eds
to be paid in full.
* The conveniences of a charge account
with no money down and up to ten
months to pay.
* Or you may elect to pay your balance
in full each month.
r
Charge SSO to s3ooYour payments will
be $5 to S3O a month. Open a C.B.A. today.
Now 10 month. Shop Mon.-Sat. 9:30 A.M.-9 P.M.

Friday, July 19,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19, 1968

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ft f\ i,'
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CUSTODIAN TURNS TEACHER
Dr. Charles Cate, director of Educational Media Center (r), inspects
audio-visual equipment with former school janitor Leonard Lattin.
The former Lake Helen custodian receives his bachelor's degree in
special education in March and plans on a master's degree in school
administration.

/JgSv Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE?
CrOSSWOId by Natalie ilankemeyor

1 Tumult.
7 Rescues.
12 Howls.
17 Operatic
solo.
21 Sweet
singer.
22 Sacred song.
23 Sailors cry.
24 Earsplitting
sounds.
25 Tooter.
27 Silly talk.
29 Look closely.
30 Girls name.
31 Although.
33 Mall: Fr.
34 Lords
Prayer
phrase.
37 Knell.
38 Strips.
40 Amper Ampersands.
sands. Ampersands.
41 Girls name.
43 Modula Modulations.
tions. Modulations.
44 Recordings.

1 Whacks.
2 Build.
3 Girls name.
4 Boys
nickname.
5 Arabic
name.
6 Whimper Whimpering.
ing. Whimpering.
7 Candle
lighters.
8 Eritrean
city.
9 Tub.
10 Feminine
name.
11 Blast
furnace.
12 Many voices.
13 Take advan advantage
tage advantage of.

SHOUTS AND MURMURS
ACROSS

48 Bird sounds.
51 Enthusiasm.
54 Avoid.
55 Big noise.
56 To burn
slightly.
57 Oriental
garb.
58 Excavates.
59 Exhausted.
60 Conifers.
61 She caused
Trojan War.
62 Hippies
dorms.
63 Anew.
64 Socialistic
insects.
65 Natural
ability.
66 Unit.
67 Seasonal
ditty.
70 Bands, floats
and things.
71 Grumble.
73 Dessert.
74 Oracle site.

DOWN

14 Late Mr.
Disney.
15 Trip
inducer, for
short.
16 Holy one:
abbr.
17 Muddles.
18 Irani coins.
19 Gore.
20 Residues.
26 Occupies.
28 Rants.
32 Rude fellow.
35 Declines.
36 Reverberat Reverberating.
ing. Reverberating.
38 Big Bens
peals.
39 Playwright.
42 Draw.

75 Sacred tune
sung in
unison.
77 Confused
shouting.
80 Midwest
citys nick nickname.
name. nickname.
83 Wanting
food.
84 Smallest
particle.
86 Raced again.
87 Gibbet.
88 French girl
friends.
89 Bond
servant.
90 Cathedral
city.
91 Indian city.
92 Day: Fr.
93 Suffocate.
94 Servant.
95 Reign of.
96 Branch.
97 Psalmists
phrase.

43 Prongs.
44 Time.
45 Os birds.
46 Tumult.
47 Mid-month:
Rom.
48 Mans name.
49 Employing.
50 Measure.
51 Farewell
speech.
52 Greek
goddess of
peace.
53 Coins.
55 Presidents
guest house.
57 Indicates
pause:
Bib.
59 Conform.

Ellis
NO MAN WALKS ALONE
Garrison
STRANGE FACTS ABOUT THE BIBLE
Lester
LOOK OUT WHITEY
Faber
THE RETARDED CHILD
Hailey
AIRPORT

100 Victim.
101 Long for.
102 Goal.
103 Armed
conflicts.
104 Hater.
107 Land
measure.
109 Gossip.
115 Bellringer.
116 Increase.
118 Notion.
119 Continent.
120 Praise ye
the Lord!
123 Sound of
rain.
126 Island: Sp.
127 Girls name.
128 Greek
theatre.
129 Develop.
130 Occupation:
suff.
131 Arab state.
132 Rips.
133 Rajah s
wives.

60 Discussion
group.
61 The late
Mr. Marx.
63 Appropriate Appropriately.
ly. Appropriately.
65 Claw.
67 Luminaries.
68 Foam.
69 Lubricate.
70 Scale
insects.
72 Persuader.
74 Ventured.
75 Brazilian
bird.
76 Indulge.
77 Wretched
hut.
78 Wall
hanging.

Former School Janitor
Goes Back To School

A 43-year old former grade
school janitor is preparing
himself for a new career in
education at the University of
Florida, because, as he puts it, I
got tired of seeing kids fall by
the wayside in regular
classrooms.
Five years ago Leonard Lattin
was a janitor in tiny Lake Helen
Elementary School near
Daytona Beach. (He shuns the
modern term -- custodian.)
Thats when he resolved to help
youngsters who are either
emotionally disturbed, mentally
retarded or just slow learners.
Enrolling in Daytona Beach
Junior College, Lattin began
night classes. After three years
he qualified for admission to the
University of Floridas College
of Education.
Presently hes in summer
session, looking forward to
obtaining a bachelors degree in
special education next March.
Lattin admittedly led a
checkered life after his
DONT MISS!
OUR
SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
Gtt}?
Iniurrjttg g>bnp

[i [2 [i [4 [5 [e HF [i pi linln Mi In In |i Ini i |m |m |m
7 r~ ~ ~
55 " 28
29 3 o KTI 32 BHfc3
3 B 39
0 Kr 42 ^3
44 45 40 47 "IP
54 ss s6
58 iHlei
82 j 3 os
00 7 6 09 iBpO
m jt?- Ifl 73 MM
75 70
83 TB4 05 WHm B7
88 B9 B!o bJll
92 s
96 o7 90 9 pO
i# i jur :
104 105 100 108 in nr firm
__ uTtarrr jj^irs
Tao 121 122 m 124 125
_ T2T T29
130 ' 111 l

79 Contradict.
81 Award.
82 Steel rod.
84 Above.
85 Chinese
port.
87 Kind.

Hersey
THE ALGIERS MOTEL INCIDENT (paper)
Cooper
AEROBICS (paper)
RIOT COMMISSION REPORT (paper)
COMPLETE SERIES RIDER/HAYDEN
ON ELECTRICITY, ELECTRONICS,
T.V., RADIO, COMPUTERS, TRANSITORS.
etc. (All in paper)

89 More timid.
90 Within.
91 Deep blue.
93 Sir Roger
de
95 Building
material.

graduation from high school 25
years ago. He entered the U.S.
Marine Corps in World War II
then became, in his own words,
a drifter. He drove trucks,
was an aircraft inspector, then
finally a sheet metal worker
before his job as janitor.
Then, being a parent with
five children ranging from age 11
to 21 and a grandchild as well
as PTA president and school
custodian reinforced Lattins
interest in education.
His philosophy, which
explains somewhat his decision

summer sale
. -K
SUMMER
DRESSES 1
BERMUDAS
SWIM SUITS 7 CI OFF
COVERS
St a 9 u Sra^
13 W. UNIV. AVE. GAINESVILLE MALL

97 Towhee.
98 Fiddler.
99 Domino pip.
100 Electrical
amplifier.
101 Neckband.
lO^Spread^out.

104 Plant louse.
105 Animal.
106 German city.
107 Degrade.
108 The late
George M.
110 miss.

to enter professional education
at middle age, is summed up:
Ive always done exactly what I
wanted to do. And, if I felt like
doing something new, I went
ahead and did that."

GOOD TYPING PAPER
for ROUGH DRAFT
or PRACTICE TYPING
$.75 FOR 500 SHEETS
Excellent for Art Work
Rolls of Paper 5O cents to $ 1.00
KISERS 604 N. MAIN

Answers On Display
the at hub
MED CENTER
Bookstore
REITZ UNION
Bookstore

111 N. Mex. mt.
range.
112 Plant fiber.
113 Snow: Sp.
114 French R.R.
stations.
[l7 Time and .

121 Diminutive
suffix.
122 Conrad's
Lord .
124 Britisher's
cuppa.
12^Girs^iame^^



r - T
ACADEMICS
news and views '
Dean Honored
Dr. Linton E. Grinter, dean
of the Graduate School at UF,
has been selected one of the 22
most outstanding engineering
educators of the last 75 years by
the American Society for
Engineering Education to its
75th anniversary Hall of Fame.
Selection was made by deans
of 200 engineering colleges
members of the society and
the ASEE board of directors
from among past presidents and
recipients of Lamme and Bendix
awards, two of the most prized
national honors given to
engineering educators.
VA HOSPITAL
Dr. Edwin M. Cohen, a
clinical psychologist with
extensive experience in Veterans
Administration hospitals, has
been appointed chief of
psychology service at the VA
Hospital here.
He was also named associate
professor in the Department of
Clinical Psychology at the
College of Health Related
Professions at UF.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
UF graduate Gareth K.
Hudson, who received his master
of business administration
degree in health and hospital
administration in June, has been
selected for one of two $9,200
fellowships sponsored by the
American Hospital Association
and the Blue Cross Association
in Chicago.
JOURNALISM
A June graduate of the UF,
Francis R. LeVar of Fort
Lauderdale, is one of four
national winners of scholarships
awarded by the Association of
Industrial Advertisers.
LeVar, who plans to enter
graduate school at the
University, was selected from
finalists representing 29 colleges
and universities to receive a
$250 scholarship for the
1968-69 academic year.
*
'Wm
CS' Or
gp
LeVAR
DONT MISS!
OUR
SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
(Sift
Hmurrjaity
1620 w. UNIV.

Minfords Poe Visionary Recluse

By DAViD MEAD
Guest Reviewer
Robert Minfords 1 aesday
evening performance of
Journey to Eldorado,
subtitled A Dramatic Portrait
of Edgar Allan Poe, was
worthwhile fare for the rather
meager audience in attendance.
The two-act play is a
monologue by an imaginary
friend of Poe and takes place on
the night of the authors death
in 1849. It consists of selections
from Poes writings, in roughly
chronological order, tied
together by the narrators
reminiscences and personal
comments.
The acting, if it can be
separated from the subject
matter, was generally
unexceptionable, although in
few places overly manneristic.
The lighting and stage-setting

SMASHING!
the little-bitbigger
bag takes over the
campus scene
Be it a barrel, a box, or a tote shape, the
luggage-look carries a lot of fashion.
Styled of plastic that pretends to he
leather, hut with a snap and swagger
all its own, antiqued in the rich browns
of autumn. From our collection, sl6
each. See all the exciting shapes of
tomorrows fashion today in Maas
Handbags.
1 l KyJ ~VL bH M I

were good. However, the Union
Ballroom is not a good theatre;
the audience was crowded
together unmercifully and
viewing was impaired for those
beyond the fifth row.
Mr. Minfords Poe is a
visionary recluse, ravaged by
drugs and alcohol, and haunted
by his desire for Eldorado, the
symbol of the eternal realm of
Supernal beauty; it is a
pleasantly romanticized fiction
which entertains but obscures.
Poe was one of the first
important, public literary men
of America.
He was an arbiter of taste, a
champion of our native writing,
and a seminal critic. He was,
also, a careful craftsman in his
own work. Mr. Minford
neglected these aspects of Poe,
relying on the traditional
biographical interpretation of

mam Sjtcfkm
GAINESVILLE MALL

IJ s
if
ROBERT MINFORD
... transports audience to Poe's "Eldorado"

Poes work. However, we should
not be too harsh here, for Mr.
Minfords portrait is informed
by such forces as the necessity
for dramatic intensity, the

I Vi' ; \
JfgpV Jr i\ : v.;\ \
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Pledge your fashion allegiance to HB
playclothes that are easy to wear, WS$
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Junior Sportswear.
i I

Friday, July 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

preconceptions and expectations
of his audience, and the amount
of time available. Within these
limits, Journey to Eldorado"
succeeds admirably.

Page 13



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 19,1968

Page 14

' Barefoot Still Funny

By DANA PREISLER
Alligator Reviewer
Barefoot in the Park, now showing at the State
Theater Friday and Saturday, is funny movie.
Having seen the show once beforeit is still as funny
the second time around. The story centers, around
the problems confronting a pair of newlyweds: Can
a rising young New York attorney find happiness
with a kooky, fun-loving wife?
Robot Redford stars as Paul Bratter, the
stuffed shirt husband whom Corie (Jane Fonda)
argues with because he hasnt the daring to walk
barefoot in the park (in 17 degree weather). After a
hectic night at an Albanian restaurant on Statten
Island die m him, Youre a watcher, watching all
the doers dfT
Corie o*#ie other hand thinks life is just a riot
and has about proving it so. Paul
informs her that she lacks common sense and
emotional lg|turity Such is the story.
Though ||he plot is flimsy it is still riotously
funny mosjjjy due to Neil Simons dialogue and
Mildred Nftkicks portrayal of Corks sweet and

Ah, How Sweet It Is!
: n

By HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
'.W
Sex. Ah£ how sweet it is!
Especially if youre middle-aged
and still in love or thats
what National Pictures would
have one believe.
In uniqak, yet slapstick style,
Debbk Reynolds and James
Gamer play a happily married
couple who still enjoy making
love. Its justthat they never can
find the opportunities.
Davey, their teenage son, has
also discovered the world of
love, falling for a long-haired
brunette named Bootsie (she
wears boots a lot). Bootsie is
going to Europe with a girls
tour, and before you know it
Davey has persuaded his dad to
let him go to Europe to follow
Bootsie. And then the whole
family gets into the act.
Davey is too young to go off
on his own, so father Gris
(Gamer) goes along as tour
photographer, and mother Jenny
(Reynolds) makes plans to rent a
house along die French Riviera.
Jenny pfoves to be a terrible
organizer (naturally, shes a
woman), for she is swindled by a
rental man and discovers the
house she thought she had leased
is owned ,by rich .French
bachelor, Phfflipe. Phillipe, a sex
Florida Players
An Italian Straw Hat.
Florida Players Summei
Production, will begin July 31
and run through August 3.
This light comedy, in the
tradition of the old French
Vaudeville, will be presented in
the HJP. Constans Theatre.
Tickets, 25 cents for student and
$1.50 for general admission, will
go on sale July 24.
DONT MISS!
OUR
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D MOVIE

maniac (all Frenchmen are, you
know), rents his home to Jenny,
anyway, so that he can try to
seduce her. Meanwhile, husband
Gris is in Paris with the girls
tour.
The rest of the movie is a
series of untangling madcap and
misunderstood situations,
although the jesting a little too
often descends to the sticky
sweet level of overdone comedy.
The acting is rather bland
throughout ; its the action which
serves to carry the show. James
Garner is his usual,
unexceptionable self, and
Debbie Reynolds, although far
from her Tammy days, just
doesnt make much of an
impression in a rather unskimpy
blue bikini.
Some very nice things are
done with the camera, and they
serve to highlight the show, as
well as to tone down the
rollicking slapstick. One scene,
especially, catching the Mona
Lisas smile superimposed with
the smiles of one after another
of the girls on the tour, has
reminiscences of the rapid scene
shifting technique used in
Blowup.

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dainty mother from New Jersey.
The newlyweds move into a five-flight walkup
after spending six glorious days and nights at the
Plaza Hotel. Those five flights of stairs (not
counting the stoop that long thing hanging on
the front of the building) provide some of the
funniest scenes in the whole movie.
Victor Velasco (Charks Boyer), the blue-beard
of 10th Street, lives in the attic above the Bratters
and he becomes destined to be the mothers blind
date and eventual beau.
After Paul leaves Corie she asks Mom what to do
and the storys message is revealed in Moms advice;
Give up a bit of you for a bit of him. Make him
feel important and youll be happy like two out of
ten couples!
If you go to movies to be entertained (and thats
all you should want during mid-terms) then youll
enjoy this one. Keep your eyes peeled on some of
the background action and your ears open to the
fast-paced dialogue and it will be well worth your
money.

Since this is a comedy, all
eventually must be happily
resolved: Husband and wire end
up in bed, and Davey, after an
unintended visit to a plush
brothel, is finally recognized as a
man. I rather question this
method by which a boy is
supposedly modeled into
manhood; there are more
important forms of maturity,
but the movie is concerned only
with the physical.
On the whole, the show is
enjoyable, though not very
laudatory. If you like slapstick
or situation comedy, or are in
the mood for entertainment
which wont drain your mind,
see How Sweet It Is, now
playing at the Plaza.
Sales & Service
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B= TELEPHONE FUN
- i A
m M L 'l I
~- *' : '*' ;i;
Gator-FSU Cage Tilt
Gator Bowl Bound?
(The athletic directors of Floridas Colleges never take a holiday, as
witnessed in this recently overheard conversation:)
Rinnnnnng!
G/ieves Gator Ray Grieves here! This is the home of the school
with the nations most representative national schedule. All we had to
do was drop our archrival to get it. Who is this, by the way?
Muncha Its Van Muncha at Seminole State, Grieves. Were the
team you dropped to get known better nationally.
Grieves Gee, sorry about that, Van. Whats up?
Muncha Well, it seems that there are 16,000 protesting students
in the lobby downstairs, and they want to see Gridiron U. back on our
schedule. Why did you do this to me?
Grieves I didnt send those students over there.
Muncha you know what Im talking about, Ray. Anyway, you
realize, of course, that we here at Seminole State are only doing this
for your own good.
Grieves What makes it for our own good?
Muncha Well, as you know, the Mechanix Illustrated pre-season
basketball poll has ranked us as the number one cage machine in the
nation. You want to play the best teams in the nation, and I guess this
makes us one of the best.
Grieves Gee, this sort of reverses the situation. Well, suppose we
sign for a single game next year. Where could we play it?
Muncha Glad you brought that up. First I figured we ought to
play it in Perry in the Taylor County High School gym because thats
Viewing Sports
By NEAL SANDERS Alligator Sports Editor #
close to both schools. Then, I remembered that this basketball
controversy has drawn so much attention that everyone will want to
see the game if its renewed.
Grieves So?
Muncha lt's obvious that weve got to play it in the Gator Bowl.
Lets see. . 50,000 paid admissions at six bucks a head means our cut
of it will be...
Grieves now hang on just a second there, Van. How are the
students supposed to drive clear to Jacksonville just to see an hour
and a half of basketball at night?
Muncha Thats just the point. No students. No students means
no fights, and none of that paltry chicken feed the athletic
department gets from student tuition money. After all, we get that
whether the kids go or not. Six bucks sounds like a fair price, dont
you think so?
Grieves By gosh, Van, I think you just might have something
there. We can pack the bowl for a basketball game, and if we play it
up enough, we might be able to get TV rights.
Muncha Thats the spirit! Ill call the Board of Regents right
away and demand that they hold a special meeting to consider the
charges,.. then, well take it to the Supreme. ..
I SCOREBOARD I

national league
W L PCTgB
St. Louis 59 31 656
Atlanta 49 40 .551 914
San Francisco 45 41 .523 12
Philadelphia 45 45 .500 14
Chicago 44 47 .484 15Vi
Cincinnati 42 45 .483 1514
Pittsburgh 41 47 .466 17
Los Angeles 42 49 .462 1714
New York 41 49 .456 18
Houston 38 52 .422 21

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L PCT GB
Detroit 57 32 .640
Baltimore 49 37 .570 614
Cleveland 51 41 .554 714
Boston 45 41 .523 1014
Minnesota 42 45 .483 14
California 42 46
Oakland 42 46 .477 1414
New York 41 45 .477 1414
Chicago 37 48 .435 18
Washington 30 55 .353 25

we care
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNS
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATION!
601 S.W. 2 AVE.
1130 N.E. 16th W E.
ff BATHROOM Yl
(I TISSUE l Ron I)
11 LIMIT ONE WITH Pkg. MJ
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EXCLUDING
XWciGARETTES^y^
JANE PARKER BUTTERMILK
BREAD 1/,b 2/49<
LOAF X T
ANN PAGE
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CELERY stalk 19<
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* 98c
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59c
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SUPER RIGHT HARD CORN FED 1/4 PORK LOIN
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GAME HENS i 2PACK $1.39
SUPER RIGHT ALL MEAT SKINLESS TENDER
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MRS. WIGGS BOTH FOR 7A i
SAUERKRAUT

Friday, July 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

IjflT EIGHT O'CLOCK Vk
U COFFEE Jj
ARMOUR
POTTED MEAT * 4 49<
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VIENNA SAUSAGE 4/99<
//DETERGENTS
fl 59{8
VL LIMIT ONE WITH
Vkss.oo OR MORE ORDER
ksaSVettes

Page 15



fpO
I*** wn MMIININNKUII W IfbadS
Sweet Treat Sliced I
Pineapple 1
Miree #2 Vi cans
*- (Bupirw ialyrter, July a*. IM> a
***BAPAaeaaaaaaaamaaaaeeaaamuutaae
0
I Armour's Star MiraCura I.
Sliced Bacon 1
1-lb. pkg. I
ju. <**' lM4ir, July at, I taw
J********Mtaeeealiaaaeaaaaaaaaaaae'
illllM^'nWW
iinmi tniMNmmuWNHMHN BUB
Sweet Red Ripe 1
Watermelons |
one large size
*****nneeeeeeaeeeuaeeeeeeeeeeeeeee)r

\WjM/ Green Stamps
with rercbete et ear Swlft'a
YvllMy Pmmhm Beef Seett I Ikt, er ever
enW ceupea
Swift's Premium Preten Gov't.-Inspected
Heavy Western Beef Selel
lie beef Hiet needs less cooking time
Swift's Premium Preten Bone-In
Pdf Roast. . r 59
Swift's Premium Preten Boneless Imperial B
Beef Roast. . t 89
Swift's Premium Preten Boneless Boost
English Cut. . c 99*
Swift's Premium Pretan Boneless
Rump Roast. c 99*

pi2| i'riHuVj
U MARKETS
A*.

deli specials
HawfM Fra* IM
Polish Loaf XL 49*
Old Fashion Loaf XL 49*
Macaroni Salad ....1 39*
Ik* Nm Tmfa Treetl -frmnhi
Sandwich 39*
frozen foods
HiHOa M (Swt. ar Uarwt.)
PlacMa Com*
Orange Juice .. 6 LH 99*
Mtaate MaU harm Cam.
Lmonade ST 19*
English Muffins 2 ££ 49*
Chocolate Cake 79*
SJ* 59*
Broccoli Spears 29*
£ 59*
hemUk 4k bemfy mlds
Tooth Paste .*2* 56*
lay
Mouthwash 66*
GATORADE
32 oz. Size 39<
WlWa Hat Weather SpeeM
Tea Bags 99*
IM (7c aft Deal)
Spray Starch 2 $|
N-affciarlMaa
Ftaa Ste halt w/perehaae)
Sanitary Napkins jffc 87*
Cookies 53
Zerf7&att<£ 37*

pil
b. -jfl
I
i Hoyaltons Golden
1 Elegance
LKeai p auem!
China
1r b yj^ttOTsSaa'haf
each
~y cup
Urt w Mi IACM $S rrIMW
> -*

i* 11 I
#>> \J u 1 1 1 I
SwHfa Hatritlaai
Lima Beans w/Ham 2 £T $1
Mcrti DtHdttt
Salad Olives t? 39*
SwHfa i
Chopped Beef 59*
Boned Chicken LT 39*
down produce lane
Fmh Salad Perfect
Pineapples 3 89*
Fresh Red Ripe
Tomatoes S 49*
Fresh Juicy Varieties Purple
Plums 10 c 39*
Tender, Crisp Bibb
Lettuce 2 !"! 19*
Sweat Thompson Seedless
Grapes r 39*

Swift's Premium Tender-Crown, Government-Inspected
gaj Shipped, Dressed fir Drawn, Fresh Not Frozen Plant Grade A
fill Delicious Tender Meaty flpr
9 Fryer Breasts ... .*. 59'9
Tender White Meat (with ribs) £xe|
9 Fryer Thighs t. 59' I
d9| For The Kids, Tasty B
9 Fryer Drumsticks. .*. 59' 9
SB Perfect For Stewing P
I Fryer Wings . 29* |
prices are
effective
Thurs., Fri., Sot.,
July 18, 19, 20
1968

j( f /
1 I wits

Barden's Refreshing lea Cream
Heath Bars 2 JL 89*
Del Monte Cream Style Golden Bantam or Hama Style
Golden Com S $1
Del Monte Delicious 1
Early Garden Peas 5 IT $1
Del AAoata Quality
Tomato Catsup 3 uT $1
Swift's Premium Ice Cream
Cake Rolls 3 £ $i
m Welch's Fruit Punch, Welchade, Low-Cal Wolchedl
Fruit Drinks 3 46 *- ti
Delicious, Healthful F flr P *"** "
Tomato Juice 4t? $1
Sweet Treat Sliced
Pineapple 3 22? $1
Kraft's (Limit I please)
Mayonnaise v 49*
Del AAenta (Limit 4 Please)
Chunk Tuna 4 *ir 1,
sc-off deal! Swiff's Jewel
Shortening . 39*
Del Monte Dessert Perfect Fruit
Cocktail. 4-2? 1.
Cold Water Detergent (15c off Deal)
Giant Surf & 49*
(Limit I piseto wMt athar perthsti as $3.00 ar am, aasMtaf tl|anHu)
Where Shopping Is A Pleasure .
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Mb wBUAf jl 1014 N. Main St
KmapritiJ Gainesvillo
Shopping 125 SW 34th St
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Swift's Premium Skinless
Link Sausage 49'
Swift's Premium Boneless
Smoked Daisies 79'
Swift's Premium Sliced 6-oz. 10-oz. 16-os.
Bologna 29' 49' 69*
Armour's Star Miro Cure
Sliced Bacon 65'
Always A Family Favorite! Tornow
Wieners I2 r 39'
Herman's Orange-Band Cookad or Baked
Sliced Ham 79'
Sarasota Brand Chipped Beef, Ham,
Turkey 3 & 99'
Seafood Traat! Fancy
Lake Smelts r 29'
Seafood Treat! 41-50-ct. Mad. Size Florida
Green Shrimp . *1

dairy speciats t
Breakfast Club Srade dorMa
Large Eggs 39.
Chefs Delight
Cheese Spread 59*
Kraft's Pertey Kegalw (] off)
Margarine if- 30#
Kraft's Crochet lernl
Sharp Cheddar '52 75*
Kraft's Crochet torn!
Extra Sharp JJy- 75*
Anoeer's Mbs Wlscecslc j
Burger Slices 39*
j|l|ll^Gree'nStamiisfeil
osto tomeeteo aoo tcccoass S
Any Beef Roast 3-lbs.
or over! I
1. (beirm SilwStir. Jutv 3C. ISM} f
FT?TI~7~ EXTRA
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light Or 2-0. eH 2-0.
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