Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'DUE PROCESS NOT IMPAIRED
OConnell Defends New Power

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Editor
UF President Stephen C. OConnell
defended Wednesday the Board of Regents
recent decision to allow state university
presidents to summarily suspend or expel
students pending a proper hearing.
Executive and legislative branches of UF
Student Government earlier this week
condemned the regents action. The Student
Senate passed a sharply- worded unanimous
resolution calling the new power a new
vehicle of discrimination against student
rights.
Student Body President Clyde Taylor
warned that the new policy may be a
violation of a students right to due process
of law. Taylor went on to hint that student
leaders might test the measures
constitutionality.
In its resolution, the Student Senate said
it may create a student defender post to

Vol 60, No. 160

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A DREAM?
Pretty Candi Dodson, 1UC f is deeply engrossed in thought as she
tries to appeal to the Homecoming Slogan Contest judges. With her
slogan suggestion, of course. Deadline for the contest is July 31.

Christian: 'Closing Gap
May Prevent Walkouts

The only way to prevent another teacher
walkout is to destroy the communications gap
between teachers, administrators, citizens and
government, State School Supt. Floyd Christian
cautioned this week.
Speaking at the College of Educations summer
lecture series, Christian also hinted that additional
sales taxes may be needed to fund the legislatures
recent $225 million education package.
Suggesting that sales tax might have to be raised
from its present four per cent to Five per cent,
Christian then quicklv changed the subject.
In evaluating the teacher walkout of last spring,
Christian laid blame on Gov. Claude Kirk, the
Florida Education Association, apathetic citizens
and school boards which lacked understanding of
teacher problems.
But,i he said, Now is the time to forget the

The
7
Florida Alligator

protect students due process rights.
The policy, which was enacted by the
regents at their meeting last week in
Pensacola, grants stale university presidents
the power to temporarily expel or suspend
any student convicted for criminal offenses
involving personal misconduct of a kind
which interferes with the orderly process or
operation of the university, or of a kind
which, if condoned by the university, would
reflect discredit on the university.
OConnell gave indication in Jacksonville ;
Monday that he might not flinch from using
the new powers.
In an interview there, he blamed student
revolts on a dedicated disruptive core and
on lenient university administrators. In
answer to questions of the press, he
promised fast, tough action against agitators
who interfere with university operation or
individual rights.
OConnell, a former chief justice of
Floridas Supreme Court, said the regents

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

differences which separated us, to see if we cant
build our school system into a strong unit, a model
for the nation.
School teachers, Christian continued, are
probably the poorest public relations people there
are. He said the recent teacher walkout was a case
of bad judgment and bad timing.
But he emphasized that he didnt doubt the
sincerity of those teachers who left their jobs.
Reflecting on the walkout of some 25,000
Florida teachers, Christian said, 1967-68 was a
paradox we went from the brink of disaster to the
dawning of a new era in education.
The legislation resulting from the special session
called as a result of the walkout almost doubled the
amount of state funds available for schools over the
previous two-year period.

IN HONOR COURT
Senate Plans Boycott
Os Redistricting Suit

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
A suit charging that UFs
Student Senate is illegally
apportioned has been filed by
William W. Wilhelm, 4LW, with
the Honor Courts Board of
Masters.
Wilhelm is asking the Board
of Masters to order the Student
Senate to reapportion itself. The
hearing is scheduled for 3:30
today, but the Senate claims it
wont be there.
We were never officially
notified of the hearing, Senate
Minority Leader Ira Hatch said.
I advised Student Senates
legal counsel, Hugh Morgan, over
three weeks ago that this hearing
was coming up, Board of
Masters Chairman Pete Zinober
asserts. He told me hed get to
work on it right away.
But the Senate has a rebuttal:
Hugh Morgan has never
officially been elected our legal
counsel, Hatch said.

policy was not a denial of any students right
to due process of the law.
There are many parallels to this power
in every day life, he said. The new
summary expulsion policy bears a marked
resemblance to passages in the UF
Constitution about the granting of tenure to
UF professors, O'Connell said.
In both instances, the suspension is
temporary, pending a hearing, OConnell
emphasized.
Its not a denial of a students due
process with a hearing, OConnell said.
Without a hearing, I believe it would.
The new policy is not operative yet,
anyway, OConnell pointed out. Any policy
passed by the. Board of Regents is
automatically reviewed by the State Board
of Education and filed in the Office of the
Secretary of State.
It does not become offical policy for the
state universities until 90 days after it has
been published by the Secretary of State.

Well, then I cant
understand why hes been
working on the case this long,
Zinober answered. I consider
him the Senates legal counsel,
and all this nit-picking is wasting
time.
As it now stands, the Senate
will not appear today before the
Board of Masters. Zinober will
have no alternative but to order
that the Senate has lost its case


Senate Approves
Reapportionment

Apparently attempting to
deal with charges that it is
malapportioned, the Student
Senate Tuesday night voted
through a reapportionment bill.
Rawlings Hall and Broward
Hall were combined into three
seats. Hume Hall and Graham
Hall were merged into two seats.
Off-campus representation was
increased from 11 seats to 23
seats.
Senate Minority Leader Ira
Hatch conceded that
apportionment was not
representative. He explained that
the problem was caused by the
Student Body Constitution.
Article 11, Section 2, provides
that each on-campus living
area with a minimum of 300
students shall elect at least one
representative.
By the time all the living
areas have been represented,
there arent too many seats for
the rest of the University,
Hatch said. v-
In other action Tuesday
night, the Senate passed a
Womens Autonomy Bill which
recommends the removal of the
Dean of Women from the

Friday, July 12, 1968

O'CONNELL
. .defends powers
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by default, and order it to
reapportion.
A citation for contempt of
court could result if the Senate
refuses to obey the courts
order.
The Senate stated its reasons
for refusing to appear.
The official Student Senate
policy, said Hatch is that the
( SEE -BOYCOTT' PAGE 2)


\ssociation of Women Students
and Womens Judiciary.
The act also provides any girl
brought before Womans
Judiciary with the right to legal
counsel, for which she must pay.
Pones RulingJ
(Due Mondays
The University Senate £
£ Committee on Academic £
£ Freedom and Tenure has £
£ ruled on the tenure case for £
.
>: former UF psychiatry £
£ professor Marshall Jones and £
£ referred the matter to UF £
£ President Stephen C. :£
£ OConnell. OConnell has £
£ promised to release his £
£ decision on the case Monday. £
£ Only the Board of Regents :?
£ may overturn OConnells £
£ decision. £
£ The committee has not £
£ announced its decision on the £
£ case and individual members $

£ could not be contacted. £
£ Jones, whose contract ended £
£ June 30, was also unavailable >j
£ for comment.



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12.1968

Page 2

OConnell Renews Pledge
To Action Conference

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has pledged his
co-operation to the Action
Conference in almost any way
he can, Action Conference
Chairman Maj. Russell Ramsey
said in a recent interview.
Ramsey conferred with
OConnell last week and
explained the progress and ideas
of each of the Task Force
Committees. The ideas will be
presented at a Steering
Committee meeting Monday and
then incorporated into an
agenda for a meeting of the
entire Action Conference
Wednesday.
Ramsey also reported to
OConnell on some of the
decisions of the Task Forces.
Hie University Community
committee has been studying
varied life styles, Ramsey said.
One plan under consideration
allows students to decide
whether they will live in coed or
Bank Seeks
Blood Givers
The blood bank of the
Shands Teaching Hospital needs
donors from UFs student
population. A dwindling supply
of fresh blood and plasma has
reached a critical stage, hospital
sources report.
The decrease of supply was
attributed to doctors having
been forced recently to
administer unusual amounts of
blood to hemophiliacs and heart
surgery patients.
The blood bank has an
immediate need for blood
donors. Students may
participate in the program as
one-time or professional
long-term honors. Prospective
donors should report to Room
A-100 in the teaching hospital
from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays
through Fridays or from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturdays.
Student donors must be at
least 18 years old. Parental
permission is required for donors
under 21.

Redistricting Boycott

f FROM PAM OWE
Board of Masters had no
jurisdiction over cases of this
sort.
Thats not for the Student
Senate to decide, said Zinober.
It is only for them to appear
before the Board.
Wilhelm claims that as
apportionment now stands, he is
not being given an equal voice as
a student and that therefore his
constitutional rights are being
infringed upon.
Wilhelm complained that as a

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the ottJcUU student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions at their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator s entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florlfe, 32601.
Subscription rate Is 914.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements aad to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wtll not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not he responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Mottoes for correction mimt be given before next Insertion.

separated dormitories.
The main question here
concerns voluntary and
compulsory association patterns,
whos going to tell whom where
to liver and with whom,
Ramsey added. The committee
is also studying the role of
fraternities and sororities on
campus.
More than just newspapers
is involved in the Freedom of
Expression committee, Ramsey
reported. The committee is also
studying what a professor can
teach that will not become
someones idea of subversion. It
is different for each course.
The curriculum committee is

Student Hit By Car,
In Serious Condition
A UF student was struck and seriously injured Thursday morning
as he crossed rain-slicked University Avenue in front of the Gold
Coast Restaurant.
The student, John Everett Stepp, was hit by an east bound vehicle
as he attempted to cross the busy street at about 9:00 oclock. He was
thrown approximately 40 feet through the air and suffered head
injuries.
Stepp was taken by ambulance to the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
where he was listed in serious condition with head injuries.
Police estimated damage to the automobile at $295. The
windshield was caved in and the right fender and right top of the
compact car were dented.
Driver Richard J. Juneau, a UF pharmacy student, refused to
comment on the accident. He was not charged.
City Affairs Expert
Speaks At Norman

A. Donald Bourgeois,
associate director of the recently
formed Urban Coalition, will
discuss Mass Living: Impact on
Man and His Environment in a
speech at 4:30 p.m. Monday at
the UFs College of Education.
As associate director of the
non-governmental study and
policy group, Bourgeois is
responsible for developing local
coalitions in 31 cities in the west
central states.
He was appointed earlier this
month by Coalition director
John Gardner, former Secretary
of the Department of Health,

student in the College of Law,
with a population of 598, he has
only two representatives in tlje
Senate.
The College of Forestry, he
maintained, has one member in
the Senate, although its student
population is only 91.
Therefore, Wilhelm claimed, his
vote is worth less than one-third
that of a student of the College
of Forestry.
This is a direct violation of
the Student Body Constitution
which insures equal voice and
vote for every student, Wilhelm
contended.

reviewing the comprehensive
courses required by the
University College for a possible
recommendation of removal.
Ramsey stated that University
College Dean Franklin Doty has
reported that he doesnt have a
penny for research to study
whether or not these
comprehensive classes should be
required. The committee is also
studying graduate work.
The Relations with the
Community and State
committee has been studying
ways of involving fraternities
and sororities as well as
academic organizations in
activities outside the campus.

Education and Welfare. Until
then, Bourgeois had been
director of the St. Louis Model
City Agency.
Before assuming that
directorship, he had been
instrumental in spearheading
efforts to organize and
coordinate the work of state,
local, public and private agencies
in St. Louis. He developed a
program called Block
Partnership which won wide
acclaim for combating poverty
and stimulating greater
inter-racial communication and
cooperation.
Bourgeois is the second of six
speakers being brought to the
campus this summer to explore
problems in teaching the
disadvantaged. Sponsor of the
lecture series is the Institute for
Experienced Teachers.
Prior to his work in the
Model City Agency, Bourgeois
was deputy general manager of
the St. Louis Human
Development Corporation.
Bourgeois practiced law in
Chicago for some 12 years
before moving to St. Louis.
Librarian Elected
The acting director of
University Libraries, Dr.
Margaret Goggin, has been
chosen president-elect of the
American Library Associations
Division of Reference Services.
Mrs. Goggin, now a member
of the governing council of the
35,000-member ALA, will
assume the divisions
vice-presidency and
presidency-elect July 23 at the
organizations annual conference
in Kansas City.

s'
WHY JUST THINK ABOUT IT? ENTER THE
HOMECOMING SLOGAN CONTEST and win a 5 day
trip for two to Jarriaica.
Send entries to Florida Blue Key Office. Deadline July
31.
'Padded Income
To End Poverty?
A sociologist who spent three years studying the Negro ghetto
called for an income supplement program as the best means of
eliminating poverty in a speech at the College of Education Tuesday.
Dr. David Schulz, a member of the Pennsylvania State University
faculty and an ordained Episcopal priest, said so-called means
programs, such as the War on Poverty with emphasis on education, are
ineffective.
The moral question (of across-the-board income supplements) is,
Should we continue to punish the majority out of fear that a few will
be rewarded unjustly? Schulz said to an audience of students and
faculty.
Schulz speech, Poverty, Prejudice and Policy: The Ghetto Family
Under Fire, was the First in a series of six being sponsored this
summer by the Institute for Experienced Teachers. At 4:30 p.m.
Monday Dr. A. Donald Bourgeois, executive director of the St. Louis
Model City Agency, will discuss Mass Living: Impact on Man and His
Environment.
Dr. Schulz based his talk on observations as a member of a 10-man
research team in the St. Louis ghetto two years ago.
He said existing welfare programs are not doing the job of raising
the poor above the poverty level. And the War on Poverty, he said, has
failed so far because the culture of poverty has developed a
different set of values among the poor, who dont recognize the
advantages of education.
Dillinger Named
Alumni Assistant

Harold H. Dillinger has been
appointed assistant director of
the UFs Division of Alumni
Services by Director William J.
Watson Jr.
A 1950 graduate of the
University, Dillinger has been
field secretary of the association
since 1963. He succeeds Ralph
Evans who resigned June 1.
Watson said Dillinger has
shown improvement, initiative
and ambition in assuming
additional responsibilities and
duties, and as a result has been
an outstanding employee,
justifying the promotion from
field secretary to assistant
director.

m. xg
DILLINGER
... alumni assistant



PUBLIX

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Thun., Fri., Sat.
July 11, 12. 13, 1968
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Roast, 3 lbs. or over
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[flJlj^GreenStairips
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rag. price 1
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Armour's Magic-Slice toneless (ail white meat)
Turkey Roast l^ 5 3 w
Armour's Magic-Slice Boneless (light b dark mix)
Turkey Roast 2 ,i 9 6 ' *2
Tasty Seafood Treat!
Kingfish Steaks . 49*
Try Our Delicious Fillet of
Red Snapper *. *1
Copeland's Tasty 5-os. 10-os. 16-os.
Sliced Bologna 25* 45 59*
Batty Crocker Assorted
Cake Mixes 3 ££. 89*
Bad, Pineapple ,or Diet
Hawaiian Punch
Lady Batty Tasty
Prune Juice JV 49*
F 6r P Flevorful
Sliced Beets # r 15*
F Br P Whole' Kernel
Golden Corn '\.V' 19*
F t P Cream Style
Golden Corn # Ftp Flavor Perfect
Garden Peas ... 19*
lOeeees White or Asserted Caters
Facial Tissue 3 *1
a dows produce lone
Festival of Plums! Mis or Match Sale on All Delicious
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Plums 10 k. 39*
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dwtfT J IIVv jr TT BHVin
Nectarines .. 10 *. 59*
Florida Grown Crisp Green
Okra Cabbage 7*
Crisp Michigan Pascal
Celery 2 h 29*

IfiTn^GreenStampsp^
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Throo 6V2 os. cans
. Wwiras Sri. July U. IMS)
mmmommmmmlmmmmuwwmmmumm***

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Braunschweiger b 55*
SwiO'i Piiwlam Tra-Taadar SlkH
Beef Liver 69*
Ralb'i Black Hawk Baaalau
Smoked Dainfees *. 79*
Taraaw't Ceefcad at lakad
Sliced Ham 59*
Taraaw'i Ovaa-laady IV* lb. pkg. 2 Vj lb pkg.
Meat Loaf 98* s i 49
dell specials
Old Fmkiaa Oanaaa Style
Sliced Bologna . 79*
Oaikiaai Utckca-Frask Salad*
Chicken, Ham or Tuna 49*
Always A Family Favorite!
Cubans ,* 49*

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Collect Reyelton's
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Swift's Premium Proton
Government-Inspected 1 iKnMy
Heavy Western Beef \RPnSsfl
Swift's Premium Bone-In
Pot Roast ...... * 59
Swift's Prsminm Boneless
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Swift's Proten Bonslsss English Cut
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Swift's Premium Proten Tasty
Chuck Steaks 69'
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Short Ittbs 49'
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Marshmallows .... Vs' 25* Lmrmtb/I
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Ketchup 29*
Star-Kist Sandwich Perfect Chunk-Style
Tuna 3-"B9*
Wilson's Shortening Special! iLimit I please)
Bake-Rite... >- 49*
Plain or Self-Rising Piilsbury (Limit I please'
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50c off deal! Reg. Price $2.90, Save 92c! Bold
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Friday, July 12,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Cocktail 25*
Kleenex Towels ...*Za* 29*
WUr. m >.mii Mm
DelseyTissue ..*£ 23*
ntlwr fuuMg TmOiM
Instant Tea Z 99*
hash. Crisps, t sash las
Cheez-lts I# JT 37*
F.F.V. CssUs Traetl
Appetizers Si. 29*
(Mm Chaaaa, Haas I Chasaa, Ptaa. Whs*
Thhts, CMMt Thlm)
bhy s Ton Hsakhtri
Tomato Juice 3 $l
Asm Halliat Taaty
Com Relish LT 35*
k M m s e ( hi
Bar-B-Que Sauce 'IT 25*
Aiitftvd Rwiti
Toastem 'JLT 39*
4-attl taari ttarof. lap
Glad Wrap 35*
CovooHoo bricM
Evaporated Milk 6 £ 98*
dairy specials
Biscuits 4 2 39*
Margarine '£ 43*
PlHsbory CfOMOOt
Dinner Rolls £* 39*
Longhorn Cheese *T 53*
Kroffs SHmO Moteml
Swiss Cheese .*£ 47*
Krsfr's AesMSsd Smt Casas.
TeezDips \Z 49*
frozen foods
Orange Juice .. 6 il 99*
Lemonade ... 6 69*
Salisbury "£teak .. *£i I*
Rich's Mm Retry
Coffee Rjch IT 49*
Leaf Spinach 2 *£ 35*
Broccoli Spears 2 49*
Haddock Fillets... 59*
Fillet of Flounder 49*
sea Rolls pC 69*
ISoMogo t Chins. Ariop I Chasss, ar lah-
M laspaHs.)
(Urn to RsHs UH Orsas SMsps sM lispl
health A heaaty rUIi
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Riqht Guard AT 49*
WHERE SHOPPING IS
A PLEASURE...
PRICES GOOD AT:
2630 NW 13th St.
Tha Moll

1014 N. Main St.
Gainesvilla Shopping
Cantor

Page 3

125 SW 34th St.
Wtitgato



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12.1966

Page 4

Wauburg
Hosts
Campers
Over 200 Gainesville
underprivileged children will
enjoy 10 days of summer fun as
a result of Operation Concerns
latest project, Camp Wauburg.
The first camp session will
run every Tuesday and Thursday
July 16 until July 30. The
second session will run every
Tuesday and Thursday from
August 1 to August 15. Campers
will be 9-18 years old, with 100
campers per session.
Project SAMSON Director
Mike Wittman has been working
closely with Buddy McWilliams
of Gov. Claude Kirks Office of
Economic Opportunity and with
personnel from the city of
Gainesville to organize the
project.
The Gainesville city
commission and the county
school board are underwriting
the cost of transportation and
free lunches for the campers.
Three city recreation directors
have been authorized to help the
SAMSON workers organize
activities.
Project SAMSON is providing
counselors and waterfront
instructors.
Any student who would like
to volunteer to help in the
project should call extension
3193.
UF, Navy |
Battle Bugs!
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF is teaming up with
the U.S. Navy (the Navy doesnt
draft) to fight one of mans
oldest and most formidable
enemies, the termite.
The hate-termites campaign
will begin because, according to
Navy spokesmen, the hungry
winged warriors keep eating the
Navys tremendous supply of
wood buildings, especially the
wood buildings in Florida.
Therefore, UF bug experts
will team up with Navy bug
experts for a 3-year study of the
best ways to get -rid of the
wood-eating pests. The project
will cost the Navy an estimated
$50,000, but the study might
discover away to get rid of the
menace once and for all and to
save a wooden Navy building or
two.
The Naval Facilities
Engineering Command in
Charleston, S.C., awarded the
grant after completing several
experiments of its own. The
UFs Entomology Dept, will use
some of the $50,000 to
construct a termite testing
laboratory in Gainesville. UF
termite experts will also
investigate termite infested Navy
buildings in Key West.
The published findings of
the UF will be available to
everyone, and hundreds of
thousands of dollars may be
saved by those who have had to
fight these persistent insects in
Key West, Miami and Tampa
where they are a big problem, a
spokesman said.

ijJ El
" Jr [fj
Attend National Conference
Four physical therapy seniors from the UF's College of Health
Related Professions are attending the national conference of the
American Physical Therapy Association in Chicago this week with the
financial assistance of National Foundation-March of Dimes chapters
in their home counties. Shown from left are: Arnold Kuypers, Sally
Goodwin, Ed Lundgren and Jan Mazurek.
Taylor Proposes
UF-Sin City Bus

A Student Government plan
to establish a Sin City-campus
bus route is in the exploratory
stage, Student Body President
Clyde Taylor said recently.
The planned route would
extend from Gator Town
apartments to the UF campus
and would utilize the city
subsidized transit system at a
better rate than now exists.
Were trying to work
something out with the city,
explained Taylor, where
students could buy a book of
bus tickets at a cut-rate.
Taylor emphasized that the

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plan is in the exploratory stages
and the first step is a survey of
the situation. He admitted there
were many problems to be
worked out.
Legal research needs to be
done on the problems of getting
certain rates for certain
people. Taylor also raised the
question of whether Student
Government should try to
include the special rates for UF
employees as well as students.
I hope something can be
worked out, he declared.
Taylor indicated that initial
contacts made with city officials
have been favorable.

Senate Kills 'Bad
Arab-Gator Bill
By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
The controversial Arab Gator bill is dead according to
Robert Glenn, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which
is studying the bill.
The proposed bill would have required all UF student
publications to submit to approval either of the Board of Student
Publications (BSP) or the Student Senate. It was introduced to the
Senate last month after the publication of the Arab Gator
magazine which attacked Israeli motives and tactics in the recent
Middle-East conflict.
Glenn said the decision to let the bill die was reached after we
had talked about it at length.
* Ira Hatch, the Senate member who originally introduced the
bill; admitted that the bill was not good.
The bill I introduced was sort of drastic, he explained, but it
brought the spotlight to the problem itself.
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Friday, July 12,1968, Tha Florida AMfcatur,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12. 1968

Page 6

W6B
Poit/kcJuAj
Potsi.
M
j\wdMM

The last half of the sixties at UF may well
become known as the era of the absentee
student body officer.
You can spend literally days trying to run
down these officers. You will meet
secretaries, receptionists, assistants, cabinet
members and honor court attorneys.
Student Body President Clyde Taylor has
delegated most of his authority to his
cabinet officers and comes in from time to
time to make sure things are working well.
Student Body Treasurer Phil Burnett
relies heavily upon his bookkeeper to keep
C EDITORIAL J
student body finances in order, periodically
checking accounts and signing salary
allocations.
But let us hasten to add that life at UF
has become so complicated that it may not
be possible at present for these officers to
devote more time to their jobs.
University regulations require that all
persons involved in student activities take at
least 12 hours of credit work.
Phil Burnett, Clyde Taylor, and Honor
Court Chancellor Pete Zinober are all senior
law students. Twelve hours of law is a lot of
work.
Student Government salaries are low for
state universities in Florida. The University
of South Florida pays $325 per quarter;
Florida State University pays SIOO a month
plus living quarters.
UF student government pays its top
officials a paltry S2OO per quarter. No living
quarters, no anything.
The top offices in our student
government require a lot of time and
responsibility. In order to attract the best
possible talent, some changes must be made.
Allow the president, vice-president,

LBJ, Dirksen: Political Patty Cake

WASHINGTON A lot of
people have been wondering
why Sen. Everett Dirksen, 111.,
the Republican leader, is
steadfastly for Abe Fortas for

jjNtt
Hk
PEARSON

Chief Justice. Here is the inside
story.
Its no secret that Johnson
and Dirksen, the friendliest of
opponents, have been playing
political patty cake for years.
Its also no secret that Dirksen
has his heart set on keeping the
outmoded Subversive Activities
Control Board in business.

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know"
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
News Editor

Ra ise The Pay

ANDERSON

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

Drew Pearson

What is secret is that LBJ
agreed to keep the board going if
Dirksen would agree to help
confirm Fortas.
Sen. William Proxmire,
D-Wisc., had led a Senate fight
last year to abolish the SACB.
Dirksen was bitterly opposed,
and the Senate finally adopted a
compromise giving the board
one more year to find something
to do. If no communist case
referrals to it were announced
by June 30, and no cases
actually sent to the board by
Dec. 31, the SACB would
automatically expire. Attorney
General Ramsey Clark promptly
announced that he had no
intention of sending any cases to
the board.
This seemed to end the
SACB.
However, just before the June
30 deadline, Clark suddenly
reversed himself. He quietly

treasurer, and honor court chancellor to take
less than 12 hours of course work.
Raise the pay for the above posts to a
comparable level of that of the other state
universities.
We can no longer afford to refuse our
public servants the time and the Financial
support they need to do their work.

The Merry-Go-Round

A Need For Wisdom

In a news report in this issue. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell detends the
recent Board of Regents action granting
university presidents the power to summarily
suspend a student pending a hearing
for conduct which may discredit the
university.
But a word of caution, Mr. President.
Any power subject to arbitrary whim is
also subject to misuse, often unintentional.
As you very carefully pointed out. Mr.

notified the board that he would
send over seven communist
cases.
Actually, there isnt much the
board can do about these cases.
Any adverse action almost
certainly would be overruled by
the Supreme Court.
But meantime, the SACB will
be saved, and the members will
be able to continue collecting
their salaries.
This is the inside reason why
Dirksen is vigorously supporting
Abe Fortas for Chief Justice.
Note: Both Johnson and
Dirksen have friends on the
SACB who are pulling down
$26,000a-year salaries. The
President appointed Simon
McHugh, Jr., husband of a
favorite White House secretary,
to the board. Earlier, Dirksen
wangled an appointment for a
friend of his, John S. Patterson.
There is a vacancy on the board

Jack Anderson

which Dirksen would also like to
fill.
Before President Johnson
announced the selection of Abe
Fortas as Chief Justice, he
sounded out Secretary of State
Dean Rusk about filling the
vacancy.
Rusk, ho w ever, was
emphatically negative.
As your adviser, I could not
let you do this, Mr. President,
he said. While I studied law,
Gen. Marshall took me for the
general staff before I had a
chance to practice. I would not
be qualified. As your adviser, I
could not let you do this.
Johnson did not press the
matter. Despite political
criticism of Rusk, the President
has the highest regard for his
devotion, dedication and
knowledge of foreign affairs. He
also feels a sense of sympathy
for him, partly because of the

President, the power is used only pending a
hearing for the student. But if a student is
summarily suspended by the president,
fairness of the subsequent hearing may be
seriously jeopardized.
It seems obvious that whoever must
subsequently judge a students conduct or
misconduct cannot ignore that the president
has already entered his vote. If the student
were not guilty, or apparently so. the
suspension power would not likely have been
invoked.
The suspended student faces a stacked
jury or at best, the possibility of it.
ET EDITORIAL
Furthermore, Mr. President, you
compared this newly-acquired power to the
president's authority in faculty tenure cases,
wherein the president may deny tenure to a
professor, pending a hearing of the case.
But your analogy may be an unfortunate
one in this instance.
Former UF psychology Professor Marshall
Jones last year was denied tenure by the
Personnel Board, a decision upheld by both
former President J. Wayne Re'itz and
yourself.
Many members of this community are
convinced that Jones was not permitted to
remain a professor at this university because
of his political views.
Such conviction has deeply alienated some
of UFs most capable leaders. And the winds
of discontent generated by Jones vigorous
battle for tenure are still fresh.
Many still believe that presidential power
was misused, implemented because of
disagreement with Jones.
Does it il)t now seem reasonable that
arbitrary power over students might rupture
discontent into anger?
For the sake of this university, let us hope
not.
Let us also hope, Mr. President, that your
new power will corrode with rust in that
darkened corner where all potential
infringements on human rights are discarded.
Such corrosion could be a mark of
wisdom.

criticism, partly because of the
Rusk family traumatic
experience in having their
daughter marry a Negro. Rusk
offered his resignation to the
President hefore the marriage
took place, but LBJ wouldnt
listen.
Its nobodys business whom
your daughter marries, he said.
Lady Bird and I sent the
young couple a present and our
best wishes, the President later
told friends.
The Constitution makes the
presidency the most powerful
job in the world. President
Johnson is sure of only one
thing: The office needs to be
studied. When he gets out of
office he plans to continue
studying it from the vantage of
the Institute on Public Affairs
which he is setting up at the
Uftiversity of Texas.



OPEN FORUM:
Adjuixi ml ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man

Bailey /Mask Os Conservatism

MR. EDITOR:
There appears to be logic in
Jimmey Baileys existence, as his
chairmanship of UFs Wallance
for President committee proves.
Floridas ultra-arch-conservative
has been judged by his actions
and found consistent.
- i
Having changed his column
heading to The Conservative
View he continues to pour out
his drivel in torrential quantities.
Poor Jim, his new found title is a
dead giveaway to his fears.
(Editors Note: The title of
Baileys column The
Conservative View was chosen
by the Editor.)
Conservatism is the mask
behind which all manner of fools
hide when their true selves are
repulsive. Jim uses it to this end
perfectly.
Hoping that all will forget his
bigoted, anti-Semitic anti-civil
rights statements of the past, he
clothes his hatreds under the

Astonishment Over
Arabgator 'Attack

MR. EDITOR:
As a member of the Arab
Club, I would like to express my
astonishment at the controversy
aroused by the recent issue of
the Arabgator, and the
contention by the Alligator that
the publication contained a
bitter attack against Israel and
its supporters.
I would like to point out that
there was no mention at all of
Israels supporters in the 1967
war. The Arabgator issue
included a short extract from
Arnold Toynbees Study Os
History, describing the massacres
that the Zionists committed
against the Arab citizens of Dir
Yasin in 1948.
It also included an extract of
the Life Magazine editorial of
April 5, 1968, and a BBC
broadcast of an interview with
Sir Dinglefoot, Britains envoy
to the UAR.
The only other articles were
an introduction by the Arab
club president, and a brief
historical survey of the Palestine
problem which is hardly less
objective than Toynbees own
account of the situation. It was
written l/ M.T. Mehdi,
secretary-general of the Action
Committee on American Arab
Relations and appeared in the
July 1-15, 1967 issue of
Concern.
The question I now ask is
what specifically, so arounsed
the ire of Ira Hatch and Jack
Zucker? Or is it against
democratic principles that the
students of this university
should be made aware that there
are two sides to the Middle
Eastern problem?
And are Life magazine, Sir

mantle of conservatism and
becomes fully self righteous.
His fears are life and change,
two almost inseparable
situations. Life in the present
presents high levels of
frustration and anxiety. The
educated hopefully are able to
cope with and in turn change
with the times. Jim obviously
can not.
He refuses to leave the
protective philosophical womb
of his upbringing and face
reality. His statements about
Wallace evidence a marked lack
of originality, and originality is a
cornerstone to survival in
modern life.
His main problem, it appears,
is that he is still too hung up in
dichotomies. Socialism and
Communism are bad; his way is
good. Welfare is bad; starving is
good. Anything that threatens
his concept of good is bad,
period. No questions asked.
Social justice? I doubt if he can
define it.
The most powerful point ot a

Dinglefoot, or Arnold Toynbee
responsible for the alleged
partisan nature of the
Arabgator.
Finally I would like to
remind you and the student
body, that no such objections
were raised when the Alligator
itself, which is financed from
Student Government funds,
published a series of mordant
and irresponsible articles and
cartoons on Nasser, Egypt and
the Arabs at about this time last
year.
IMADE KATTAN

The Conservative View
Communists Are Harmless?
Jimmey Bailey

On December 11, 1967, the
United States Supreme Court,
by a vote of 6 to 2, declared that
portion of the McCarran Act
which bars defense employment
of communists to be
unconstitutional.
In other words, members of
the Communist Party, USA, or
communists loyal to Peking or
Moscow directly, are now
considered by the Supreme
Court to be so harmless that
they can work in our American
defense plants with no harm to
anyone.
Under this kind of reasoning,
it now becomes legal for
followers of the Viet Cong or
Communist North Viet Nam to
exist in the United States with
right to employment in
American defense facilities.
The Chief Justices backdoor

socialized state is that it
compensates strongly for the
lust, greed and dearth of social
justice that Jimmey Baileys
utopia is rife with.
Men may not be physical,
mental, or socio-economic
equals, Jim, but they deserve the
equal right to the opportunity to
advance. If society has made
advancement meaningless to
them, they deserve the right to
live.
Emerson once said,
Consistency is the hobgoblin of
little minds. If you desire
things past so dearly, Jim, then
allow the past to make comment
on you.
GIL KORENBLIT, 3AS

lAW AND ORDER, \ BMCK^PgyW
c*
Vetting Acquainted

logic comes up with the phrase,
The statute quite literally
establishes guilt by association
alone, without any need to
establish that an individuals
association creates the threat
feared by government in
proscribing it.
Has the Supreme Court
forgotten the cases of Klaus
Fuchs, Dr. Alan Nunn May, Dr.
Bruno Pontecorvo, the
Rosenbergs, David Greenglass,
and Morton Sobell? These
people were introduced into
American and British atomic
installations during World War
11.
But the" Supreme Court
dismisses this record with an airy
hand. Now the United States
Supreme Court has held that
communists may have passports
to travel to Moscow, Peking, or
Hanoi. They have forbidden

No Respect For
'Gu ise Os Law
MR. EDITOR:
Judge Adkins, the great protector of law and order, has again taken
up his banner and waved it piously over Gainesville. I was unable to
attend his address as I am presently confined to the Alachua County
Jail for having no respect for law and order."
First of all, I have a deep and passionate respect for the Law. I have
no respect for law and order when it is used to repress a portion of
our citizenry. I have no respect for law and order when it is used to
put behind bars those who would speak the truth about the degraded
conditions of our Black Brothers and Sisters and the poor, and who
tell how they feel about their degradation in this land.
We, who protest, demand a society that is not atrophied by
injustice, and by an overzealous commitment to law and order. We
protest against a commitment of lazy citizenry who allow violence by
the cops, the public officials, rent collectors, landlords, loan sharks
and indifferent public agencies against the people and those who dare
to speak out against the Sacred Power Structure.
A society which encourages the persistence of injustices under the
guise of law and order has sown the seeds of hate for the law and
order be damned.
Finally, Dear judge, we do not break laws just to test their
constitutionality in court. That is the most absurd thing Ive ever
heard. In the course of our protests we have only one thing in our
mind to unmask the hypocrisy of this society.
CAROL THOMAS
Alachua County Jail

individual states to inquire
whether or not teachers are
communist.
The question naturally arises,
Do loyal Americans no longer
have legal right to protection
against treason and subversion?
The following remarks are
addressed to Jeff Raffle, ILW,
the exponent of immediate fear
from the atomic bomb rather
than the shootn am.
Raffle blatantly exclaims that
the Second Amendment to the
Constitution of these United
States reads, in full, A well
regu'ated militia, being necessary
for the security of a free state,
the right of the people to keep
and bear arms shall not be
infringed.
He goes on to profoundly
state that the Second
Amendment, according to the

Friday, July 12, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

(Supreme) Court, is concerned
with state militias, not the
private ownership of firearms.
In my column I only gave the
last half of the Amendment
because it was all that is
relevant. Raffle didnt look too
closely at his copy of the
Constitution or he would have
seen a very important comma.
Using good English
construction, the comma was
both there to apply to both
points of the amendment. The
comma asserts that neither the
states rights to a well regulated
militia ? nor the right of the
people to keep and bear arms,
shall be infringed.
One more thing, Mr. Raffle.
If I am a Super Patriot what
is more desirable than a person
\yho is loyal to his country? Just
what are you?

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
y M
wxwJ>>x*y-v.v; MW>>>:*x ww<"W i*'
PLAYFUL kitties. PartSiamese,
partPersian. One grey, fluff, one
long haired black, one calico. 8 weeks
old. Healthy. Have been de-wormed.
Call 3782077. Address: 3205 N.W.
14th St. (A 157 4t p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (Als4tf p)
DEPENDABLE 1967 Honda 5O,
1100 miles. Like new side basket
$170.00. 3788397 or see at
702 1 1 5 S. W 16th Ave.
(Als6stp)
GIRLS 3speed bike $25.00, 170
lbs. barbells, $15.00, Fan $4.00, 110
S.W. 4th Ave. Weeknights after 5
p.m. (Als B3t p)
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS.
Quality food for low prices. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (Als22otp)
Air Conditioner for VW "Beetle 6v.
$150.00. Call 3 7281 97.
EXCELLENT, efficient and
economical, that's Blue Lustre carpet
and upholstery cleaner. Rent electric
shampooer. SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (Al6oltc)
FOR SALE: 1967 60 x 12, Custom
built, completely furnished two
bedroom, Homette Mobile Home.
Down payment SIBOO plus $79.00
monthly payments. Call 3762894.
(Als3tp)
AT LAST in Gainesville, AKC Welsh
Corgi pups. 3783725 after 5:30
p.m. 3763261 Ext. 2746 weekdays.
(Al6o3tp)
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al*o:
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(short existential film)
Friday 7:00,9:15 p.m.
Saturday 7:00.9:15 p.m.
40 cant par sludant

FOR SALE
WvrtWXWX.I.K.WSK.WWW.mv.v*'
LUXURY on wheels. 1968 Hillcrest
Mobile Home. 12* x 44*. 1 Bedroom
furnished $3795.00. Phone
3725267 after 5:30 p.m. and ask
about the many included extras.
(Als7st-p)
a free kittens? Part-Persian;
House-trained. 3511 S.W. Archer
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f JtodHag Chair Twin ]
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| Downtown GoJwsvH/a |

STARTS FRIDAY JULY 19 |
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A SELZNICK ommotcow 5£J?5! w-wuoiv Academy^
INTERNATIONAL PICTURE VICTOR FLEMING aw mno METRO GOLDWYN MAYER t- JS&. METROCUIDR W SnSS I
MGM ||p

Friday, July 12,1968. The Florida Alligator,

;.yyyy;.yyy*.y ;V. yy;.y;.y;.;.;.yV. , ;*; ; X*
FOR RENT
;
ENORMOUS living room with
fireplace, three large bedrooms,
dining room, big shady back yard
with barbecue pit, ample parking. An
excellent place for serious minded
students who wish to throw an
occasional party. Available Sept. 15
at $l5O/month. Call 3764019.
(81592 t

Page 8

FOR RENT
ARTISTS 3 room studio Apart Apartment
ment Apartment Center of Art Micanopy. Call
466-3459 or 372-4979. (B-159-4t-p)
2 BR garage apt. A/C and CH
available Aug. Ist.
1 BR apt. A/C large shady backyard
available now. Victorian Mansion 6
BR available now to Sept. 15.
3764019. (81597t p)

l___Powgfowj^Ggi svtfle 1
They beat him... § 1:30 3:30
branded him... 1 5:30 7:30
broke him... 1 9:30
but the stranger § M >.
still took I
every dollar
and every C
,vl^^^n^a Modio-Cia Sandri and rank Wolf I
Suggested For I Produced by Infascelli Directed by Vance Lewis
Mature Audiences |
inMetrocolor MGM

t WXMTVeVoVV.VeV.VAW,W>>V*%V#* v *Ve
FOR RENT
** *
1 Bedroom Apartment, furnished and
Air conditioned. 1533-1535 N.W. sth
Avenue. 5 Blocks from Campus,
available immediately. Call:
376-8475 or 376-1065
(B 160 5t p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. Ne w 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768 990.
(Bls7lstp)
ROOMS for men. A.C. Convenient.
Low summer rates. Ph. 3788122 or
376 6652. For lady graduate
student or faculty member. Ph.
3766652. (81592 t-p)
WANTED
GIRL to cook evening meal for one
man. Call 3782281 67 p.m. only.
(Cl6o-3tp)
FEMALE roommates for July tii. .
$36.50 per month and V utilities.
Share House, 1708 N.W. 10th Ave.
3722048. (Cls6-stp)
WANTED: used Photographic Dark
room Equipment., Enlarger, trays,
dryer; the works. Call 376 3157.
(Cls 92t p)
DESPARATE: Student needs 3 BR,
2 bath house. SIOO or less D.P. and
assume mtg. at low interest rate.
Occupancy before Sept. Call
372-7177. (C-159-st-p)

HELD OVER! Show Starts at Dusk
gMMI
" v * Mi' 1
S *T '' f
' : ||| |. H'' ,/
Cofeature At 10:45
[ Tony Franciosa I
i

) Main Entrance (
GAINESVILLE MALL j
j Cartnlnella's S'anLi 4 <&% |
J! mi I't \
Ufr m Xr?!rL4 IB == =-TI:AM.B:3OPM Mon-Set. j 1
i|S22£S. *T| ii fl Ijk ***} 1
i /iij uu [ |j|yLJL_^j^f
Gainesvilles Finest J
[ and Most Intimate )]

WANTED
4 BR Furnished house wanted year
lease starting September faculty
family ownership care write
Buskirk, 3324 St. Antoine,
Kalamazoo, Mich. 49007.
(C 160 stp)
.vav.^.v.-.-xvx-x-x-x-x-x-X'X-x-x-v.
HELP WANTED |
v.r.:.-. > x-;x*x*x*xx.v.!.v;xx*:*x*:-:*:*x-:*:*x*v: :
RELIABLE couple wanted as
resident manager of 24-unit apt.
complex. Wife must be non-working,
husband handy with repairs, no
children or pets, and to stay at least
two years. Send resume to Post
Office Drawer X, Gainesville.
(Els9 4t p)
AUTOS
1963 Chevy station wagon. White
with blue interior. Mark II air
conditioner. Perfect mechanical
condition. $450.00 or best offer.
3784907. (Gl6o3tp)
1959 Ford Sedan, good reliable local
transportation, SIOO. or best offer;
available July 25. Call 3784750
after 6 p.m. (Gl6o3tp)
WANTED: A.C. Bristol. Call John
Snead 967 0577 Area 305
Collect. (Gl6ostp)

Friday, July 12, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
v
:-:xs-xxxxx-x*?.vx*x-x-:xx.vXs*x-xv
19 6 2 PONTIAC Tempest.
Convertible, $250.00 or best offer.
Good engine, top and transmission,
needs some body repair. 1956 Ford
very dependable, $200.00 or best
offer. Call Don 378-8640, 300 NW
11th St. (G-155-6t-p)
..;.;.X*x*X*X X*V*V-". i*X*X*XX XX
PERSONAL
y ,
X.v.v; 1 ;-:*;..; vX-X'XX'X'X**!-
EMERGENCY: Jim Scott please call
Walter Cook at 378 7300 As soon as
possible! J.T. (Jls9 Itp)
W BOX OFFICE AT 8:00 P.M. 11
I pBt rScll < i| s I
AT 8:52 T
ONLY X
V A i T o :49 l
THRU SAT.
vlNl 7:00 & 9:00
lanen, M
Hit! Total Female Anneal!
EASTMANCOLOR ni ULTRASCOPE
SUN-TUES
J ll t

Page 9

.>.;.:.x.:.:.x.;.v.v..*xx*x*x*x*>:>wavx*x*: x*>:;
PERSONAL
WANTED ARCHAEOLOGISTS Are
YOU going to "Yucatan this year?
Today is your last chance for
$272.00. $75.00 deposit today,
balance July 20. Leave Sunday,
August 25, return Sunday,
September 1. (J-160-lt-p)

RESCHEDULED BECAUSE OF LATE ARRIVAL
NOW...YOU HAVE ANOTHER CHANCE
TO SEE
MONDAY NIGHT ONLY
THREE SHOWS: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 PM
AT THE UNION 25<
Wometco s Twin Theatre
N.W. 13th St. at 23rd Road Telephone_37gg434
ex II BBgl
§ L FEATURE: 2:00
Jma4:oo-6:00-8:00-10:OOlZ; I
!Jf fMS |i s iitulii iSi BISSSEI
v Suggested For Mature Audiences *^ l
n
Jn W 13th SI ... 23rd RO f 1
l| "bW/al I Telephone 378 2434_^ L! _^rjJ
mjmp* HELD OVER! I
2nd WEEK!

%'' k
- COLOR by DeLuxe VityT
FEATURE AT: 3=50 5:50 7:55 lOflO^r^J

Use our handy
mass in order
form.

I LOST & FOUND |
$50.00 reward No questions asked
for information leading to return of
all taken from Graham Apt.
Sentimental value 0n1y... Call
3760203. (Lls Bst-p)



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12,1968

Page 10

CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES
:'x-x.x.vxvx-x*x-x'x-v.v.vx x'x-x-x.v.vx'
A Generator Alternator or starter
Problem? We rebuild them all, Call J
and J Auto Electric. 3788301,
1726 N.E. Waldo Road. Electrical
systems checked free. (Mls3tf c)
Attention Bristish Car Owners: SU
Carbs rebuilt and tuned. 24 hour
service. Call 378 7571.
(M 159 3t p)
DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
Wake up on time!! Call Phone Alarm,
3786994. 13:30 p.m. or 8:30
p.m. on. (Mls4t p)

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION
ANNOUNCEMENT
FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
THE BOARDOF INTERNATIONAL
ACTIVITIES AT U. of F.
\
will hold an International Student Social
TONIGHT at 8:00 p.m. in the Reitz Union,
Room 361. All interested students and
their friends are cordially invited.
SUNDAY NIGHT ONLY -7 and 9:15
THE ORIGINAL HORROR FILM!!
The expressionist masterpiece
which set the mood for terror
in motion pictures!
UiMJm JiMiliMJ I
IMUU
(1920 version soundtrack added)
THE VERY FIRST UNDERGROUND SUPBUHERO!
CAPTAIN FLASH VS. THE BAT
COMPLETE! AT THE UNION! SUNDAY NIGHT!

X in Savings by the lth. T a^"jsss|BElS|lji ; --J|
Earns Interest from the 1 jMm
f <% t/ AWPX 5 1/4 % per year dividend credited semi-annually TTml
jPg, tS?CSC Minimum dividend earning account only $5.00!!! 1
Serving the full-time employees of the U of F
FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION!
- 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. I

SERVICES
: $
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M 153 tsc)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
WILL tutor CPS 121, 2,3; ivIS 301,
2. 3; PS 211 and 215; EGR. 183, 4,
5. Call 3787571. (M-159-3tp)

Orange and
BLUE
BULLETIN

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Friday, July 12
Union Movie: The Sandpiper,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing,
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
Men's Interhall: Dance, Towers
Rec. Room, 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 13
Union Movie: The Sandpiper,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
India Club: Visit India Through
Films," 349 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 14
Program Office; Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.
Opera Workshop: Music by
Schumann, Debussy, Faure,
Scene from "La Traviata,"
Constans Theatre, 4 p.m.
Everyone invited.
Florida Cinema Society:
"Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,"
Union Aud., 78i 9:15 p.m.
Monday, July 15
Florida Cinema Society: "Son of
the Sheik," Union Aud., 7,
8:30 & 10 p.m.
Photography: Lessons, 118
Union, 7:00 p.m. Taw*:t by
Nick Arroyo.
1.E.E.E.: Lecture, Dr. J. Salz,
"Communication, Theory &
Practice," S-310, EES, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club:
Meeting, 525 E&l, 8 p.m.
a
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Lyceum Council presentation
ROBERT MIN FORD, 50
cents for students and SI.OO
for faculty, staff and general
public; and Florida Cinema
Society subscription tickets.

xj>s

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
PROGRESS TESTS: Students
in the following courses are ex expected
pected expected to take the following
tests. Each student must bring
a No. 2 lead pencil and will be
required to use his SOCIAL
SECURITY NUMBER.
CSS 111: Tuesday, July 16,
8:30 p.m. All CSS 111 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141: Wednesday, July
17, 7 p.m. All CLC 141 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251: Thursday, July 18,
7 p.m. All CHN 251 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
CBS 261: Thursday, July 18,
7 p.m. All CBS 261 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: July 12,1968,
is the deadline for receipt in the
office of the Department of
Foreign Languages, 3 Anderson
Hall, of the applications for all
foreign language functional
examinations to be given on
Saturday, July 20,1968.
FULBRIGHT GRANT
information is available at
International Center (south of
Walker Auditorium) for enrolled
U.S. students who will have at
least a bachelor's degree by the
fall of 1969. Grants pay all
expenses for one year of study
or research in one of many
foreign countries. In most
countries language capability is
required. English teaching
assistantsh'D' for six countries
are also available. No
transportation and in most
cases, iio maintenance are
provided for dependents.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: All foreign
language functional
examinations will be given bn
Saturday, July 20, in 18
Anderson Hall from 10 a.m.
12 noon.
GENERAL NOTICES
ORANGE AND BLUE
DEADLINES: During the
summer term the Orange and
Blue will be run once a week
on Friday. All notices must be
received by 9 a.m. Wednesday
prior to publication. Notices
should be typed and signed by
the person submitting the notice
and sent to the Division of
Information Services, Building
H., Campus. Items for the
Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office
Reitz Union.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Signup sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date in Room
G22 in the Reitz Union. All
companies will be recruiting for
August grads unless otherwise
indicated. p
JULY 10: EASTERN AIR
LINES. Mktg., Acct., Fin., All
Eng.
JULY 10: UNION CAMPCORP.
Bus. Ad., Acctg., IE, CE; ME,
Forestry.
JULY 11: WESTINGHOUSE
ELECTRIC CORP. CE, EE, IE,
ME, NE, Eng. Sci., Met. Eng.,
Math.
JULY 17: CANNING, WELLS &
SALZER. Acctg. Must be US.
citizen.
JULY 19: PRESTON H.
HASKELL CO. Bldg. Constr.,
CE. Must be U.S. citizen.



DEFERMENTS SOUftMT
Draft /May Harm
Post-Grad Study
By DAVID OISER
Alligator Correspondent
First year graduate students seem more worried, about the new
selective service laws than are UF administrators.
Although most graduate students have probably not received their
reclassifications yet, some of them are attempting steps to find further
deferment.
Army ROTC instructor Maj. David Bauer said his office has
received an increase of inquiries from graduate students about entering
advanced ROTC.
However, Bauer said, theyre not beating down the doors.
Applications are not above normal, he said. He said most graduate
students are rejected because they dont fulfill completion
requirements.
Advanced ROTC cadets must have six quarters remaining to
graduation to complete the program.
While it seems graduate students are concerned about the new draft
laws which may result in calls consisting of almost all graduate
students or college graduates, UF officials apparently dont expect
large cuts in the graduate program.
Dr. Robert Bryan, assistant dean of the graduate school, said even
though next years enrollment is estimated to be down 10 per cent, he
doesnt see disaster.
Bryan also said he didnt think many first year graduate students
have attempted ROTC. But students cant find much help by
appealing to graduate school, he said.
We can only write letters to individual draft boards, said Bryan.
We dont receive any responses. I dont know if they help or not.
Bryan said graduate school is not going to drop entrance
requirements, however. He thinks draft boards will let most student
complete their degree work because draft calls have been lower
recently.
Bryan said he didnt think graduate school will be hard hit as a
whole. However, individual disciplines may suffer more than others,
he noted.
Chemistry may be one of these. Dr. Thomas Stearns, assistant head
of chemistry, said draft calls will probably not affect teaching but
may cut into research. He said his department wont know real effects
until about October.
Another area that may be affected, but where not much is yet
known, is engineering. Robert Hollis, assistant professor in the College
of Engineering and engineering administrator, said theres not enough
information yet to make speculations.
Hollis said he didnt know any steps graduate students could take
to continue their studies. He did say he didnt know of any
engineering graduate students in ROTC. Also, undergraduates who
take advanced ROTC cannot use those credits toward graduation.
One graduate prqgram whose students may not be largely affected
is the College of Law. Robert Lee, administrative assistant to the
dean, said the law school is accepting 20 per cent more students. He
pointed out, though, that the law school is expanding its facilities and
can handle more students.
Lee said he cannot make any predictions on the drafts effect.
So, at mid-year UF administrators still cannot foresee catastrophe
from new draft laws. Most of them questioned cannot see a large cut
into their programs. They are at best, uncertain.
However, all those questioned said students were beginning to be
reclassifed. And most graduate students interviewed have received
physical examination notices.
FRIDAY SPECIAL
SHRIMP
BASKET
14 delicious Shrimp
Large 4
Rolls and Butter
WONDS||
HOYTS E d
RESTAURANT |r
14 SW First St. 1
Parking For 200 Can Within 150 Feet 1

SUMMER
1 At
Ml; the in-fashionstore#
feX Jm
GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street I
save 33% to 36% I
DRESS CLEARANCE! I
orig. 5.99 to 10.99 $4 fOs7 I
Real buys for most of summer still ahead. Breezy voiles, cool blends, B
textured fabrics. Misses', juniors', petites', youthful half sizes. B
save 25% & 33% I
JAMAICA SHORTS I
reg. 2.99 & 3.99 1.99&2.99 I
Look how much you save in this annual sale, and look at the choice. ¥
The group includes solids, stripes, prints and plaids in sizes 6 to 18. B
save 33% I
ROBE SPECIAL! I
regularly 2.99 $2 I
Easy care cottons for now or any season ... at sizable savings. Smart B
shifts and other wanted styles with or without sleeves. Sizes 10 to 18. B
save 37% I
FAMOUS MAKE SLIPS! I
comp, value 3.99 2.49 I
Here's a stock up price you can't afford to miss. Lace trimmed nylon
tricot in proportioned lengths. White or colors. Sizes 32 to 40.
save 20% to 33% I
Girls&Boys Sportswear
examples: reg. 1.99 A 2.99 1.59&1.99 I
A sale worth rushing in for. Girls' short sets, shorts, sunsuits, skirts.
Sizes 1 to 14. Boys' shorts, short sets, sports shirts. Sizes 2 to 7. B
Shorts, short sets, sport shirts. S izes 2 to 16. B
save 20% to 33% I
GIRLSDRESSES! I
reg. 2.99 to 5.99 $1.99 to 3.99
Out go a large group of summer dresses . reduced for quick sale. Mm
Sleeveless cottons, cool blends, more. Fresh prints, solids. Sizes 1-14.
-Jd! wm 11 BmnlHMy

Friday, July 12, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



r. TH* Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12,1968

Page 12

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! : ... ' >.. : :;..+ ..-. :v
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13 for 2
M H
-' / < *§L#Jo CONSTANTLY GROWING
JiJ COAST TO COAST
our deliciously INNING 01/fR J 0...
different ] M
Roast Beef Sandwich ! *jb
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with anything less!
1405 SW 13th ST
* t
1967, Arbys, Inc. Creators of Arty? Roast Beef Sandwich JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS

Friday, July 12,1968, The Florida Alligator

Page 13



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday. July 12,1968

Page 14

(ED. NOTE: This is the third
in a four part series on UFs last
student elections. The series is
an excerpt from Ernie Litzs
forthcoming book: Beer For
Breakfast.)
The Taylor camp had a great
deal of difficulty in agreeing on
tone of the advertising for their
candidate. The group was
comprised mostly of students
who had swept into power with
Shepherd. They felt that they
were astute and brilliant
politicians. But the steering
committee was a shambles of
inarticulate political gossip,
useless trivia and precious little

decision*
making. They
learned by
mistake, but it
came almost too
late.
But the
Taylor group
learned the
ropes, and the

Mcride forces, quick to make
decisions, came down to the
wire in perhaps the most
controversial and hectic SG
campaign in history.
Week two closed toward
election day, and provoked the
most bitter and controversial

/JgX Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
Crossword By George W. Frank
Edited by William Gant

1 Sheepskin.
5 Settles
gradually.
9 N.T. book.
13 Typewriter
part.
19 House of
estate.
20 Inland sea.
21 Gulls,
terms, etc.
22 Observatory
site.
24 Speedily.
25 Appointed
hour.
25 Wheat coat.
27 Detail.
28 Medicare?
32 Court
appeal.
33 Mild rebuke.
34 Elephants Elephantsear.
ear. Elephantsear.
35 Afrcan.
36 Spirited
horse.
37 Component:
abbr.
39 Ball points.
41 Canary
Island.
42 Mink coat.

TKenaf fiber
plani.
2 Passed a
law.
3 Legal
places.
4 Entertain.
5 Ridiculing
writings.
6 Goldwater,
e.g.
7 Sports
contest.
8 Dog-drawn
vehicles.
9 Astron. ratio.
10 Podded
herb.
11 Athletic
coaches.
12 Unaffected.

Alligator Major Factor In Election

CULPEPPER

ANIMALS AND MEN
ACROSS

43 Signal
system.
45 Syrupy
grape juice.
47 Anger.
48 Released on
honor.
52 King Sauls
uncle.
54 Sodium
carbonates.
57 Bring
together.
58 Showed
respect.
62 Allen.
63 Deep bell
sound.
64 Prominent
person.
65 Apertures.
67 Chimpanzee.
68 Covenant.
69 "Stingy
violinist.
70 La-ge
marine
aquariums.
72 Shaded
retreats.
74 Mongrel.
75 Knights
weapons.

13 Cactus
thorn.
14 Meat pie.
15 Fermented
liquor.
16 Washington
watchdog.
17 Zola.
18 Prune.
19 Skilled
artist.
23 Com Comprehend.
prehend. Comprehend.
29 One circuit.
30 Drinking
cup.
31 Nigeria city.
36 Breaking
waves.
38 Sales
middleman.

clash of interests in campus
politics: a political party and the
campus newspaper.
The outcomes of the past
three SG elections had been

significantly af affected
fected affected by Alii* ;
gator decisions.
Bruce Cul Culpeppers;
peppers; Culpeppers;
election was
bolstered by an
Alligator attack i
upon some*
questionable

poop sheets his opponent threw
before the elections. Buddy
Jacobs acquired his throne by an
editorial endorsement of a third
party movement which took
Independent votes from his
major opponent. Charles
Shepherd won largely by an
Alligator crusading attempt to
elect him and thus overturn the
establishment.
Editor Steve Hull was
determined that the Alligator
should be neutral. He felt the
Alligator should play down the
whole election.
The Alligator finally printed
an editorial slightly critical of
Bill Mcride. John Ritch and
Manny James, running the
Mcride campaign, realized that
once the anit-Mcride support

76 Increase in
sound
volume.
78 Italian
masculine
name.
82 Powerful
explosive.
83 Ohio city.
84 Irish
Protestant
defender.
86 Relative
worth.
89 Keep off.
90 Marble.
92 Sphene.
93 Across.
94 Andrews.
95 Kind of jury.
97 Eliminates.
98 Science of
intonation.
100 Old English
gold coin.
102 Buzzing
insect.
103 Athletic
competitor.
104 Damage.
105 Tom-tom.
107 Timepiece.
111 Beg.

DOWN

40 Health
resorts.
42 Long tooth.
44 Yellow
pigment
46 Genus of
leaf-cutting
ants.
48 Farm lake.
49 Reclined.
50 Short jacket.
51 Contradict.
53 Refashion.
55 Food.
56 Conqueror.
57 Companion
ship.
58 Urge on:
Australia.
59 Ancient
money chest.

JACOBS

112 Legendary j
tale of India. I
115 Recognize. j
117 Italian
coins.
118 Gem weight. I
121 Travelers
document.
123 Close. *'
125 Orange
pekoe.
126 Intensely
interested.
127 Voice j
illogical j
statements.
130 Imitation.
132 Rove.
133 Indian
polyandrist.
134 Increase.
135 Power tools.
136 Part of
Saturns
rings.
137 Irish river.
138 Interior.
139 Principal
dish.
140 Youthful.
141 Colored.
142 Table
supports.

60 Charge on
property.
61 That: Ger.
63 Island of
Faeroes.
66 Deteriorates.
68 Feast of
Lanterns:
Japan.
69 Single-story
cottage.
71 Sports ring.
73 Mussolini.
74 Talked with
jargon.
77 Lineman.
79 Givevoiceto.
80 Far
advanced.
81 Individuals.
85 Assistance.

started in the Alligator, it would
continue. If they didnt head off
a continued Alligator barrage
against Mcride, he was
doomed.
A poop sheet attacking the
paper was distributed early that
morning. The poop sheet
attacked Hull and strongly
blasted political chicanery in

tf sHkh >**
SHEPHERD

took it as deeply as did the
Mcride camp. Many did not
understand Mcrides reaction
and took it as mudslinging. A
series of related events
complicated the matter:

HULL

that Mcride couldnt take

Watkins
YOUR FLORIDA GARDEN (New 1968
edition)
Leiden
THE POLITICS OF VIOLENCE (paper)
Fra sea
THE MULBERRY TREE
Johnson
THE SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST
L indent eld
READER IN POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY

mp 2 3 4 "e 110 11
28 29 30 II HBDf
33 LJ34 3 s I
37 I
is InVii mm* si I
52 s^jM 54 55 56 7
58 59 60 iMpS ir* I
ii 69 I
70
"75 76 77 I
B2 tKT 85 I
I 86 88 K 1
93 94 jMSs I
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I TO3 lo4 MMIiT 108 109 110 I
I | rn ll2 113 iiijiTr I
I \26 l27 128 129 I
I 130 131 l32 |K Eli I
I1 I
I IZHII ZIHIL iU

86 Cast a ballot.
87 English
river.
88 Pentitential
period.
89 Actuality.
91 Overlay
with gold.

Taylors politi political
cal political organization.
By hindsight
only is it
t obvious now
that not enough
people either
read the first
editorial, or

1. Mcride
had a personal
discussion with
Hull which
began calmly
but ended
violently with
Mcride
storming out.
Hull now felt

94 Eat a meal.
95 Type of
amplifier.
96 Man from
Ankara.
99 High-strung.
100 Ada Clares
husband.

criticism, and questioned
whether that type of individual
should be student body
president.
2. The next days editorial

ignored Mc-
Bride, but it
raised questions
over what was
happening in
Taylors camp.
This coming
after the poop
sheet made
many students

wonder what Mcride was
shouting about. Again, the sheet
was probably right, but poorly
timed.
3.1 knew that by the second
day after the Mcride-Hull
altercation the Alligator planned
an endorsement of Taylor. In
Mcrides steering eommittee
Independent chairman McNemy
got up and said this. This
showed there was a leak of
monumental proportions in the
Taylor-Johnson organization,
since only five or six people
actually knew it was corring.
The decision was finally made to
throw the Alligator Sheet not
because of any political
considerations between the
Alligator and Mcride, but

Lowry
DARK AS THE GRAVE WHEREIN MY
FRIEND IS LAID
Moore
MOCK ORANGE
Schultz
JOY
Brown
THE EXPERIMENTAL MIND IN
EDUCATION
C R C
HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY &
PHYSICS, 48th. ed.

101 Source of
happiness.
104 Beaverlike
rodent.
106 Traveled by
car.
108 Levying one onetenth.
tenth. onetenth.

TAYLOR

109 Trouser
ridges.
110 Furnace.
112 Buddy.
113 Masc.
name.
114 River in
Venezuela.

because the fighting back
approach would unify and forge
together the entire Mcride
organization and make them
work harder to win.
The implications of the
Alligator sheet are quite diverse.
It seems obvious now that
Mcrides people felt the paper
would grow more anti-Mcride.
The only way to combat this

daily attrition
that would beat
their man (as it
had the year
before) was to
strike back.
Their motives
and thinking
were right, but

the endorse endorsement
ment endorsement of Taylor came the
following Monday, many days
after the sheet.
The endorsement was UFs
second in history. Like the first,
it gave a tremendous amount of
average student support to the
candidate endorsed.
The $ Man
WOODVILLE, Miss. (UPI)
Oliver Pollock, who is credited
with originating the $ sign for
the dollar, is buried in this
southwest Mississippi town.
Pollock came to America in
1760 and settled in New Or Orleans.
leans. Orleans.

Answers On Display
AT
THE HUB
MED CEHTER
BOOKSTORE
REITZ UNION
BOOKSTORE

116 Succeeded.
118 Group of
cabins.
119 Mentally
quick.
1i o Type face.
ILI Ballet move movement.
ment. movement.

McBRIDE

122 Harmonized.
124 Risk.
127 Wheel hoop.
128 City In
Indiana.
129 Sensible.
131 Indian
weight.



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Walking Fish
Un-American,
UF Prof Says
By MARK LEIBOVIT
Alligator Correspondent
Walking albino catfish who
qlirnb out of water and
supposedly attack innocent dogs
are not the most common sight
in Florida. Yet they have turned
out to be the most talked about.
Monsters, is how West
Palm Beach fishery biologist
Vernon Ogilvie describes them.
Ogilvie, who is in charge of
non-native fauna for the
Florida Wildlife Commission,
said in an Associated Press story,
Its just unbelievable. Ive got
two at home in an aquarium.
But they jump out of it if I
give them an opportunity.
Theyll come into the living
room. It walks like a man
walking on his elbows like
youre trained to walk in
combat.
About nine of these strange
catfish have been found in South
Florida, and, so far, a mystery
surrounds their origin.
Dr. Carter R. Gilbert,
assistant professor of Zoology at
UF, is highly skeptical about
walking catfish. No native
American catfish have been
known to walk on land, he
says. The only known species
of this type of catfish live only
in Africa and parts of Asia.
Gilbert, who is also Assistant
Curator of Ichthyology at the
Florida State Museum, said these
catfish were probably of the
African variety who were
imported for breeding. They
either escaped or were turned
loose.
Ogilvie, on the other hand,
feels that there is no real proof
that the fish are escapees
because they have appeared over
too wide an area.
There is a very remote
chance that these catfish will
ever affect the Gainesville area,
Gilbert said. You have to
consider temperature tolerances,
not to mention distance.

THE WILD, WILD WEST .
takes on urban manners when A&R Jr. tames
vinyl into a casual look-of-leather jumper and
pardners it with a brown or burnished gold
foulard shirt. 5 to 11, at $26, to choose n
charge right now in Maas Young Juniors!

GAINESVILLE MALL

UF Coed |
Edits
Magazine
NEW YORK Becky
Hollingsworth, who has just
graduated from the UF, is
spending a month in New
York as a guest editor of
"Mademoiselle" magazine.
This spring she became a
winner in the publication's
national College Board
Competition and was judged
one of 20 most outstanding
college girls of the year. Her
prize is a guest editorship for
the month of June in the
magazine's New York offices
where she is working as a
salaried employee and helping
edit the August college issue.
The guest editors were
selected because their entries
in the contest showed
exceptional originality,
intelligence and an impressive
aptitude for fashion
publishing.

Engineering-
Hope Os World?

Urgent problems in society
today urban blight, air
pollution, transportation
may find hope in a relatively
new technique called systems
engineering.
The systems engineer is the
architect who bridges the gap
between the multi disciplines,
gathering the facts and designing
. the programs to solve the
problems of society.
Dr. Robert Braswell of the
University of Florida, an expert
in the field, calls the systems
engineer the new breed of
engineer.*
In a paper presented recently
at the national meeting Os the
American Society for
Engineering Education in Los
Angeles, Dr. Braswell said
systems engineer is one answer

SUMMERS YOUNG LOVE v.
pant sets cropped dlose and checking lit in
cool, carefree girl look in ging gingham
ham gingham checks, iced lace;sayy
white or green/white, s*to 13, .at sl6, Cool it
in pant sets now frofn Maas Junior Sportswear!

Friday, July 12, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

to our complex society.
Dr. Bniswell, chairman of the
Universitys Department of
Industrial 'and Systems
Engineering, notes that the
advent of automation, emphasis
on increased productivity' and
higher levels of sophistication
are providing impetus to the
demand for the engineering
graduate with a broad
interdisciplinarian background
and specific skills in computer
techniques.
The computer is one of the
most important tools of the
systems engineer, Dr. Bfaswell
remarked.
One reason is the computers
capacity for storing and
remembering information.
This i*-important because of the
technology explosion that has
occurred since Wofld Way 11.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12,1968

The Moose In The Barbershop

By AL BRITO
Alligator Correspondent
Its strategically placed, high
on the right hand wall, as you
enter the shop.
From its perch, it regards all
who enter with disdainful eye.
Even a cursory glance suggests
that it has never been stared
down.
Closer inspection reveals that
it is slightly shopworn around
the jowls and age has caused the
skin around its antlers to shrink
a bit, making its overall
expression somewhat wizened.
The antlers arch outward
menacingly measuring five feet
from tip to tip.
It is Gainesvilles largest
and probably only stuffed
moose head.
Its a conversation piece,

ACADEMICS
news and views
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Dr. Ted Landsman, College of Education, has been appointed as
distinguished visiting professor at Georgia State College for the
summer quarter. Dr. Landsman will conduct a seminar in Theoretical
Foundations of Counseling.
At the invitation of the Secretary of State, Dr. Vincent McGuire,
College of Education, attended the National Foreign Policy
Conference in Washington, D. C., June 20-21. The panels covered
Africa, Middle East, military power and foreign policy, educational
and cultural exchanges and Latin America.
DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
Chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology Dr. Herbert E.
Kaufman has been appointed a national civilian consultant to advise
and assist the surgeon general of the Department of the Air Force in
the field of ophthalmology.
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Dr. Myron S. Heidingsfield, College of Business Administration,
was one of the major speakers at the national meeting of the
American Marketing Association held in Philadelphia, Pa., June 19.
His topic was The Mythology of the Computer.
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
Dr. Melvin Fried, College of Medicine, presented the results of
recent studies on the biosynthesis and metabolism of serum
lipoproteins at the Gordon Conference on Lipid Metabolism in New
Hampshire June 12. The conference was composed of more than 100
scientists selected from industrial and research institutions for
discussions on recent developments in specific scientific areas.
COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS
Dean of the College of Health Related Professions Dr. Darrel J.
Mase has been appointed to the National Advisory Allied Health
Professions Council to advise on matters relating to the Allied Health
Professions Personnel Training Act of 1966 and review applications
for research, construction and training project grants provided under
the act.
Dr. John Champion, Health Related Professions, attended the 31st
annual assembly of the Southeastern Hospital Conference in Atlanta,
Ga., and the national forum on health and hospital affairs in Durham,
N.C., during the month of May.
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
Kyle Stirling, College of Journalism and Communications, has been
commissioned by WOMETCO broadcasting companys WLOS-TV,
Asheville, N.C., to write, produce and direct a series of documentary
films this summer. One of the films will be on the Cherokee Indians at
Cherokee, N.C.
SHANDS TEACHING HOSPITAL
Robert L. Lantos, director of pharmaceutical and central supply
services of Shands Teaching Hospital, has served as a faculty member
at a general institute on hospital pharmacy sponsored by the
American Society of Hospital Pharmacists in New Orleans June 23-28.

iHf M
M JM
says Jerry Butler, full owner of
the trophy and part owner of
the Carolyn Plaza barber shop
where it hangs.
Most barbers talk about
politics or sports while plying
their trade, but Butler talks
about his prize with obvious
relish.
I bought it two years ago
from a Ft. Myers family whose
son was attending school here,
Butler mused with a twinkle in
his eye. They bought it in an
auction in New York City, and
before that it most likely
belonged to a Canadian moose.

z
w
V

Forestry School Uses
2000-Acre Classroom

By JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondent
What University of Florida
school has a classroom of over
2000 acres?
Strangely enough, the school
with this enormous classroom
also has the UFs smallest
enrollment. Its the School of
Forestry.
Somewhere among the nearly
20,000 full-time students
enrolled there are 85 to 90
whose classifications end with
FY. Os these, 16 are engaged in
graduate work.
Each year Forestry graduates
about 25 students, according to
Don Post, Professor of Timber
Harvesting. Most of the
graduates are hired by
companies in the pulp and paper
Nehru Jacket
'Hof Seller
By O. J. MOSELEY
Alligator Correspondent
Nehru jackets are big in the
cities, but they are slow starters
here in Gainesville, one local
merchant has commented as he
spoke of the newest advances in
mens clothing.
It is probably true that the
Nehru jacket is just too hot for
90 degree weather.
But another merchant in
town reported that the coat was
selling very well and that he
was forced to continually
restock the garment.
If you decide to purchase a
Nehru jacket remember, it is not
the jacket that is important, its
the beads man, its the beads.

Butler describes the head as a
sure-fire attention getter.
Customers, almost to a man,
never fail to pass some remark
on the stuffed trophy.
People asked so many
questions that I had to get
information on it from the
encyclopedia to answer them.
That moose once weighed
around 2,400 pounds and ate up
to 50 pounds of forage a day,
Butler said.
A quick glance around the
shop reveals that the moose head
is not the only conversation

industry.
Graduates hired by the pulp
companies receive starting
salaries between $5500 and
S6OOO annually.
The School of Forestry,
founded in 1937, is one of 30
accredited nationally by the
American Society of Foresters.
The schools 2000 acre
classroom is the Austin Carey

IN UNIVERSITY GALLERY
Chinese Art Shown

The University Gallerys
exhibition for July might be
called a sleeper. The fact that
such a significant and intriguing
display is available in
mid-summer at UF may catch a
few gallerygoers off guard
attending the beach rather than
the gallery.
The title, Early Chinese Art
and the Pacific Basin, is
composed of 100 photographs,
up to three feet in size. This
exhibition displays a number of
ancient Chinese art motifs and
juxtaposes them for dramatic
comparison with several similar
motifs from Pacific Basin
cultures.
These photographs were in
New York last summer for
display at the symposium
arranged by the Department of
Art History and Archaeology of
Columbia University through the
sponsorship of the Sackler Fund
to promote Central Asiatic
Studies.
The display arrived in
Gainesville from the Asia House
in New York and following the
showing here, from Friday, July
12th through Sunday, August

piece. On the wall directly
oposite the shaggy hulk hangs
the head of a ten point
white-tail deer.
I got that one myself down
in Gulf Hammock, said Jerry,
along with those thirteen sets
of rattles from rattle snakes.
Those tusks, he said
pointing to the rear wall of the
shop, came from a 250 pound
boar I got in the same place last
year.
Other trophies and
decorations, ranging from a set
of wild turkey legs to a large
piece of beautifully eroded
cypress driftwood, ring the walls
of the barber shop.
I just like to meet people,
says Butler, and these trophies
are a sure-fire way to get a
conversation started.

Forest northeast of Gainesville
on Waldo Road. Also operated
by the school are a 20 acre seed
orchard on Millhopper Road,
and wildlife and wood products
labs located near Reitz Union.
With growing demand for
foresters and its professional
excellence, someday Forestry
will no longer be UFs smallest
school.

11th, it moves to an October
display at the East West Center
in Hawaii.
The University Gallery is
open free to the public Tuesday
through Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1
p.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed
Mondays and holidays.
Irish Festival
Draws Harper
To Lecture
Dr. George M. Harper,
chairman of the UFs
Department of English, will
lecture at the William Butler
Yeats Festival in Sligo, Ireland,
in August.
This is the third consecutive
summer the Irish scholar has
been invited to lecture at the
international festival. He will
deliver six lectures on Yeats
poetry during the three-week
summer school.
Harper and his family will
leave here July 15 and return
Aug. 21. Before going to Sligo,
they will tour Ireland.



Union Plans Trip
To Daytona Beach
The London Symphony Orchestra is again spending part of the
summer in Daytona Beach. The orchestra is participating in the
Florida International Music Festival.
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is planning a second annual trip to the
festival Saturday, July 27th. Center aisle orchestra seats have been
made available at a reduced rate for an evening performance in
Daytona.
Conducting the London Symphony Orchestra will be Andre Previn,
along with Barry Tuckwell on the horn. The program will include:
Delius, Paris Suite; Mozart, Symphony Concertante for Winds;
Strauss, Horn Concerto No. 1; and Ravel, La Valse.
A chartered bus will leave from the Reitz Union at 4 p.m. and
return immediately following the concert. Concert time begins
promptly at 8:30 p.m.
The cost per person is SB.OO which includes the round trip
transportation and concert ticket.
TJiose interested in making this cultural trip should contact the
Program Office of the J. Wayne Reitz Union, ext. 2741, before
Friday, July 12, 1968 to secure a reservation.

MINFORD HERE
Poe(try) In Motion

Robert Minford, an actor
with a great deal of theatrical
experience, will be in the J.
Wayne Reitz Union Ballroom
next Tuesday night doing a
dramatization of Edgar Allan
Poes works.
Calling his show Journey to
Eldorado, Mr. Minford will
offer an evening of
entertainment that will cover
almost everything written by
Poe.
Robert Minford has many
television performances and
parts in leading theatres to his
credit. He has appeared on TV in
Perry Mason, Playhouse 90
and Rawhide. He has also
played in theatres from the
Royal Poinciana Playhouse in
Palm Beach, Florida, to the Palm
Springs Playhouse in California.
The scene will be set in Edgar
Allan Poes cottage in Baltimore,
Maryland, October 7, 1849, the
night of Poes death.
Robert Minford (portraying
one of Poes friends) will tell of
the dead authors haunting and
artistic spirit. Through Poes
at
the
flicks ..
UNION Fri. & Sat., The
Sandpiper with Elizabeth
Taylor and Richard Burton. 7 &
9:15 p.m.
CINEMA SOCIETY Sun.,
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. 7
& 9:15.
CENTER Fri. Sun.,
Family Band with Walter
Brennan & Snow White. 2:37,
6:16,7:10,9:55.
PLAZA I Fri. Sun., The
Sweet Ride with Tony
Franciosa. 2:10, 4:10, 6:10,
8:10, 10:10. (SEE REVIEW,
PAGE 18)
PLAZA II Fri. Sun., The
Thomas Crown Affair with
Steve McQueen and Faye
Dunaway. 1:45, 3:50, 5:50,
7:55,10:00.
FLORIDA Fri. Sun., A
Stranger in Town, with Tony
Anthony. 1:30, 3:30, 5:30,
7:30,9:30.
STATE Fri. & Sat.,
Carmen, Baby. 7 & 9. (SEE
REVIEW, PAGE 18) Sun., The
Presidents Analyst. 3,5, 7, 9.
SUBURBIA Bandolero!
and Fathom.
GAINESVILLE The
Party and The Scalphunters.

poetry and prose, Minford will
reveal the dream Poe had of
Eldorado.
Such well-known works by
Poe as A Dream Within A
Dream, The Tell-Tale Heart,
The Bells, Annabel Lee,
The Raven, Eldorado and
Israfel will be used by Mr.
Minford in his dramatization.
Anyone who has experienced
the thrill and horror of reading
Poes works will probably enjoy
this performance if Mr. Minford
is any kind of dramatist. Poes
work lends itself very well to the
spoken word and seems to have
been written to be dramatized.
Lyceum Council is sponsoring
Journey to Eldorado. Tickets
are available at the Reitz Union
Box Office and are 50 cents for
students and $1 for general
admission.

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THE JIMI HENDRIX STEREO ALBUM
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? youre in the market, tor hes the man to see. The Fidelity?
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\ novice or a buff, come in to the Fidelity shop and ask Dick?
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JF YOURE 21 =^==t[
Gainesville Has Action I

By 808 WATTLES
Alligator Correspondent
The weekend is here at last, and you cant wait
to pick up your date for the evening and hit the
town. Only it doesnt work that way. Not in
Gainesville.
The biggest collegiate pastime of them all seems
to be just deciding on what to do for entertainment
during the week or weekend. Its definitely not an
easy task.
For those over 21, the decision is somewhat less
troublesome. Trader Toms Tavern still sells beer for
a quarter in spite of the recent tax hike. Dubs Steer
Room also is a popular spot. The prices are quite a
bit higher here though, but prospects for the
evening are somewhat enhanced by the famous
Dubs Mini-Skirt contests which are still held on
Thursday nights.
For a considerably quieter atmosphere, the ABC
Lounge, Winnjammer, or Alibi Lounge are. all
popular spots. Also on the list are the Gay 9os and
the Schooner Room.
If youre not 21 yet, deciding on what to do

India Club
Offers Free
Film Tour
Have you ever wanted to
visit India?
If so, youll have a chance
Saturday night to take a free
film vacation of this interesting
country. The program is
sponsored by the India Club and
will be shown in room 349 of
the Reitz Union at 7:30 p.m.
The Magic Touch,
Souvenirs From Kerala and
The Stranger, three
documentary films will offer an
evenings entertainment plus a
glimpse of India as it reallv is.

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Friday, July 12, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

presents a more difficult problem. There are four
theaters in Gainesville. Prices run fairly high (youre
not old enough to drink, but youre still classed as
an adult), but the shows are changed pretty often,
offering a good choice to pick from. If you have a
car, the drive-ins (two) could provide an evenings
fare.
On the weekends its a different story. First off,
the beaches are a little over an hours drive away.
Crescent Beach is the closest, and seems to be the
most popular for its privacy and lax drinking
enforcement. Daytona is somewhat farther, but
offers more to do with its boardwalk and pier.
Returning to closer habitats, there is the peculiar
institution of tubing. Everyone grabs an old inner
tube and heads for Ft. White where the river used
for this sport begins. One word of caution: state
beverage agents are literally sprouting out of the
woods in the area, so if youre not 21, better leave
the booze home.
If none of these pastimes suits you, then of
course there is the University-sanctioned game of
studying. Its probably not nearly as much fun as
any of the others, but it cant be all bad!

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator. Friday. July 12,1968

Playboy Shamed By Carmen

By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
Never having been to a skin flick before, I was
nervously preparing myself for an evening of total
embarrassment when 1 went down to the State to
view Carmen Baby last Wednesday. I walked in,
bought a box of popcorn to occupy my thoughts,
sat down in my seat, and then looked around the
theatre. Yup, I was the only chick in the place, and
was getting more and more chicken by the minute.
But I had worried for nothing, Carmen Baby
turned out to be on about the same level as
Batman so camp that it was enjoyable. Ive
never laughed so hard in my life. The movie has
some of the grossest one-liners Ive ever heard; they
even put Playboy to shame. Id give you a sample,
but you know all that controversy about four-letter
words...
Anyway, the ad on the billboard read: From
the makers of I A Woman Audobon Films (does
that mean theyre naturalistic?) presents Uta Levka
as Carmen, the total female animal! Well,
Carmen (a sexy redhead) was savage as an animal all
right, and totally female. She had the role of the
insatiable prostitute whod snap her Angers at any
male in town as if they were puppy dogs, and then
shed take them for all they were worth.
The plot of the show revolves around this stupid
mistake Carmen makes by selling her favors to a
very young and impressionable policeman. He, of
course, falls head over heels for her, and, in his

'Sweet Ride-No Surfing Flick

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
The Sweet Ride, now
playing at Plaza I Theatre, is not
a surfing expedition but an
investigation of the lives of a
young beachcomber, Denny
(played by Michael Sarrazin), his
lover Vicki (Jacqueline Bisset),
and his buddies. The message of
the film is the coming of age
of the beachcomber. In specific
and the continuance of life
through in general.
There are two types of
rides the brutal one given
Vicki at the beginning of the
movie, and the illusory lives of
all the main characters and
neither is very sweet.
Denny lives with Collie
(brilliantly played by Anthony
Franciosa), a 40 year old bum
who hustles tennis games for
spending money, and
Choo-Choo (Bob Denver), an
aspiring jazz pianist with fiancee
problems.
All three are engaged very
diligently in trying not to grow
up. Collie is the most obvious
because he is a drunken, cynical
failure subsisting on herb
worship from the other two.
Until Vicki comes in rich,
beautiful, aloof, and quite
mysterious. She too dreams
unrealistically that she can exist
in Dennys beachhouse world
forever without conflict with her
career and its master, her
producer whom she is unable to
break with emotionally.
The physical attack on her
Sales & Service
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S2B N.Moin 376-5551



and the subsequent ride causes
Denny to gain strength to leave
Collie.
The problems of Denny and
Vicki are certainly plentiful
enough for one movie and the
introduction of Collie as a man
out of his generation, obviously
afraid to join life as a man and
so in need of this adoration and
respect from Denny and
Choo-Choo introduces another
problem that is worthy of
specific consideration and adds
to the movie almost needless
complexity. However, Collie is
necessary as the embodiment of
the ideal and life Denny rejects.
The characters are real in
their dependency and even at
the break from Collie there is no
breaking up of the old gang.
Collie is stunned for only a
moment and returns to his
regular routine. Choo-Choo
again leaves his fiancee and
moves in with Collie and Denny

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youthful jealousy just happens to kill a couple of
the other men with whom Carmen is having affairs.
Carmen cant get rid of him because her
horoscope tells her it would be unlucky, and his
bumbling mannerisms do evoke a certain amount of
sympathy.
Carmen Baby will never win any photographic
awards, even though its in color, nor will the actors
ever be awarded much acclaim. Actually the movie
borders more on the stag-flick line, rather than the
pornographic. It does, however, run the entire
gambit of sexual pervasiveness, and all the major
action takes place in alternating bedrooms.
And yes, boys and girls, theres even a fairly
substantial amount of skin to be seen when Carmen
lets the sheet slip at various strategic moments.
As for philosophy, Carmens matches that of
todays: she loves every guy shes with. Do you
love me enough to kill? she asks of one of her
lovers. Profoundly the lover replies, I killed the
boy I once was to become the man I am today.
The last line is the real clincher, though, but Im not
going to spoil its punch by including it here just
see the movie.
If youre looking for a little ribaldry to take your
minds off those midterms, let Carmens antics
entertain you at the State till Sunday. And when
you do, would somebody please explain to me the
function of the colored hourglass in Babys
bedroom? I still dont understand what he was
timing.

drives away, saying that I see
everyone growing up around me,
except you and Choo-Choo.
He leaves Malibu with a vague
idea of getting a job in Santa
Barbara where Vicki is staying.
What his next ride will be, we
dont know. Maybe not better,
maybe not even with Vicki. But
different. And thats what
maturing is all about about
- about when to say goodbye
to one dream, one life, and
accept another.
There is one big flaw: the
situation with Vicki and her
producer is not explained
enough (in my eyes) to warrant
the violence he subjects her to.
Perhaps implication is enough.
This is not an entertaining
movie, but it certainly is
pertinent. It is modem in every
sense of the word and the
problems presented are those we
all have or will face. And life
continues.

Opera Workshop
Presents Program
The Opera Workshop of the Department of Music of the University
of Florida will present Miss Ingrid Hellwig, soprano, and Dr. Gerald
Langford, baritone, in a program of art songs and opera Sunday
afternoon at 4 p.m. in Constans Theatre. Admission is free.
Dr. Langford will sing ten songs from Robert Schumanns Song
Cycle, Dichterliebe. Miss Hellwig has selected songs by Debussy and
Faure. v
In a scene from the second act of Verdis La Traviata, the role of
Violetta will be sung by Miss Hellwig; Germont, Dr. Langford;
Annina, Rose Bullock; Giuseppe, Marvin Sylvest. Kim Tuttle, pianist,
will accompany the program.
Miss Hellwig studied voice in Rome, Italy two years on a Fulbright
Scholarship. In 1964 she appeared with the Chautauqua Symphony
and was recipient of the Chautauqua Symphony Award.
She did her undergraduate work at Mac Murray College in Illinois,
and received her Masters Degree and the Performers Certificate from
the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.
Dr. Langford also studied voice in Rome with Riccardo Stracciare
and is aq ardent opera enthusiast.
Both singers were heard in the production by the Opera Workshop
of The Devil and Daniel Webster in April. The Opera Workshop is
directed by Evelyn Taylor, assistant professor in the department of
music.
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Frank Lagotie s Summer One Rina Circus

By JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondent
With children and teens
running, jumping, throwing and
hurdling, weekday afternoons
seem hectic at Florida Track.
But not to Frank Lagotie.
Lagotie, captain of the Gator
track team, has activities well
organized for the 200plus
enrollees in the Junior Champ
program.
Sponsored locally by the
Gainesville Junior Chamber of
Commerce, the program seeks to
expose youngsters to track and
field before larger spectator

FSU Cage Schedule
Official,No UF There

Florida State announced its
most ambitious 26-game
basketball schedule in history
today and the Seminoles will
play 13 of these contests at
home against some of the
countrys top teams.
Included on the home slate
are games against such cage
powers as Southern California,
Ohio State, South Carolina,
Dayton and Georgia Tech.
On the road, Coach Hugh
Durhams Seminoles will meet,
among others, Virginia Tech,
Louisville, North Carolina and
Miami.
The Seminoles will also take
part in the Florida Sunshine
Classic in Jacksonville Dec. 6-7
along with Miami, Jacksonville
University and Florida.
The Seminoles were 19-8 last
season, gaining their first bid to
the NCAA Tournament.
All-America candidate Dave
Cowens, who as a sophomore
averaged 18.8 points and 17
rebounds per game, tops the list
of returning lettermen.
When Florida State goes
against North Carolina Feb. 8 in
Greensboro, N.C., the Seminoles
will be facing the club which
finished second in the NCAA
Tourney last season. The
Bowling,Golf
Goes Coed
For Summer
There will be a mixed doubles
bowling tournament and a
handicap golf tournament
sponsored by the Intramural
Department this summer.
Both of these tournaments
will be open to student wives,
faculty and staff* members in
addition to students.
The bowling tournament will
be single elimination and a
match will consist of two games
each by the boy and girl, with
the highest total pins being
declared the winner.
The golf tournament will be a
handicap tournament with
players divided into three
groups; 85below, 86100,
101-above. There will be three
winners.
There will be no charge for
this tournament and the
deadline for entering is Friday,
July 19, at 5:00 p.m. You may
enter by calling the Intramural
Department at Extension 2912
r by dropping by room 227
Florida Gym.

sports gain all their attention. In
addition, physical fitness is aided
and growth enhanced by the
exercise involved in the program.
As 23-year-old Coach
Frank, Lagotie oversees daily
practices for the two to 18-year 18-yearolds.
olds. 18-yearolds. The workouts climax
Friday afternoons at 5 p.m. with
full scale track meets.
At the meets, top
competitors in each event are
awarded ribbons. Any new
record performances are
enshrined on the Junior Champ
record board.
Originator of the Junior
Champ program in the

Tarheels were beaten by
champion UCLA in the finals.
During the regular schedule,
North Carolina was pressed to
beat the Seminoles 86-80 at
Chapel Hill.
The NCAAs No. 3 team is
also on the Florida State slate.
Ohio State defeated Houston for
third spot in the tournament.
Also earlier in the season, the
Buckeyes downed the Seminoles
76-69 at Columbus.
UF Signee
Owens Top
Tennis NIC
Charlie Owen, recently signed
by the UF tennis team, won the
National Interscholastic
Championship last week.
Competing against the top tennis
players in the nation, Owen
defeated all opposition reaching
the top of the ladder.
Owen, who is rated the
number one high school tennis
player in the South, is from
Tuscaloosa High School,
Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
He will begin his freshman
year in September and plans to
major in Business
Administration.

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Or the lady with the wheel
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Champ program in the
Gainesville area was Gator head
track coach Jimmy Carnes.
Carnes instituted the program
when he moved to the unversity
in 1965.
Highlight of the summer
schedule will be the state Junior
Junior Champ meet, to be held
at Florida Track on August 3.
State winners in the senior
division will travel to the
National Jaycee Junior Champ
meet. Site of this years
nationals is the 'University of
Oregon at Eugene.
Although one member of
Junior Champs, Kathy Day, won
three state AAU titles in her age
group, Lagotie maintains that
the emphasis of the program is
on participation, not excellence.
The kids get a kick out of
competing with others their own
age, said the obviously pleased
Lagotie, but with the little ones
we arent too worried about
form or performance.
The older members are
taught the correct way to run,
the former Gator star continued.
Running doesnt have to be
hard work; it can be very
relaxed.
Lagotie, who receives a
Masters Degree in Physical
Education and Health this
August, is living testimony to
the theory that running can be
relaxed.
Even after completing his
eligibility at Florida and setting
school records in five events, the
tall Miamian still runs 105 miles
a week to stay in shape for
future competition. As a coach,
Lagotie practices what he
preaches.
Coach Lagotie starts each
days Junior Champ practice
much as he would a college
workout.
First, the ten and under age
group arrives at 2:30 p.m. The
workout begins with the whole
mob of pint-sized cindermen
taking a warm-up lap around
the quarter-mile oval.

Then Lagotie, assistant track
coach Ted Benz and Gator team
member Don Laene lead the
kiddies in calisthenics.
Sprint races by age groups and
sex are the next order of
business, followed by
instructions in field events.
High jump, broad jump,
discus, eight pound shot put and
the triple jump all receive special
days for study and practice.
At 4 p.m. each afternoon the
cycle is repeated with the more
competitive 11 to 18 year old
group. Lagotie comments that
most of the Junior Champs have
improved their performances

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Friday. July 12,1968, The Florida Alligator,

greatly since the first practice,
June 10.
After the close of the 200
member program and August
graduation, Lagotic and his wife
plan to move to Los Angeles,
where he will teach. He figures
he has three or four more years
of good running in him.
And possibly three or four
more years of good youth work.
Kentucky Mark
NEW YORK Kentucky,
under veteran coach Adolph
Rupp, has made a record 16
appearances in the NCAA
basketball championship
playoffs.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 12, 1968

The Basketball Flap:
Round Two Is Here
New fuel was added to the dying embers of the UF-FSU
basketball controversy this week with the uncovering of a 1955
directive by the old Board of Control stating that the two schools
should engage in all athletic competition.
Wednesdays Tallahassee Democrat carried the story in Sports
Editor Bill McGrothas column. In it, McGrotha said that the Board of
Control, now known as the Board of Regents, agreed at a conference
held in February, 1955, that UF and Florida State would enter into
competition in all sports.
McGrotha further charged that the regulation would force the two
schools into competition because Florida State was never consulted
on the decision to drop the series between the two schools.
As of yet, neither school has asked the Board to act on the possible
violation of the forgotten agreement, an action which would be
necessary for the Regents to step in to decide the battle.
|y/ew/ng Sporfs^|
By NEAL SANDERS Alligator Sports Editor
As far as the discussion has gone, everything seems to be going in
FSITs favor, for up to now, it has been solely that school which has
created the current flurry of activity surrounding the May decision.
However, there is another side, one that has been relatively silent.
The side comes from soft spoken Tommy Bartlett, who ordinarily
isnt so soft on such matters. This time, however, he has chosen to
take the matter extremely seriously.
Bartlett refutes the validity of the directive. McGrotha, in his
column, admitted that the directive dealt with the establishing of
athletic ties between the established program at UF, and the fledgling
one in Tallahassee. This in itself took time. In swimming, for instance,
the two schools met for the first time in the following year, yet in
football, the first clash was not until 1958.
Bartlett calls the entire incident one sided, and hopes that it will
die without further controversy.
I dont think that will happen, however, said Bartlett. There is
little doubt in my mind but that Florida State will press this Board of
Regents decision.
In the meantime, he has been assured that neither school could be
held in violation of any ruling, as neither school knew of the existence
of it until Wednesday.
The the argument is what disturbs me, said Bartlett.
The two schools have gone off in different directions, which the
Board of Control could not have realized.
FSU has never joined a conference, he explained, and it is
doubtful that they ever will. We have a strong conference
commitment. When we beat them, it means nothing, and when we
lose, it is just their prestige.
But the difference in basketball between the two schools shows
up every time we play them, he continued. We have beaten the best
team they have ever fielded by 25 points.
Coaches at Florida State were unavailable for comment on the
question.
Whatever happens in the controversy, whether it dies for good
now, or goes on for a third act, Bartletts reasoning cant be taken
lightly. The one-sided arguments need some reviewing, preferably
before either side takes any further steps.
SCOREBOARD

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L PCT GB
St. Louis 53 30 639
Cincinnati 42 39 .519 10
Atlanta 43 40 ; 51 10
San Francisco 42 42 500 HJ4
Pittsburgh 40 41 494 12
Philadelphia 3g 4Q 48? I2 A
Los Angeles 44 482 13
New York 39 72 476 1314
Chicago 39 45 464 14V4
Houston 34 4g 422 18

TODAYS GAMES

Chicago at New York, night
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, night
San Francisco at Cincinnati, night
Los Angeles at Atlanta, night
Houston at St. Louis, night

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L pci GB
Detroit 55 28 .663
Cleveland 47 39 547
Baltimore 43 37 .538 WA
Boston 42 38 .525 \VA
Minnesota 39 42 4 g| J 5
California 39 43 476 15%
Oakland 39 43 47 6. \5'A
New York 36 43 456 17
Chicago 34 44 >436 im
Washington 39 47 .390 22

Boston at California, night
Detroit at Minnesota, night
New York at Chicago, night
Washington at Baltimore, night
Cleveland at Oakland, night

we care
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