Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'gwyEmmy
|
O'CONNELL
... powers increased

Ttie
Florida Alligator

Vol. 60 No. 157

Senate Recommends
Publications Autonomy

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
Climaxing nearly two years of
negotiations and false starts,
the Student Senate last week
passed a resolution urging UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
to approve a new charter for the
Board of Student Publications
(BSP) which grants the board
fiscal autonomy from Student
Government.
Financial independence had
long been sought by BSP officers
and by Alligator editors. Pledges
of autonomy for student publi-
cations were also planks in the
platforms of both major parties
in the past election.
In the same resolution, the
Senate also promised its support
to a possible second newspaper
for the university. During the
meeting last week, it authorized
spending up to $125 to cover
any debts the new paper may
incur.
The resolution urged that the
new paper, headed by UF stu student
dent student Richard Martin, receive
support from all agencies of
Student Government and of the
University.
The new charter for the BSP
which the Senate urged

Bo az Retirement Set

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COL. BOAZ
... to retire

Student Senate Blasts
Regents Discrimination

Calling the university presidents new power to
summarily suspend a student a vehicle of dis discrimination
crimination discrimination against student rights, the Student
Senate unanimously passed a resolution sharply
condemning the recent Board of Regents action
which granted the power.
The Senate pledged considering the feasibility of
creating a student defender post*to represent stu students
dents students who face loss of due process procedures.
The legislative body also blasted a rewording of
Regents policy on student publications. The section
of the policy on freedom of the press was changed
from free discussion to responsible discussion.
The new clause, the Senate contended, is so
vague as to cause reasonable people to have to guess
at its meaning and differ as to its application.

THE NATIONS LEADING COLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

OConnell to approve was
essentially the same document
that the BSP recommended to
OConnell about a month ago.
There were, however, several
changes which prompted more
than 30 minutes of debate on
the Senate floor.
One of the more controversial
sections changed the
composition of the BSP from its
present four students and four
faculty to six students and three
faculty.
The change was made
supposedly to insure that
control of student publications
remain in student hands rather
than the administrations,
because of the threat of
censorship.
But Bill Zewadski, a student
member of the BSP, argued
against the change. He pointed
out that past experience has
shown that the student members
of the board are more willing to
censor an editor than are the
faculty members.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich said the
proposed number of faculty
members was to allow one
expert from each of the three
main areas of newspaper

Col. William N. Boaz, head of
UFs Air Force ROTC program,
has announced plans to retire
from the military in September.
The Air Force veteran is
slated to become chief of flight
technology at Embry Riddle
Aviation School in Miami. Boaz
said he is looking forward to the
move as a second career.
My whole life has been
avaiation, he stated.
Boaz has been succeeded as
university military coordinator
by Army Col. Arlo Mitchell.
Even though Boaz will not retire
until September, the change was
made to coincide with the end
of the fiscal year.

Tuesday, July 9, 1968

operation: business, law and
journalism.
The idea of raising the
number of students on the BSP
follows closely SGs drive to
increase student representation
on university policy-making
committees.
(SEE 'AUTONOMY' PAGE 2)

CLO Gets $280,000 Loan

A $280,000 federal loan will
give cooperative living students
at the UF modem facilities for
the first time, probably by
September, 1969.
The 40-year loan to the
Universitys Cooperative Living
Organization (CLO) through the
college housing loan program of
the Department of Housing and
Urban Development was
announced recently by U.S.
Congressman Don Fuqua of
Altha.
Former CLO President Frank
Shepherd was credited by Dr.
Harold C. Riker, director of UF
student housing, for successfully
obtaining the loan.
Frank deserves tremendous
credit for his work on it, Riker
said. Shepherd, who was active
in CLO for two years before he
graduated in June, spent a year
or more arranging the loan and
spent a great deal of his own
time and money in the process.
Twin two-story units,
connected by a one-story
building, will be constructed at
Northwest 15th Street and First
Avenue, site of five houses of
pre-World War II vintage now
occupied by the cooperative
organization.
Riker said the new units
modem, brick facilities will
house about 88 students,
approximately 28 more than
presently accommodated.
The loan with three per cent
interest will be repaid from
revenue produced by students
living in the new housing, Riker
said.

The resolution, introduced by Sen. Larry Martin,
promised that the Senate will commit itself to a
course of action to protect the right ot freedom of
the press through whatever means available.
The resolution on presidential power noted that
the effect of the increased authority negates the
Code of Student Conduct.
The resolution argued that the president must
represent the administration's point of view and
that the administration instigates disciplinary action
against a student.
Furthermore, the resolution claimed, the grant granting
ing granting of this power to the president ignores recent
court decisions which demand a fair and impartial
hearing as a minimum requirement for substantive
due process guaranteed by the Fifth and Fourteenth
Amendments of the United States Constitution.


Taylor: 'Student
Rights Violated?
The Board of Regents decision to give state university presidents
power of immediate suspension of students may be a violation of a
students right to due process of law, Student Body President Clyde
Taylor has warned.
The Regents decision last week gave the presidents discretionary
power to suspend students in any situation discrediting the
university before the case is reviewed by the Board of Regents.
Formerly, a case had to be reviewed before the student could be
suspended.
Im skeptical, Taylor said about the decision, so skeptical, that
I think it could be inviting a test case.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell said Sunday that he hasnt
looked closely into the Regents decision yet.
I assume the Regents had their lawyer check the legality of it,
OConnell said. If it is a violation, he would have told them.
I have to study this now, OConnell continued. He said that after
looking into the suspension power, if he decided it was imlawful, he
would not use it.
It is definitely not a step forward in student rights, Taylor
asserted. He called it an attempt to hold the line on the part of the
Board of Regents in a reaction to the student unrest at FSU last
spring.

Plans call for 44 double
sleeping rooms, a lounge, living
room and kitchen, and possibly
an apartment for a housemother.
Jack L. Turner of
Aubumdale, a former CLO
member, is the architect. The
project is not expected to be
ready for bidding before 1969.
CLO is the only scholarship
house of its kind on campus. To
qualify, students must show this

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DOUG CASE
COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION
... receives building loan

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. . under fire

type of financial need is required
for them to attend college,
according to Carl Opp, director
of off-campus housing and a
member of the seven-man board
of trustees directing the co-op
program.
Students taking part in the
program can live at half the cost
of the average University
students, paying only S6O a
lonth for room and board.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

Conduct Code
Revision Seen

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Code of Student
Conduct may be up for another
revision soon if one of the task
force committees of the Action
Conference has its way.
The Minimal Conduct
Expectations: Student-
Administrative-Faculty
Committee is studying ... the
Student Code of Conduct with
an eye towards a possible
overhaul, said Task Force
Chairman Pete Zinober.
Any such revision, which
ZINOBER
. .. 'code studied'
Senate Meet
The Student Senate will
meet Tuesday in Room 349
in the Reitz Union at 7:45
p.m. The parties will caucus
at 7 p.m. with United-First
Party meeting in Room 355
and Forward Party meeting in
Room 349.

Autonomy Approved

F* FROM PA6t ONE J
Also changed in the proposed
charter was provision for setting
up three reserve accounts: one
for holding two months
operating expenses, one for
emergencies and one for capital
depreciation.
Any money in excess of the
reserve accounts will be divided
between the BSP and SG, with

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1230 W. UNIV. AVE. NEAR RAMADA INN
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertlslng
tlslng Advertlslng Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

Zinober admits is merely under
consideration, would be the
second one within the past year.
Student leaders were successful
in persuading the UF
administration to grant sweeping
reforms to student conduct
regulations in 1967. The most
controversial of the reforms was
the surrender of UF
administrative control over
off-campus student conduct.
Zinober did not say what
parts of the present code were
under study. It is only known
that his task force is concerned
with the rights and
responsibilities of students.
We are also reviewing the
tribunal systems on campus,
from dormitory regulatory
bodies, sorority standards
committees, all the way up to
the AWS and the Honor Court,
he said.
The Minimal Conduct
Committee is also studying
student conduct in the
classrooms, the rights and
responsibilities of students, and
the effectiveness of the Honor
System as well as any
alternatives for it.
The trend in the Task Force
is also towards revising the
Student Handbook regulation on
compulsory class attendance,
said Zinober.
No one can eliminate the
teachers prerogative to penalize
the student if he cuts class, but
we are hoping that the official
university policy on this matter
might be changed.
The Task Force also has a
faculty code of ethics under
consideration. We expect
concrete results in two to three
weeks, he said.

SG getting 80 per cent and the
BSP getting 20 per cent.
The resolution also urged that
an independent accounting firm
audit student publications
records once each year at SG
expense.
A bill similar to the
resolution passed last week was
passed by the Senate last
November, but was vetoed by
then Student Body Treasurer
Don Braddock.

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SPARKLING FOURTH DOUGCAS6
What's a Fourth of July without sparklers? These girls celebrated the Fourth here in Gainesville while
many UF students were out of town making fireworks of their own.
Taylor Not Too Happy
With Publications Ruling

Student Body President
Clyde Taylor said he is not too
happy with what he called the
Board of Regents reinforcement
of the state university
presidents solitary power over
student publications.
The Regents decided last
week that the presidents could
appoint boards or business
directors as publishers to wield
presidential power over student
publications.
The recommendations of the
Regents are already essentially in
practice at the UF with the
Board of Student Publications
directing the operations and
policies of UF student
publications under the
presidents power.
Taylor said the Council of
Student Body Presidents (CSBP)
has been pushing to have the
university presidents share
responsibility for publications
with perhaps a full time
administrator in a publication
agency.
Calling the Regents
recommendation an obvious
reaction to the FSU incident,
Taylor said it was an affirmation
of the presidential power as the
Final authority as the owner of a

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student publication.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Sunday that the
Regents suggestion will indeed
make little difference here. He
emphasized that the persons
making publications policy are

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ultimately responsible to him.
The suggestion, OConnell
said, is primarily for the newer
state universities which have not
yet formulated their
administrative structure in
student publications.



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GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is AOPi Marti Cox. This New Jersey transplant
was caught working on her 4th of July tan. Marty, a 3ED history
major, is president of the Delta Tau Delta little sisters.
New SG Cabinet
To Save Money
Student Body President Clyde Taylor is revamping his cabinet, a
move expected to cut the number of cabinet members in half, and at
the same time, save up to $ 1,800 from the coming budget.
Taylors basic plan is to have nine or 10 key positions consolidate
and perform the tasks previously done by 20 sub-groups.
When I started my term 1 set up a cabinet I knew would have to
eventually be changed to serve its proper function, Taylor said
Sunday. I felt it would be better to start with a broad range of jobs
and then cut down, rather than starting short-handed and having to
add personnel after everything was started.
He promised to make the changes public as soon as they are
completed this week.
Taylors start with 20 positions was similar to the plan used by his
predecessor Charles Shepherd. Taylor said he has found that a plan of
fewer, but larger groups would be more efficient.
An example he offered was that of the new Office of Student
Affairs. In the past, separate offices represented married students,
foreign students, junior college students, and other classifications. The
new office combines these offices into one, saving time, manpower
and money.
Were not using old guidelines in setting up the cabinet, Taylor
said. The plan is geared to economy and control. If a new idea will
be helpful and economical, we will not be afraid to try it just because
it has not been done before.
The expected SI,BOO cut from the cabinet budget will probably
come from a reduction of paperwork, material and machineiy use.
One of the major areas that will be phased out is the position of
Secretary of Housing.
_ w
This position wasnt really necessary, Taylor explained. We
gave the job as an added one to the President of Interhall Council..He
actually did the work before, but in the past an extra person was
hanging around who was forced to attend meetings and such.
Taylor predicted the summer quarter would be an important one
for Student Government.
Every project in our partys platform is now under way, he said.
We have lots of ideas, and our plans are just now starting to roll. This
summer will be an important one for these plans and for the
university.

HONOR COURT RULES
Ignorance No Excuse
By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
Ignorance of UFs Honor Code is no defense against conviction for its violation, the Honor Court ruled
in a recently announced precedent-setting decision.
By the time a student reaches university level, he is assumed to know the law (the Honor Code); there-

fore, ignorance is no excuse,
the Honor Court said in an
opinion written by Honor Court
Chancellor Pete Zinober.
The opinion was requested by
the Honor Court Attorney
Generals office after former
head cheerleader Charles Gore
4BA, was found guilty of
plagiarism last quarter by the
court.
It marked the first time that
the Honor Court, in which all
judicial powers of the UF
student body are vested, had
convicted a student on charges
of intentional misrepresenta misrepresentation,
tion, misrepresentation, Zinober said.
Gore admitted ihat he
submitted to Professors Norman
Keig, ES 445, and C. Arnold
Williams, ES 521, a paper which
failed to footnote or to
otherwise
acknowledge
sources of VK&jyll
information.
His defense
was that he was^^Bhk^l
not aware that
his procedure ?C
was illegal, ac according
cording according to the GORE
Honor Code, and that he did not
intend to misrepresent his ideas
as expressed in the paper.
The Honor Court, however,
ruled that Gore did intentionally
misrepresent his ideas.
If a person intends to use
anothers ideas or words without
acknowledging him (the author),
then he per se intends to
misrepresent, the court said its
opinion.
The court uphelp Gores
failing grades in ES 455 and 521
and further ordered him to
satisfactorily complete, under
the direction of Professors
Mathews and Keig, another
paper of at least 15 pages.
Gore, not in school for the
summer quarter, could not be
reached for comment.
Professional
Society Exists
For Athletes
Doctors, lawyers, and
journalists all have societies
honoring outstanding
individuals, and so do athletes.
Sigma Delta Psi is recognized
as the national honorary athletic
fraternity. It promotes the total
fitness of college students with
emphasis on physical fitnesss.
Membership is open to any
college student passing all 15
athletic requirements. Test items
are: 100 yard dash, 120-yard
low hurdles, running high jump,
running broad jump, 16 pound
shot put, 20 foot rope climb or
golf test, baseball throw or
javelin throw, football punt,
100-yard swim, 1-mile run,
front handspring, handstand or
bowling test, fence vault, good
posture, and scholarship.
Florida is presently leading
the nation in team competion
and membership.

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Tuesday, July 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

Workshop Recommends Changes

By DON YOKEL
Campus Living Editor I
A psychological and en environmental
vironmental environmental gap exists between
the junior college and UF, a j
Student Mental Health Project
workshop reports.
Given a choice between com completing
pleting completing lower division work at
UF or at a junior college,
transfer students in the
workshop chose their former
junior colleges.
Doctors Ben Barger, Carl
Clarke, and Everette Hall were
the workshop director,
coordinator and co-director
respectively and authors of a
report entitled Transfer
Students Speak Out. The
workshop was held April 22-26
at the Reitz Union. The report
was released recently.
The gap is the differences
between a large, complex
multi-college university system
and a more personal and less
demanding junior college
atmosphere.
Many students claimed they
had trouble making the
transition from junior college to
university life.
The report recommends the
following suggestions for filling
the gap:
Make it possible for a
typical schedule under the
quarter system to be three
five-hour classes instead of five
or more two-, three-, and
four-hour courses.
i Make it possible for
academic advisement to be a
more personal and a less hurried
experience with the same advisor
each time so that longer range
planning can be accomplished
and more accurate information
can be communicated.
9 Expand the summer
orientation programs so that all
transfer students can be invited
to participate.
Hall said very few UF
students have psychotic breaks
with reality and that the
emotionally disturbed segment
of the university group was not
the main concern of the
workshop.
We need to make the
transfer process more smooth by
establishing lines of
communication between the
junior college and the
university, he said.
Former junior college
students at the UF should go
back and talk to students and
tdl them if they should come
here.
There are students who can
do passing work at some colleges
in the state but not here, claims
Hall.
The 16S students interviewed
at the workshop retained a sense
of loyalty to their former college
and felt that their experience
was a good intermediate step
between high school and die
university, says the report.
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SUBSTITUTE PERSONAL ADVISEMENT ..

Most students at the
workshop felt the junior college
had prepared them adequately
with the exception of:
§ Students who found
themselves to be one to three
quarters deficient in course work
to be eligible for admission to
upper division work.
Counselors in lower division
had not told them the
advisability of taking university
recommended electives.
9 A lack of communications
on changes in upper division
requirements.
Widespread dissatisfaction
was expressed by students,
according to the report, in areas
of UF counseling in terms of
advisor availability, disinterest,
hastiness and the impression
they gave that advisement is a
burdensome task.
More specific recom recommendations
mendations recommendations by students include:
A desire for more long
range planning and greater
continuity of relationship with
an advisor.

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9 Courses with comparable i
hours should not differ in work
load requirements.
9 Pleas were made for the j
reduction of two- and three-hour \
courses offered and a t
corresponding increase in the t
number of four- and five-hour ;
courses in order to reduce the
confusing sense of fragmentation
which the present system \
generates. 1
Got An Opinion?
Any student, faculty oi
administrator who would like j
to present his or her opinion 1
on any topic pertaining to \
evaluation of goals for the
university is urged to contact
Dr. Melvin Fried, chairman of
the Evaluation of Goals Task
Force of the Action 1
Conference.
Fried may be reached at
Ext. 5781 in the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.

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MILK SHAKES j
Ist SHAKE .... REG. PRICE 1
2nd SHAKE .... Vi PRICE S
FLAVORS CHOC. VANILLA-COFFEE g
STRAWBERRY CHERRY PINEAPPLE |§
1



Js!r!!'l SitvehmanZ
y or city this look is
t peasantry. A Villager
with long high neck top. Os 1 1 Jgfj I
100% acetate tricot by 1 llmPi I
Aladdin the top comes in hot 1 f
pink, yellow and turquoise. % i
leather. The Sleek A-line J Hts j \
smarten any girls t %
* 1 '. . - '*' .h

Tuesday, July 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9,1968

Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know 99
1%8 Harold Kennedy
PfiMtoa kt/i/ Editor
Harold Aldrich Paul Kaplan
IvCttta Managing Editor Executive Editor
All
. Steve Hulsey Neal Sanders
JKwINWIi News Editor Sports Editor
Tte Florid* Alligator's official pocltloo on in Is uprd
oaljr la tte eolas Mow. Otter material la ttes Issm may
ratted tea ogUloa of tea writer or cartoonist and not aoeossarUy
teat at tea Florida anl ijiy tMlf^r 1
The Killing

This killing has got to stop.
Throughout their nations 192
year history, Americans have always
been agents of destruction.
We destroyed the Indian culture
we found here. We decimated, by
fire, sword, disease and starvation,
the proud people who created that
culture and then scattered and
impoverished the survivors.
We destroyed the wildlife which
C EDITORIAL
once covered this land. No more the
buffalo; no more the whooping
crane, nor the panther.
They fell one at a time and in
droves to the thunderous sound of
American gunfire.
Now the American Anglo-Saxon
reins supreme over his land. Gone are
the Indian savages. Gone are the wild
animals.
From this destruction some of
it necessary, some of it pure waste
has arisen a strange myth.
The myth is that killing is both
noble and manly. It has its deepest
roots in medieval Europe and 19th
century America. A man with a
sword or a gun strapped on his hip is
a Real Man.
And that ridiculous myth -a
tale told by a village idiot has
survived until today.
Surrounded by modem civilization
and crowded into apartment
buildings and suburbs, American man
still believes the myth.
In his closets,over the mantle and
under his pillow he stores his deadly
toys, hoarding them, together with
the dream of his manhood. They stay

Alligator Staff
Margaret O'Brien Don Yokel
Copy Editor Campus Living Editor
Ted Remley Lori Steele
Entertainment Editor Features Editor
Staff Writers: Caron Balkany, George Cunningham,
Susie Halback, Joe Knight, Kitty Oliver.
Staff Photographer: Nick Arroyo
Staff Artist: Lois Parks

there, seldom used, until the man
becomes enraged or insane or both,
grabs his well-loved toy, and goes
out to kill someone.
Someone named John F. Kennedy
or Martin Luther King or Robert F.
Kennedy.
Or some pretty UF coed named
Mrs. Carol Persons.
Or any of the other nearly 200
people shot every week.
The killing has got to stop. Now.
The vast majority of the American
public B5 per cent in some polls
favors some form of gun control.
The Federal Bureau of
Investigation and the Justice
Department both favor gun control.
They realize that something must be
done.
Sixteen thousand deaths a year
murders, suicides, and accidents
are too many to be overlooked any
longer.
Action must be taken. And
Congress is the place to do it. Florida
Senators Spessard A. Holland and
George Smathers are our
representatives there. It is time for
them to take positive action now.
The mail order purchase of
firearms should be banned. All
firearms should be registered and
licensed. Convicted felons and the
mentally ill should not be permitted
to own firearms.
Systems such as this work in
Europe and eliminate most murders.
Such a system can work here. The
time to act is now. Write your
senator or your congressman. Lets
stop the killing.

\ V : f- V-S: 'y.-:y i'-i^'-i'
C=^^=Merry-Go-Round =SB^^^^"i
Amateur Diplomat
Drew Pearson SSSSSS Jack AndersonSSK

WASHINGTON The details
of the historic breakthrough
with Soviet Russia on
disarmament will not be told
until the usual period of State
Department waiting -about ten
years.
When it is finally told,
however, it will reveal that the
progress toward better
understanding between the
worlds two great nuclear powers
was due almost entirely to the
dogged determination of one
man Lyndon Johnson.
Almost bare-handed he
achieved the significant assent
from the Soviet Union which
may hasten the day when the
two countries will no longer face
a bristling array of opposing
intercontinental missiles.
Johnson has never been noted
as a diplomat or international
expert in the past. However, he
became convinced that the peace
of the world depended on better
understanding between the
worlds two strongest powers,
and he applied the same kind of
Texas selling that he used as
Senate Majority Leader when he
wanted to pass a difficult bill.
He kept up a constant barrage
of personal letters, personal
talks, messages through
ambassadors to Moscow, all
aimed at this objective.
Johnsons most significant
bid to woo Soviet Russia took
place with Ptemier Alexei
Kosygin at the famous Glassboro
Conference one year ago.
Kosygin appeared friendly
when talking to Johnson; but
went back to New York to
repeat the party line about
American imperialism. It was
obvious that his hands were tied
by the Kremlin.
After Johnson announced his
big decision on March 31 both
not to run again and to hold

PEARSON
peace talks, relations with
Moscow improved.
And the Presidents drive for
better understanding also
increased. Though some
newsmen have talked about the
slowing up of a lame-duck
President, actually the White
House tempo regarding
international affairs has
increased.
Not having to worry about
domestic politics, Johnson has
concentrated most of his energy
on foreign affairs.
It would have been easy for
any chief executive to be
distracted by the war in Vietnam
and neglect the broader, more
important objective of world
peace. Johnson, however, kept
hammering away on this main
goal, despite (hscouragmg initial
cracks from the Kremlin.
There are still some
diplomatic hurdles to overcome
before the USA and the USSR
get down to productive
disarmament talks. But judging
by Foreign Minister Gromykos
favorable speech, it looks as if
the persistent amateur
diplomacy of the man in the
White House is paying off.



The Conservative View

We are living in a society of slogans. Slogans are
screamed at us from radio, television, newspapers,
magazines, and billboards. Wherever we turn, we are
confronted with some kind of a slogan urging us to do
this or buy that.
We are slogged with political slogans, too. During
elections we are treated to a variety of slogans in verse
some good, but mostly bad.
But in the forest of political slogans, one stands out
head and shoulders above all others. It carries with it a
shrewd philosophy, a message if you will.
It states simply: free men are not equal, equal men
are not free.
Think about it. What exactly does it tell us? It tells us
that a free man living in a free society is an individual,
that he is his own master; that he can climb as high as he
wishes on the ladder of success.
And the beauty of it is that a free society offers its
citizens the opportunities and challenges that make for
individual greatness.
From another point of view, v a free man can criticize
his government. He can vote in elections to bring about
changes in government policy -a privilege people in
communist countries do not enjoy. The free man, by
voting judiciously, puts into office those men who will
see to it that he remains free.

You Should Pay Your Civic Rent

MR. EDITOR:
There is a great deal of
community activity in
Gainesville right now, initiated
by Rev. Wrights Coordinating
Council of Concern and given
added impetus by Gov. Kirks
recent visit.
In an effort to keep the
interest heightened and to
include more citizens in the
effort to solve Gainesvilles
social problems, I am asking you
to print the enclosed chapter
from Chuck Stones book as a
guest editorial.
The two sections in the text
which have been enclosed in
parentheses are my own
insertions to make the article
relative to our situation here in
Gainesville.
I think that concept (Youve
got to pay your civic rent) better
hits the nail on the head than
anything that ever has been said
about community responsibility
of the individual.
All of us, to some extent,
are indebted to our families, our
friends, our schools and colleges,
our churches, and various civic
organizations for the moderate
success each of us enjoys today.

The Silent r Gator
MR. EDITOR:
The sky is slowly turning gray and I think this silence is too much.
Are their shoes too big for you to fill, O Conserv-agator? (When I
want straight news IM pick up the NY Times.)
Here in NEVERLAND came an ungodly looking creature to write
for a pauper paper. And HE was quite unGodly (so they said)! There
was another who was a leftist (so Im told). But Joe and Bob saw all
the phonies (dangle?) and they UNDERSTOOD. And they tumbled
the glass walls and there was NOTHING.
They also write of MYTHS and the myth-believers replied (what
they said!) loudly. Without understanding. Graduation silenced them
(lets not forget Steve, either) and they are gone (to the Peace Corps
and life somewhere). And the artificial becomes art.
And there is everything, freshmen. Even myths (slightly used!). But
no PORK CHOPS (Winn-Dixie sells them for 69 a pound).
There is just this SILENCE, hello.
R. L. WISNIEWSKI, 3UC

Free Men Are Not EquaL.

OPEN FORUM:
ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

Nobody has ever made it
alone. One of the biggest myths
ever perpetuated in American
folklore has been this nonsense
about a self-made man. Where
did he live on an island?
It seems to me that if
society has been good to you,
you ought to be good to society.
If youve been fortunate
enough to get a thorough
education, obtain a good job,
raise a family, buy a home, or
just live a decent and
comfortable life, youre 700
percent ahead of two-thirds of
the people in the world.
God has blessed you and
youre already in debt both to
Him and to society.
But some people think that
going to work each day, doing
their job well, coming home and
playing with the kids, and
making conversation with the
family is enough.
Its not.
All of us have an obligation
to something larger than our
immediate selves or family. It
can be our church, our fraternal
organization, our civic
organization, our political party,
our neighborhood, our social
club, or our school.

Lets discuss the second part of the slogan: equal men
are not free. Socialism and communism spread the false
theory that all men are equal.
A society of equal men always reaps a low standard
of living. The people turn over their goods and their lives
to a ruling body of men who do their thinking for them.
That is why communism is such a dismal failure it
deprives man of his creativity, his capacity to think for
himself, and turns him into a vegetable.
We Americans are lucky. We still have a choice. But
many of us tend to be gullible. The power-hungry
politician dangles the carrot of security before our noses.
He woos us with the promise of some vague dreamland,
a welfare society where all our needs, from cradle to
grave, will be taken care of.
And because some of us take our freedom for
granted, we vote carelessly for the man who would
snatch our freedom from us.
A classic example is what happened in Saskatchewan,
Canada. In 1944, the socialists offered the people in that
Canadian province a real utopia. They laid it on thick.
They promised to solve the unemployment problems
by building government factories. And from the profits
which were somehow to be manufactured in the
factories, they said they would build highways, schools,

If your city is becoming
strangled by crime (or poverty,
or poor education, or injustice,
or racial tension, or apathy), its
because youre sitting at home
strangled by your television set
instead of personally trying to
do something about it.
Instead of being a freeloader
on society, you can make your

I 111 I I .....

city a great place in which to live
if and only if you become
active in some organized
institution. .
This is how you pay your
civic rent.
(Stont, Chuck, TELL IT
LIKE IT IS, Trident Press, New
York, pp. 149-151)
SUE DECKELMAN

TnocHaw lulu P 1 Qfi Thfl Florida Alligator,

hospitals, and create ail kinds of welfare schemes.
The people swallowed the bait. But it took them
twenty years, until 1964, to wake up to the fact that
they had been snowed.
During those twenty miserable, lean years, look what
happened. The making of profits was condemned.
During that period the rest of Canada was enjoying a
healthy boom, while Saskatchewan faced total economic
collapse. After 18 years of socialism there were fewer
jobs. Six hundred new taxes were introduced and 650
existing taxes were increased.
To top it all, 270,000 citizens packed their bags and
left the socialist utopia. They sought the exhilarating
challenges of freedom elsewhere.
Eventually drab, dreary, stifling socialism was booted
out, and a government which believed in private
enterprise and the initiative of the individual was voted
in.
We Americans have always stood proudly on our
own feet. Let us continue to rely on our own personal
efforts. Once we permit a government to do our thinking
for us, we can wave good-bye to liberty that priceless
possession and very foundation of our Constitution.
Remember, you can be a free man or an equal man.
Its your choice.

By Jimmey Bailey

Opinion Page
We would like to remind
our readers that the purpose
of the Advice and Dissent
page is to permit expression
of opinion of any member of,
or anyone interested in the
university community. All
arguments, no matter how
radical, are acceptable to this
marketplace of ideas, subject
to normal legal standards of
libel and obscenity.
The editors do not
necessarily agree or disagree
with any view printed here.
Letters and columns express
the opinion only of their
writers.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

:-;-;v;\s\-xxx<-x*x-w.%%v;vX-x*x-v->v.*."v;
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Vespa 1965, 150 cc,
Good Condition, $115.00. Call
376 9)86. (Als7 2t-p)
PLAYFUL kitties. PartSiamese,
partPersian. One grey, fluff, one
long haired black, one calico. 8 weeks
old. Healthy. Have been de-wormed.
Call 3782077. Address: 3205 N.W.
14th St. (A 1574t p)
guns GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (Als4tfP)
DEPENDABLE 1967 Honda 5O,
1100 miles. Like new side basket
$170.00. 3788397 or see at
7021 1 5 S. W 16th Ave.
(Als6st p)
iERMAN Shepherd Puppies, AKC,
excellent pedigree. Black and Tan, 1
Silver. Males and females. $75.00 and
up. 372-7061. (A-155-st-p)
GIRLS 3-speed bike $25.00, 170
lbs. barbells, $15.00, Fan $4.00, 110
S.W. 4th Ave. Weeknights after 5
p.m. (Als3t p)
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS.
Quality food for low prices. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (A15220t p)
Air Conditioner for VW Beetle" 6v.
$15,0.00. Call 372 8197.
LUXURY on wheels. 1968 Hillcrest
Mobile Home. 12 x 44. 1 Bedroom
furnished $3795.00. Phone
3725267 after 5:30 p.m. and ask
about the many included extras.
(Als7st p)
SPECIAL! Metallic Blue 1968 Honda
Scrambler 90, 2800 miles, 8 months
old. Superior condition. Just tuned
and adjusted. Plus helmet and helmet
lock. Originally $470.00 value for
S3OO or SIOO.OO and take up
$13.00/mo. payments for 15 mo.
Call Mike at 376 9769.
(A 158 2t p)

*DO-lt-Yourself
W? DAYS TO RUN
9 To order classifieds, use the
| form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive)
( $ tance to: Alligator Classifieds, D 1
( Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- 2
( S ville, Florida 32601. 3 days (*lO% discount)
4 days (*lO% discount) $8
| x Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount)
| DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE B
:§ ri A<;^lFirATinKl Count the words, omitting a, an & ||j
j g L.LA jj i rill win Addresses and phone numbers
i g n for sale count as one word. Minimum charge Rfi
18 n for rpnt ls S l oo or 20 words For each jjj
1 wanted additional word add 3 [ R helD wanted the total by number oi <*** the ad
! I D autos la to run. Subtract the discount ( 1 n personal 0* a PP licable ) and enclose a check 3$
f K n tor the remainder. For example,
I n services 32-word ad to run 4 days costs §g
5| U servlces $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?).
l| WORDING f|i
I NAME DATE |j
|$ STUDENT PHONE |j
M ADDRESS I
if CITY STATE _ZIP J
KBjgfononey cannot be refunded if ad Is cancelledarEjS

FOR SALE
v ... .*.
FOR SALE: 1967 60 x 12, Custom
built, completely furnished two
bedroom, Homette Mobile Home.
Down payment SIBOO plus $79.00
monthly payments. Call 3762894.
(Als3tp)
MOBILE HOME 10 x 50, 2 bedroom,
Air Conditioned, fully carpeted new
furniture, 10 x 20 patio cover, 3x5
utility shed, $2500, No. 47 Hickory
Hill Park 3722795. (A 158It p)
,',...;.v.v.v.v,;,y,y y. .v.v,vXv!v!V ,,,,,, 1v.vy
FOR RENT |
FOR RENT Spacious 1 bdrm
furnished Apt. 3 blocks from campus
S7B July 14 thru Aug. 31. Option
for Sept. Call 378-7193 after 3:30.
(B-157-2t-p)
ROOMS for men. A.C. Convenient.
Low summer rates. Ph. 3788122 or
3766652. For lady graduate
student or faculty member. Ph.
3766652. (8159 2tP)
2 BR garage apt. A/C and CH
available Aug. Ist.
1 BR apt. A/C large shady back yard
available now. Victorian Mansion 6
BR available now to Sept. 15.
3764019. (81597 t
ENORMOUS living room with
fireplace, three large bedrooms,
dining room, big shady back yard
with barbecue pit, ample parking. An
excellent plapf for serious minded
students who wish to throw an
occasional party. Available Sept. 15
at $l5O/month. Call 3764019.
(8159 2t-p)
CLEAN, cool, downstairs apartment
$70.00 a month utilities furnished,
boys only also single room $20.00 a
month. 1614 N.W. 3rd Place. Call
3722946 for appointment.
(B 1591t p)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Airconditioned. 2
Bedroom IV2 Bath CBS ll
Miles S. W. University 5125.00/mo.
- Phone 4952186. (Blssst p)
ROOM for rent in lovely home,
walking distance to University. Male
student. (B-155-st-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

Page 8

FOR RENT
&..*AVwv,W.K.K.>K.M.M.NV?MW:*W>>M*Si*v
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. .Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave. or call 3768990.
(B 157 15t p)
ARTISTS 3 room studio Apart Apartment
ment Apartment Center of Art Micanopy. Call
466-3459 or 372-4979. (B-159-4t-p)
WANTED
>; v
WANTED: used Photographic Dark
room Equipment., Enlarger, trays,
dryer; the works. Call 376 3157.
(Cls92t p)
DESPARATE: Student needs 3 BR,
2 bath house. SIOO or less D.P. and
assume mtg. at low interest rate.
Occupancy before Sept. Call
372-7177. (C-159-st-p)
FEMALE roommates for July til. .
$36.50 per month and utilities.
Share House, 1708 N.W. 10th Ave.
372-2048. (C 156-5t p)
YOUNG FOREIGN female student
willing to do light housework or
babysitting in return for lodging
place. Call 3786086 after 5 p.m.
(Cls73t p)
MALt roommate wanted $75.00 for
entire summer. Have own room in
house with T.V., stereo. 1 Block
from campus. 376-9592. (C-158-lt-p)
HELP WANTED |
lsy.vi'X'X'V-vsS'i'X'tt'tt'X'X'XW'X*-'
RELIABLE couple wanted as
resident manager of 24-unit apt.
complex. Wife must be non-working,
husband handy with repairs, no
children or pets, and to stay at least
two years. Send resume to Post
Office Drawer X, Gainesville.
(Els9 4t p)
jox Off iceO pens At
I AT: CUfF ROBOnSON I
8:52 Only VINCEEPittOS |
I ALSO, At 11:22 Only 1
I "A Fistful Os Dollars" I
Starring Clint Eastwood
(SVHTC TIMERS
iLfiVKENCE}
OFARABIA
1
(5* Cariiien
BA )y
WOMAN" U J
Total* 1
/// Female
/// Animal! (
W UTA LEVKA I
/§/ lASTMANCOLOft I
14J ULTRABCOPK
"HARLEM MAG I CANS"

f HELP WANTED |
HELP WANTED MALE: Mens
Clothing Salesman, part-time.
Discount privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Dept. Stores, Inc.
(Els2tc)

First Run!
Show starts at Dusk
; ] a I /.j| i {' 111 II <:^lhl^^'
;&' A 11 1 lml 11 i __i Ml
Bw ,g\ ;
&&iwm |9BnBTCiHjpF
BcraWtiy 11 JACKSHtBnm Sc55S5 L* mwm m-nniiui I
V
Wometco's Twin Theatre
N.W. 13th St. at 23rd Road Telephone 378-2434
ipPII
r~lS| TMoteow/
CYCLES :
ANOTHE jfe&
I SWINGERS Ms VSflk 42KBM?
Z t e
IT ALL GO! B
introducing
! TONY FRANCIOSA JACQUELINE BISSET ...808 DENVER^
! jfMfej-haP OVGt! 2nd WEEKK
' FEATURE AT:
L FROM 1:30 I 1 I 1:45-3:50-5:50-7:55-10:00
\ JT~ Steve McQueen HHHiIH
I Faye Dunaway. flj^M|w
A Norman Jewison Film | .JSK^
fmM *h
I V Paul Burke Jack Weston t "i
7 I'pWWaiV: 1 111 mi 11 iitinor- J
I COLOR by DeLuxe r

,, ** '#,.y
AUTOS
vw-X'X-x-v-Nvivx-ra-x-x-sN-w-x-x.x.x.y;:
1 962 PONTIAC Tempest
Convertible, $250.00 or best offer.
Good engine, top and transmission,
needs some body repair. 1956 Ford
very dependable, $200.00 or best
offer. Call Don 378-8640, 300 NW
11th St. (G-155-6t-p)



CLASSIFIEDS

vx-x-x.svivx-x-X'X-XXxx-x-x.x^.x.SNSS'v
AUTOS
S
:*: i*: : :*:*: "*>x >: :*:*: : x !*x*x*xxx?K*:': x*X;!'
FOR SALE: 1966 MGB Excellent
Condition Wire Wheels Luggage
Rack tonneau top $1350. That is
$275.00 below blue book Price. Call
Fred 3787148. (Gls2tp)
64 XKE Coupe gold with red
leather interior. 4-wheel disc brakes,
new tag. 21,000 miles. $2750.
378-2993 evenings. (G-155-st-p)
x*x*v.v;-;x; xx:*x*xxx*ssnn w*:*k x >Xv i
1 PERSONAL
.v.X.vX-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-V-'.VXXX-X-X-X-X-X-!'
HURRY tomorrow is the last day!
Yucatan trip with The Reitz Union,
Aug. 25-Sept. 1. $272. Have a great
trip to a great place. Home of
ancient civilizations don't wait any
longer. Call 2741 or come by 310
Reitz Union Today! (Jls9ltc)
EMERGENCY: Jim Scott please call
Walter Scott at 3787300 As soon as
possible! J.T. (Jls9ltp)
/..X*X X*X*. X-X-X"Xv-X*XvX X > XX*X*X*Xv
I LOST & FOUND |
v**,*,X # x # x-x*x*x.v.v.%vx ;vx*x x-X'
$50.00 reward No questions asked
for information leading to return of
all taken from Graham Apt.
Sentimental value 0n1y... Call
3760203. (Lls Bstp)

Campus
Calendar ||

Tuesday, July 9
MENSA: Lunch Meeting, Union
Cafeteria, 12 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society:
Platinum Blonde," Union
Aud., 7,8:30 and 10 p.m.
Program Office: Bridge Lessons,
150 D Union, 7 p.m.
Program Office: Painting for
Fun, 118 Union, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 10
Union Board: Watermelon Feast,
Union Terrace, 6:30 to 9:30
pjn. Everyone is invited
Florida Speleological Society:
Meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society:
"Golddiggers of 1933,"
Union Aud., 7, 8:30 and 10
p.m.
Thursday, July 11
Program Office: Painting for
Fun, 118 Union, 7 p.m.

| Main Entrance [
}) GAINESVILLE MALL |
I Csmlttllslt Sartlut &£Sjg J
li/ij7AiMnBHRSE2TB
- g I L Lasagna _JL_ Hi
atmosphere i| | SSSa | T RavioM Pill "TgJ
(fj / Finest in gourmet food \ !ii| III! =c / Hoot* Si
jp it Imported Beers end Winesr r= AM-B:3OPM Mon. Set. ] St
K & Excellent Service yff =j 4 IB fv Serving Continuously AHi
fiyJjj_JJj|| LIU j
if Gainesvilles Finest |
| and Most Intimate )]

SERVICES
JvX-X.NSSS^X-I-X-X-X-VAVyXXXXI-X.X.SS-;-:-
ATTENTION British Car Owner: SW
Carbs rebuilt and tuned. 24 hour
service. Call 3 78-7571.
(M 159 3t p)
WILL tutor CPS 121, 2,3; MS 301,
2,3; PS 211 and 215; EGR. 183, 4,
5. Call 378-7571. (Mls93tp)
TMk
WANT
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Christian Science College
Organization: Meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Florida Cinema Society: "King
Kong," Union Aud., 7, 8:30
and 10 p.m.
Yoga: Lessons, Towers C, 9 p.m.
Friday, July 12
Union Movie: "The Sandpiper,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Men's Interhall: Dance, Towers
Rec. Room, 8 p.m.
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing:
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Lyceum Council presentation
ROBERT MINFORD, 50
cents for students and SI.OO
for faculty, staff and general
public; and Florida Cinema
Society subscription tickets.

Task Force To Review
Class Attendance Plan

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President Clyde Taylors voluntary
attendance proposal will soon be rolling back into
action after a two-week cooling-off period that it
met upon entering Action Conference.
Taylor announced Sunday that Student
Government was going to hold an Intercourse
program in the Plaza of the Americas in order to get
an over-all view of the pros and cons of voluntary
attendance from both student and faculty members
at UF.
When I first introduced my voluntary
attendance plan, it was only a broad and general
statement, Taylor said. But after further study of
the proposal and talks with a few professors, we
now realize that the plan needs to be worked on and
discussed.
For example, we realize that some courses,
namely those that are built around lab classes,
simply require attendance by the student.
Taylor said that an open Intercourse in the Plaza
would encourage statements and opinions by
interested parties that could further their knowledge
of the proposal.
The Intercourse is tentatively scheduled two
weeks from today. The results of the program will

Demonstrations Condemned

By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator News Editor
University administrations
and student demonstrations
were severely criticized recently
by the American Civil Liberties
Union.
In a prepared statement, the
ACLU criticized university
faculties for being indifferent to
the needs and aspirations of
students and university students
for interfering with the
processes of teaching, learning,
and the right to free speech.
In its criticism of
administrators, the ACLU
warned that inviting civil
authorities onto a campus
endangers the universitys
autonomy.
Inviting civil police to the
campus, said the statement,
should be resorted to only
when all other have
failed, and then preferably under
strict procedural rules laid down
and agreed to by administration,
faculty and students.
A resort to violence, such as
violent demonstrations, by
students is unjustified, the
statement said. Gaining ends by
means which infringe on the
liberties of others is inconsistent
with tliJ purposes and principles

BY ACLU

with faculty and administration
for which universities exist.
Admitting that students have
usually had justification for
concern in the issues which
prompted demonstrations, the
ACLU speculated that the
demonstrations had been used to
express frustrations and
disillusionment in other areas,
such as the national government.
It added the demonstrations
are representative of a neglect of
principles such as full and open
communication between faculty,
administration, and students,
and a rigorous priority of
academic and human
considerations over financial and
organizational ones.
A change in the nature of the
student body and its relations

REITZ UNION BOARD
PRESENTS THE BEGINNING
OF A SERIES ENTITLED
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
ENTERTAINMENT AGGREGATE
THIS SERIES FOR THE BENEFIT OF UF
STUDENTS WILL PROVIDE A VARIETY OF
ENTERTAINMENT EACH WEDNESDAY NIGHT
THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER.
LOOK FOR WEEKLY DETAILS IN EACH
TUESDAY'S ALLIGATOR
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
ENTERTAINMENT AGGREGATE
JULY 10
WATERMELON FEST
PETE WINTERS OF WUWU
TO PLAY YOUR
FAVORITE RECORDS
GAMES AREA SPECIALS
6:3opm to 9:3opm nS?' I
REITZ UNION TERRACE 1

Tuesday, July 9, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

be sent to Action Conference to help the
Curriculum Committee, to whom the bill has been
referred, to study the proposal.
In order to get the bill moving as fast as possible,
Taylor also said that he planned to approach the
Council of Academic Deans to get their opinion of
the proposal.
The task forces of Action Conference are
already burdened down with two or three proposals
to study at one time, Taylor added. But one week
after the Intercourse program we expect to have our
findings in, and were hoping for immediate
consideration from the Curriculum Committee.
Student Government is
hoping for larger participation
during the Intercourse, and will
promote it by having two or 1
three key persons there to speak.
University College Dean I
Franklin Doty is expected to be I
one of the speakers. JM
Taylors voluntary attendance HBSjfl
proposal passed one of its largest TAYLOR
barriers two weeks ago, when Student Senate voted
unanimously to accept the proposal. Political
leaders feel that the bill will need strong support
from Action Conference if it is to become part of
the schools constitution.

is another neglected principle,
the ACLU said.
The faculty and
administration, it said, have
hardly been aware of these
changes.
The passivity of many
faculties, said the statement,
has allowed most of the power
in the university to pass into the
hands of the administration,
which has been only too ready
to accept this power.
Activist students, the ACLU
continued, have played a useful
role in drawing attention to the
universitys imbalance of power.
But it seems short-sighted, the
statement said, to seek to
destroy the only institution
capable of playing such a role
effectively.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9,1968

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Sin City: Winds Os Change?
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Summertime life in Sin City centers around the
swimming pools. But behind all the suntan lotion and
leisure, Sin Citys reputation has begun to slip. Campus
Living Editor Don Yokel takes a look into the changing
behind-the-scenes life at the apartment complexes in the
following story.
By DON YOKEL
Campus Living Editor
Sin Citys reputation is lagging.
And UF administrators and Gainesville city fathers are glad.
The spring and summer months have brought a lull in activities
to the once notorious location for nude swim parties and a beer
party a night atmosphere.
Some say the lack of summer residents and the heat have slowed
the pace to an occasional dive in the pool.
Activities were not always this slow, a news article in the
Gainesville Independent dated July 20,1966 said.
The widespread use of alcohol particularly kegs of beer an
occasional nude swim in the pool, and a party a night atmosphere
tends to prevail over the massive complex of student occupied
apartments located along SW 16th Avenue, between Main and 13th
Streets.
There is a wild party a night atmosphere that is beginning to
take hold of students occupying the apartment complex. The
situation has potential for the decline of morality, the second
installment said about the worsening situation that was built up by
the author as a bad apple in the barrel for the UF student body.
Early this year while Sin Citys reputation was still intact,
Tropic Magazine, a Sunday supplement to the Miami Herald,
ran a stray which said that every student living in the dormitories
at UF is envious of the life led by students who live in Sin City.
UF Off Campus Supervisor of Housing Carl B. Opp claims Sin
City does not really deserve its reputation.
We have one-fourth the problems with students who live in
16th Avenue housing as compared to students who live in other
areas of Gainesville, he said recently.
Opp gives credit for the reduction of student and law
enforcement conflicts to the employment of full-time managers at
the units.
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PHOTOS BY NICK ARROYO
Finance companies who hold liens on Sin City properties
still dictate the terms for payment of rent from students to
landlords.
But buildings and administrative problems still persist at the
16th Avenue projects, says Opp.
There is still a lack of soundproofing, a lack of desks we
count the dining room table as one desk and a 12 month lease for
apartments is still standard.
Loan companies usually allow 10 per cent of the residents in a
development to have a nipe month lease with the remainder of the
occupied units on yearly leases within one development.
The supervisor of off campus housing said contractual and
interpersonal relationships are the students biggest problems.
He talks about the 16th Avenue developments as big business
with a need for a higher proportion of families as residents.
One group of apartments has as high as 30 per cent of the
residents married, says Opp.
A contract with ground rules and regulations that will benefit
both the landlord and the tenant is needed in regulating conduct
and monetary agreements within the projects.
And special form for word of mouth agreements is needed to
supplement any regulations that would be placed into use.
Opp feels that a month-to-n nth or quarter-to-quarter system
of leasing apartments is needec to solve much of the financial
troubles that plague the tenant and the landlord.



Jobmobile Start
Slow, Impressive
By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
At least 34 and possibly as many as 100 of Gainesvilles poor
and unemployed will now be working thanks to the Jobmobile, the
travelling employment agency of Gov. Claude Kirks Operation
Concern.
The Jobmobile,which interviews and refers unemployed persons
to jobs for no fee, made three local stops on June 18, July 1 and
July 2.
On June 18, 300 persons were interviewed, 16 were referred to
jobs, and 50 others were referred to prospective jobs, which
means that employment is possible, but not definite until an
interview or tryout period. Those who received official referrals are
considered employed.
On July 1, 71 persons were interviewed, seven were referred to
jobs, and 30 others were referred to prospective jobs. Jobmobiles
July 2 stop included 24 interviews, and 11 referrals.
The figures arent as impressive as they could be percentage
wise, said Malcolm Williams, coordinator of Operation Concern in
Gainesville. But for a start, we were pleased with the Jobmobiles
performance.
As far as were concerned, if we get just one person a job, we
are improving the situation, he said. Programs such as ours
always start slowly, but the figures will improve.
Jim Bax, head of Operation Concern and a former UF graduate,
said pride that Negroes often show when they look for
employment is one of their major problems.
Many Negroes want more distinguished jobs than what we are
able to offer them at this time, Bax noted. This is a definite
problem, but an understandable one.
Williams, a former tennis coach at Florida A&M for 11 years,
gave an example. One program that Operation Concern wanted to
start was a waiter-waitress program aimed at unemployed Negroes.
Very few people showed up for these jobs, Williams said. We
figured that one of the major problems was that the name was not
distinguished enough. We changed the title of the program to the
host-hostess program, and were expecting much better results.
Other Operation Concern programs were launched last week.
Locally, 15 of Gainesvilles small businessmen, both Negro and
white, met at a meeting of the Small Business Association. The
men discussed possible methods of improving business, images and
race relations in their community.
Bax also said he had high hopes for a lot of help from the UF.
If we could get 500 students from the university, it would
change the entire face of Gainesville in the areas that these people
are needed, he said. Social relevance is missing in too many
colleges. We can test the social relevance of Florida by letting
Gainesville serve as a ready-made lab for departments such as
education an d sociology.
UFs College of Education has already pledged its help to
Operation Concern.

UF Considers
New Program
The UF is considering a
Senior-Year Internship Program
for prospective Peace Corps
volunteers from agriculture and
related fields.
Students would take several
courses designed to adapt
technical skills to conditions of a
selected host country.
Interested students should
apply to the Center for Tropical
Agriculture.

YUCATAN pensua 5272
M fltf 25 DEPOSIT DUE JULY 10
Sept Jjjjjk
CALL 2741 or COME BY
310 REITZ UNION

QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49* SPECIALS X
EVERY DAY
B WSEkR SELF SERVICE NO TIPPING T

AT SOUTHEAST BOYS CLUB
Busy Project Gray Needs Help

Project Gray, UFs
student-run community service
program, is doing well in its
work at the Southeast Boys
Club, according to club director
Samuel Grant.
> Michael J. Margolis, white UF
student who is summer
coordinator for Project Gray,
plans to have four to six
students per week helping in the
predominantly Negro clubs
recreation program. Fund-raising
is also scheduled for the
summer.
We handle about 800 boys
here altogether, the Negro
community leader said.
Without Project Gray we
would have no tutorial service at
the dub, Grant said. About
ISO young boys have taken
advantage of this service.
Most of our younger boys
are potential failures, and the
older boys could care less. Ive
had to round the kids up the
parents dont get them out
there, Grant said.
I have one criticism to
make, Grant added. While the
program has been very helpful,
discipline is often lacking
because the white students bend
over backwards to be good
guys to the blacks.
If white students want to
work here they should become
part of the program and not just
say Svere white, and were
here.*
Margolis agreed that some of
the Project Gray workers have
been less than sincere.
A few students come out to
the club only because some
education courses require them
to work in community service,
he said.
United Fund supports all
Boys Clubs here.
At the Southeast club we
dont have money for furniture

or curtains, and we need much
more athletic equipment, Grant
said.
Much more money is given
to the white-neighborhood
dubs, Margolis, an accounting
major, said.
Dr. E. A. Cosby, Negro
dentist who has been active with
the club, commented, The

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Tuesday, July 9,1068, The Florida Alligator,

Southeast boys Club is very
worthwhile we need lots of
help.
We need volunteers who
enjoy working with kids in
recreation, Margolis said. Its
only for two hours per week
and its a great experience.
Volunteers for Project Gray
should contact Margolis.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

WHATS
HAPPENING
By LORI STEELE
Alligator Features Editor
IN BRAIN DRAIN: Today,
Mensa will have a luncheon
meeting at noon in the Reitz
Union Cafeteria.
IN THE SCIENCES, SORT OF:
Tonight, electrical engineering
fraternity Eta Kappa Nu will
hold a smoker in room 122,123
Reitz Union from 7:30-10 p.m.
There will also be a smoker
tomorrow night room 122,
same time. Also, the Association
for Computing Machinery will
hold a dinner meeting tonight at
6 p.m. in 150 D Reitz Union. A
conference will follow in rooms
346, 347 at 7:30 p.m.
IN SLIDE RULING IT, BUT
NOT CON SERV ATI VELY:
Wednesday, Benton Engineering
Council meets in room 118
Reitz Union 7-9:30 p.m. Young
Republicans meet in room 347
Reitz Union from 8-10 p.m.
IN ITS BETTER LATE THAN
NEVER: Wednesday, Youth
for Rockefeller will gather in
rooms 361, 362, 363 Reitz
Union at 7:30-10 p.m.
IN TARZAN, WHERE ARE
YOU NOW THAT WE NEED
YOU?: Thursday, King Kong
will be shown by the Florida
Cinema Society at 7 p.m.
IN FUNNIN IT: Friday, a dance
sponsored by Mens Interhall
will rock out from 8-12 p.m. in
the Towers recreation room. Phi
Delta Kappa will picnic-it at
Camp Wauburg at 2:30 pjn.
IN SONG OF INDIA
ALMOST: Saturday, movies will
be shown by the India Club at
7:30 p.m. in room 349 Reitz
Union.
IN SORE TONSILS: Sunday,
the Opera Workshop will present
La Traviata in the Reitz
Union auditorium at 4 p.m. with
a reception following in the East
Gallery.
IN HAMMIN IT UP OR
HAM ON THE HOCK?:
Monday, Gator Amateur Radio
Club will climb right to room
525 of Bldg. E and I. Dont ask
me. I just work here.

INTRODUCING
XV BOXES
CHICKEN from $1.15 SHRIMP from $1.30
SERVED WITH FRENCH FRIES COLE SLAW HUSH PUPPIES
PEUVERED FREE to do£r ur
ALSO DON'T FORGET ABOUT OUR MANY SANDWICHES
FAST
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378-1492 1029 W. UNIV. AVE.

_
Tdffl I m HI
I
V&Vwv. L mk mw W
For those quarter-harried students who haven't noticed, the time is
at hand for mid-term exams. This sleepy-eyed Florida man seems to
be well-equipped physically for becoming well-prepared mentally.
U F Pool Offers
Water Programs

The UF now offers a
complete swimming program to
students, faculty, staff, and their
families.
Membership is granted on a
first-come, first-served basis.
Faculty and staff must purchase
a season membership for $56.65.
Student memberships are
available for a monthly rate of
$10.40.
Fees include swimming
lessons and swimming privileges
through September 15 for
students and their families. Fees
may be paid at Room 201,
Florida Gym.
Student memberships require
renewal each month or the
membership will go to the first
individual on the waiting list.
The pool is open 9 a.m. to 7

PM 90s
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin 20s
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
V SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave

p.m. Monday through Saturday.
Morning hours (9 a.m. -1 p.m.)
are reserved for teaching
programs, with evening hours
reserved for recreational use.
Recreational swimming
tickets are available in Room
227, Florida Gym at $2 per
person for the season.
New England Loves Pools
The National Swimming Pool
Institute, at its 11th annual
convention and trade show,
said 21,400 new pools were in installed
stalled installed in 1967 in the North Northeast.
east. Northeast. The Midwest ranked sec second
ond second with 17,200 new pools and
the Califomia-Hawaii region
was third with 15,900.
Other regions ranked as fol follows:
lows: follows: Southwest and Mountain
8,900; Florida 8,700; South
5,500 and the Northwest, 1,000.

Fun Wednesdays
Begin Tomorrow
By LORI STEELE
Alligator Features Editor
Once Wednesdays were dull. Now they will be camp. They also will
be FUN!
Fun Wednesday kicks off this Wednesday with free watermelon
and music on the Reitz Union terrace. WUWU disc jockey Peter
Winters will host the festivities from 6:30-9:30 p.m. The Games Area
of the Reitz Union will present two free bowling games to every
couple entering the area.
Sponsored by the Union Board, the purpose of Fun Wednesdays
will be to provide a pleasurable study break. According to Union
Board summer president Bruce Harlan, Fun Wednesday is a take-off
on last summers Fun Week. The idea this time is to spread the fun
out so everyone will have a chance for an enjoyable study break
sometime during the quarter.
Fun Wednesday of July 17 will provide an outdoor movie. Kiss
of the Vampire will be shown in evil color on the wall of the Con Constans
stans Constans Theatre.
c SitwtoMifo
LADIES SPORTSWEAR
MEZZANINE FLOOR
SUMMER
CLEARANCE
SALE
Continues!
REDUCED!
Vz to Vl OFF
Bathing Suits Bags
Shifts Coordinates
Pants Dresses
Suits Skirts
Blouses Shorts
ODD AND END COLLECTION OF
Botiques and Jewelry Vi OFF
ASSORTED GROUP
BLOUSES and SHIRTS
VALUES TO 10 Now 3 Ea. I
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING
AT REAR OF STORE.



* * r v * *- o 5 an *. u k
|P% H 1 II H 1 fl *'
MOVIE
i Wayne Leads 'Green Berets

By DANA PREISLER
Alligator Reviewer
John Wayne is alive and well in South Vietnam
which is more than you can say for the majority of
Green Berets seen in the movie of the same name
now showing at the Center Thptre through
Thursday.
Wayne, who plays Col. Mike Kirby, is transferred
to Vietnam but afraid that hell end up with a desk
job, he requests to go over three weeks ahead of
schedule in order to get oriented to the
hard-fighting area.
Many questions concerning the United States
involvement in Vietnam are put forward by
newspaperman George Beckworth (David Janssen)
during a sort of Meet the Green Berets program at
Fort Bragg, N.C. Two Sgts. Muldoon (Aldo Ray)
and McGee (Raymond St. Jacques) fend such
questions as: Since a lot of people believe this is a
war between the Vietnamese people why not let
them handle it? to Is the Green Beret a military
robot with no personal feelings or opinions?
At the conclusion of the program, super-dove
4 Beckworth tells Kirby that the two brainwashed
sergeants didnt sell him on our being in Vietnam.
Wayne leaves Janssen sputtering when he asks,
Have you ever been in South Vietnam? Os course
Janssen later finagles his way to Da Nang and into
Waynes battalion where he sees all kinds of action
from a modularized lieutenant to a murdered

Dunaway Stars In 'Crown Affair 9

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Take a good producer producerdirector,
director, producerdirector, a Florida girl, an
intriguing plot, and a brand new
theatre and you have The
Thomas Crown Affair now
playing at the Plaza II Theatre.
Norman Jewison can
certainly be proud of his latest
film since In The Heat of the
Night. His directing skill is
evident throughout the movie.
The plot is simple but
interesting. Thomas Crown
(Steve McQueen) plans a bank
robbery and carries it out to
perfection. The Police Chief
Eddie Malone (Paul Burke) is
completely baffled.
The insurance company calls
in its ace investigator Vicky
Anderson (Faye Dunaway). She
becomes Crowns lover (after the
sexiest chess game youll ever
see) but warns him that she is
out to prove that he robbed the
bank. He seems to think she will
never do it.
Malone is disgusted at Vickys
ruthless tactics and immoral life
but admires her skill. She admits
that money is her only
conscience.
Vicky is fine until Crown tells
her, Tm all hung up the
closest he ever comes to an
emotional display.
As a test of her love, Crown
decides to stage another robbery
and fill her in on the details.
Vicky informs Malone and the
story ends with both Crown and
Vicky crushed when they
realized theyve lost near
happiness. (The actual
circumstances concerning the
robbery are surprising.)
Faye Dunaway escapes her
Bonnie fame. Instead of
robbing banks, she is a
sophisticated insurance
investigator who always gets
her man.
Steve McQueen plays his
standard over-confident role and
uses his well-known
self-satisfied smirk to
advantage. While he claims to be
sick of the system and

unaware of his identity, using
these excuses to explain his bank
robbing ways and love of
dangerous sports, he seems to fit
the system well as a rich,
divorced executive, graduated
from an ivy league school, who
drives a Rolls-Royce and
dresses in the latest styles.
Haskell Wexler, who won an
Academy Award for the
photography in Whos Afraid
of Virginia Woolf?, almost

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Ph. 378-2931 of Holiday Inn

5-year-old Montagnard child.
At the movies end Janssen is won over to the
rightness of our current involvement in Vietnam.
Two major plots are contained within the main
story: 1) the defense of Camp 29 Savoy AlO7 by
Wayne and the Berets; and 2) a bit of TV type
espionage with the capture of any enemy general in
V.C. territory. The second plot seems to have no
real continuity within the framework of the
established story except perhaps to show how
versatile the Green Berets are. It also enables Irene
Tsu as a Vietnamese Mata Hari to show a few of her
charms. (Every war flick has got to have a broad in
it somewhere.)
On the whole the acting is substantial. Wayne is
Wayne whether hes in a sheriffs vest or army
fatigues. Aldo Ray and Raymond St. Jacques did as
well as they could within the confines of the script.
Jim Hutton as the company scrounger, Sgt.
Peterson, turned in an engaging performance up to
and and including his final scene.
If youre in the mood for a fair war movie and
particularly if youre a John Wayne fan youll enjoy
this show. Since it is true that unless youve been to
South Vietnam you really dont know what its like
you might check into Green Berets for a taste of
the action. And if youre classified as IA its a
must got to find out what the sneaky little VCs
are up to.

ruins the film with his
multiple-picture techniques, in
which several scenes are shown
on the screen at once. This type
of photography was fine during
the credits but I was surprised
and disappointed when he used
it to an excessive extent during
the film.
Despite the jumbledup
photography Im sure The
Thomas Crown Affair is a
movie you wont want to miss,

Bridge Named
For Shepherd
Leaders are remembered by their staff and the people they served.
In America, many past presidents have monuments erected in their
memory: the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial and Grants
Tomb. The UF Student Government has dedicated a walk bridge in
Ravine Park to Charles Shepherd.
Shepherd, as Student Body President last year, is remembered for
changing the student body constitution. He vetoed the first proposal,
as it did not contain a statement of student rights. A second was
proposed and adopted.
After the Pamme Brewer incident, he instituted the formation of a
student code of conduct. Campus improvements were accomplished
with the spending of $44,000. This included the lighting of the Hume
Recreation Field.
SG saved Ravine Park from being built up in an administrative plan
to expand the university plant. They named the walk bridge after
their immediate past president. Shepherd is one of the few people ever
honored this way while still living.
Charles Shepherd has been well remembered by SG. Permanently
burned into the wooden railing of the bridge is this note Shepard
Bridge 1967!
JIM I HENDRIX
ARE YOU EXPERIENCED
STEREO ALBUM ON SALE
THIS WEEK $2.89
DISCOUNT SECONDS
1230 W. UNIV. AVE. NEAR RAMAbA INN
VOLKSWAGEN Os AMERICA, INC.
s iWHI aSSx .-,
jB s ...
MR
I.
Volkswagens electronic brain.
Its smarter than a carburetor.
Alas, the carburetor.
Decent and hard-working though it was, it just
couldnt think.
So every now and then it would do thoughtless
little things. Like get everything dirty. Waste gas.
Shamelessly pollute the air.
Our new computer would never behave that
way.
In the first place, its too educated to get every everything
thing everything dirty.
(Its always properly informed about changes in
the speed, engine temperature and load. So its al always
ways always properly informed about whats improper.)
And its too shrewd to waste gas.
(Since it knows everything precisely, it can de decide
cide decide everything precisely. And its decisions about
how much fuel you need are so precise that you
actually wind up burning less gas.)
Finally, its too prudent to pollute the air.
(No unburnt fuel around the engine means no
unburnt fuel to evaporate in the atmosphere. Even
the pollution from exhaust fumes is greatly reduced.)
Just think. When you get a carburetor-less
VW Squareback or VW Fastback, you not only
become the proud possessor of a sound body.
But of a brilliant mind.
MILLER-BROWN /ov
MOTORS INC. VfiF
4222 NW 13th Street IKK,"

Tuesday, July 9,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

L, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

WITH OPERATION CONCERN
1 ; ; i f i fm 1
Law School Offers New Program

By STEVE WHITE
Alligator Correspondent
The UF Law School plans to
make legal aid for indigents a
part of its curriculum this fall in
cooperation with Operation
Concern.
According to Frank E.
Maloney, Dean of the Law
School, the new professor for

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UF LAW STUDENTS
... can receive practical poverty training

Jimmey Bailey Chairman
Os CJF Wallace Supporters

By AL BRITO
and
JIM BUZBEE
Alligator Correspondents
Jimmey Bailey, chairman of the newly-formed
UF division of the George Wallace Party,
describes Wallace as the angry mans candidate
in the angriest nation in the world.
In an interview immediately following the
initial meeting of the Wallace group on July 2,
Bailey outlined its goals.
Our basic objective, he began, is to gather
support for and to elect George Corley Waflace
to the presidency of the United States.
Getting Wallace elected is the first step, but
the people wont elect just Wallace, because they
realize that the president cant do the job all by
himself.
People are fed up with violations of their
rights, and theyre going to do something about
it, continued Bailey.
The chunky former Holmes County
(northwest Florida) schoolteacher then stated his
views of the Kennedy-Johnson era.
Power politicians in Washington have
flagrantly violated the 1 Oth Amendment of the
Consitution (states rights). The federal
government is really a welfare state taking care of
people from the cradle to the grave.
Outlining the former Alabama governors
chances, Bailey indicated that he doesnt place
much stock in public opinion polls.
Ive talked to people from a number of states
and many have expressed support for Wallace
and what he stands for, he said.
Bailey, a mathematics major, feels that a split
in the popular vote would greatly enhance
Wallaces bid.
If the election goes to the House of
Representatives, Wallace already has 17 states
sewed up, claimed Bailey. AU he needs is 16

the program should be
announced within a few days.
Operation Concern was
initiated a few weeks ago in
Gainesville to help the
un de r p r ivileged find
employment, new opportunities
and a better way of life.
The Law Schools role will be
to offer legal aid to citizens who

more for election.
Carl Sanders, former Democratic governor of
Georgia, is currently standing in as running mate
for Wallace. However, according to Bailey, no
official announcement has come from Wallace
regarding the vice-presidential slot on the ticket.
The former Alligator staffer then lashed out at
media coverage of Wallaces third-party bid.
I really feel that the mass media are doing a
good job of hard-timing Wallace, said Bailey.
He either gets no publicity at all or is shown in
an unfavorable light. Why, every (Harold) Stassen
gets more publicity than Wallace.
Bailey pulled a leather wallet from his pocket
and extracted an article predicting the chances of
various combinations of major-party candidates.
You see, he said, Wallace isnt even
mentioned.
Bailey confirmed that he had been in contact
with Robert Shelton, Grand Imperial Wizard of
the United Klans of America. He spoke with
Shelton in a recent long distance telephone call
to Tuscaloosa, Ala.
He didnt have much to say about politics
other than, Everything is OK in Alabama. Hes
planning a speaking tour of Florida in the near
future, Bailey said.
Concerning his relationship with UKA, Bailey
stated that he is not now a memberand never has
been. He is, however, in agreement with some of
the organizations basic beliefs.
Theyre against Communism and their ideals
are based on a strong belief in Christianity and a
constitutional form of government. 1 agree with
them there, he said.
In the spring of 1967, Bailey traveled with
Shelton on a speaking tour. He later wrote a
series of Alligator articles on the UKA leader and
was instrumental in bringing him to the UF for a
Florida Union Forums speech.

cannot afford to pay.
Maloney explained that the
law students will actually be
enrolled in a course teaching
them to work with these cases.
They will work under the
direction of their professor, who
will be a member of the local bar
and qualified to try the cases
that develop into litigation.

The Bar Association of the
Eighth Judicial Circuit
(Gainesville Bar) recently
endorsed the program
unanimously.
The plan tentatively calls for
a four quarter curriculum with a
total of four hours credit. The
first quarter the law students
would act as observers and
investigators on a voluntary
basis.
The second phase would
involve a classroom course
covering the pertinent law and
problems faced by the poor and
the procedural problems that
would be faced by the students
assisting them.
This would be followed by a
clinical course in which the
students would interview clients,
recommend solutions to their
problems (to the professor) and
follow the client to court if
litigation is called for. All of
this, under the supervision of a
full-time faculty member. The
last phase would again be
voluntary participation. The first
phase is scheduled to begin this
fall with about 20 students.
A law student who worked
with a similiar program
sponsored by the Office of
Economic Opportunity last
summer in San Francisco, said
that many of the cases involved
domestic problems. As an
example, a mother might not be
qualified for welfare simply
because she had not received a
B
j I
m* A
MALONEY

Nursing Home Plans
Older Than'Sin City

Present day rumors indicate
that Gainesvilles recently built
$1 million Extended Care and
Nursing Center was constructed
in Sin City, 1000 S.W. 16th
Ave., to avoid zoning laws'
Had it not been for a rumor
four years ago that Alachua
General Hospital would move its
location to present day Sin
City the nursing center never
would have been built.
Administrator Thomas R.
Bruce Jr., said, We were here
first. There were no apartments
here when our plans for
construction of the nursing home
began.
Sin City thus far has
created no problems for the
nursing home and Bruce doesnt
think it will in the future.

divorce, even though she wasnt
living with her husband. Legal
Services helped her get a divorce.
Other problems mentioned
were landlord problems and
administration problems with
the Social Security or Welfare
Departments; often this would
mean just ironing out some red
tape.
This student emphasized the
importance of the training this
experience gave the law
students, and as Associate Dean
Leonard S. Powers, a UF law
professor, said, This isn't
one-sided. One of the criticisms
weve received in the past is not
having enough clinical
experience for the students.
The plans call for two offices;
one downtown and one at the
law school, as well as a full time
secretary paid for by Operation
Concern.
The implementation of this
program represents the efforts of
many people over several
months. Maloney tried
unsuccessfully to get assistance
from OEO two years ago and
had actually received approval to
appoint the professor before
Operation Concern came along.
However, thanks to
Operation Concern, the project
is beginning earlier than it
probably would have, and with
some assistance.
Research Aimed
At Vitamin D
RIVERSIDE, Calif.
A University of California bio biochemists
chemists biochemists research pointing to toward
ward toward a significant contribution
to mans basic understanding
of how vitamin D is used in hu humans
mans humans and animals.
Future results of his work
could provide chemists with a
substance less expensive to
produce and more effective for
preventing and treating vita vitamin
min vitamin D deficiency diseases, such
as rickets, a childhood disease
that impairs bone structure.
The scientist is Dr. Anthony
W. Norman, assistant professor
of biochemistry at UCs River Riverside
side Riverside campus. He is studying
under a grant from the Na National
tional National Institute of Health, a
branch of the U. 3. Public
Health Service.

lUeecTTurorsil
Jurors are needed by the
College of Law for practice trials
at the Courtroom Auditorium
on the ground floor of the Law
Building this summer.
There are no requirements for
being a juror except that the
volunteers stay for the duration
of the trial which begins at 1:45
and runs to approximately 10
p.m. with one hour dinner
recess, according to Herbert A.
Bargeon Jr., 4LW.
Trial dates are: July 11, 18,
25, and August 1. Appearance at
the time and date of trial is all
that is needed for jury duty, says
Bargeon.



Summer Softball Starts,Kings,Lammies Win

Softball began last week with
a wave of runs and many close
ballgames.
On Tuesday, the Renovators
defeated Microbiology 11-3 as

Rifle Team Forgotten,
A Sewer For Home
A group of campus competitors have recently finished a season
with 22 wins and only nine losses. They have represented UF in
matches all over the southeast, but the team is not considered a
varsity sport.
Repeated attempts for recognition of UFs rifle team by the
athletic department have failed, according to Maj. Russell W. Ramsey.
Almost all the schools in the SEC consider rifle a varsity activity, he
said.
Not so says Mandell Glicksberg, chairman of the Committee on
Intercollegiate Athletics. Rifle is a varsity sport at only some
colleges.
Ramsey, ROTC instructor and candidate for a Ph.D. in Latin
American history, also charged that Florida is the only school in the
SEC that does not have an indoor range. Glicksberg agrees that we
need an indoor range for the rifle team, but, We also have a crying
need for an indoor pool, not to mention the basketball court.
Recognition as a varsity sport means more than status, said
Glicksberg, You get into eligibility rules that I dont think the rifle
people are aware of. v
Composed of ROTC cadets, girls, and students at large, the rifle
team does not have to comply with SEC rules on team member
eligibility.
This is a problem that involves more than just the rifle team,
Glicksberg said. Soccer, gymnastics, and fencing are in similar
positions. All these activities are worthwhile and ought to be
encouraged, but not as varsity sports.
The athletic department gives varsity letters for participation in
these activities when requested, but follows the SEC policy as to
recognition as varsity status.
The SEC does not recognize rifle as varsity, and so neither do
we, Glicksberg said.
We are sympathetic to the rifle team, added Glicksberg. The
athletic department recently supplied most of the money necessary to
send a member of the team to the Olympic trials.
The athletic department and the military have a long history of
cooperation, Ramsey said. The professor of Military Science here
was once the head football coach as well Gen. Van Fleet.
" {

Fencing Squad Competes

The UF Fencing Club lunged
into the national fencing meet
recently in Miami. Campus
fencers competed in foil, epee,
and saber.
Sponsored by the Amateur
Fencing League of America, the
competition included male and
female, beginning and advanced,
and collegiate as well as
non-collegiate entrants. This
has been the first national
competition for the UF club in
many years.
The Amateur Fencing League
of America is made up of
sections which are composed of
divisions. Florida has several of
these divisions, and is included
in the southeastern section.
The UF clubs members
include faculty and staff, but
mostly students. Only one girl is
competing in the national meet.
Campus fencers have been
practicing in the gym at least
three nights a week. We go at it
very seriously, said Hunter G.
Jackson, Jr., 13year fencing
veteran.
Jackson, a researcher in
neurosurgergy at the medical
center, is competing in
individual and team foil.
In foil, the target is only the
torso, Jackson explained. The
whole body fingers, toes,
anything is the target in
epee. The target in saber is
anything above the waist.

Earl Shannon and Gil Nicolson
led the' way with a homer and
triple each while David Klapper
had two hits for the losers. Ed
Aigeltinger paced the perennial

this summer, Jackson said
the club wants to attract new
fencers who already have
experience.
A beginners class, however, is
scheduled to be taught by
Jackson in the fall. The class in
basic fencing will develop
stamina, footwork, and balance.

TUESDAYSPECIAI
K. a STRIP STEAK
5-8 p.m.
WITH:
Baked Potato
Fresh Chopped Salad
Hot Rolls & Butter
Reg. $1.65
TONIGHT ONLY sl.3s
WONDER
HOUSE
RESTAURANT
14 S.W. Ist St.
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
VEAL PARMESAN and A LOT of SPAGHETTI

powerhouse Old Timer team to
an 8-4 win over Delta Theta Pi.
Vasilio Kaklis and Rick Brown
each had two base hits in a
osing cause.
The Sugar Kings squeezed out
an 8-7 win over the Poage
Hounds as they held off a late
Hound rally. Bob Cohn had a
homer and two singles for the
Dogs while Ralph Fernandez
homered and doubled for the
winners.
The hitting star of the day
however, was big Mike Warren
who slammed three long home
runs in pacing The Losing Streak
to a 6-3 win over the Latin
American Club.
B. Hanny had a horher and
two singles in leading the Flavet
SCORE
BOARD
National League
w L pet
St. Louis 30 -639
Cincinnati 42 39 .519 10
Atlanta 43 40 .518 10
San Francisco 42 42 .500 1114
Pittsburgh 40 41 .494 12
Philadelphia 38 40 .487 1214
Los Angeles 41 44.482 13
New York 39 43 .476 1314
Chicago 39 45 .464 1454
Houston 35 48.422 18
American League
w L PCT GB
Detroit 55 28 .663
Cleveland 47 39 .547 914
Baltimore 43 37 .538 1014
Boston 42 38 .5£5 1114
Minnesota 39 42 .481 15
California 39 43 .476 1514
New York 36 43 .456 17
Chicago 34 44 .436 1814
Washington 30 47 .390 22

Tigers to a 6-3 win over tne
Dunkin Bill Hawkins,
Ron Gottlieb, and Paul Kaplan
each had 3 hits as the Leftover
Lammies smashed Newman Club
14-3. M.B.A. crushed Diamond
Village 13-2 behind Ron Bellers
two home runs.
In a real slugfest, Physics
came up with 3 runs in the
bottom of the sixth to defeat

SPORTS
v\ / vs:
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Tuesday, July 9. 1968, The Florida Alligator,

the Frappes 16-14. Walt
Caldwell and Ron Jessup had 3
hits for the winners and Nicky
Hall had the same number for
the losers.
Roy Forsythes homer in the
top of the seventh led the R.B.s
to a 4-3 win over Flavet No. 2.
444

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 9, 1968

we care
1151-1567...108 YEARS YOUNG
Two Convenient Locations
401 S.W. 2 Awo. l
1130 N.E. 16 Ave,

ANN PAGE
GRAPE JAM 2 LB. JAR 49$
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JANE PARKER DUTCH
APPLE PIE ,16 802 39$
0 A & P INSTANT 8
COFFEE z 89$
| WITH $5.00 OR MORE FOOD ORDER #
| EXCLUDING CIGARETTES. LIMIT ONE 0
ANN PAGE REGULAR
PUDDING LARGE 10c
ANN PAGE
HONEY 3 LB. JAR 95$
JANE PARKER
RAISIN
PLAIN RYE
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WHEAT SANDWICH
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1 LB. LOAF
4/89$
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ANN PAGE
MAYONNAISE ct. 49$
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FRANKS 12 or EACH 39C

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WATERMELONS 69$
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HONEY DEWS ch69s
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spanish BANANAS ib 10$
ANN PAGE
SOUP SALE
CHICKEN with RICE m oz
TOMATO RICE io% oz.
CREAM of MUSHROOM io% oz.
VEGETABLE BEEF io MIX OR MATCH
4/59$

| ARISTOCRAT I
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HEARTS DELIGHT
APRICOT
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35$