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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
r '' f ':
Probable Showers
High In The 80s
Low In The 7 0s

Vol 60, No. 158

ROTC MADE VOLUNTARY

&ap I JgffiS*TvWaF
'4tf *'^; |p|r J
COMPULSORY ROTC
. . often protested by students

UF Reaction-. 'Glee'

Word that the Board of
Regents had made ROTC
programs at state universities
voluntary was received with
surprise and glee by UF
administrators and student
leaders and with stoic
acceptance by UFs department
of military science.
Immediate impressions were
that ROTC would become
immediately and universally
voluntary at UF in September,
that the size and magnitude of
the ROTC programs at UF
would be drastically reduced,
and that it might cause a
disciplinary problem among
rebellious students.
Student leaders and
administrators praised the
regents for heeding the wishes of
the UF community.
Students and administrators
were happy that their opinions

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. . enrollment expected to drop about 65 per cent

The
Florida Alligator

and requests to make UFs
Reserve Officer Training
(ROTC) program voluntary
instead of compulsory.
Air Force Col. William Boaz,
commander of the Air Force
ROTC unit, warned of a possible
disciplinary problem.
If a successful completion of
two courses of ROTC training is
no longer necessary, for
graduation, military instructors
will have no more control over
their students than non-military
instructors. This may te
detrimental in matters of
military discipline, Boaz said.
Boaz also predicted a possible
60-75 per cent cutback in
student enrollment when the
program becomes voluntaiy in
September. The largest cutback
will be among freshmen and
sophomores; juniors and seniors
are volunteers, already.

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

But Boaz emphasized that
both the Army and Air Force
ROTC programs will adapt to
the wishes of the state.
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale called the
regents decision excellent, par
excellence. This ought to ease
things off a little, he said.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter, asst.
dean of academic affairs, said, I
happened to have been one who
felt that the compulsory
program was desirable. However,
in terms of national trends it was
the only thing we could do.
Theres a basic inconsistency
between a voluntary program at
FSU and a compulsory one here.
From that point, I see it as a
step forward, he said.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylors office released a
statement from Taylor thanking
the regents for responding to

Presidential Powers
increased By Regents
By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
The ROTC program at UF and the states other six universities will
become voluntary next September. The decision was made
yesterdays Board of Regents meeting in Pensacola.
In another ruling, the Regents gave the presidents of the
states universities the discretionary power in any case...to
summarily suspend a student from the university pending a BMP'? JMH
hearing contemplated by this (Board of Regents Operating |HL jHH
Manual) section. £.
In the past, a state university president could suspend a
student only after a hearing by the Board of Regents. rfit7
Dr. George W. Gore Jr., president of Florida A & M
University for 18 years, added to the action-packed meeting started drive
by submitting his resignation to the board. Gore has reached retirement age
and his resignation will become effective Sept. 15.
Voluntary ROTC will be in the best interest of national defense and of

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GORE
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the responsible requests of the
students and the faculty by
eliminating compulsory ROTC
at this campus and throughout
the state.

Inside
Student Senator Blasts
New Regents' Proposal
See Story, Page Two

Tuesday, July 2,196 S

the universities, said Dr. Burke
Kibler 111, Chairman of the
Compulsory ROTC Training
. Committee appointed by the
Board of Regents.
The ROTC program at UF
has been a compulsory curric curriculum
ulum curriculum for freshman and sopho sophomore
more sophomore males ever since the
schools inception in 1853.
A uniform voluntary program
for the states seven universities
was set up. UF and Florida A &
M were under compulsory
programs before the ruling;
Florida State University has
always had a voluntary program.
It was pointed out to the
board that the new ruling might
mean that Florida A & M will
not have enough participants in
the ROTC program to continue,
and this prompted the board to
ask FSU to consider a
consolidation of their program
with that of Florida A & Ms in
(SEE 'COMPULSORY' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!. Tho Florida Alligator. Tuesday July 2. 1968

Student Senator
Blasts Regents
New Proposal
By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator News Editor
UF students will have to go to city courts to express their views if
the Florida Board of Regents proposal to give university presidents
broad powers to limit demonstrations is approved, a member of UFs
Student Senate said Sunday.
Larry Martin, 3LW, a summer appointee to represent Off-Campus
Housing in the Senate, said if the president is given autonomy over
disciplining students, he can completely ignore the Student Code of
Conduct.
The Code will be reduced to a piece of paper, said Martin.
There will be nothing to limit the power of the body bringing
charges against a student. This is like the prosecuting attorney being
given the power to pass judgement.
Martin was referring to Regents Chancellor Robert B. Mautz
announcement last week that university presidents would be given
autonomous power to bring charges against a student and determine
his guilt or innocence.
This is a serious matter, said Martin. No attention is being paid
to student rights. It gives the president blanket authority to prohibit
free speech.
Martin also referred to the announced proposal to name the
university owner of student publications, such as the Alligator, instead
of publisher. This would allow the president to appoint a professional
board or person as publisher to maintain high standards of
journalistic responsibility consistent with the aims and character of
the institution.
Through this means, said Martin, the publications board,
appointed by the president, will be able to censor all criticism of the
university.
For a student to criticize the university, he said, a student
would have to hire an attorney and go through the courts. This is a
clear violation of freedom of the press and of student rights.
Martin said such proposals are cutting off all channels of free
speech, leaving open only two channels one of apathy, the other of
violence.
With the reduction of constructive channels, he said, the
destructive channels will become more prevalent.
Niayor Praises
Poverty Attack
Gainesville is cooperating as much as possible with Gov. Claude
Kirks Operation Concern, according to Mayor T.E. Williams.
This thing has just started and although it is in full swing, I have
not yet a report on it, Williams said.
Gainesville has got quite a few programs going itself, he
continued. Operation Concern is trying to bolster these programs
and make them better.
He cited the Jobmobile and Operation Clean-Up as phases where
Operation Concern will be able to work over and above what we
have. The Jobmobile is a mobile employment center whose services
are free for the jobless. Operation Clean-Up is aimed primarily at
improving the appearance of ghetto areas.
Mayor Williams believes Operation Clean-Up will be especially
useful because it may instill some interest and pride in the people.
HE'fixes EM FOR a LOT LESS
THAN YOU KNOW WHO... THEY
THINK THATS SORT OF DIRTY.
And besides being a heck Os course, he's fully
of a lot closer, he's factory trained.. .Who
usually a lot faster, toOo else would you let work
If you want, he'll on your very own bug?
pick your car up and
deliver it when it's fixed.
(No need to mention he's
equipped forail VW
repair and maintenance .)
in> *f.i maibb i mem i 55 tmwwaaa&t at Uilnnlty of Florida
and | pffiMffiqd ttf ttmot wookljr wrapt during Juno, July and August whon It Is piMlshod
aantt -mTtlt and dw!i student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
*ftM**m ft their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Halts
Union BsUdtag. Uidverslty of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, SMOI. The Alligator is entered
as second class natter at the United States Foot Office at Oalnesvllle, Florida, IS6OI.
Subscription rate is 914.00 per year or 94.00 per quarter.
Its Florida Alligator rase tree the right to regtfate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
Its Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement
lsvolvlM typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Adverwithin
within Adverwithin (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
oot be responsible tor more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to rwi several times. Mottoes tor correction must be given before neat insertion.

Compulsory ROTC Abolished

non PACE out Jj
order to keep both programs
alive.
The student conduct ruling
made by the board will
drastically increase the scope of
the university presidents power.
It has, in effect, given the
president the right to
instantaneous action in any
matters discrediting the
university.
The statement goes on to
read:
The conviction of a student

IN CONSTITUTIONii=^=a|
| Increased Tax Burden Seen 1

By MARGARET O'BRIEN
Alligator Copy Editor
Tax provisions in the
proposed state constitutional
package will cause an increased
tax burden for those without
the ability to pay while
eliminating popularly supported
corporate income taxes, two
Gainesville political leaders said
Sunday.
The constitutional package
was under consideration Sunday
by a joint House-Senate
conference to iron out
differences in bills passed by
both houses. The conference is
expected to complete its work
within seven days.
The final product will be
presented to the public in a
November referendum, which
will virtually rewrite the entire
constitution.
Both Gainesville men
criticized what they called
special interest lobbyists for
their efforts in killing private
and corporate income taxes,

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for criminal offenses involving
personal misconduct of a kind
that interferes with the orderly
process or operation of the
university, or of a kind which, if
condoned by the university,
would reflect dishonor or
discredit on the university, shall
be sufficient grounds for
suspension or expulsion of
students.
In other business taken up by
the board, the presidents of the
state universities have been given
the power to appoint either a
board or a private businessman

which would furnish badly
needed state income.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the UF political
science department and designer
of the present state legislative
apportionment system, said he is
definitely against the new tax
proposals.
Dauer attacked the proposed
constitution package for not
providing for private or
corporate income taxes, and for
setting a 30 mill tax limit on ad
valorem taxes. The 30 mills are
to be divided equally between
the city, county and schools in
Florida counties.
It will be very bad, Dauer
emphasized. If will cause an
increasing sales tax which will
fall much more on those without
the ability to pay.
The people would be ready to
accept a corporate income tax,
Dauer said, but the interest
lobbies have kept it out of the
new constitution.
State Senator J. Emory
Red Cross of Gainesville has

to exercise presidential control
over all student publications.
In the past, the presidents
had to exercise direct control
according to Regents policy.
In addition, the board
changed the role of the
university from pubfisher to
owner of the various divisions of
student publications.
This move will enable the
president to name his board as
publisher of student
publications, enabling it to have
the role previously assumed by
the university by authority of
the president.

. jfflHr fm
: Ifil
fin
DAUER
V
... opposes proposals
been extremely critical of the
tax structure of the proposed
constitution.
We have too many
exemptions from taxes in the
new constitution, said Cross.
We left those that were already
there and added some new ones.
Cross feels that many voters
do not see a need for a revised
constitution to replace the
present one written in 1885.



Two UF Students Injured
In Airplane Crash Sunday

Thomas Hutchinson, lUC,
was listed in fair condition in J.
Hillis Miller Health Center
Monday morning after an
aircraft in which he was a
passenger crashed north of
Palatka Sunday.
Two other occupants of the
plane, J. D. Meyer, 7AS, and
Bodil Maria Lodin, 29,
Gainesville, were treated for
minor injuries in Putnam
Memorial Hospital in Palatka
and released.
Hutchinson was taken to the
Health Center to be treated for
possible brain damage. Sources
in the Health Center reported
that Hutchinson appeared to be
out of danger.
The plane, a Cessna 172
Skyhawk said by the Florida
Highway Patrol to be piloted by
Meyer, was called a total loss.
Fragments were spread over a
July 4
To Test
New Law
July Fourth will be the first
holiday weekend for testing
Floridas new implied consent
law to keep drunk drivers off the
highway.
The new law says that by
obtaining a license and driving
on the highway a person has
given his consent to submit to a
test of breath, urine or saliva if
arrested for drunk driving.
According to the American
Automobile Association and the
Florida Association of
Broadcasters, approximately half
of all fatal holiday accidents in involve
volve involve drinking drivers.
Authorities hope this figure
will be reduced by the new law.
A refusal to Be tested can result
in a six months suspension of
the drivers license.
This law, effective July 1, sets
standards for determinging when
a person is under the influence
of alcohol to the extent that his
If a chemical test shows that
a persons blood is 0.1 per cent
alcohol by weight, he is pre presumed
sumed presumed guilty.
If the reading is more than
0.05 per cent but less than
0.1 per cent, the person is not
presumed guilty but he can be
convicted.
Experts agree that a couple of
beers, or drinks, would normally
result in a reading well below
0.05 per cent.
Girls Wanted
Florida Blue Key needs UF
coeds to work as secretaries for
Jomecoming 6B. Girls
interested in working should
report to the Florida Blue Key
office in the Student Activities
Center on the 3rd floor of the
Reitz Union, or call Patty
Larot, 378-2938 evening.

75-foot area.
The craft crashed at 11:45
a.m. Sunday in a heavily wooded
area in the St. Johns Harbor
development north of Palatka.
The three occupants had rented
the craft from the Four Winds
Agency at Gainesville Municipal

Fine, Kirkland
Not Registered

Robert M. Fine and John R.
Kirkland, who were arraigned in
Alachua Circuit Court last week
on charges of possession and sale
of marijuana, are no longer
enrolled as UF students, UF
administrators said recently.
Kirkland did not register for
the summer quarter and has not
applied for a fall appointment.
Fine registered but cancelled
his registration during the first
week of classes. He was to
graduate from the College of
Journalism and Communications
in August.
Fine requested that his
registration be cancelled, said
Dean of Men Frank Adams.
Fine had not been able to

Legislature Unlikely
To Lower Voting Age

By MARGARET O'BRIEN
Alligator Copy Editor
A provision for 19yearold
voting in the Florida Senates
version of the proposed state
constitution is favored by two
local leaders in political circles.
In the view of Manning J.
Dauer, chairman of the UFs
political science department, its
a great idea, but the
controversial issue has little
support in the legislature as a
whole.
State Senator J. Emory
Red Cross (D-Gainesville),
has voted for the provision, but
has declined to speculate on its
future.
I think the proposal for
19-year-olds voting is
especially important in Florida,
Dauer explained. We have more
people over 65 than the rest of
the country. Youll find many of
them not acting on questions,
like voting for school bonds,
that are real problems for much
of the younger group.
He doubted, however, that
the provision could win out over
a 21-year-old voting age set by
the House of Representatives
Letting younger people vote,
Dauer said, would help to
balance off age grouping
imbalances. But the legislature as
a whole is more conservative, he
concluded.
Cross said Sunday that the
issue was very controversial and
has not been included in the
package of constitutional
provisions.

Airport and had decided to visit
friends in Palatka.
Representatives for Four
Winds said only that the plane
was on a private flight and that
the crash was still under
investigation by the Federal
Aeronautics Agency.

attend classes because he was in
the Alachua County Jail, Adams
said. He had been concerned
about not being able to attend
classes, according to Adams, and
did not know when he was going
to get out of jail.
It is not an unusual procedure
to allow a student to cancel
registration and have fees
returned when he hasnt
attended any classes, Adams
noted.
Kirkland has pleaded guilty
to the charges of drug possession
and sale and is awaiting
sentencing. Fine has entered a
plea of innocent to the same
charges and will be tried in
September.

Instead, the voting provision
is designed to be a separate item
for the public to consider when
it votes on the new constitution
in the November election.
Cross said he had voted for
19-year-old suffrage when it
passed the Senate. He mentioned
that when the provision had
passed, a subsequent proposal
was made for 19-yearolds to
be allowed to purchase liquor
and enter into contracts. These
proposals, Cross said, were
quickly killed.
The question was being con contemplated
templated contemplated Sunday by a Con Conference
ference Conference Committee reconciling
the differences between the two
houses versions of the consti constitutional
tutional constitutional provisions.
Union Board
Head Resigns
President of the Union Board
Ed Koren has resigned to work
in Rep. Edward Gurneys
campaign, according to a
statement made Sunday by
Union Program Director Robert
Dawson.
He resigned from the
board, said Dawson, because
he was withdrawing from school
to work for Rep. Gumey in his
bid for the Senate.
Koren was in Washington
D.C. and unavailable for
comment.
Bruce Harlan, public relations
chairman for the board, will be
sitting in for Koren until the
s%dent elections in the Fall.

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Tuesday, July 2, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday July 2, 1968

(""TO SOLVE TRAFFIC PROBLEM I
UF May Use Fee System

By MARK LEIBOVIT
Alligator Correspondent
Though officials say there are
no immediate plans for
instituting parking fees at UF,
*fee charges are highly probable if
the parking problem on campus
is to be solved.
A study of campus traffic
problems has been under way
for several months by Arnold F.
Butt, associate director of
campus planning.
The study will present data
on surface and structure parking,
main thoroughfares, pedestrian
ways, and proposals for moving
vehicular traffic to and from
campus as well as on campus
streets.
Butt called attention to a
national survey of 118
educational institutions in which
68 per cent charge for campus
parking.
These figures vary for
students from $5 to sls per
year for commuters and S2O to
$25 per year for resident
students. Fees for faculty and
staff range as high as sllO per
year.

Local Liquor Sales Down

Long considered a prime
barometer of the Alachua
alcohol business, Gator thirst has
dropped off since the end of the
third quarter.
Maris Distributing Co., a large
beer wholesaler, has seen a 3 Vi
per cent drop in its sales to
stores patronized largely by
college students, according to
manager Clyde Tanner.
Phil Burgio, manager of
Triangle Beverage Mart No. 2,
says students provide over half
his business during the regular
school year.
At Triangle No. 2, beer sales
are off 45 per cent, keg beer
sales more than 50 per cent, and
party set-ups show a 25 percent
decrease.
Owner Byron Winn of the
Winnjamer and Thirsty Gator
bars said he is suffering a 10 to
20 per cent decrease in business.
Spokesmen for ABC Liquors,

TUESDAY SPECIAL
LONPON BROIL STEAK
uittMm
CHOICE Os POTATOES WW*
I ROUS 80TTIR
l,m lARRV'S
1225 W. Univ. Ave. x /% Block From Campus

*******
mm z
UF'S TRAFFIC PROBLEM
...will fees eliminate it?

Examples include: Illinois,
S6O; UCLA, $72; Wisconsin,
$36; Minnesota, $110;
Washington, S4O, and
Pennsylvania, SSO. Student cars
are not permitted on the
University of Illinois campus
during the daytime class periods.

Inc., and United Liquors, Inc.,
indicated their businesses were
also affected by the summer
exodus of 12,000 UF students,
but would not comment on
specific sales damages.
Most owners and managers of
Gainesville establishments agreed
that the drop-off in employment
of faculty and staff, as well as

BAY 90 s
Under New Ownership-Foimerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 om to 2 om 1011 W. Univ. Ave

Ramp Engineering Associates,
who conducted a UF traffic
survey last year, showed that the
average car is on campus for
only 30 minutes. The solution is
one of traffic flow not
parking, the campus planning
office said.

the vacation season, affected
their business.
Proprietors said the volume
of beer sold generally increases
during the warmer summer
months, while liquor sales go
down.
In winter the sale of liquor
again picks up because of
increased prosperity in the city.

Campus pLuniu* calls for a
maximum ot 25.1UX) students in
its estimates for peripheral
parking and buses. Monorails
have also been suggested as
possibilities to relieve campus
congestion.
The University of Georgia is
now considering a monorail
system to relieve traffic
problems. Under the proposed
arrangement, students and
faculty would park their cars in
peripheral areas and ride a
monorail to class.
The UF study, said Butt, has
convinced him that the parking
problems solution will require a
fee system. Income for such a
system will be needed for
building additional surface or
structure parking facilities and
maintaining them. Also, these
funds would be used to operate
an intra-canfpus bus line
monorail to run from the
parking areas to the center of
campus.
Butt, who plans to release
findings of the study in
September, emphasized that the
broad concept of campus
planners is to keep a pedestrian
campus and not to permit the
automobile to destroy the
natural beauty of university
grounds.

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now
PRICES
APPLY ONLY TO
SALE SHOES
fNr.fflftcftelf*
1127 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE!

Union Offers
Fun Courses
To improve yourself and have
fun this summer, contact the
program office at the Florida
Union. Courses in painting,
bridge, and photography are
available through August 16.
Painting for Fun," for
beginners and experienced
artists, costs So for eight lessons.
The class meets Tuesday nights
from 7 jo 9:30.
Beginners Bridge, meets
Tuesdays from 7 to 9:30 pan.
and costs $6 for eight lessons.
Duplicate Bridge meets
Sunday afternoons from 1:30
Photography meets Monday
nights from 7 to 9:30 and costs
$5 for eight lessons. Photography
requires a camera with an
adjustable lens.
Classes began June 17, but
according to the program office,
it is not too late to sign up.
Sales & Service
typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
YJMMttJI
553
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Moin 376-5551



jfejj SitvetoMifo
Cook out, entertain, or
lounge in this Patio Dress by s
Lanz. The blouse is green
organdy, and the skirt is a
flowered pique print. Pink f
sandals by El Greco. Modeled f
Be daring and bold in a smart m *.
2ace pant sat. Bodice in solid m W, 1
black with lace knit sleeves I {/1
cotton, completely washable. I ''' \
shell and straight belted skirt

Tuesday, July 2, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 2, 1968

Puffeahv
'Ra td
All
AhM/UIM.

Kill The Bill

We congratulate the Student
Senate for its action in sending
Senate Bill 68-1043 to its Judiciary
Committee for further study.
Bill 68-1043 is Senator Ira Hatchs
bill to create a sub-committee of the
Senate Investigations Committee to
control publications paid for with
student fees but not under the
control of the Board of Student
Publications.
It was inspired by the Arab-Gator
bitter articles against Israel and
inadvertently provided the
r EDITORIAL
m a chinery Fo r the first real
consorship to menace UF student
publications in months.
But it has been sent to the Senate
Judiciary Committee, where
hopefully it will die. Even its creator,
Hatch is having second thoughts
about it now.
And the bill should die. It usurps
the power of the Board of Student
Publications (BSP), which receives
sole authority for student
publications from the president of
the university.
It also provides means to outlaw
expressions of controversial opinions
in publications paid for with student
fees but not licensed by the BSP.
Is freedom of expression a
privilege granted general circulation

A Restless Youth

Your birthday is Thursday, but
you arent showing your age. One
hundred and ninety-two years, and
scarcely a sign of the passing time
shows.
True, you have involved yourself
in your longest, dirtiest, most
unpopular war. And your
long-opppressed minorities have
finally, forcefully and loudly
demanded their share of the Great
Society. And you seem to enjoy
killing your best leaders.
As a result, you havent made
many friends lately.
Many say that your youthful spirit
of freedom and human dignity is
dying as you become older. They say
that the land of the free and the
land of the plenty cannot co-exist
within you.
But they are wrong.
Wars, like diseases, can be cured.
The medicine must be found.
And the rioting minorities, who
angrily shake their clenched fists at
you, may prove to be your greatest
help towards maturity. Out of the
charred rubble of your broken cities
may grow the fruits of freedom for

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Steve Hulsey
News Editor

Tka Florida Alligator's official poaltloo on laauas Is expressed
only la the columns below. Other material la tUs Issue may
reflect the opinion at the writer or cartoonist aad not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically Indicated.

The
Florida Alligator
**To Let The People Know 99
Harold Kennedy
Editor

publications but denied weaker,
unprotected ones?
We think not. It is a right for the
powerful and the weak, and it shall
not be usurped.
The Arab-Gator controversy did
stir up one old problem, however.
And it was this one, we believe, that
Hatch attempted to deal with.
There are some 120 student
publications on this campus
unfettered by any uniform control at
all. They are club newsletters, special
interest magazines, and living area
newspapers. Most are inexpensive,
crudely published affairs with very
small circulations.
But the University is legally
responsible for their content.
The BSP, then, faces a perplexing
problem, a veritable Gordian knot
which must be slashed loose.
It must find a method of insuring
that all student publications on this
campus adhere to laws applicable to
publications in Florida, and yet it
must refrain from limiting opinion,
no matter how unpopular it may be.
The problem for the BSP, which is
already straining to meet its present
commitments, is difficult. But a
solution must be found if free and
responsible expression for students is
to be protected.

all men which you once displayed so
proudly to the world.
This cannot condone the death
and violence you have fostered. But
even the pain may yet yield progress.
The riots are at least proof that
your people will not let your spirit
of freedom die.
The wars, the riots might not
they be the signs of your restless
youth? Your voyage from
adolescence to maturity has been
painful.
But the road must be traveled and
you must find solutions for your
ugly wars and your plagued
minorities.
You have found in this century
that you are a powerful and idealistic
giant. You must learn to use your
newly-flexed muscles wisely, so as
not to hurt your weaker neighbors.
With maturity will hopefully come
wisdom. The road has not been nor
will it ever be an easy one. But you
ARE learning.
You have lived many years since
July 4, 1776. And despite a few
blemishes, you still wear the badge
of hope.
You are still America, the
Beautiful.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
i |1
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

iifw fi?/ y vMym
tWi tWii
i tWii f u- Ml,
sThe Fifth Column=3SHHSHHs^^=sHSHi
Short Hitters 1
Jason Straightdl

- For five days after Robert
Kennedys assassination the
Campus Book Store had a poster
in the window with a likeness of
a political button inscribed I
Hate Democrats.
- We seem to have a budding
cult of personality here at UF.
There is a large glossy of UF
President Stephen . OConnell
in the Union Barber Shop*
- Lets Make a Deal with
Monty Hall has to be the
funniest daytime T.V. show
going. A better title would be
Lets Be Greedy.
- If youre looking for a new
way to measure your material
success, see how often you have
to wait in line for anything. The
longer and more often you have
to wait, the less successful you
are. (This of course excludes
Communion.)
- I have yu > sje a girl look
better than just all right in
culottes.
The Gainesville Police
Department has to be the best of
its size in the country.
-- The law school has courses
like Legal Method, Legal
Accounting, Admiralty and
Military Jurisprudence, but
somehow it doesnt feel the
necessity or obligation of
carrying a course on Civil Rights
Law. Earl Warren,... whos he?
- I can understand somebody
being for what they think
Wallace stands for; but I cant
comprehend an educated person
seriously believing that Wallace,
the man, is capable of being
President of this coumry.
- We wont have a revolution
in this country anymore than
France will because the great
majority of the people are
content and thus afraid of
change. But as long as the
working class in France and the
poor people in this country are

relegated to a second-class
citizenship, with no realistic
hope of some upward mobility,
then youll always have the riots
and general strikes.
-It looks as though both
pennant races are going to be
over by mid-July, and that is
going to be hell for attendance.
But after the disgusting way the
club owners acted during the
Kennedy mourning period, I
cant say that Im sorry.
- l wonder if Clyde Taylor is
still going to hold a referendum
on Student Government. I
understand a recent president of
the FSU student bbdy ran on
the same promise and then
weasel ed' out via a
constitutional loophole.
- The quarter system is
killing the off-campus apartment
owners. In the past they could at
least count on capacity rentals
through the A term, but now
most of them are lucky if
theyre half-full. So dont be too
surprised when the new
accelerated rent plan goes
through in September.
-- Dubbies got a new
hard-rock band called the
Youngermen. Good heavy
driving beat.
- If some business students
want to pick up on some extra
coin they should start a
sandwich shop near the new law
school ~ it opens in September
with 1000 students and no
restaurant closer than Kings.
Sandals can be very
comfortable in the summer, but
if you wear them youre going to
get fishy looks from our future
well-respected men you know,
prima facie youre an American
hating hippie. Funny thing is,
you leam far more about them
by their reaction than theyll
ever know about you ans your
irrelevant sandals.
- Pushin.



Yes Mother, Plenty Os Vitamin C And Lots Os
Physical Activity.

I OPEN FORUM: 1
Aitiiti mi ViAAwt
There is no hope for the complacent man, I

Thanks For Interest

MR. EDITOR:
Thank you for your interest
in Operation Concern. It was
a pleasure meeting with you in
Gainesville on Thursday, and I
look forward to your support
and involvement in this program.
As you know, I have taken a
personal interest in this project
and will be closely watching the
progress in Gainesville to

a nmnMMERRY-GO-ROUND eacooBB
'No Hard Feelings
Drew Peorson Jack Andersonog*

WASHINGTON For the second time in two
months, two burly sergeants pinned down Pvt.
Richard Decker the other day while an Army nurse
inoculated him contrary to his religious convictions.
His beliefs are so devout that, rather than submit
to the second round of inoculations, he deserted the
Army and came to us to explain his reasons. He was
willing to serve in Vietnam or accept a 20-year

... linjftf-' ' j
jk v I m
PEARSON

Stanley Resor, who took the case up with his top
generals.
He called back to report that they had decided
Decker would have to be inoculated. We appealed to
him to reverse their decision, and he agreed to
reconsider the case. While he was reconsidering, here
is what happened to Decker.
He was summoned to see Lt. Col. Clark Williams,
the post Surgeon General, who explained the
medical reasons why he should take preventive
medicine. A chaplain also tried vainly to persuade
Decker to submit to inoculations.
The slight, sincere young soldier said he felt the

sentence at hard labor, he said,
rather than violate the Lords
commandments.
We persuaded him to return
to his post at Fort Knox, Ky.,
and promised to intervene with
the Army in his behalf.
Although we disagree with his
religious views, we told his story
to Secretary of the Army

determine the effectiveness of
state agencies to assist local
citizens and their local
governments.
Please keep me informed as
to any suggestions or criticisms
that you may have so that we
can work closely together for
betterment of the residents of
Gainesville and Alachua County.
CLAUDE KIRK, GOVERNOR

same way about compulsory inoculations as the
chaplain might feel about being forced to commit
sodomy.
Suddenly two large sergeants entered the room

and attempted to seize Decker.
I tried to run through
them, said Decker. There was
a struggle as they grabbed hold
of me. They tried to pry and
pull my arms apart. I kept
squirming and pushing, trying to
get away. They finally broke my
grip and pulled my arms apart. I
kept pushing the best I could

until I finally pushed one of them up against a
corner of the room.
Then both men wrapped their legs around mine
so that 1 couldnt push or kick anymore. The one
man held my arm so I couldnt move at all. The
nurse gave me one shot. As she started to give me
the second needle, I was able to pry loose enough to
squirm a little more. But the men held me even
tighter, and she put the second needle in the same
arm.
*The doctor got an eye dropper which was filled
with red liquid (polio vaccine). The doctor took my
bottom lip and pinched it as you would put a twitch
on a horse. He pulled my bottom lip down. I kept
my teeth together, so he put the medication
between my teeth and my lip.
After the ordeal, Colonel Williams grinned,
grabbed Deckers hand and said: No hard feelings.

LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

BPp wjm
ANDERSON

Rockefeller Best
For White House

MR. EDITOR:
Recently Governor Nelson A.
Rockefeller launched a vigorous campaign
in quest of the nomination for the
Presidency of the United States.
Judging from the public opinion polls
this is not an isolated effort of the
Governor and a few loyal aides, but rather
it is an effort supported by a large segment
of the American people. Republicans,
Independents, and Democrats alike. Indeed
such popularity is not unwarranted.
Gov. Rockefellers qualifications for the
Presidency are unmatched by any other
candidate. His experience is extensive
covering both domestic and foreign affairs.
Rockefeller has held positions as:
Assistant Secretary of State for Latin
America; Under Secretary of Health,
Education, and Welfare; and Special
Assistant to the President on foreign
affairs; as well as participation in the
creation of the United Nations and the
Point 4 program.
As Governor of New York, a position to

SPEAKING OUT
Why Gun Misuse?
By Regina Rainey
I have a few comments to .address to Mr. Harry Beckwith,
author of last Fridays (June 21) Speaking Out column.
Mr. Beckwith, I could not agree with you more. What we
have in this country today is indeed a people problem, a
problem that I feel concerns the entire society and not merely
its criminals.
After all, Mr. Beckwith, how do criminals inherently differ
from such enlightened individuals as yourself except in
defective socialization thereby leading to a defective adult
personality? As for the law cracking down on crime and
untying the judges hands, 1 would like to cite a quote from a
sociology textbook used at this university, The Family In
Social Context, by G. R. Leslie:
' Yet it is inherent in the nature of human social
organization that the threat of force is a far more effective
deterrent to deviation from approved behavior than is the
actual use of force. In fact, the need to use force on any great
scale is likely to be symptomatic of ineffective social
organization.
Would this not seem to indicate, Mr. Beckwith, that an
entire re-evaluation of our societys value system is necessary
rather than a mere crackdown on criminals?
The following is also a quote, this time from Dr. Karl
Menninger, a renowned psychiatrist:
Furthermore, almost at the same moment that crime
prevention agencies are assuring the public that crime never
pays, the police departments of many of our larger cities
openly proclaim their intention of using criminal methods in
handling criminals ... The American public is periodically
shocked by such frank confessions on the part of prominent
individuals that criminal acts are permissible, providing favored
individuals commit them.
This mental reservation that others should not commit
crimes but for me it is all right is a characteristic element in
American psychology ... The truth of the matter is that we
Americans believe that crime does not pay if you get caught.
This is just another instance of our societys not practicing
what it preaches, Mr. Beckwith. In short, I would like to
suggest that instead of untying the policemans or the judges
hands, lets untie the psychologists hands.
Admittedly, it takes a long time to produce change in a
cultural value system that has been hundreds of years in the
making, but would this not be closer to an actual long-range
solution of the problem than would getting tough with the
criminal?
He is, after all, a product of die environment in which he
lives, just as you are, Mr. Beckwith.
Youre right! A gun law is certainly no answer to the misuse
of guns in this country. We need to know why the guns are
being misused, and if the answer lies in our cultural
inheritance, then that should be the starting point in effecting
an adequate solution.

Tuesday, July 2, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

which Rockefeller has been elected three
times, he has pursued moderate policies
much to the dismay of the left and right.
His programs for education (half the states
budget), water and air pollution control,
and mass public transit have been widely
aclaimed and demonstrate the Governors
ability to handle urban problems.
Due to his experience in state
government and his support by business.
Rockefeller is in an excellent position to
use the full resources of private enterprise,
state government, and national government
in solving today's social problems.
The Governor's ability to disassociate
himself from past administrations, his basic
pragmatism and willingness to change
programs or goals if necessary, and his
moderate views make him the candidate
best able to bring the hostilities in Viet
Nam to a peaceful and honorable end.
For the same reasons lie is the candidate
best able to unify the country.
WILLIAM J. DENNIS, 7AS

Page 7



Hamiurgerans a 23
SeX*' Kelthap . i- 13
Potato Chips.. x 49* W/^<*A. -2J
Charcoal c 79*
HM Drinks .. 3 89* !|L !=§ fl?WfiLSaP
Mayonnaise r 49* j= ==- i c ** ,Jr
MMMl#M N t > CMSl|li(W!l iSL. Zw I £ZT WiiUtO SOUSOjfB SMM */
JKSLIIU-lU.lw*? ES- E=cr- E=-£T Paper Plates. .. r 79*
Draft Beer *£ 89 EHETZ. EsSL Instant Upton's *? s9'
imoivi
kM ftfllUl/Q I We reserve the
Mkf^inAvj DBai^^B
NeMsce hurt Treet!
Sferhey'e Chorceel .
Utcr Fluid rt 39< ***
Kraft'> Bmai Mbit* MeM Fnw Ceeeeene
PeWtlem Green Giant neeeipm* I ______ J_ A
Mnicotn '29- Cretan Cheese
hniwiM Wrcum VIICCSC Strawberries Vi 39
Shoe Peg Corn 'iT 29* 3 ** *1
WMi Onions Gffoon Oioot
GfCCn Peoi *IiT 29 r#nMne* Cleb Grade A Florida
Stuffed Olivet iT 39* Medium Eggs Si || V
Sweet Relish 'ir 23* *> v i UJ^ji^-
l*'i!l s il!FS EJ^i*l^! I FS IT|M ''fnjSm
*£?? i[ s& | sk i mAIJDp^
tenrinim. Mr .teen || (Biwoei wm.nnra.uen j [ tiwMiMHMrsim
'



down produce lane j
Tomatoes "£ ' 49' ICES E,FECTIVE MON
Crapes J9 *>3 ,9S
Juicy Sun-Kist
Cantaloupes . 3 > 99' j
in our meat dept.
2fcw# ... ic J 5 vm Vjft
Slicedacon .. £ 49' lj^/o^^
T 1. T . t|| C|. . *""*" f Mill '***~^**^ o*' 0 *'
TareeWs Tatty Sliced 5-o*. 10-o*. 16-os.
Bologna 25'.. 45'.. 59'
Not just dinnerware, but
fine porcelain. .
Bar-B-Q
I Pork Steak .. :: 69 s I fl HqXIjIQSA Real S
I l lbs 69* 4J W'raa China
** I lil ftrll 1913 s
I London Broil. c1 I \AbV T^dr 11
I Swift's Premium Preten Beef English Cut
riSte # delicatessen treats ____
Micious or
Testy Old Fashion Recipe
Twly Lmk Cooked
PRICES GOOD AT:
2630r^ust 2630r^ust_
_ 2630r^ust_ .. .V. .-....
1014 N. Main Sf. 125 SW 34th St.
Gainesville Shopping Westgate
Center
.
m, t .j&Mfc



m wwwwwww -
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
3fcsssa^^^^^
FOR SALE: Vespa 1965, 150 cc,
Good Condition, $115.00. Call
3766086. (Als7 2t-p)
TOPCON SuperO with f 1.4 lens.
Fiaest TTL meter system. ExceWent
for scientific and professional. List
$420.00. Sell for $220.00. New. Call
3763578. (Als72t-p)
PLAYFUL kitties. Part-Siamese,
partPersian. One grey, fluff* one
long haired black, one calico. 8 weeks
old. Healthy. Have been de-wormed.
Call 3782077. Address: 3205 N.W.
14th St. (A 157 4t p)
Guns GUNS GUNS Inventory
ever 460 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
ftWG. DEALER, MICANOPY
4563340. (Als4ttp)
DEPENDABLE 1967 Honda 5O,
1100 miles. Like new side basket
$170.00. 3788397 or see at
702 ll5 S. W 16th Ave.
(Als6 5t p)
GERMAN Shepherd Puppies, AKC,
excellent pedigree. Black and Tan, 1
Silver. Males and females. $75.00 and
MP. 372-7061. (A-155-st-p)
- 1
GUN SALE GUN SALE GUN
SALE. MY FIRST GUN SALE IN
EIGHT YEARS lO% DISCOUNT
ON GUNS AND AMMUNITION
FROM JULY Ist THRU JULY 6th
BUY NOW WHILE YOU STILL
CAN. HARRY BECKWITH GUN
DEALER, MICANOPY FLA. 466-
3340. (A-157-3t-c)
>
GIRLS 3speed bike $25.00, 170
lbs. barbells, $15.00, Fan $4.00, 110
S.W. 4th Ave. Weeknights after 5
p.m. (Als3tp)
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS.
Quality food for low prices. Hungry
Students stop by L & W Cafeteria,
313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (Als22otp)
Air Conditioner for VW Beetle 6v.
$150.00. Call 372-8197.
(A 155 6t p)
21 G.E. TV in solid cherry console
525.00. Three Fanon intercom sets
55.00 per set. Three speed G.E.
16 Office fan. $15.00. Cast
aluminum Smoke cooker and
Bar Bque Grill used once
$40.00. Tourrobe luggage by
Hartman 520.00. Phone
3785736. (Alslt-p)
fiox Office OpanT^TToQ-jir^^^B
** 1 mm :
hi B
I DEAN MARTIN
STELLASTB^SI^iJ
- u sunt
WEDNESDAY
vnioc
SbOtM.
Il 7:00 & 9:00 OUT 10:40
STARTS THURSDAY. |

| FOR SALE §
nk£
LUXURY on wheels. 1968 Hillcrest
Mobile Home. 12* x 44*. 1 Bedroom
furnished $3795.00. Phone
3725267 after 5:30 p.m. and ask
the many included extras.
(A 157 stp)
SPECIAL! Metallic Blue 1968 Honda
Scrambler 90, 2800 miles, 8 months
old. Superior condition. Just tuned
and adjusted. Plus helmet and helmet
lock. Originally $470.00 value for
S3OO or SIOO.OO and take up
$13.00/mo. payments for 15 mo.
Call Mike at 376 9769.
(Als2tp)
FOR SALE: 1967 60 x 12, Custom
built, completely furnished two
bedroom, Homette Mobile Home.
Down payment SIBOO plus $79.00
monthly payments. Call 3762894.
(Als B3t p)
FOR SALE: New Ranger 14 watt 4
and 8 track solid state car tape
player, pair of custom mounted
acoustic suspension speakers, pair
miniature speakers, noise filter.
$75.00 compare anywhere! Cali Rick
at 3767873 after 5 p.m.
(A 158 2t p)
MOBILE HOME 10 x 50, 2 bedroom,
Air Conditioned, fully carpeted new
furniture, 10 x 20 patio cover, 3x5
utility shed, $2500, No. 47 Hickory
Hill Park 3722795. (Alslt-p)
;£:-X->X-X-X-X<-XiXW;v.*X-X-XO-X>SSWMWC
FOR RENT i
ttx.%Nxx-x-x-:-x-x-x-x-xx;xx*x-x-xxcx RANCri HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Airconditioned. 2
Bedroom lto Bath CBS ll
Miles S. W. University 5125.00/mo.
- Phone 4952186. (Blssstp).
UNIVERSITY APTS, now renting
for Fall. Swimming pool, close to
campus, fully furnished, AC apts.
Efficiency Apts. $75.00
85.00/month Uncarpeted 1 bdrm for
SIOO./month. Carpeted 1 bdrm
SIIO.OO/month. New 2 bdrm.
$120./month. See at 1524 N.W. 4th
Ave', or call 376 8990.
(B 157 15t p)
ROOM for rent in lovely home,
walking distance to University. Male
student. (B-155-st-p)

IlgjgjffiEilSS) tomorr ow
/ i..i 3-^
1 1 GAU GRAND OWNING 8:15 PM
CONTINUOUS FROM 2 PM IjpJ^^
. N \| M continuous
COLORbyDeLuxe |

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 2,1968

Page 10

:^-x-x>xosesis9!Brx > : < K*fi<<44os > x WANTED |
!i-x*x-x-:-x-xi*x*x->x-x-x-x-x-:-;rx-x-:*x-xi:
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
$75.00 for entire summer. Have own
room in house with T.V,, stereo. 1
Block from campus. 3729592.
(Clslt-p)
FEMALE roommates for July til
$36.50 per month and ¥ utilities.
Share House, 1708 N.W. 10th Ave.
3722048. (Cls6-stp)
BABY SITTER needed: Boy 13 mo.
needs care Mog.Thurs. mornings
7:45 12:45 our home or yours
Please call 37614 15.
(Cls62tp)
YOUNG FOREIGN female student
willing to do light housework or
babysitting in return for lodging
place. Call 3786086 after 5 p.m.
(Cls7 3t-p)

)) Main Entrance u
GAINESVILLE MALL f |
I CaratntUaY <&*£ 4 j
OTSfinP^l
|7conin.ntd i | £T~ Rovio,i Pizza |)
(@ / Finest in gourmet food \ jj; BUI Ec / Hew* 5)
1(3 Beers and ftkmr *=ij|| *H: AM*B:3OPM Mon.-Set..j 3(
)p NvExcellent Service II
||yyJJy!l!j UU |^j_jLjyL^i
| Gainesvilles Finest ||
I) and Most Intimate )]
ww > II

f HELP WANTED^
OUTSTANDINGLY qualified,
competant bookkeeper for
Construction firm proven ability and
experience a necessity. Call'
3769950 days or 3782000
weekends and evenings,
(Els7tfc)
HELPWAN IED MALE: Men's
Clothing Salesman, part-time.
Discount privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Dept. Stores, Inc.
(Els2tc)
;v-x*x*x-x-:-x-x-x-:-:-x-x-x*x-x-x-x-x-x-x-:->:;
1 AUTOS |
Ax-x-i-x-x-x-x-x-xixwx-x-x-x-i-xisrJxc*:-^-
*64 XKE Coupe goiu wan red
leather interior. 4-wheel disc brakes,
new tag. 21,000 miles. $2790.
378-2993 evenings. (G-155-st-p)

C autos J
FOR SALE: 1966 MGB Good
condition wire wheels Luggage
Rack Tonneau top A steal for
$1,450. Must sell before leaving
states. 3787148. (Gls62tp)
19 62 Pontiac Tempest
Convertible, $250.00 or best offer.
Good engine, top and transmission,
needs some body repair. 1956 Ford
very dependable, $200.00 or best
offer. Call Don
llth St. (G-155-6t-o)
1965 Pontiac Bonneville 9 passenger
Station Wagon. Automatic
Transmission, Power Brakes and
Steering. AC, Roof Rack Excellent
Condition. Original owner will sell
this fine car for $2300. Phone
3785736. (Glslt-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIED

AUTOS
1961 PLYMOUTH Wagon, White,
six-cylinder, standard transmission
Good Mileage, Mechanically sound,
asking $325. Mobil-eer Trailer Park,
Behind Lot 19 Call 3783375-
(Gls 6 3t p)
FOR SALE: 1966 MGB Excellent
Condition Wire Wheels Luggage
Rack tonneau top $1350. That is
$275.00 below blue book Price. Call
Fred 378-7148. (Gls2tp)
.v.v.v.v.vx x*x*x*x.x.x*x.v.vx*x*x x*x*x\£
PERSONAL
:y.v.*x*x'x*x*x.x.x.%%vx*x.x<*x*x*:::
travel TO MEXICO! The Reitz
Union is going to the Yucatan
Peninsula, Why not come along?
Escorted by Bilingual guides in
private cars, 8 days 7 nights of
exciting sights. If you might be
interested, give us a call at 2741 or
come by 310 Reitz Union. Deadline
is July 10. (Jls Blt c)
MUSIC LOVERS: Dont miss the
London Symphony Orchestra
directed by Andre Previn at Daytona
on Sunday, July 27, 1968. SB.OO per
person includes round trip bus fare
and concert tickets. Call Program
Office. Ext. 2741 for information
and reservations Deadline Friday July
12, 1968. (Jlslt p)
WANTED: Coed with interest in
sports cars, capable of navigating on
rallies. Low wages, frantic working
conditions. 376 8464.
(Jls7 2t p)
| LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Prescription Sunglasses June
14 in or outside Research Library.
Small reward but great appreciation.
378-7082. (L 158It p)
$50.00 reward No questions asked
for information leading to return of
all taken from Graham Apt.
Sentimental value 0n1y... Call
3760203. (Lls Bst-p)
ONE OF THE 10
BEST OF 1967!
'THE
HUNT'
SHOWS AT 7 &9:15
SUNDAY
AT THE UNION

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, July 2
Program Office: Bridge Lessons,
150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Program Office: Painting for
Fun, 118 Union, 7 p.m.
George Wallace Party: Meeting,
346 Union, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, July 3
Florida Speleological Society:
Meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 4
Christian Science College
Organization: Meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Yoga: Lessons, Towers C, 9 p.m.
Friday, July 5
0 ~\
Florida Folk Dancing: Dancing,
214 Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 6
Program Office: Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C Union, 1:30
p.m.

C*x*x "">WIWW X.X.WWM*X;
SERVICES
X X*X*XW**rt*X X DONT MISS CLASSES, EXAMS!!
Wake up on time!! Call Phone Alarm.
378 6994. 13:30 p.m. or 8:30
p.m. on. (Mls4tp)
WANT
ADS
JJy ?
room, pm
VALBNTMO
m SON F THI 1m ami?
SHIER- AtP
i Tvcsmt Jm.v 9

Sunday, July 7
Florida Cinema Society: "The
Hunt," Union Aud., 7 8c 9:15
p.m.
Monday, July 8
Photography: Lessons, 118
Union, 7 p.m. Taught by
Nick Arroyo
Florida Cinema Society:
"Son of the Sheik," Union
Aud., 7,8:30 & 10 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets will go on sale Monday,
July 8, for the Lyceum
Council presentation
ROBERT MIN FORD, 50
cents for students and SI.OO
for faculty, staff and general
public. Tickets are now on
sale for Florida Cinema
Society subscription tickets.

iw*x*t.wtv.vx*x*x<-x*:x*x-xxx?x*x*x*x*x*x
SERVICES
>.HSSS'*X*X*X.X.V.XXX*XX.X.:.V.-X\X-X-X*XX'
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs, Auto Electric Service*
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (M 153tf c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
THESIS, dissertations and short term
papers typed in my home. Pica type
and Spec. Characters on typewriter.
Telephone 4663338, Micanopy,
Florida. (M 1536t p)

I | | " w w
fan '- "" *"
J J Feature starts at 1:00 4:40 8:15
{ 233 W. Urniversify Ave. |
The movie z
and the music
ALEC GUINNESS
fAM Hill mil GERALDINE CHAPLIN
IUI lUUIIg RITATUSHINGHAM
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From the years A mWm I
most exciting motion picture
comes the years ~ I
most popular music- ..MmmMaKwm
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DAVID LEAN S FILM OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCTOR ZHiIAGO
in panAvision* and metrocolor J

I Rocfcfaf Cfcoir Twlw J
KaEyUuLJH Feature starts at 2:00 4:36 7:12 9:38
I 101 SN. Vi. 13th St. | T
Hie Green Heim's
Their badge of honor was a green beanie
and it said they had lived it a11...
The night jumps, the ambushes,
the hand-to-hand combat, the operation
they called Sky Hook...and
the long nights of terror
they filled with courage.
i f JIN', *. t y, *l' --i< V£ .vfev/V.>
I JOHN DAVID
1 Wayne Janssen 1
.


Reach I||1 || Q}
THE yy
1 I AMINCE* 7
USE ImjnJ VaJa^w
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR



E, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 2,1968

Page 12

POLL SHOWS
Students Skeptical
Os Taylor And SG

By CAROL BALKANY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government in general, and Student
Body President Clyde Taylor in particular, seem to
be separated from the students they serve,
enshrouded in a cloud of mystery and anonymity,-
according to a random poll the Alligator conducted
recently.
But Taylor disagreed with most of the students
interviewed.
Clyde Taylor? Whos Clyde Taylor? asked Rod
Grover, 3AGF.
I havent seen Clyde Taylor since the election,
added Cleste Ponushis, 3JM. He managed to
contact the student body before and during the
campaign, but where is he afterward?
A few students who knew about SGs activities
were strongly opposed to them.
1 firmly believe that Student Government has a
place at the UF, claimed Bill Moore, 3JM. It
keeps people like Clyde Taylor and other student
politicians busy and away from places where they
could do harm.
Moore cited inefficiency .. waste of money in
the handling of student funds, and projects the
Student Government has sponsored as major
failures. Look how much money is lost every year
through the Union Board, he added.
Student Government is a self-contained
hierarchy that perpetuates itself, added Miss
Ponushis. Robert Givens, lUC, and John DAmore,

Gvilles Blacks Divided
On Operation Concern

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Correspondent
Gov. Claude Kirks
Operation Concern may really
be concerned about poverty
conditions in Gainesville, but he
must prove it.
Many members of
Gainesvilles Black community,
the group largely affected by the
project, are not yet aware of the
project. Most of those who do
know of it are skeptical of the
project, Kirks motives, and the
extent to which the project
attacks their problems.
Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins,
leader of Gainesvilles Black
militants, calls the project,
Tokenistic .
Its just something to keep
the nigger (sic) cool during the
summer by giving them an ounce
of hope, Dawkins said.
Dawkins doesnt believe Gov.
Kirk is concerned about
Gainesville. He labeled Kirk a
power hungry mad-mogul,
who came here, to build
himself up politically and keep
the ghetto cool.
It wont be successful
anyway, Dawkins said.
Theyre trying to get to the
kids and not doing anything to
better the mamas and dads.

YUCATAH pennsla {272
An 1 25 DEPOSIT DUE JULY 10
Sept yjjk
CALL 2741 or COME BY
310 REITZ UNION

The operator of a Black night
club doesnt share Dawkins
view. She believes Operation
Concern is a marvelous thing
to happen to us.
Roosevelt Branch, who
operates a pool room on NW sth
Ave., has talked previously with
the governor about Gainesvilles
problems.
I think what hes
appropriated would be great bit
of help to the people, Branch
said, because this is a new
frontier. Something like this has
never been tried before.
Branch feels that Gov. Kirk
has left at least one area out of
his project underemployment
at UF.
Thats one of the main
places he should hit right square
in the face, Branch said.
Rev. T. A. Wright, president
of the local NAACP, is highly
skeptical of Operation*:
Concern. He discussed the
project with Gov. Kirks aides
who told him they would like to
combine their efforts with
community efforts already in
progress.
Wright said he welcomes
anybodys sincere help. He
hopes the project is not some
kind of publicity stunt where

lUC, said they didnt see much purpose for SG.
Other students took a stance in the middle of the
road.
Clyde Taylors okay, said Tom Staley, lU£.
He hasnt done anything spectacular, though.
I think hes trying to fulfill his campaign
promises, said Bob Stahmann, 2UC.
Its not whats hes done, its what hes trying to
do, claimed Mary Wagemaker, lUC.
Two SG activities, Project Grey and Project
SAMSON received support from one student.
I think theyre a start, said Willie Rawls, 3JM.
Perhaps theyll enlighten students ... let them
know its time for Student Government to involve
itself in problems around Gainesville.
Many other students, however, did not even
know Project Grey and Project SAMSON existed.
They blamed a communications gap between SG
and the student body.
I only know what I read in the Alligator, said
Givens, and that isnt enough. DAmore felt that
posters or billboards of some kind would help
publicize SGs activities.
Don Peterson, lUC, stated, There just doesnt
seem to be too much contact between Student
Government and the general student body.
William Benet, 2UC, agreed. There may have
been a lot of projects that affected me, but I just
dont know about them, he claimed. Fletcher
Paschal, 3PH, and James W. Lee, 2UC, both felt that
SG ought to publicize its activities, v

you promise a lot and do
nothing.
If you really want to do
some good, Wright told the
aides, why dont you have the
governor do something about
the low wages at the UF and at
Sunland?
Wright believes this is perhaps
the most important area the
project should cover.
In the long run, this would
actually solve a lot of other
problems, he said.
However, Wright believes the
project could work. He thinks
the key is the Black middle class.
The middle class Negro who
has arrived so to speak, needs to
be a part of this project in order
for it to succeed, he said.
Rev. Wright summed up the
sentiments of many of
Gainesvilles Black citizens. He
compares Gov. Kirks project
and Gainesville to a man raking
his yard who is offered help by
his neighbor.
The man has started already,
but his neighbor wants to help
and the man welcomes him,
Wright said. Weve started so he
comes in with his aides to help.
We welcome their support. But
our yard will still be there when
hes gone.

1 bp*
MBHot
**' jMMHHHHHHHHHHHHHHIIHB
STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT
... mystery to students
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9 DAYS-8 NIGHTS
August 31st-September Bth
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See Fabulous SANTA MARTA
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call house of travel at
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Some Models $ 9 Q 95
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GUARANTEED LOCAL
OPEN TILL 9p.m. DURING SALE
- 712 N Moi 376-7110



- J 3g IBHH f¥
VISITORS GREEreD
UF humanities professor Dr. Robert Carson and his wife will be the
weekend caretakers of the recently restored home of Pulitzer Prize
winning authoress Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.

Case Os The Walking Cane

Dave Swords walking cane
seems to have walked off again.
Swords, a pre-vet major, was
riding his motorcycle by the
Carolyn Plaza two weeks ago
when the cane he had been using
to support himself while he had
a broken leg fell off.
About a week later, the cane
turned up in the Florida Book
Store. Friends noticed the cane,
Gab Bag
A new column called Gab
Bag will be printed for the
benefit of all campus
organizations wishing to
publish their activities. These
activities may include such
items as election results,
awards, new members, social
events, etc.
Deadline time is noon
every Wednesday, The
Florida Alligator office, Reitz
Union. Please place
information in the Campus
Living basket.

Mon s Department Son/wj. Infr Su/mm/i 2tii I
DRESS & SPORT SHIRTS J§wf
$6 value reduced to / I
$3.49 or 3 for $lO
mutt I
solids, tattersalls, stripes
long A short sleeves ApOnTAIOMJV I
* bcCtldifM Auuti ffiHjS I
SWIM SUITS
$5 to 58.50 values now up to 1/2 off V / I
$2.99 so $4.99 j A
SHOES If
were sls to S3O | I
now I
$9.99 to $19.99 Jutiurrsity iWfopl
in loafers, brogues, dress shoes mm |

which is quite distinctive, and
searched for Dave, but he wasnt
in the store.
Swords is still looking for the
cane, a family heirloom. He is
offering a reward and can be
reached at 378-6281.

I QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49< SPECIALS X
EVERY DAY
JR.SEIF SERVICE NO TIPPING T

By LORI STEELE
Alligator Society Editor
IN LOOK AT GEORGE;
SEE HIM RUN: Tonight the
George Wallace Party will gather
in room 346, Reitz Union, 8
p.m.
IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR
POLITICS: Tonight, Student
Senate meets in room 349
6:3 0 11 p.m. Action
Conference meets in room 355
Reitz Union, 2:30-3:30.
IN WE AINT DOWN YET
BUT WE ARE!: Wednesday,
Students for Humphrey meet in
room 355 Reitz Union at 7 p.m.
while those cavers, Florida
Speleological Society, meet in
room 346 Reitz Union at 7 p.m.
IN NOT ANOTHER
MEETING?: Wednesday, the
Union Board meets in room
150 F Reitz Union from 4:155
p.m. and the Union Board
Program Office meets in room
1508 from 4:156p.m.
IN OPPOSITE WORLDS:
Thursday, the Christian Science
College Organization gathers in

Whats Happening

room 357, Reitz Union at 7 p.m.
and at 9 p.m. Yoga lessons will
continue in Towers C.
IN KINGS, QUEENS, AND
FOLK: Friday, the Chess Club
checkmate in room 118 Reitz
Union at 7 p.m. while Florida
Folk Dancers Fling fastly in
room 214 Florida Gym.
IN ALLAH, ALLAH, ALLAH:
Also on Friday, Muslim Students
will hold a prayer meeting in
room 121 Reitz Union from
12:30-1:30.
IN GAMES PEOPLE PLAY:
Sunday, those interested in
Duplicate Bridge will meet in

CHARTER TRIP TO:
The Florida International ; ;
Music Festival l|K
FEATURING : BBBVHBH
Jj p Condon rrljptra
Prabuby Auditorium. Baytima Srarh
SB.OO Per Person. Includes: I
Round trip bus fare, concert tickets.
C CENTER AISLE ORCHESTRA SEATS )
bus leaves J. Wayne Reitz Union
I RADIO RO. ENTRANCE) AT 4(00 P.M., SAT., JULY ST
CONCERT TIME 8:30 P. M., RETURN AFTER CONCERT
TIME ALLOTTED FOR DINNER HOUR IN OATTONA
For Retervetions Coll: Program Office, Reitz Union,
Ext. 2741, BEFORE FRIDAY, JULY 12

Tuesday, July 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,

room 150 C Reitz Union at 1:30
p.m.
IN STUDENTS ABROAD:
Sunday, Brazilian Students
Dinner will be in room 150 D
Reitz Union from 6-8 p.m.
while the Muslim Students meet
in room 357 Reitz Union from
23:30 p.m.
IN CAMP, MAN, ITS CAMP:
Also on Sunday, the Florida
Cinema Society Camp Film
Festival will feature Rudolph
Valentinos Son of the Sheik
at 7,8:30, and 10 p.m.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday July 2, 1968

Style Unnamed
iu t Its Grea t

By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviewer
Its hard to praise someone
without going overboard. But if
one ever had had any doubts as
to the ability of lan and Sylvia,
they were all erased by Saturday
nights performance.
No introduction was needed
- they came on stage singing,
and their voices spoke for them.
Never, in all my years of Florida
crowd-watching, have I seen an
audience so captivated by a
group of performers. After
twenty minutes of encores, the
applause was still deafening.
Critics have described Sylvia
as serene yet vibrant. She is
beautiful. With her waist length
brown hair, and wearing a simple
white minidress, she visually
blended the old Elizabethan
ballad music which she loves,
with the folk-rock of today. And
lan, who likes to keep up the
cowboy image, has a manner
Film Festival
Next Week
Some of the campiest
movies ever made will be seen at
the Union next week during the
Cinema Societys first annual
Camp Film Festival.
The Films to be shown are:
Monday, July 8, Son of the
Sheik, with Rudolph
Valentino; Tuesday, July 9,
Platinun Blonde, starring Jean
Harlow; Wednesday, July 10,
Gold Diggers of 1933, a
backstage musical; Friday, July
11, King Kong, the camp
monster movie of all time.
A poster contest was held
early in the term to publicize the
event, and the entries will be on
display in the second floor lobby
of the Union all week. Prizes for
the best poster will be awarded
next week.
There will be three showings
of each film, at 7:00, 8:30 and
1:00 each evening. Admission is
25 cents.

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i i
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IAN AND SYLVIA

about him which immediately
puts everyone at ease. Theyre
comfortable people; the kind of
performers you can relax and
enjoy because theyre relaxed
and enjoying themselves even
more than you.
And their music ... In spite of
poor sound equipment, guitars
which are used to 40 degree
below weather, and the
unairconditioned suffocating
atmosphere of Florida Gym, lan
and Sylvias songs rang out in
their inimitable style which is
almost impossible to describe.
Its sort of a cross between
country and western, and yet it
captures the nostalgia of blues
and ancient ballads as well.
We dont really know what
to call our style, Sylvia
commented backstage, we just
like to hope its our own.
Highlight of the evening
(believe it or not) was a broken
guitar string. Until a new string
could be found, they were
forced to sing acappella (without
any accompaniment), and
brought to life an old English
hit from the pop charts of
17 68. Sylvias voice is
frighteningly bitter-sweet; lans
strong and endearing. Together,
they have a sound which is
jarring, wailing, yet perfectly
harmonious.
lan and Sylvia take their
songs from everywhere. From
the Little Beggarman (an Irish
folksong from Newfoundland)
to the songs of Dylan, Tim
Hardin, Leadbelly, and Charley
Badger Clark (the poet-laureate
of South Dakota!), the lan and
Sylvia style makes each
rendition unquestionably
unique.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
for ENGLISH IN ACTION
to meet each week
with a student or
trainee from abroad
for English conversation
practice.
1 or 2 hours on
Mons. & Weds.
from 4 to 8 p.m.
at BSC 1604 W. Univ. Ave.
Please come in or
call 372-4711
during above hours
1 for an appointment.
Mrs. Bernice Harvey

Plaza No. 2 Opens

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Gainesvilles second twin theatre will open
Tuesday night. Located in Fields Shopping Center,
the Plaza Theatre has expanded and now contains
two auditoriums.
The opening of this second twin theatre gives
Gainesville a first. The Plaza Twin Theatres will
be the only ones in the world that contain a dual
computer-run operation.
These computers, located in the two projection
rooms, perform the functions normally given to the
projectionist.
The computers were developed because there is a
shortage of projectionists and also because the one
necessary monitor can take over other duties in the
theatre such as checking the temperature in the
auditorium and actually listening to the sound in
the audience.
The computers are capable of opening and
closing curtains, lowering and brightening house
lights, signaling when malfunctions occur and
projecting the film.
Although the computer, once in operation, runs
itself, it takes several hours of programming to
prepare a single for showing. At various intervals
along the film, codes are inserted to signal the
mechanical operations.

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?^£*^alnesvill^^^hon^37B-231^^^^J

According to Harris Beck, the theatres
projectionist, one man can monitor the two theatres
during the showings. This situation has been
approved by Local Union No. 360 of the
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes
and Moving Picture Machine Operators of which he
is a member.
The Eprod Company of England makes the
computerized projector. Beck contends that the
machine contributes to a better picture because the.
entire movie plus shorts and previews is contained
on two one-hour rolls of film. Under the
old system, the film was on six 20-minute rolls. This
means that instead of five projector changes during
a movie, there is now only one. *'
makes this single change with such speed that it is
completely unnoticeable.
The new theatre officially opens Tuesday night.
In Plaza I The Private Navy of Sgt. OFarrell will
be showing with Gina Lollobrigida, Bob Hope and
Phyllis Diller.
The premiere night of Plaza II brings Faye
Dunaway back to Gainesville in her newest movie
with Steve McQueen, The Thomas Crown Affair.
This is producer Norman Jewisons first film since
his Academy Award winning In the Heat of the
Night and should be a good movie with which to
open a new theatre.



Paul Varnes Appointed
As Successor To Cherry

According to Dean Dennis K.
Stanley of the College of
Physical Education and Health,
Dr. Paul Vames has been
appointed as associate professor
in the college and recommended
to fill the vacancy in the
department of intramural
activities and recreation.
Pending Board of Regents
approval, Vames will be the new
director of intramurals replacing
H. Spurgeon Cherry who died of
a heart attack June seventh.
Dr. Vames had worked under
Cherry for three years as
program director when he
worked on his doctorate degree
at the UF. He was recommended
and appointed by Dean Stanley
and assumed his position on July
first.
The new professor received
his degree here in curriculum
and instruction education. And
since leaving Florida has headed
the Title 111 physical education
center in Ocala that serves five
counties including Alachua.
Trapp Makes
It Official
Its Football
Richard Trapp, UFs
double-sport success, finally has
decided on a professional
football career.
Trapp, who was the third
round draft choice for the
Chicago Cubs, signed with the
Buffalo Bills of the AFL
Saturday. Trapp cited the longer
baseball season as one of the
reasons to choose a grid career.
Trapp is the leading single
game, season, and career pass
receiver in UF history. He has
twice been named all-SEC in
baseball and football.
I grew up in baseball,
Trapp said, but I like football
equally well. I feel that the
baseball season is longer, and
wears you down physically.

/ Jv THE FREIGHT TRAIN
Vm
// ] 1 tobaccos candles
J and
?) \ / other fine merchandise
-4ow open next to'Carolyn Plaza

His duties as intramurals head
will primarily be in the
supervision of clubs, dormitories

Do Athletes Cash In?
Not At UF Ellenson
By AL BRITO
Alligator Correspondent
Theres no such thing as an athletic scholarship at the University
of Florida, said Asst. Coach Gene Ellenson, as he outlined
little-known facets of the Universitys athletic recruiting program.
All scholarships provided to UF athletes are on an academic basis,
and few people know that a coach has no power to take a player off
scholarship, he said.
Infractions involving training or other rules can be punished by
demotion to the B team or in extreme cases, by dropping a player
from the squad, but only the University Scholarship Committee can
terminate a players scholarship.
A better illustration can be found in this hypothetical situation,
suppose we sign a prospect to a full grant-in-aid and the athlete is
injured in his first year to such an extent that he cant play again. His
scholarship continues for the remainder of his four years in college
even though he is no longer affiliated with the Athletic Dept.
Referring to recent newspaper reports concerning the granting of
excessive aid to athletes by some colleges, Ellenson remarked, Ive
been coaching college football for 17 seasons, in that time Ive signed
at least 100 players to grant-in-aid scholarships and I have never seen a
case where excessive aid has been granted.
On the contrary, many of our players must work during the
summer months to earn money to stay in school.
University of Florida grant-in-aid scholarships are limited to
providing room, board, tuition, fees, and sls monthly laundry
allowance.
All aid granted must conform to strict SEC rules governing this
area.
In addition to conference guidelines, the Chairman of Athletics, a
faculty position outside the Athletic Dept., is charged with seeing that
the UF measures up to all rules concerning scholarships. Professor
Mandall Glickberg, College of Law, currently fills this position.
We are also limited /in the number of grants we can award,
Ellenson continued, according to SEC guidelines, we cant award
more than 40 in any given school year.
The ceiling on grants is set at 140. So our recruiting is limited not
only by a yearly total, but also by a cumulative total.
Grades are a major determinant in selecting prospective high school
seniors. The NCAA and the SEC both have requirements based largely
on grade averages and test scores which must be met before a player
may be signed.
By far the most stringent, however, is the Universitys requirement
of a score of 300 or better on the Florida Senior Placement'Test.
Each individual player must be certified as eligible by the faculty
athletic chairman before a grant can be awarded.
In the final analysis, observed Ellenson, an athlete comes to
college, first, because he wants an education, secondly, he comes to
college because he has a desire to play ball.

and independent groups for
intramurals and the orange and
blue leagues.

SPORTS
SCOREBOARD
AMERICAN LEAGUE J NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB W L Pet. GB
Detroit 48 27 .640 St. Louis 46 30.605
Cleveland 42 36 .538 IVi Atlanta 39 36.520 6H
Baltimore 38 34 .528 8& San Francisco 40 37 .519 6 Vt
Minnesota 38 35 .521 9 Los Angeles 40 38 .513 7
Oakland 38 36 .514 9 X A Cincinnati 37 37.500 8
California 37 37 .500 10 Vi Pittsburgh 36 36.500 8
Boston 34 38 .472 12& New York 36 38.486 9
New York 33 39 .458 13& Philadelphia 31 34.478 9&
Chicago 31 40 .437 15 Chicago 33 41 .446 12
Washington 27 44 .380 19 Houston 32 43.427 13&
__________________ tr
II uatood
II FMSN raOM y||
|> EVERY MONDAY 41
P and TUESDAY 1
I OLDE FASHION I
FISH & CHIPS
I 1 Served In a Basket l
I Fresh Ocean Fish Breaded in I
j Our Kitchen and served in the 1
f Olde Fashioned English way. j
I Hush puppys Cole Slaw I
Try Our Arabic 6alad As.
| LOBSTER Pto
I HOUSE | I
Serving Daily from S P.M. i
lIT Sunday* Fm 4.00 ta 10:00 il
||V GAINESVILLE OCALA M I
ijy\ 3500 SW 131 H Hwy. 301. *4l Mm
. St. an Bivan 27 South JEjjjjm |
Arm lali* ' mile *auth
I BfeX Ph. 37* 2931 of Holiday Inn

Tuesday, July 2,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



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5 HARD CORN FED WESTERN
1151-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG I ODAPCPIPO Ao>
Two Convenient Locations J WljMkPfc PI PP 8
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SPECIALS
SUPER RIGHT ALL MEAT SKINLESS
FRANKS AT. 49<
SUPER RIGHT VAC. PAC. SLICED
SALAMI 6 OZ. PKG. I
SPICED LUNCHEON sc
PICKLE LOAF eoz. pkg.
YOUR CHOICE
3 for 79{
JANE PARKER
POTATO CHIPS >* 59{
HORMEL i
SPAM IZozCAN 534
V
HEAVY DUTY
WONDERFOIL 25ft roll 45$
HUDSON SHOWCASE
NAPKINS 60's SPECIAL 104
OLD DIZ
CHARCOAL 20 "> 59 4
YUKON CLUB ASSORTED REG. & DIET
BEVERAGES 24 /$1.49
s-S'
HELLMANS (EXTRA SPECIAL)
MAYONNAISE 49$
SULTANA
PORK&BEANS 394
1
A&P VIRGINIA SALTED
PEANUTS I lb. BAG 594
A&P SPANISH SALTED ~ n
14 OZ.
PEANUTS can D O V

U.S.O.A. "A" QUICK FROZEN, TENDER PLUPAP
YOUNG TURKEYS ::: 39<
SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS COOKED
CANNED HAMS ::: $3.29
GRADE A" FRESH FLA. or GA.
FRYER BREAST 39*
LEG QUARTERS V

ljC FROZEN FOOD Y
If SPECIALS J
W 4/49< I
Wr CUT GREEN BEANS /
lit CUT CORN J
{ftp MIXED VEGETABLES!
Mr GREEN PEAS j
jvflL All In Butter Sauce j
JUMBO VINE RIPE LUSCIOUS
HONEY DEWS EACH 69$
LARGE CRISP ICEBERG
LETTUCE 194
FRESH SWEET WHITE SEEDLESS
GRAPES 394
RED RIPF
WATERMELONS EACH 694
LARGE VINE RIPE
CANTALOUPES 3/SI.OO

DEL MONTE
FRUIT DRINKS
A&P
ORANGE
DRINK
A&P
GRAPE DRINK
A&P
TROPICAL
PUNCH
DOLE
PINEAPPLE DRINK
GRAPEFRUIT IVI IN IV
DOLE
PINEAPPLE HDIMIf
PINK GRAPEFRUIT DKIIMK
1 QT. 14 oz.
3/79<
MEL-O-BIT CHEESE
SLICES
AMERICAN
SWISS
PIMENTO
soz. 29$ 12 55$
DAD'S
ROOT BEER % gai. 49c
SULTANA
GRAPE JELLY 21b. 39<
SULTANA SLICED FREESTONE
PEACHES Voz. 3/SI.OO
IONA HALVES
PEARS 2 ib. 802. 2/29*
TIP TOP
LEMONADE 602. 10$