Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 90s
Low In The 70s

Vol. 60, No. 156

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PER-ERIC f /RDQUIST
WAUBURG QUEEN
Lovely Pam Pemberton, a sophomore from Tampa, is crowned Miss
Wauburg, 1968, at festivities at Lake Wauburg Saturday.
Pam is a member of Alpha Delta Pi and was sponsored by ATO
fraternity.

Gators Win First NCAA Team Crown
* *>
.. See Story Page 11


H *.
B I j^B
B \ JM B

(EDITORS NOTE: Ernie
Litz is a former Alligator editor
and student presidential
candidate. He holds a bachelors
degree in history and political
science and a masters degree in
counseling psychology and
personnel services from UF. He.
is currently working on a second
masters in public relations and
advertising. This is the first of a
four-part series excerpted from
his forthcoming book.)
By ERNIE LITZ
UF student politics is a
combination three ring circus,
Socratic dialogue and Chicago
gangster showcase, all rolled into
one. It represents the very best
and the very worst. Student
Government itself is an amazing
phenomenon; it is cursed and

The
Florida Alligator

MAKING OF A PRESIDENT, 196 U
Beer for Breakfast

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

By GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
University presidents have
final authority over matters of
student conduct, Atty. Gen. Earl
Fair cloth ruled in a legal opinion
handed down last week.
Presidential Assistant Melvin
L. Sharpe declined to comment
Sunday on the opinion which
supports UF President Stephen
C. OConnells stand on student
conduct.
OConnell requested the
opinion from Faircloth last May
when the UFs Student Conduct
Tickets On Sale
For SG Frolics
Folk-singing duo lan and
Sylvia will be the featured
performers in Friday nights
Student Government Summer
Frolics.
Tickets are selling for $2
per person and may be
obtained at the Reitz Union
Box Office and the Record
Bar.

blessed, blamed and rewarded,
sought and ignored.
There are three basic phases
to a typical UF student political
campaign: first there is the
involvement of various members
and groups within the mens
honoraiy organization, Florida
Blue Key. FBKs involvement
includes commitments between
fraternity and independent
groups making pledges to one
another to let in certain
people at the next tapping
session, as well as bargaining for
the next FBK election of
officers.
Second are fraternity-sorority
bloc vote commitments. These
are based on promises for
appointments upon victory, and
subsequent entrance into FBK

FAIRCLOTH RULES
Presidents May Set
Conduct Standards

Committee rejected a directive
from the president restricting
their authority.
In the legal opinion sent to
Chancellor Robert B. Mautz,
Faircloth affirmed OConnells
right to establish rules for the
student committee to operate
under.
This statement of law,
Faircloth said in the opinion,
may be taken by each student

Student Named
Carnegie Hero
UF student Jerry D. Hatfield, 4ED, was named last week one of
three Floridians who will receive a bronze medal and $750 from the
Carnegie Hero Fund Commission.
Hatfield, 21, was cited for his heroism in scaling a 100-foot
scaffold last Oct. 11 and persuading a former roommate not to carry
out a suicide attempt.
Hatfield, who received a citation from UF President Stephen C.
OConnell at graduation exercises two weeks ago, is classified as
occupationally blind. He wears thick-lensed glasses.
Yet, soon after classes began last fall, Hatfield climbed
construction scaffolding at the NASA building in the da/k of night
and talked his despondent friend out of a threatened suicide jump.

| or Mortar Board, the womens
honorary.
Third is The Alligator. This
has generally been an unknown
factor until after the election
campaign has begun, with the
exception of the 1967 election
! of Charles Shepherd.
The methodology of this
report is that I was granted the
privilege of sitting in both
steering committees during the
1968 campaign. This, in addition
to conversations with*third-party
candidates, gave this reporter
full access to the causes, analyses
and reaction that evolved the
1968 student body election.
Many aspired to be president
in 1968.
(SEE 'BEER' PAGE 10)

Inside
Elmore Replies
To Editorial
See Page 2

Tuesday, June 25, 1968

in Florida as a directive of the
type of conduct expected of him
and informative of the type of
conduct he may expect from his
fellow students.
OConnell was out of town
and not available for comment,
but assistant Sharpe said a copy
of the ruling had not yet been
received. He declined comment
(SEE 'RULING' PAGE 10)



I. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 25, iab

Page 2

VP Elmore Replies To Editorial

The following is a statement
by UF Vice President
for Business Affairs William E.
Elmore in answer to a recent
editorial In the Gainesville Sun,
which was reprinted in Fridays
Alligator.
The editorial charged the
University with failing to pay
minimum wages to some of its
staff employees.
Recent statements in the
press ha\te charged that the UF
has not made any effort to
improve compensation of its
staff employees. These
statements are both grossly
inaccurate and extremely unfair.
The UF always has been
vitally concerned with the salary
and working conditions for all of
its employees and is constantly
striving through improved
personnel policies to be as good
and fair an employer as possible
under existing regulations and
within funds appropriated to it
by the Legislature.
Recently the UF announced
for its staff employees the

HC 6B Slogan Contest
Offers Travel Prizes

Five grand prizes, including a
five day cruise to Jamaica and a
four day cruise to Nassau, are
being offered this year to the
winners of the UF Homecoming
slogan contest, which begins
July Ist.
All entries should have a
general Homecoming theme and
consist of seven words or less,
said Manny James, Homecoming
general chairman.
First prize will be an all

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five dross wsskly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is entered
as second class matter at the United states Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per qiarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not oonslder adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

liberalization of fringe benefits
in terms of holidays, additional
vacation leave, establishment of
an impartial grievance
procedure, and a performance
evaluation program which
affords each staff employee an
opportunity to discuss his job
with his supervisor and, in turn,
be rewarded in relation to his
contribution to the UF. These
progressive steps reflect the UFs
concern for its employees.
In 1966 the minimum hourly
rate for the UF was $1.15 as
compared to the Wage-Hour law
requirement of SI.OO. In 1966,
when preparing the legislative
budget for the 1967-69
biennium, the UF foresaw the
need and requested an increase
in the minimum rate from $1.15
to $ 1.40 per hour.
In the same legislative budget
request, the UF also requested
an increase of 15 per cent for
staff employees the first year of
the 1967-69 biennium and 10
per cent in the second year. The
legislature passed an

expense paid trip for two to
Jamaica aboard Continental
Cruise Lines Jamaica Queen,
plus two tickets to the
Homecoming game between
Florida and Auburn on
November 2nd. Accommoda Accommodations
tions Accommodations for two at Gainesvilles
Holiday Inn will also be given.
Originality and clarity are
necessary, said James. The
winning slogan wili be used as
the central theme for the

DEFENDS WAGE POLICIES

BRING YOUR FRIENDS
AND HAVE A...
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Pitchers SI.OO
Monday thru Thursday
9 pm 10 pm
ISMKETU 5S*
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372-3389
OPEN 4P.M. DAILY fP

appropriation to provide the UF
with a 9 per cent increase in
Education and General budget
rather than the 15 per cent
requested, and 6.49 per cent
rather than 10 per cent
requested for the second year.
During this same time the
Legislature adopted a statewide
classification and pay system,
establishing uniform hiring rates
for all state agencies. The
minimum rate set was $1.25 per
hour rather than $1.40 as
requested. As a result of this
action, the UF raised its
minimum to $1.25 per hour
starting July 1,1967.
Under the uniform
classification and pay plan there
is a provision for an agency to
request geographical differentials
in minimum salary rates. In
February of 1968 the UF, in an
effort to better the salaries of its
staff employees, transmitted a
study of area salary rates to the
Board of Regents office
requesting a minimum rate to be
raised to approximately $1.50

football weekend.
All entries must be
postmarked by midnight, July
31.
All entries should be mailed
or delivered to: Homecoming
Slogan Contest, Florida Blue
Key Office, Reitz Union,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32601.

per hour. Subsequently, it has
furnished additional information
supporting this request.
The UF was joined by the
other state universities in this
request. The Board of Regents
staff has discussed this request
with the Director of the State
Personnel Board. He has
indicated a sympathetic
viewpoint and expressed a
willingness to help resolve this
problem within the funding
available.
With the enactment of the
Wage-Hour law, the University
Senate became concerned some
of its provisions might adversely
affect the operation of the UF.
If felt this law as originally
drawn was primarily to cover
industrial and business activity
and was not intended to cover
educational activity. The charge
that the University Senate
resisted a minimum wage for UF
employees is false. In the
resolution adopted by the
Senate it specifically stated:
The Senate of the UF
supports minimum pay
standards equal to or greater
than those in the Act.

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Ultimately, it must be
remembered that approval of a
minimum wage of
approximately $1.50 per hour in
no way increases monies
available to the UF for its
employees during the remainder
of this biennium. Nevertheless, if
granted the required authority
the UF will activate the raises. In
order to do so there is the
possibility some positions will be
left vacant.
The foregoing illustrates that
the UF has and will continue to
request appropriations from and
action by state agencies that will
enable it to provide adequate
and competitive salaries for its itsemployees.
employees. itsemployees.
Sales & Service
typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
23
Rentals
Hancock Office
Equipment
528 N.Main 376-5551



Student Government: Still Listless?

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last of two parts on the prog progress
ress progress Student Government has
made and the problems it has
faced under Student Body Pres Presdent
dent Presdent Clyde Taylor.)
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Managing Editor
Marc Click, adviser to
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor, has answered student
charges that Student
Government is as ineffective as
ever by citing 16 specific
projects SG has undertaken since
Taylors election.
SGs activeness or lack of
it may be linked to Taylors
campaign pledge of offering the
students a referendum on
abolishing SG if they are
dissatisfied with it after his year
at the helm.
Most of the work in the 16
project areas has been done by
Taylor's subordinates, although
several of the ideas were his.
In fact, some SG underlings
have complained that Taylor is
too inaccessible, that he should
be available more often for
advice and consultations.
Police Sell
Autos
Eight bicycles and l i autos
will be sold at public auction by
the Gainesville Police
Department at noon July 2.
The auction will be held at
the city police department, 721
NW 6th St.
BICYCLES: Boys, Schwinn, ID
No. F 45887 5; Boys, Dunelt, ID No.
3466; Boys, Dunelt, no ID No.;
Boys, Sears Western Flyer, ID No.
54X1 166289; Boys, Dunelt, no ID
No; Girls, Sears, ID No.
2451912654182; Boys, Sears, no ID
No.; Boys, Sears, ID No.
50247784188556.
MOTOR VEHICLES: 1953
Chrysler, ID No. 7241 191; 1961
Metropolitan Conv., ID No. E97779;
1 960 Ford 4 dr, ID No.
0G54Y164843; 1958 Ford 2 dr, ID
No. 38AR1 10413; 1960 Dodge
sedan, ID No. 41021691 11; 1956
Ford wagon, ID No. A65R166431;
1959 Pontiac conv., ID No.
159212576; 1959 Chevrolet 4 dr, ID
No. A59A173121: 1954 Cadillac 2
dr, ID plate missing; 1956
Oldsmobile 4 dr, ID No. 569L1151;
1955 Oldsmobile 4 dr HT, ID No.
558A2 1377.

LITTLE LARRY'S IS NOW OPEN
RE-OPENING SPECIAL
LARGE RIB-EYE STEAK
SERVED WITH TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CHOICE OF POTATO
HOT ROLL &. BUTTER
TUESOAY ONLY
ALL DAY
Reg. $1.75 *1.25
1225 W. Univ. Ave. Just !4 Block From Campus

The fault may not be
completely Taylors, but there
may be some truth to the
complaint that he spread-s
himself too thin.
Besides his duties as president
and law student, Taylor is a
member of several university
committees, including the
Action Conference. He also
works part time at a local hotel
as a bookkeeper, in addition to
his obligations to his family.
But the work goes on.
Click cited as either
completed or currently going
on: the Off-Campus Housing
Association, the Rathskeller
project, Teacher Evaluation,
establishment of an ombudsman
(problem trouble-shooter) post,
increased student representation
on university policy-making
committees, Wauburg
development project,
participation in drawing up
proposed changes in the Board
of Regents operating manual to
permit greater student freedom.
Also listed were:
consolidation of student
activities to prevent needless
duplication, sponsorship of
Carnigras, student employment
service, creation of the
Inter-Organizational Council,
summer entertainment,
increased cooperation between
executive and legislative
branches, the Intercourse
program, book sales and
exchanges, and newly newlyimpiemented
impiemented newlyimpiemented SAMSON project.
Glick also noted several ideas
which are currently in the final

GAY 90's
Under New Ownership-Former! y Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave

ADVISOR SAYS 'NO

stages of development, such as
creation of a grade appeal board,
elimination of compulsory class
attendance policies,
revitalization of the public
funtions board, SI 50,000
campus development program,
Lyceum Council-Union Board
Study Commission and increased
freedom for students by
persuading administrators to
relinquish control of purely
student functions.
Also, reorganization of the
cabinet, revision of the finance
laws, and creation of a
Legislative Research Bureau.
Glick emphasized that the
main concept guiding Taylors
decisions and plans was
government of action, providing
services which directly involve
the students.
The Off-Campus Housing
Association, for example, is a
legally constituted corporation
created to advise students about
contracts and problems with
landlords who take advantage of
inexperience. It also advises on
the best types of insurance to
buy to protect valuables in
apartments.
Perhaps the singularly most
important accomplishment of
the association to date was
pressuring the Gainesville
Apartment Owners Association
into ditching a {dan under which
students would be required to
pay 40 per cent of a years rent
during the first month of
occupancy.

Another SG project which,
according to Click, received
tremendous student support
was Carnigras. Taylor thought a
carnival would both break the
monotony of the quarter and
help raise funds for Dollars for
Scholars.
The plan was so successful,
Glick reported, that negotiations
are now under way to bring the
carnival back next spring,
possibly with more rides if SG
can get permission to use the
drill field.
Another example of Taylors
action government, Glick noted,
is the Intercourse program,
designed to bring students,
faculty and administrators
together to discuss issues and
problems. It is under the
direction of Rich Houk.
Creation of the ombudsman
post followed student
complaints that they cannot
break through the maze of red
tape frequently involved in
getting questions or suggestions
to the persons responsible.

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Tuesday, June 25, 1968. The Florida Alligator,

The SG Book Sale was
formed by Dutch Hotaling to
break the monopoly local book
stores have on book sales.
Defending SGs eagerness to
work on any problem facing
students and to reach
meaningful solutions, Click
said:
All this is just the beginning.
The real action is yet to come.
But for the students who
complain that SG is listless,
more action much more
will be required to change their
thinking.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
for ENGLISH IN ACTION
to meet each week
with a student or
trainee from abroad
for English conversation
practice.
1 or 2 hours on
Mons. & Tues.
from 4 to 8 p.m.
at BSC 1604 W. Univ. Ave.
Please come in or
call 372-4711
during above hours
for an appointment.
Mrs. Bernice Harvey

Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 25, 1968

Rif H
mk; y -r'fe£v r ,?*
JM Ml W ML JM mm M
' t l BL
IAN AND SYLVIA
.. .at Friday's Frolics
Prices Reduced
To 5G Frolics

Folksinging duo lan and
Sylvia will be the featured
entertainment at Friday nights
annual Student Government
Summer Frolics.
The price of tickets has been
cut to $2. per person, according
to a press release from Student
Body President Clyde Taylor.
This is about $3. below the usual
general admission price.
Providing more low cost
activities for the student to aid
in relieving the pressures of
academia is as important to
Student Government as
Whafs
Happening
IN MEANWHILE, BACK
AT THE FIGHTS: Tonight,
Students for Nixon meet at 8
p.m. in the Reitz Union, room
363. Youth for Rockefeller will
meet at 7:30 p.m. in the same
room, plus rooms 361 and 362.
IN FOLKSINGING FOR FUN:
Also tonight. Father lan and,
wife Carolyn Mitchell will sing
folk at 8:15 p.m. in the Reitz
Union Ballroom. Sponsored by
Lyceum Council, student tickets
are $.50 and general admission is
SI.OO.
IN BLUE KEYS AND BOARD
MEMBERS: Wednesday, Florida
Blue Keys will meet from 3:30-5
p.m. in room 316 Reitz Union.
The Union Board will meet in
the Unions Programs Office
from 4:15-6 p.m.
IN EDUCATING CHILDREN
BUT NOT IN YOGA:
Thursday the Association for
Childhood Education will meet
in room 150 C Reitz Union at
6:30 p.m. Dr. Wm. Purkey will
speak on 1,000 Hours a Year:
School and Student Esteem.
From 9-10 p,m. yoga lessons will
be held in Towers C.

watching out for the students
academic needs, the release
said.
lan and Sylvia are Canadian
folksingers better known for
their albums than their singles.
They have appeared on
United States television on such
programs as the Bell Telephone
Hour and the Hootenanny. Their
repertoire includes English and
American classic ballads, Negro
blues, cowboy ballads, and
mountain music.
Frolics will be held at 8 p.m.
in Florida Gym. Tickets may be
purchased at the Reitz Union
Box Office, Record Bar, or at
the door.

RUMOR!
THERE STILL EXISTS A BREED
OF MEN; DEDICATED, YOUNG,
EDUCATED AND MOTIVATED MEN,
PROUD OF THEIR COUNTRY,
AND HAVE THE DESIRE
TO FLY WITH THE BEST.
ARE YOU ONE OF THESE MEN?
THEN NAVAL AVIATION HAS
AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU!
DO YOU QUALIFY?
'FLY
ASK THE NAYy
TEAM
YOUR QUESTIONS.
' ?
On Campus: 2425 262728
June 1968 Reitz Union

UF Faculty Divided
On Attendance Plan

By LAKEY FULLER
Alligator Correspondent
Student Body President
Clyde Taylors plea for removal
of compulsory class attendance/
for students has had relatively
favorable acceptance by faculty
members.
The proposed resolution
which has received Student
Senate endorsement, calls for
the elimination of mandatory
class attendance for all UF
students.
Some faculty members agree
with Taylors policy but with
some reservations on its
application.
Dr. Mickie L. Newbill,
assistant professor and
supervisor in the College of
Journalism and Communica Communications,
tions, Communications, said it should be entirely
up to the instructor.
She said the nature of a class
should be the determining
factor.
Associate Professor of
Religion, Richard H. Hiers, said,
Students should be responsible
enough to decide about class
attendance. If any rule of
attendance should be imposed, it
would probably be for
freshmen.
Hiers feels a teacher should
use discretion in handling a few
students who would take
advantage of the policy and
perhaps fail a course because of
not getting the information
given in class.
Mrs. Marie R. Henderson,
instructor of Music, favors
required attendance for
discussion and lab classes.
Pocket Nest
PERRYVILLE. Mo. Mrs. Roger Meyer found a
birds nest in the pocket of a
pair of shorts hanging on the
clothesline.

In a course like Music
Appreciation, she said, how
can a student learn it he isn t in
class to listen to the music
discussed in the text, or have it
played and explained?"
John M. Champion, associate
professor of Management and
Business Law, agrees. Champion
said for a course requiring only

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II fmsn 1101111 \ll
|A EVERY MONDAY 41
f and TUESDAY 1
I OLDE FASHION I
FISH & CHIPS
I S Served In a Basket I
I Fresh Ocean Fish Breaded in I
Our Kitchen and served in the
I Olde Fashioned English way. I
Hush puppys Cole Slaw
I Try Our Arabic Salad I
| LOBSTER Hb
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if U'*m 9 o*f hmm S OJA. \ \
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GAINIIVIUi OCALA NA

textual material for thorough
understanding, class attendance
shouldnt be necessary. But
attendance should be
compulsory for discussion
classes.
Students in a discussion
learn a lot from the interchange
of ideas and contribute to the
learning of others said
Champion.



'Around The World
By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
It all begins in the Reform Club of Merry Ole London in 1872
when Mr. Phileas Fogg (thats the name all right) bets that he can go
around the world in 80 days, 10 days less than the most optimistic
guess.
From there, you spend 3 hours watching what is akin to a
travelogue interrupted by commercials (Foggs and his valets
well-played by Cantiflas misadventures) which include rescuing an
Indian princess from cremation, participating in a bullfight and getting
caught in an Indian raid. As they use every mode of transportation
imaginable an ostrich no less they rush to make the deadline
and win their considerable wager.
If the story sounds hardly meritorious, so are the characters. David
Niven portrays Fogg as an antiseptic hero whose life is run by
timetables and who seems totally oblivious to the charms of Shirley
MacLaine (they discuss whist). Cantinflas, as the weak-minded but
faithful servant, is perfect. However, not so for the entire movie.
Although peppered with about 40 stars in cameo roles (its a game
in itself to name all of those that pop up and out!) and
extravagant production techniques, this 54 film stops there.
The laughs came few and far between and even the appearance of
comic insurance like Red Skelton fails to get the fun moving.
For a good, clean movie no sex, no violence, no foul
language thats Around the World in 80 Days.
However, if you wish good acting talent and storyline, then forget
it. The late Mike Todds legacy of extravagance is all too evident but
extravagance does not a great movie make (hie!).
Jules Verne, where are you?

'Georgy Girl

By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Reviever
Georgy Girl (now playing
at the State) is quite an
experience the second time
around. And for the second
time, Ive come to the same
conclusion: that is, that Georgy
Girl is a monster. Its not just
that Georgy is big and ugly
(which she is), but that she
completely smothers everyone in
her overhelming matemalism.
Georgy (Lynn Redgrave) is
the ungainly daughter of Mr.
James butler. And Mr. James
(James Mason) is of course after
Georgy.
Georgy shares a flat with
Meredith (Charlotte Rampling),
a beautiful concert violinist.
Meredith decides to marry Jos
(Alan Bates). Georgy is ecstatic
because she is allowed to live-in
and do the cooking and
housework.
Merediths full personality is
exposed when she has the baby.
She hates it for the pain it
caused her. Georgy takes the
baby and Jos, and Meredith
disappears. After a brief affair
with Georgy and the baby, Jos
also disappears. By now, Mr.
Operetta Planned
H.M.S. Pinafore, a Gilbert
& Sullivan operetta, will be
presented as a project of the
Music Education Seminar Aug. 9
and 10 for the benefit of the
Music Scholarship Fund.
According to Pinafore
director, Mr. Earl Grothe, the
project hopes to combine the
talents of the Gainesville and the
university community in the
belief that there is abundant
amateur talent in both of these
areas.
There are still openings in the
chorus and the cast will be
announced at a later date.

James wife has conveniently
died. He married Georgy and the
final scene implies that they
lived happily ever after. But
Im not so sure.
Actually, the characters in
the story are only half people.
Alan Bates was the highlight of
the movie with his marvelous
myriads of facial expressions.
The camera crew did an
outstanding job of capturing
them. The opening scene is the
pictures best. Here, in muted
but moving flight, the pathetic
life of Georgy is revealed.
At one point in the movie,
Mr. James said that he felt
Georgy had just missed being
beautiful. To me, Georgy was
more like a clumsy beast, or, as
she herself says, a
brontosaurus. And
brontosauruses, may I add, are
now extinct.

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The losers of this canoe jousting contest hit the
surf as their canoe is overturned. The dunking they
took was what happened to other losers in this con contest

Father lan Here Tonight

Tonight, at 8:15 p.m.,
Lyceum Council presents Father
lan, and Caroline Mitchell in the
Reitz Union Ballroom.
Father Mitchell, a
guitar-playing Episcopal priest,
is married to Caroline (his
partner).
He composed The American
Folk Mass, a major work for
guitar, bass, banjos and chrorus.
The Mass, believed to be the
Coffeehouse Opens
This Friday night marks the
opening of a new Coffeehouse
Cabaret the Freight
Train located at the site of the
now demised Scene poster shop
on University Ave.
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
nights entertainment from the
Gainesville area will be presented
with a range from folk, through
rhythm and blues, to classical
music. Also, the Train will show
underground films.
The performers will be paid
for entertaining and admission
will be $1.25 with the cost of
drinks (fruit drinks blended and
3 varieties of coffee) to be
nominal.

first work of its kind gained him
an international reputation and
has been produced and
performed in many major cities.
Tickets for the performance

QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49< SPECIALS X
a EVERY DAY
SELF SERVICE NO TIPPING T
Twin 313 w, univ. ave^^
NO FLY^^m^ALE
keeping the town buzzing
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fly in and see for yourself
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13 WEST UNIV IN THE MALL

/

Tuesday, June 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator.

test contest Saturday at Lake Wauburg. It was all part of the
fun of the annual Wauburg Play Day.

are on sale at the Reitz Union
Box Office and will be on sale at
the door. Prices are 50 cents for
UF students, and $1 for all
others.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 25, 1968

Page 6

Picnuiev
Pjfti
M

Operation Concern

Operation Concerns pilot
program is a move typical of its
creator, Gov. Claude Kirk.
It is sweeping and spectacular, and
it is the product of a rapid fire brain.
If it nets Kirk the national
attention he craves, perhaps he
ET EDUORuTI
deserves it. For, although Kirk was,
as usual, shooting from the hip, he
seems to have scored a bullseye this
time.
The announced programs
themselves hit at sore points which
have long plagued Gainesvilles poor.
Renovation or removal of
abandoned buildings, rat control,
family planning, job training, child
care, and special emphasis on
neighborhood service centers, street
paving and rural problems are
solutions to major irritants for the
poor.
But some comments.
The governor said Thursday,
What we want to deal in is facts and
results. Were not interested in false
hopes. We cannot stir up desires
which dont result in action.

IH

Harold Aldrich
Managing Editor
Margaret O'Brien
News Editor

The florida alligator's

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
Harold Kennedy
Editor

Well see that, and double it,
Governor. You have promised us
both immediate and long-range
results. That is good. Because both
are needed. Gainesville faces a long
very hot summer which must be dealt
with immediately, if violence is to be
avoided.
But, as a member of UFs Afro-
American Student Association told
the Governor Thursday, attitudes of
both black and white must be
changed. And that is a very long af affair.
fair. affair. The governor rudely silenced
him, but the student made a valid
point.
However, may not such programs
such as this one force attitudes to
change? In Operation Concern, the
poor and the vast machinery of the
state join forces to seek solutions to
the economic problems facing them
both.
Through this interaction, may not
understanding be bom? We hope so.
We applaude the governors
announced intentions for Operation
Concern. May the results be worth
all the fanfare.

Paul Kaplan
Executive Editor
Neal Sanders
Sports Editor

Student Conspiracy
Part II

Drew Pearso

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
second of a series of Washington
Merry-Go-Round columns on the
student has been
disrupting campuses around the
world.)
WASHINGTON The student
revolt is so complex that its
impossible to generalize regarding
its origins, aims and frustrations. In

PEARSON

Eugene McCarthy and Sen. Bobby
Kennedy.
It also has international political
overtones, as when Berlin students
paralyzed the newspapers of Axel
Springer, who is so pro-West that
his plant is built practically on the
Berlin Wall. His competitors
encouraged the student revolt to
the point that Der Spiegel bored its

readers with nine
issues carrying
page after page
on the battle of
Springer vs.
students.
One sig significant
nificant significant aspect of
the student
revolt, however,

is the maimer in which a small
minority less than one per cent
represented by the Students for a
Democratic Society, was able to
paralyze Columbia University.
The Students for a Democratic
Society had broken away from the
moderate National Student
Association in 1962 to organize the
new left for American campuses.
Last August, while the National
Student Association was meeting at
the University of Maryland, the
SDS organized a counter-congress
also at College Park, Md., to pull
students over to the new Left.
Strategy was to set targets which
university executives could not
possibly accept, then stage strikes if
they were not accepted. This was
exactly what happened.
Mark Rudd, who last fall visited
Cuba as the guest of Fidel Castro,
wrote a secret strategy program for
Columbia, giving step-by-step plans
to take over the university, which
follows in part:
To be militant is to fight to
achieve a specific goal: Let us
clearly state that our goal is to end
university complicity with the war:
IDA (Institute for Defense
Analysis), ROTC, CIA contracts,
recruiting, etc. But we can never
force the university to submit to
our demands unless we have behind
us the strength of the majority of
students on campus. We can achieve
this majority at Columbia, where
over half of the students are
against the war, but we will need
real organizational strength to
mobilize these people.
Mark Rudd then outlined the
following strategy, step by step:
Phase I: Decision and positions.
November.
A committee elected by the
general assembly draws up a

MERRY GO ROUND I

some respects it is
[to the left of
communism. In
other respects its a
healthy reach for
[more participation
in political life,
which took the
form of doorbell
ringing for Sen.

I: JBII \ ; A
ANDERSON

Jack Anderson

statement of general strategy and a
position paper (a very broad
theoretical statement of SDS'
objections to the federal presence).
These statements should be
discussed and adopted by the
general assembly as official
guidelines for the campaign. The
organization should be discussed
and the structure laid out.
Phase II: Organization and
training. November-December.
A research committee prepares
a ten or 15-page factual paper with
bibliography for the dorm
canvassers. The dorm organization
is constructed, with a committee
for each dorm. Canvassers discuss
arguments they will probably
encounter in their work, as well.
The research committee should
also assemble the material it will
need to provide a steady stream of
propaganda and exposures during
the next pluses.
Secretarial committee works on
the mailing list (a big job).
The defense squad begins
training.
Financial and faculty support
are sought.
Action: Begin circulation of a
petition on our demands, prove
action against ROTC classes,
harassment of recruiters
(obstructing them without being
liable to official retaliation), a few
dormitory programs.
A committee should produce a
manifesto giving our analysis of and
alternative to the university. This
should provide a second front for
discussion, complementing that of
opposition to the war. Liaison
should be set up with other IDA
campuses as well as other NYC
campuses for support and
coordination.
Phase III: Mass base.
January-February.
Intensive dorm canvassing,
debates, discussions, and newspaper
propaganda, in preparation for the
CUSC (Columbia University
Student Council) referendum on
university complicity scheduled for
about March 10.
Spontaneous demonstrations
around campus. Publication of
more material on goals, demands,
and their justifications.
Harassment of recruiters,
ROTC to continue. Publication of
all federal projects with a list of
their personnel.
A fund-raising rally to be held.
Phase IV: Preparation for mass
action. March.
Presentation of huge petition
to the university. A rally two days
before the referendum. March 10
the referendum which we will win,
if weve done our work right. March
15 rally at which we issue final
ultimatum: University must
consider referendum binding and
must meet our demands by April 5.
Individuals will sign a pledge to
militant action if the demands are
not met.
Phase V: Mass action. April.
A sit-in at Low Library which,
after one day, turns into a general
student strike. University
capitulates.
This was the secret strategy
planned for Columbia as early as
last fall. It went off exactly on
schedule.



'Censor Bill
Isnt Needed

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is to bring to the
attention of the student body
Senate Bill No. 68-1043 which
proposes the setting up of a
committee to approve or
disapprove the publications of
student organizations which
receive monies from Student
Government funds. The
committee is to be called the
student publications
subcommittee.
The bill was introduced to
the Student Senate on June 18
for first reading and by a vote of
17-15 was sent to the Judiciary
Committee for further
consideration. This action was
taken following discussion on
the floor of the house.
I would urge all student who
value the right of freedom of the
press to make their objections to
this bill known to members of
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
AJlptor, letters to the editor
must be typed and sipied and
diould not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
he withheld from publication
for jut cause. The editor
mmw the right to edit al
letters in the interest of
space.

I 4V C MI!i TREASTERS/^NI
I Mr GRAND OPENING f VnifO 1
IRK TUIS. JUNE 25 SAT. JUNE 29
hi DRAWING FOR PRIZES BAUOONS
6 pic. Kinosiz* Cokes furnished by- smith-s men-s store anthony-s BUBBLE GUM
K W AND THE RECORD BAR CANDY

[ 6. $12995
|j 't
L^QQ29
I MW INSTALLED?
I CARtridge ZZ.L
LEAR JET
MODEL ASHB3O
I DURING TREASTERS ENCO
I GRAND OPENING
I Th %4CWtd &f*
I of Gainotvillo
I 923 W. Univ. Avo

the Student Senate. To approve
of this bill, or any watered
down version of it, is to
condone censorship on the
campus, the censors being the
duly elected representatives of
the student body.
If the well intentioned
motives behind this bill are to
prevent the possible
embarrassment of the Student
Government or the University of
Florida then I would support a
measure which would require a
statement to be carried in each
issue of any publication to the
effect that the material written
is solely the opinion of the
author and/or organization
concerned and does NOT reflect
the opinions of the Student
Government or the University or
imply any degree of assent by
the latter parties.
In this way individuals can be
held responsible for any material
they publish through the
existing structure of Student
Government... or by civil law
if need be.
Please, Student Government,
let us not have any committees
to deny fellow students the
rights that faculty,
administration and Student
Government have fought and
worked for so long to achieve
and protect.
ANTHONY F. WALSH, 7AG

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OPEN FORUM:
J[(Lkl(mi V'lAAwt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

UF Can Help Gainesville

MR. EDITOR;
Just recently the University
of California announced that it
was embarking on a new
program to gear the institutions
resources to carry the thought
and research of the campus
directly to the heart of the
city.
President Charles J. Hitch
stated that future research and
assistance should be
mission-oriented and
announced four preliminary
steps to be taken immediately:
1) scholarships for disadvantaged
students, 2) special training for
teachers to improve elementary
and high school education, 3)
establishment of a fair
employment coordinator to
improve job opportunities for
minority groups in the university
and in placement work, and 4)
augmenting of minority-group
enrollment in graduate schools.
In addition, Hitch called
upon the Chancellors of the
several UC campuses to enlarge
their role from that of operating
an educational complex to the
management of a cultural
resource of the surrounding

community. A special
committee of faculty, students,
and administrators was formed
to coordinate the program.
It seems to me that President
OConnells Action Conference
provides a particularly suitable
forum for examining the whole
spectrum of University-
Gainesville relations.
Our University is currently
engaged in research aimed a
solving the problems- of
Vietnam, Latin America, and
other areas. Should these

More Holidays Needed
MR. EDITOR:
I was very pleased to read in the Alligator that the
administration has decided to let us have both Thursday and
Friday off as official holidays on the Fourth of July weekend.
Now that the Board of Regents has abolished the rule that a
quarter must be 50 days, I think we should also have a short
break around Easter, as was the case under the old semester
system when we had Good Friday off.
In fact, I think it would be a good idea to poll the student
body and see how they stand in regards to having an Easter
break. Im sure almost everyone would come out in favor of it.
So I hope the administration will consider making Good
Friday an official holiday again as it had been before under the
semester system.
TONY FERNANDEZ, 3AS

ANTHONY'S BAG
A E DURING TREASTERI I
REG. $1.05 Q GRAND OPENING
THE DIFFERENT SANDWICH It Changes Daily As
The Muse Moves Us ALWAYS WHh A Meat And A
Cheese PLUS...
I ANTHONY'S A Truly Unique I
Experience In Lunch Dining.
Featuring Such Delicacies As
BURNSCHWIEGER
ffl SPANISH BEAN I
1C LECHON PEQUENO
jr GENOA SALAMI I
I FAVORITE BEVERAGE I
i Untfjonps
, 921 W. Univ. Avt. |

Tuesday, Aina 26,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

resources not be trained on
Gainesvilles ghettos as well?
By doing so that University
would emerge from its splendid
isolation and directly contribute
to solving our pressing urban
problems. Such a program might
additionally provide a vehicle for
improved student-faculty student-facultyadministration
administration student-facultyadministration cooperation.
Now seems a particularly
relevant time to undertake such
an endeavor.
LEON G. CAMPBELL, 7AS

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

r FOR SALE |
FOR SALE. Lunch and Dinner
Specials. Quality food for low prices.
Hungry Students stop by L & W
Cafeteria, 313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (A 152 20tp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (Als4tf p)
FREE KITTENS: Call Rick,
378-6994, 1- 3:30 p.m., or after
8:30 p.m. (A-155-2t-p)
AIR CONDITIONER for VW
Beetle 6v. $150.00. Call 372-8197.
(A-155-6t-p)
GERMAN Shepherd Puppies, AKC,
excellent pedigree. Black and Tan, 1
Silver. Males and females. $75.00 and
up. 372-7061. (A-155-st-p)
$399. Immaculate Honda 305. Such
incredible condition Im willing to
warranty. New custom seat, extras.
Must sell. Harry, Med. Center,
376-3211, Ext. 5721. (A-155-3t-p)
BEING TRANSFERRED 2 BR.
Mobile home, AC, carpeting, patio
awning, completely furnished. Clean
and attractive $3,000. Call
3720743. (Als 6
DEPENDABLE 1967 Honda 50,
1100 miles. Like new side basket
$170.00. 3788397 or see at
702 1 15 S. W 16th Ave.
(Als6stp)
MANS Schwinn bicycle with lock
and basket. Good Shape. SIB.OO or
best offer. Also, guitar case, $5.00.
Call 372-7329. (A-156-lt p)
HUNTER 14 Whaler, 59, Evinrude
35hp electric starter, Controls
battery. Murray Trailer. Vinyl cover
and extras, excellent condition,
$675.00. Call 37 2 682 8.
(Als 6 2t p)
FOR SALE: Blackmasked African
Lovebirds. */z price. 3725767. See at
107 S.W. 26 St. (Als3st p)
*vx*x'x*x*x*x*x-xvx*x*x*:x*xx*v.xx*x*>:
FOR RENT
VSVXVX*X*X*X*X*X*X*X*X*WWYX*X*X*X*XW!*'
ROOM for rent in lovely home,
walking distance to University. Male
student. (B-155-st-p)
SPACIOUS 2 bedroom furnished
house, block from campus. $150.00
per month. No Lease. 1217 SW 3rd
Ave. 376-0894. (B-155-2t-p)
FOR RENT: 1 Bedroom Apartment,
Furnished and Air conditioned. 5
Blocks from campus, available
immediately. 1533-35 N.W. sth Ave Avenue.
nue. Avenue. Call: 376-8475 or 376-1065.
(81525t p)
ROOM & BOARD slO per
quarter. Males and Females.
Collegiate Living Organization. 117
N.W. 15th Street. Phone: 376-9420.
(81534t p)
WOULD YOU BELIEVE $250.00?:
That's all it takes to live in the
luxurious LA FONTANA hirise for
the entire summer quarter! Adjacent
UF Post Office. See Apt. 506 or call
3784134. (Bls34tp)
RANCH HOUSE Unfurnished
Built-in-kitchen Airconditioned. 2
Bedroom IV2 Bath CBS ll
Miles S. W. University 5125.00/mo..
- Phone 4952186. (Blssstp)

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, June 25, 1968
Program Office: Bridge Lessons,
150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Program Office: Painting for
Fun, 118 Union, 7 p.m.
Lyceum Council: Father lan and
Caroline Mitchell, folksingers,
Union Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, June 26,1968
Florida Speleological Society:
Meeting, movie, 346 Union 7
p.m.
Thursday, June 27, 1968

!vXvX-X*X.NXX*X XvXvX WANTED
>:
XXIXvX-X-X-X-X.vX-XXX-X-X.X.X.X.vX-XX
FEMALE roommates for July til. .
$36.50 per month and l U utilities.
Share House, 1708 N.W. 10th Ave.
372-2048. (Cls6-st p)
BABY SITTER needed: Boy 13 mo.
needs care Mon.Thurs. mornings
7:4512:45 our home or yours
Please call 376 1415.
(Cls6 2t p)
FEMALE roommate wanted to share
3 bedroom apt. with 2 others. Large
kitchen. Living room, much space, no
lease, 3 blocks from campus. $30.00
per month. Call 372 6768.
(C-1552t p)
MALE Business Administration
(M.8.A.) graduate Student needs
roommates for September, 1968.
Centrally AC and heated STARLITE
apt. Split $135.00 per month rent.
Prefer business administration grad,
students but other grad, students
O.K. 3727329. (Cls6ltp)
WANTED: Female roommate to
share one bedroom Colonial Manor
Apartment. Starting July 1. Senior or
working girl preferred. Call Ext. 2912
or 3 768182 after 5:00 p.m.
(Cls 6 2tp)
ROOMMATE wanted for fall. Private
bedroom in 3-bedroom house. Full
house privileges. $65.00 per month.
Phone Jim 372-9860 after 5.
Conscientious students only.
(C-155-2t-p)
TWO female roommates wanted for
summer and or fall quarter. F.Q. 109,
Call after 5. Ask for Judy or Jane.
376-0008. (C-155-2t-p)
UNFURNISHED DESK SPACE, air
conditioned, preferably near north northeast
east northeast part of campus, wanted by doc doctoral
toral doctoral candidate. 376-0036. (C-152-
st-p)
DESPERATE! Need ride to
ATLANTA July 3 or 4. Will gladly
share expenses. Call 3785532.
(Cls 6 2tp)
WANTED: Ride to Pensacola for
weekend as soon as possible. Leave
Friday afternoon. Call after 5:30
3767045. (Cls6ltp)
NEED ride to Jacksonville on July 3.
Want to leave after 12:00 noon and
be in Jacksonville in time for a 2:40
p.m. plane flight. Call Pam Clark
between 1:00 and 3:30 p.m. or after
midnight. 372 9311.
(C 156 2t p)
HELP WANTED |
PHOTOGRAPHIC Help Needed
Require Student with Photolab.
Experience to be employed as a
General Lab. Helper. V* time Student
Wages. Call 3763211, Ext. 5193.
(E 156 tf c)
$5.00 for 9:30 l2 a.m. Sunday
Mornings Nursery attendant needed
for the summer. First Christian
Church. Call 3766011, 804 S.W.
2nd Ave. (Els62tp)
HELP WANTED. Part time waitresses
days and nights from 7:00 to 12:30.
Apply at Anthonys 921 w.
University Ave., or phone 3729223
for appointment. Must be 21.
(Els4 3t p)
; x*vx x*x*x*x*>:*:vw*x*x*x<*Mws?!S xi: ;
AUTOS
"'r-X'X-v.v.'.vX'XvX'X-x-X't-x-X'Xv.v.v.sv*:
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, 1965. Red
with white top, tonneau. Excellent
condition, SI2OO. 1959 Plymouth
station wagon. V 8 Full power.
$300.00. Phone 372-9860 after 5.
(G-155-2t-p)

Program Office: Painting for
Fun, 118 Union, 7 p.m.
Christian Science College
Organization: Meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Yoga: Lessons, Tower, Bldg. C.,
9 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Lyceum Council presentation
of FATHER IAN AND
CAROLINE MITCHELL, 50
cents, students, SI.OO for
faculty, staff and general
public; Summer Frolics, IAN
& SYLVIA, $2.00 per person,
and Florida Cinema Society
subscription tickets, SI.OO.

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 25, 1968

:;:xx*xwxxx*x*x*x*xttx.x.x.xxs*x*v
AUTOS
:Wxx-xx-x-x*x*^
1961 PLYMOUTH Wagon, White,
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Good Mileage, Mechanically sound,
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(Gls63t p)
1958 PORSCHE 1600 engine,
completely rebuilt $475.00 petri
S.L.R. with wide angle, telephoto,
strobe light, and other extras
$160.00. Velocity stocks for Volvo
$14.00. Call 378 3937
(G 1562 tp)
FOR SALE: 1966 MGB Good
condition wire wheels Luggage
Rack Tonneau top A steal for
$1,450. Must sell before leaving
states. 3787148. (Gls62tp)
'64 XKE Coupe gold with red
leather interior. 4-wheel disc brakes,
new tag. 21,000 miles. $2750.
378-2993 evenings. (G-155-st-p)
19 6 2 PONTIAC Tempest
Convertible, $250.00 or best offer.
Good engine, top and transmission,
needs some body repair. 1956 Ford
very dependable, $200.00 or best
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11th St. (G-155-6t-p)
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satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
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3 BlgHtti ln Color
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circulation dept, in Research Library.
(J-155-3t-nc)
FOUND: 1967 P.K. YONGE
graduation ring with blue stone at
Circulation Dept, of Research
Library. (Lls43tnc)
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THESIS, dissertations and short term
papers typed in my home. Pica type
and Spec. Characters on typewriter.
Telephone 466 3338, Micanopy,
Florida. (M 1536t p)

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Shoe Rental 10$ Game 40$
BECBZSn ENDS "What's So Bad About Feeling Good"-color-
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Silvmianl
The dreamy country look
exemplified in this dimdl
dress by Lanz. Its white
M
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V ML >4n eory core / car 6 summer living. Modeled

/^Jrrw

Tuesday, June 25,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 9



Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 25, 1968

==MAKING OF A PRESIDENT, 1968=
Beer For Breakfast

F* FROM PA6E ONE J|
The leading contender was Robert Charles
Shepherd, the incumbent on the throne. He
hoped to be the first student body president to
ever run for re-election. And he thought he
would win.
Shepherd came to power in an upset
election. Running against one candidate with a
2000 bloc-vote behind him, and the other a
well-known independent, Shepherd won a
surprisingly heavy victory, based on the tacit
support of the Alligator and a
heavily-emotional independent dorm
organization. He won also on the strength of his

SHEPHERD i

many others became offended by Shepherd and
were hesitant to proceed at full speed for fear
of incurring the wrath of the chief of state.
While Shepherd indeed fought the tuition
hike in Tallahassee (and with remarkable
success: some legislators directly credit
Shepherd and FSU student body prexy Gene
Stearns with preventing the tuition hike from
going to $l5O per quarter), defended student
rights and did battle with the special interests

on campus, he was a very
aggressive personality,
demanding as much from
others as he himself gave.
And not all others were as
willing.
Other individuals either
themselves considering a run
for the roses or others
considering them for it

included former student body veep Fred
Breeze, an outstanding independent with a
dazzling mind and an equally outstanding
academic status. He chose academic pursuits
over political, and refused to align with anyone,
although he was sympathetic to the
pro-Shepherd forces.
Another was Dick Thompson, another
former vice-president who stood behind former
president Bruce Culpepper, a lackluster

SK:
IEP
v to AwHk
Mcride

He had, however, a commitment (which was
later sold down the river by Marc Glick, one of
Shepherds chief aides) that if Shepherd chose
not to run, that they would back him.
Thompson was dumped by the Shepherd
forces in favor of Clyde Taylor.
John Ritch, the Sigma Chi political pro, and
much respected by all who had anything to do
with campus politics for the last four years, was
Shepherds personal choice for the slot, but
Ritch preferred instead to run the steering
committee for Bill Mcride.
The only other major contender for the
nominating run was Shepherds veep, Jim
Valentine.

H I ||fii |
|gSP§l||cx,
Jlr i
Candidates Debate On Radio

anti-establishment, anti-Blue
Key and progressive reform
[program.
But Shepherd had
academic difficulties. More
than this, his determined,
individualistic attitude and
pride offended many of his
f co-workers in student
government. Many left, and

TAYLOR

jpresident who prided himself
I on not rocking the boat. This
was the third time that
if Thompson had come off the
starting block. He sought to
f be a candidate in both 1967
and 1966, both times to be
dumped for others, Buddy
Jacobs in 1966 and Larry
Tyree in 1967.

Valentine was snowed in during a skiing trip
in Canada. His mind made up to run, he was
trapped by natures elements. Houses were
being lined up, commitments made and
campaigns begun.
And for the moment at least, Valentine was
stopped cold. He called long distance to inform
his house (PKA) that if he ran only with his
house, he would run.
Valentine and Shepherd had been splitting
further and further apart as the administration
continued through the year. Valentine wanted a
more moderate course in the sense that he

believed that Shepherds
arrogance was unduly making
enemies. He saw any
possibility of compromise to
pass major Shepherd
programs through the \jM
Council disintegrate \SBgk
his eyes as the CouMf
presiding officer.
Disillusioned and

distrustful, he urged Shepherd time and again
to talk with these opponents and get something
done. Shepherd continued to refer to the
council, including majority leader Greg
Johnson, as a pack of idiots, and Shepherd
said it often and publicly.
While Jim was in agreement, he didnt feel
the view need be publicly aired. Resentful,
Valentine was determined to assume and assert
a leadership role himself, and if need be, run

'4..
THOMPSON

Thompson, and wanted to protect and continue
the record of the Shepherd administration,
let alone the small political group of cronies
that had ridden in along with Shepherd.
Taylor is not the type to get up and say, I
want to be president. He chose the mantle
because there was no one else whom he felt he
could support and trust.
Bill Mcride had been set to run for a full
year. When Rob Blue lost the previous year,

Mcride made up his mind to
run. He was the earliest
known candidate, the first
organized and the first with
money and pledged Greek
support. He was to be billed
as Mr. Sincerity, and he
filled the requirement.
Protest parties]
Contrived with Rich Houk
and Mick Callahan would

later appear, along with Individual Partys Ira
Brukner. Their role became increasingly
important, especially in the later days of the
first campaign.
The candidates selected, the importance of
the campaign became apparent. Mcride came
out first and ran a hard-hitting anti campaign
directed at Student Government. He was trying
to be a reformer himself. Taylor was to become
the second Charlie Shepherd, and Houk and
Brukner wanted the whole structure changed.
The campaign was on.
(NEXT: First week strategy and tactics, the
platforms, the first poop sheets, and the
beginning of entry into the campaign by The
Alligator.)

i. H
l
HOUK

himself.
I Later he would choose to
Iback Bill Mcride rather than
Iwork with the Shepherd
people who were working for
Taylor.
I Clyde Taylor became a
candidate because Marc Glick
and Charles Shepherd did not
really want to back Dick

urn
BRUKNER

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GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Bonnie Parker Cameron. Bonnie, a 2UC who
will major in journalism, confesses to being a suntan addict. She also
likes parties and dancing.
Rights Activists
Lose Appeal Bid

Two motions by local civil
rights workers seeking a reversal
of a District Court ruling have
been denied by the Fifth Circuit
Court of Appeals in New
Orleans.
The group of about 100
activists has been trying to have
certain state laws governing
arson, rioting, and resisting
arrest declared unconstitutional.
The motion charged that
actions taken under these laws
were prompted by bias and
prejudice. 3 <
Four of the plantiffs in the
case are involved in local legal
actions under the controversial
law.

Ruling Supports OConnell

FROM PA6E ONE
on the opinion until he has a
chance to read it.
I assume its in the mail, he
said, but we havent received it
yet.
In the controversial directive
issued to the conduct committee
last quarter, OConnell said the
committee had no authority to
interpret any portion of the
Universitys regulations on
student conduct, to question the
wisdom or justice of the
provisions, or to attempt to
determine the intent of the
drafters of the regulations.
He said the committee may
only determine guilt or
innocence of a student based

One of them, Mrs. Carol
Thomas, activist wife of UF
professor Dr. Billy S. Thomas,
was sentenced to six months in
Alachua County jail Monday on
a charge of resisting arrest. Mrs.
Thomas had attempted to stop
law officials from arresting black
militant Joe Waller at her home
for inciting to riot. She pleaded
guilty.
Waller still awaits trial with
militant Levy M. Wilcox on the
riot charge.
Black power leader Irvin
Jack Dawkins, also a plaintiff,
is scheduled for trial in Marion
County on arson and firebomb
charges Monday.

on the facts of the case.
The student committee
rejected the presidents directive
by an 8-3 vote.
The case under consideration
by the committee at the time
was a hearing for five students
who had taken part in a protest
against Dow Chemical Co.,
manufacturer of napalm for use
in Vietnam.
The five were subsequently
found guilty of trespassing and
fined $35 in Gainesville
Municipal Court. They were
later charged with disobeying a
University official during the
same incident.
Because they had already
received a conviction in
municipal court, the five claimed
the charge constituted double
jeopardy.



UF Wins NCAA Golf Championship

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Editor
Florida has been waiting a
long time to win an NCAA title
and when it finally came
Saturday, not even Steve Melnyk
could believe it.
Steve was the last player left
out in the 100 degree-plus
sunshine in Las Cruces, N.M.
Florida had built up an
eight-stroke lead over eventual
second-place Houston, and it
seemed like it was all over
except to carry home the
trophy.
But, then, on the back nine,
Melnyk started having trouble.
He finished the first seven holes
at par, but bogeyed No. 17.
Melnyk then went on to post a
two-over seven on the final hole.
In the meantime, Houstons
final player, Hal Underwood,
birdied the final three holes to
cut UFs lead from eight, to
seven, to five, and finally, down
to two strokes. If Steve Melnyk
was sweating during the final
three holes of play, it wasnt
because of the heat from the
sun.
For the Gators, it was their
first team honors as an NCAA
winner. Last year, the Gators
were runnersup in the golf title,
and have placed among the top
ten in other NCAA sports.
In individual honors, John
Darr placed fifth in the NCAA
Trackman
Morton Is
All-American
John Morton, UFs mighty
discus and shot put man, has
been named to the All-America
squad. For the Miami
weightman, it will be his
second year on the squad.
Mortons honor came for his
third place effort with the discus
at the NCAA meet at Berkeley
two weeks ago. The All-America
listing came out this week.
Florida placed 25th in the
final appraisal of the competing
teams. Along with Morton, Mike
Flanagan placed fifth in the pole
vault for top points. Flanagan,
however, was not named to the
squad.
Both trackmen are presently
in California awaiting the
preliminary Olympic trials to be
held in two weeks. The top
twelve qualifiers from the trials
will go to the training camp
being sponsored this year at
Lake Tahoe to acclimate the
contenders to the high altitude
in which the Olympics will be
held.
Three other SEC cindermen
are among the All-America team
members.
In the 120 hurdles,
Richmond Flowers of Tennessee
is on the squad along with
teammate Karl Kremser in the
high jump. Also, Jim Green of
Kentucky has been named for
the 400-meter hurdles.
Volley Medal
TOKYO (UPI) Japan won
the womens volley gold medal
at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics,
capturing all five of its matches.

individual count, with a 285.
Melnyk was behind Darr at 287,
followed by John
Sale at 290, and finally, Richard
Spears at 292. Spears posted the
best individual game for the
Gators, with a two-under par 69
on Saturday.
On team counts, Florida
finished first over the 72-hole
course with a team total of
1154. As this is the first year
that such a long course has been
used, Floridas score will be
considered as a record.
Defending champion Houston
placed second at 1156, followed
by Wake Forest at 1160.
Oklahoma State finished at
1162, tying with Texas to make
up the top five scores.
Number six was Arizona
State at 1166, New Mexico,
1171, Colorado, 1172, Michigan
State, 1175, and, at the tenth
spot, Florida State with a score
of 1180.
The Gators finish in this
tournament now stands to put
the squad in contention for
All-American honors.
As present regulations now
stand, the All-America squad is
Mm
WtmL c* *3* m
JOHN DARR
.. .fired 285 for sth in NCAA

When our mechanic
is finished working
on that Volkswagen,
hell work on your
Volkswagen. And
when lie's finished
working on your
Volkswagen, hell
work on another
Volkswagen.
Not much variety, but he sure knows Volkswagens.
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC.
4222 NW 13th Street "BSP

FIRST GATOR TITLE

composed on a 6-6-6-18
arrangement six each on the
first, second, and third teams,
with 18 honorable mentions.
A proposed ruling would
change the formation to an
8-8-8-18 arrangement.
The change could push

Bishop.. The Rainmaker

Coach Buster Bishop went
onto a local radio show in Las
Cruces last week to talk about
UFs golf prospects in the NCAA
tourney. He eventually got
around to golf, but before he
did, he had won the hearts of
Las Cruces citizens as the best
rainmaker in town.
It seems that every time

Viewing Sports

By NEAL SANDERS

Coach Bishop brings his boys to
town, it rains. Seven weeks ago,
he went there, and it rained for
the first time in three months.
Last week, it rained the first two
nights his team was there.
I offered the town our
services any time of the year,
said Bishop. All I asked for was
expenses.
Las Cruces isnt the only
place the Gators have brought
sudden changes in the weather.
At Cape Coral, he stirred up 40
mile per hour winds, and
brought a deluge to Miami which
hasnt let up yet.
But Coach Bishop has also
won tournaments in all those
cities, and so, considers the
weather as just an incidental
sideline to winning golf.

several additional UF golfers
into contention for the first
team. John Darr, who finished
fifth in the individual standings,
is almost a sure finish on the
first team. Steve Melnyk,
however, is the best known of
UFs golfers, and was ranked

I guess we were ready to
win, said Bishop. I woke up
Saturday morning and felt like
we were going to win. We had
been gathering confidence
throughout the meet, and it was
time.
Perhaps it was Steve Melnyk
who offered the best comment
before the final day of play.

Alligator Sports Editor

Its like being on a football
field with fourth and one for a
touchdown that will win the
game, Melnyk said. Theres
just no time left to drop back
and punt.
i
The tournament had its ups 1
and downs, however. Richard \
Spears posted a 75 midway <
through the meet.
J
He couldnt even look at 1
me, said Bishop. He just went s
over to a far side of the green
and stood there for a long time.
Spears score took a turn for
the better on the final day of
play, as he posted a two-under
69 for the best score by a UF
player in the tournament.

FATHER IAN
AND
CAROLINE MITCHELL
HEAR THEM TONIGHT
FATHER IAN
The Folk-Singing Priest With A Beat
And A Guitar Who Created The Singing,
Swinging AMERICAN FOLK MASS
CAROLINE MITCHELL
A Shiny-Eyed, Dark-Haired, Mini-Skirted
Girl Whose Lyric Voice Makes
M sic Come Alive J
UNION BALL ROOM 8:15 P.M.
Admission: Students 50< Others SI.OO
Presented By The LYCEUM COUNCIL

Tuesday, June 25, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

highly in pre-season polls. His
showing at the NCAA
tournament left nothing to
discredit his rating as he finished
two strokes over Darr. With this,
Melnyk could also appear on
the roster, which will be re released
leased released within ten days.

He came running up to us
like a wild indian, he was so
proud, said Bishop.
Melnyk posted a two-over 73
on the final round of play, and
had everyone on the course
holding their breath. Everyone,
that is except Bishop and his
squad.
We knew we had the
tournament wrapped up, said
Bishop. I told Steve to go for
the hole, not for the score. He
took it in nice and careful, and
made sure the ball would up in
the cup instead of some place
that would have really cost us.
It went in the cup, Florida
won, and brought some well
de served light to an
All-American school.
It is worthy to note, also,
that with this championship,
Florida becomes one of the
three schools in the country to
carry a major NCAA title.
Southern Cal has won in three
sports, basketball, tennis, and
track, and Indiana copped the
swimming title in April.
Hank's Mark
ATLANTA Aaron, outfielder of the Atlan Atlanta
ta Atlanta Braves, leads active major
league players in production of
grand slam home runs with a
total of 11.

Page 11



W All good Brand 1^
Sugar-Cured Sliced I J
%iir BREAKFAST Pk9
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG Bl\tni\rnwl
Two Convenient Locations BACON l' k 071 1
6015. W. 2Ave. Pk '* |i
1130 N.E. 16 Ave. .....v....w.-,.-.w.w.v.-.-:5

111 01
LARGE RED RIPE
WATERMELONS 7 9t
FIRM RIPE
PEACHES 29<
DELICIOUS LARGE
BLUEBERRIES 39*
ji FIRM RED RIPE i|
TOMATOES
29{ ,b ,b---*
--* ,b---*
FIRM RED RIPE CALIFORNIA
PLUMS 29*
MEDIUM YELLOW COOKING
ONIONS = 35*
FRESH GREEN
PEANUTS, 19c
JANE PARKER SALE
WHITE BREAD 4/99
1 lb. 8 oz. loaf
APPLE PIES 3/SI.OO
1 lb. 8 oz.
POTATO CHIPS 59*
1 lb.
ANGEL FOOD RING 39*
1 lb. 10 oz.
JELLY ROLL 59*
GIANT 1 lb. 7 oz.

SUPER RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN TENDER
BEEF RIB qqa
STEAK ~ v
SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS FRESHLY
GROUND BEEF 41.39

;! KRAFT VELVET A
|i CHEESE 99* ji
;i SPREAD ;j
BREAKSTONE
SOUR qa
CREAM Pt. Special Jr
AHOY LIQUID
DETERGENT- 3/SI.OO
10 oz. Bot.
A
ANN PAGE
BARBECUE oc
SAUCE 1802 JJV
SULTANA
GRAPE Q
JELLY 2lb i af *5 Y y
ANN PAGE v
RED OOa
BEANS 4,02 V
ANN PAGE RED
KIDNEY OOA
BEANS 4, - t
SULTANA
PORK
BEANS 5202 39$
; j TEA SALE
!; OUR OWN 49* ji
jj OUR OWN 99* jj
1 1 Loose J
jj MATINEE BAGS 79* jj

10{ BUYS
HEINZ 9 PORK & BEANS
TIPTOP FROZEN CONCENTRATE
DRINK
BIX MIX
BISCUIT MIX
PET EVAPORATED
SKIM MILK 13
BIRDS EYE
COOL WHIP- 29<
IDAHO SUPREME
POTATO llb 35a
FLAKES
BRIGHT SAIL
BUG BOMB ,4oz 73<
JANE PARKER OLD FASHION
COOKIES tt-3/SI.OO
ANN PAGE
MIX 'N MATCH
SALE
SANDWICH SPREAD soz.
GARDEN RELISH iooz.
SMALL STUFFED OLIVES 2oz.
3/79c
*#*/tff. f A t
f / # t'f