Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Partly Cloudy
High Near 90
Low Near 70

Vol. 60 No. 154

Kgr #v k M t w t>l 'f* it
m. UHHMIO liaygWgggUM iniiliiliMWHMi
w _Jgg ~.> v. *L
y< > - yS#te&:iA#l ..Jal&l s f .. - mit mMM;
'.*! llf
I 1 is A
II fHff|* |. fi
CONFERENCE IN ACTION
... Ramsey named chairman
BY STUDENT SENATE
Resolution Condemning
Attendance Policy Slated

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President
Clyde Taylors plea for removal
of UFs compulsory attendance
policy will try to clear one of its
early hurdles tonight when a
resolution is presented to the
Student Senate asking them to
endorse the rule-change.
The proposed resolution also
calls upon UF President Stephen

'Arabgator Prompts
Reprisal Legislation
By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Editor
A proposed bill tentatively slated to be presented to the Student
Senate tonight may force all UF student publications to submit to the
approval of either the Board of Student Publications (BSP) or the
Student Senate.
The Senate meets in room 346 of the Reitz Union following
United-First and Forward party caucuses at 7 p.m. tonight.
The bill, reportedly being drawn up by newly-appointed Senator
Ira Hatch and Young Maccabee leader Jack Zucker, is a reaction to a
UF Arab Club publication attacking Israel and her supporters.
The publication, a 12-page, irregularly issued magazine called the
Arab Gator, bitterly attacked the motives and tactics of the Israelis
and their supporters during and since the week-long Arab-Israeli war
in 1967.
It was reportedly published with funds supplied by the Senate
from student fees.
The magazine supposedly aroused the ire of Hatch and Zucker,
who objected to the Arab Clubs use of student fees for partisan
attacks upon Israel and her supporters.
The two are reportedly drawing up a bill stating that no student
organization may issue a publication without the approval of either
the BSP or the Student Senate.
(SEE 'REPRISAL' PAGE 2)

: The
Florida Alligator

C. OConnell to change the
make-up of the Curriculum
Committee to include greater
student representation.
The resolution also condemns
the change in the deadline for
withdrawing from school. In the
past, students have been allowed
to withdraw up until the final
week of classes. The change
permits withdrawing only
through the fifth week of
classes.

THE NATIONS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida. Gainesville

The resolution is expected to
pass, Senate leaders say.
Cliff McClelland, a Forward
Party and Student Senate
member, believes the resolution
will pass.
When our party (Forward)
ran against Taylor, one of our
platforms was to make the only
penalty for missing cfasses an
academic one, McClelland said.
Im very much in favor of
Taylors proposal.
If the proposal is favorably
(SEE 'ATTENDANCE' PAGE 2)

aaW pr
T % js
THE TUBER
Ah, the life of tubing down the Ichnatucknee River, smiles Mike Hollis. See pictures, page 10.

Task Forces
Picked Today
By NEAL SANDERS &
Alligator Staff Writer
The Action Conference Steering Committee IgP
meets at 10 a.m. this morning in the University lyV ||,
College Conference Room to assign members to 10 gBP",11
task forces selected by the conference at its second JnjjErc
The conference picked a chairman and jfe,
vice-chairman and heard position papers from BHBtlF''
representatives from the student, faculty, and RAMSEY
administrative factions on the problems facing this
university, in addition to selecting the task force SfIHHHKk
areas of study.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell's role in the |
conference was bitterly contested. f *lr aPWfc
The conference voted to accept the task forces W
recommended by the conference steering |jEUy|j
committee. They were:
1. The University as a self-governing body.
2. The University as a community of scholars.
3. Curriculum (including the ROTC program HI TL Br
and graduate studies). O'CONNELL
4. Quality of instruction.
5. Freedom of press, speech and assembly.
6. Minimum conduct expectations.
7. The University and its relation to Gainesville
and the state.
8. Responsibility to minority groups.
9. Counselling and advisement policy. mamm
10. Evaluation of the Universitys goals. HL WmMm
The steering committee was expected to assign
conference members to the task force which most W
nearly expressed their interests at todays meeting J/j'
so that the investigative work of the task forces DAtIER
could get underway immediately.
In the election of a chairman, Army Major
Russell Ramsey, UF freshman ROTC instructor
and history doctoral student, defeated UF ISSr
President Stephen C. OConnell. OConnell was HP. Tgk
out of town on business.
OConnell was seated as a full member of the f ? M
conference following an attempt by a small JHgH
number of students and faculty members to limit
his participation in the work of the conference. BHBBHiWI
The students, led by law student Clyde Ellis, Jfy
(SEE 'PROBLEM' PAGE 2) HOLLIS

Inside
Track Stars May Be
On Way To Olympics
See Story, Page 11

Tuesday, June 18, 1968



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 18,1968

Attendance Rapped

ROM M6E ORE
received by the Senate, Tayior
will probably take his suggestion
to the Action Conference. It is
generally felt that the proposal
will need the backing of the
Action Conference if it is to
succeed.
If Action Conference came
up with a recommendation, it
would, have considerable validity
and influence, McClelland said.
Im sure the Action
Conference will consider a
recommendation, and I feel that
they will eventually back
Taylors resolution, said Marc
Glick, assistant to Taylor and
Secretary of the Task Force
Steering Committee. Taylors
resolution will come about, but
if not, the students will know
why.
Were going to raise all the
hell we can.
Glick then said that the
matter was going to be held in a
responsible manner, because
even though the university is
generally unresponsive to
student needs, matters held in a
responsible manner tend to bring

Reprisal Resolution
E FRO* PAGE ONeJUH
Neither Hatch nor Zucker could be reached at press time. Dr.
Byron Kenneth, the Arab Club faculty sponsor and the only club
officer available, was not aware of the controversial issue.
The bill is expected to pass if introduced.
At present, only those publications financed by the BSP are
required to have BSP approval. Those include the Alligator, the
Seminole and the Florida Quarterly.
Other UF student publications are governed only by those
organizations which publish them.
The BSP is a UF presidential committee which supervises the
finances of authorized student publications and requires such
publications to adhere to Florida laws governing the press.
The resolution will be the first of many controversial issues to face
the 70-man Senate this summer, Senator Cliff McClelland (Forward
party) said Sunday.
The Senate will receive a bill to provide a faculty sponsor rather
than an administrative one, for the Association for Women Students
(AWS). It will attempt election reforms to prevent a recurrence of last
spring's debacle when Honor Court Chancellor Bob Hughes
overturned the Student Body Presidential elections.
It will attempt to re-form the Union Board, and to liberalize
academic regulations, such as class attendance rules. It will also
attempt to enlarge the power of the student judiciary.
Tonights meeting will be an important one, because it is largely
organizational. Student Body Vice President Gary Goodrich said.
Floor leaders of both United-First and Forward parties will be
elected at caucuses before the Senate meeting.
CONVENIENCE plus QUALITY
6 WELL-TRAINED BARBERS
RAZOR CUTS HAIR STYLING
HAIR STRAIGHTENING
Shoe Shine
8:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. MON. -FRI.
8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. SATURDAY
STUDENT UNION BARBER SHOP
GROUND FLOOR STUDENT UNION
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Flo rids
and la published five tiroes weekly except during June, July and August when It la published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
offiM.l nptninM of their autN rs. Address correspondence to tbs Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of .orlda, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second dess matter at the United States Poet Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is 914.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
11m Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn sway copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next Insertion.

action.
But ev:n if Taylors
resolution passes all of the
student-led political
organizations, it still must be
cleared by the University Senate
and finally by OConnell.
The University Senate is
made up of every full professor
at the university, plus 50 elected
associate professors and 15
administration members.
Frederick W. Conner, UFs
vice president for academic
affairs, is on the University
Senate.
I think that non-compulsory
attendance can work on some
levels, but not on all of them,
he said.
When asked if he meant that
some students, freshmen for
example, were not as responsible
as others, he replied, I know
theyre not.
McClelland and Glick disagree
with Conner.
The student is responsible
and mature enough to deserve
non-compulsory attendance,
McClelland said. We have to
start freshmen off on the right
step.

Problem Areas Selected

E "1
said OConnells presence could be an obstruction
to uncovering true dissent.
Administrators defending OConnells right to
take part in the conference called the move to
deny him a seat disgraceful.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer. chairman of UF's
political science department, said OConnells
presence was necessary because it would be
instrumental for deciding on what is within the
power of the University to rule upon.
Dauer was named vice chairman of the
conference, after Alligator Managing Editor Harold
Aldrich, who had tied with him in a runoff,
withdrew his name in the spirit of cooperation
we all seek.
Delivering the students position paper, law
student David Wilson called the purported
existence of dossiers on both students and faculty
members a threat to the University.
A growing alienation syndrome has turned
the students against the administration and anyone
else who even looks oppressive, Wilson said.
Students do not like the limited freedom of
exploration a student has outside his major field of
study.
Speaking for the faculty, Dr. Corbin Camell,
assistant professor of English, called for the
reapportionment of the University Senate and
re-evaluation of curriculum goals, including a
possible pass-fail system.
Camell suggested also giving credit for
non-academic studies, for instance, working in

Engineers Meet
The first meeting of the
student chapter of the American
Institute of Industrial Engineers
will be held Wednesday, June
19th in the Mechanical
Engineering auditorium (rm.
211) at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting will feature a
talk by IBMs Paul Moore on
sales engineering within his
company.
Refreshments will be served
during a short business session
after the meeting.

BRING YOUR FRIENDS
AND HAVE A...
...Happy Hour
Steins 15<
Pitchers SI.OO
Monday thru Thursday
9 pm lO pm
HBBW mimi 4
mHOMI If Ye Public house
3510 SW 13th ST. JL.
372-3389 T

slum areas.
Camell called UFs previous attempts at
instructional evaluation scandalously
irresponsible. and called on the conference to
close the gap between the curricular and the
extra-curricular."
Dr. Camell raised the possibility of a second
subsidized campus newspaper, and called for an
explanation of the administration s present role of
final judge over who appears on campus to speak.
He also blasted the stand by the Board of
Regents in regard to the present regulation on
ROTC. asking, By what rights does the Board of
Regents convene themselves as the Department of
Defense?
Dean Franklin Doty of the University College,
presenting the views of the administration, asked
for a clarification of authority of the
administration, which he called mainly intuitive.
in UFs relation to the world around it, he set
up as one of his objectives to determine what the
University's commitment was to the community,
since the university could not be all things to all
people.
He further advocated a plan for providing funds
for curriculum research and improvement.
Following the three statements, the group was
asked for additions to the topics given, or any
clarifications of what had been said. At this time,
Jim Hollis, 4EG, questioned the basis on which
the student complaints had been based.
The majority of the students serving on this
conference are representatives of themselves, and
only themselves.

OAY 90*
Under New Ownership-Formerly Roarin' 20's
Serving Lunch
HOMEMADE and HOT
ROAST BEEF and SMOKED TURKEY
SANDWICHES
Open 11 am to 2 am 1011 W. Univ. Ave



Aquavanti of Blue and
White with Military Piping.
Th e Umbrella is styled by
Etienne Aigner of Belgian
m /men one/ leather case.
pP^ Leather shoes by Etienne f
/ Hf pique. Modeled by f
HHF
Jr coo/ kicky Pant Dress I
Modeled by Marsha j 1

Tuesday, June 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 18,1968

Page 4

UF Has Tighter Control Over Alligator

(Editor's note: This is the second in a two-part senes
dealing with pre-publication censorship and ex post
facto punishment of student editors at the UF.)
By PEGGY SEYKORA
Alliptor Staff Writer
Since 1966 the Board of Student Publications (BSP)
has employed a full-time director whose duties include
advising the editorial department of the Alligator.
With the introduction of the office of director, the
philosophy of pre-publication restraint has developed,
said Journalism Professor H. B. Davis, Jr. He is one of
the professors teaching at the journalism college who has
served on the BSP.
Davis feels that student liberty has deteriorated in the
past few years.
The student press has changed, said Davis. It has
become less dedicated and more radical in its proposals.
This move has been started by the university image. The
university is strengthening its controls for its own
protection.
The most recent incident of an editor crying
censorship occurred with pre-publication restraint of
Alligator Editor Steve Hulls editorial on the hearings for
psychology professor Marshall Jones. As a result of the
editorial, five subordinate editors quit their jobs, and the

jfl m EllgF
GATOR SUMMER BAND
... will give concerts
Gun Control Advocate
Gaining Local Support

By MARGARET O'BRIEN
Alligator News Editor
Response to Dr. Bob Burton
Browns appeal for active protest
for gun legislation in Gainesville
has not been overwhelming. But,
said Brown, an assistant
professor of education, the
situation is encouraging.
Weve gotten about 15 or 20
phone calls, Brown said, in
response to a story in last weeks
Alligator telling of his wish to
organize a gun demonstration
group. Brown declined to
mention the names of those who
called him.
People who are against guns
are not very volatile, Brown
ventured, adding that they tend
to express their dissatisfaction in

Live Band To Perform At Playday

A beauty contest, skydivers,
and a live band will highlight the
days activities at the 16th
annual Camp Wauburg Playday
Saturday, June 22.
Playday, which is sponsored
each summer by Student
Government, will begin with
games at 8 a.m. Prizes will be
awarded to the winners of each
game.
The highlight of Playday, the

more subtle ways than
demonstration.
Brown said that most of
those who called him were
interested in writing letters to
representatives and talking to
friends, acquaintances and local
officials to make their opinions
felt. These efforts will probably
be the continued tactics of the
group, he said.
Brown has talked to U.S.
Representative Don Fuqua
(D-Fla.) and to Democratic
nominee for state Senator Bob
Saunders. Saunders, Brown
mentioned, offered warm
support to gun legislation.
Brown was also pleased by the
editorial support for gun laws by
the Alligator and the Gainesville
Sun.
The people who have called

beauty" contest, will begin at 1
vgjpJTbe contest is open to any
full-Jime with a 2.0 or
above average. Applications for
the pageant are free and may be
picked up in room 310 in the
Reitz Union until Wednesday.
There will be trophies for the
queen and the two runners up.
The queen will receive clothing,
jewelry, theater passes, and free
meals provided by local

FORMER BSP MEMBER CONTENDS

editorial page remained blank on April IBth and I9th.
The BSP told Hull to revise the editorial. He did, but
the board voted that the revisions were not sufficient
to meet the intent of the action taken by the board.
Director of Student Publications John S. Detweiler
said he withheld publication of the editorial until tue
BSP could meet because he thought it was both
potentially illegal and injurious to Hull and the Alligator.
Until February 7 of this year, the board did not
define the duties of the director. But at the time, it
stated that the director should review and recommend
removal of all libelous, obscene or otherwise illegal
material, he said.
The withholding of copy must be appealed by the
editor to the BSP within 24 hours. The board will then
decide whether the copy may be published.
My basic appeal to the board, said Detweiler, was
that it paralleled a type of document for which editors
could be cited for contempt of court. If there was a legal
parallel, 1 wanted the board to be aware of it.
The BSP supposedly provides an opportunity to keep
one man from arbitrarily deciding to publish or deny
publication of questionable material. The board is
composed of four students and four faculty members,

him, Brown explained, are in
agreement, but they as yet have
no plans tor meeting together,
although they might come
together if the situation warrants
it.
Brown said the sentiment for
gun legislation has been gaining
ground and that this group will
keep it up until somethings
done.
Art To Rent
The College Library has a
collection of art
reproductions which may be
loaned to students, faculty,
or anyone having a library
card. These paintings are
framed, ready to hang, and
rent for only $1 to $1.75 per
quarter

merchants.
The sky diving show will
begin at 3 p.m. with the divers
diving into the lake.
For the first time, a live band
will play all day at Playday and'
radio station WDVH will cover
the days events.
Playday will end with a dance
on the Union Terrace. The
Certain Amount will perform
from 8 pan. until midnight.

appointed by the president of the university.
BSP discussion was not restricted to Detweilers
contempt of court analogy. Board members also
discussed whether the editorial was potentially libelous
and questioned the appropriateness of a number of its
phrases.
Following discussion, a motion to run the editorial
failed to carry in a 2-2 vote and the editorial was not
printed.
Hull contends that the BSP discussion shows that
those voting against printing the editorial were
motivated on the basis of good taste, which is not
premitted under the BSP policies.
The two BSP members, on the other hand, claim they
acted to prevent publication of the editorial because of
the legal considerations discussed.
I probably wouldnt have withheld the editorial
now, Detweiler said. I think the director should be
able to cite the statute the editorial violates if he pulls it.
I responded to bad journalism, rather than illegal
journalism.
Detweiler agreed that it is less likely now that an
editor would be removed than it was before
pre-publication restraint began.
The practice of the past may be the best, but the
new policy does protect the editor better, Detweiler
contended.

Summer Band
Concerts Begin

The Gator Summer Band
presents the first twilight
concert of the quarter
Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. on the
lawn of University Auditorium.
Kicking off the season will be
Frolicking Frenchmen by Jack
Jarrett. Jarrett, an alumnus of
the UF, is head of the Theory
and Composition Dept, at the
University of Alabama.
Leading the French horn
section on this number will be
Kenneth Jones formerly band
director for Santa Fe High
School, and presently the
graduate assistant with the Gator
Band.
The overture for the evening
will be Light Cavalry Overture
by von Suppe. Other selections
will include Beguine for Band by
Glenn Osser, Western Dance by
Clare Grundman, Highlights
from South Pacific by Rodgers
and Hammerstein, Water Music
Suite by Handel, and March of
the Blazerteers by Caudill.
Concluding the evening will be

More Dorms Being Cooled

Air-conditioned dormitory
facilities will be available to
2100 add: nal UF students by
September, Director ot Housing
Harold K J k l.xursduy.
Included in the million dollar
contract are all dormitories in
the Graham and Tolbert Areas
and Hume Hall. System
installation has begun and will
be completed by summer of
1969.
We anticipate all interior
work will be completed prior to
class time in September, said
Riker. This includes painting of
corridors, stair-wells and
common areas, as well as the
interior installation of the
air-conditioning system. The
exterior construction will
continue through the 68-69
school year until completion.
Student rents on the west
end of campus will go up
slightly, he continued, but the
increase is intended to defray
the costs of operation rather
than the costs of procurement
and installation of the units. The

traditional UF songs during
which the audience will be
invited to sing along.
Conductors for the evening
will be Richard W. Bowles,
Director of Bands and Robert E.
Foster, Assistant Director of
Bands.
Explosion
In Cycles
According to Sgt. J. M. King
of the University Police
Department, a total of 1,778
cycles were registered with the
UF in the two year period from
September, 1965, to
September, 1967.
UF cyclist, Phil Daniel said he
rides a cycle because, Its
cheap, fast transportation.
Other students seem to agree
that the main reason for cycle
popularity among college
students is their practical uses in
and about campus. A few
students say they like to ride
just for the thrill of it.

exact additional costs are not
available at this time, but we
plan to keep increases to a
minimum.
Dr. Riker outlined
improvements which will be
accomplished in other dormitory
areas during the summer.
Fluorescent lights will be
installed in the study areas of
Murphree Hall and the mail
room will be renovated,
including the installation of new
equipment.
Fletcher Hall will receive
similar improvements after
Murphree Hall is completed.
Sledd Hall is presently under
consideration for similar
renovation.
ODK Keys Here
Omicron Delta Kappa
members may pick up their keys
and certificates in the Dean of
Mens office any time this week.



'Will Penny: Adult Western

Bv JOE KNIGHT
Alligator Staff Writer
9*
Charlton Heston (Will Penny)
is a middle-aged cowboy
disillusioned with life because he
has never been off the cattle
range. In this movie he manages
to be thoroughly beaten, causes
Joan Hackett (Catherine) to fall
in love with him although she is
already married and has a son

'Yours, Mine And Ours

By TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
Yours, Mine and Ours now playing at the
Center can be described in one word unusual.
The plot is unusual. As far-fetched as it may
seem for a widowed father of 10 and a widowed
mother of eight to get married and have a child of
their own, it makes a good movie. The writer is
aware of the storys unusualness and during the
wedding, one of the many children observes, Its
more like a freak show than a wedding.

Little Story In 'Madigan'

By SUSIE HALBACK
Alligator Staff Writer
The world of New York
Citys law enforcement
personnel is a very unhappy one.
Violence, ruthlessness, and
alienation are the motivating
principles in this often brutal
story of Detective Madigan s
(Richard Windmark) search for
murderer Barney Benesche.
Dan Madigan, ace detective of
the 23rd precinct, is having
troubles with his pretty wife,
Julia (Inger Stevens). Henry
Fonda plays the unemotional
police commissioner, Tony
Russell, and his acting is as
neutral as his role. Russell is the
absolute moralist. He lives in a
world in which everything is
either right or wrong there is
no in between.
Russell and Madigan, of
course, dislike each other. A few
odd characters whose problems
are exposed but never resolved
wander in and out of the story.
Rocky Benero, Madigan s
partner, is the only
well-adjusted member of the
This is Where Good
Service Starts!
CRANE IMPORTS
Specialist in repairs of
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in North
Central F lorida
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY
372-4372

MOVIE

and makes his bow from the
movie with a tremendous show
of strength from an old man.
Will Penny is an unusual
western that presents the typical
trials and tribulations of a
cowboy. Some of the plot is
what youve seen over and over,
but this flaw does not destroy
the films quality of realism.
Charlton Heston is in his usual
excellent form. You might

cast. He has a happy home life
and no major worries.
The action of the movie
moves in triple-time to the
already rapid pace of New York
City life. The camera roves up
and down east-side streets,
following Benesche as he scurries
from one hiding place to
another. Culminating in a
Bonnie & Clyde shoot-out, the

COUCH S carrying a
complete line of ROBERTS
stereo component systems,stereo
&
and monaural tape recorders
JSgjy nijMijgii m
279 95 TOSSriSI RP 2000
o complete compact stereo component system
o stereo record player
o AM-FM receiver combination
o complete with speaker system
/VAI 60S N. Main St.
LUUUI V PH. 376-7171

The acting is unusual. Lucille Ball provides a
little of her typical slapstick, but her role is basically
sedate. Henry Fonda seems to be best in his
narrating roles. Eric Shea as Philip, one of the North
children, turns in a fine performance for a boy of
nine.
The over-all mood of the movie is unusual. Be
prepared to cry a little and laugh a little,
occasionally both at the same time. The unhappy
aspect of two recent deaths (the two spouses) and
the touching prospect of uniting two families into
one provide both tears and hilarious laughter.

remember Joan Hackett from
The Group in which her
acting was limited. However, in
Will Penny her character
portrayal was superb. Also. Lee
Majors of TVs Big Valley
makes his movie debut. His part
was not large, but from what
was seen of him, Im sure hell
be seen again in the near future.
You can see this movie at the
Plaza Theatre.

only definite solution to any of
the storys problems is the death
of Benesche.
If you want a movie thats
full of rapid, rough, and rampant
screenplay one in which your
mind can relax completely
see Madigan at the Florida.
Photography is often excellent,
and made me long to be roaming
the streets of New York myself.

Tuesday, June 18,1968, The Florida Alligator,

* i jf| ilPlf *'.' < Igj^ i
iSp 4 sdHwBI
, 3|f 4 M 7s j.-::^Wfer
' i §j. ., 'm^Kmm;
\ f -,--'
ww; #
is9Bg> v^im
MELODY STUART
.. .Wometco Refund Girl
Melodys Day
Spent In Money

Theres this cute blonde, see,
named Melody Stuart. She
stands about 4 11 and works
at the Hub in the former Lost
and Found booth next to the
student depository. One of her
greatest attributes, besides
wearing a size three dress, is that
she refunds money.
Melody is the Wometco
refund girl.
I have no trouble with
students, she said. It is usually
professors that approach me
frowning.
One professor said he didnt

SEAFOOD vHI
II nESH FROM \||
l> EVERY MONDAY 4|
f and TUESDAY 1
I OLDE FASHION I
FISH & CHIPS
I S1 Served in a Basket I
Fresh Ocean Fish Breaded in
Our Kitchen and served in the
Olde Fashioned English way.
I Hush puppys Cole Slaw I
Try Our Arabic salad 1
| LOBSTER p% |
hV HOUSE I
Serving Daily from S P M. I
Ik | Sunday* From 4:00 to 10:00 1.1
IkV GAINESVILLE OCALA JJm
|j\ 3500 SW 13th Hwy. 301. *4l Mi ..
|\ St. an Sivan 27 suth
Arm lake 't mila south JK
Ph. 378-2931 of Holiday Inn JKi

like walking all the way from
Tigert and would bust the
machine if it failed to give him
change again, laughed Melody.
On the job since February,
Melody already has plenty of
anecdotes about her unusual
occupation. A recent incident
concerned a student who rushed
in to tell her that the milk
machine behind the Hub was
tossing nickles at passersby. Sure
enough. Melody spent some time
retrieving the coins which were
being cast quite randomly.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 18,1968

Compromise Needed

The Action Conference is now in
its second week. Individual task
forces will soon begin to zero in on
their assigned problems.
But already there are some
misconceptions which must be
cleared up, if the conference is to
perform its best.
President Stephen C. OConnell
told the conference at its first
meeting that all must be willing to
forget their status and to agree that
CMTI
what we seek here is what is best and
necessary for this community, not
for any one segment or group in it.
Taken at face value, this is
unrealistic. The 75 members of the
conference were picked because of
their leadership positions for the
various segments of this community.
Most feel they must represent the
interests of their particular segments
in the search for solutions to this
universitys probles.
No doubt, members of each of the
three interest groups represented in
the conference are already discussing
the best ways to secure what they
feel their constituents want.
No one should be either surprised
or chagrined at such political
wheeling and dealing because it is
the heart of American democracy.
This was the manner in which the

"Campus Comments
;
Sin City: Paradise?
R y Margaret OBriensl
Sin City is getting famous. Its residents have read about their
glorious debauchery and revelling in newspapers and magazines
throughout the state. But all is not quiet in this supposed paradise of
wan ton ness.
Rent is high, apartments are starting to wear and something is
always in need of fixing or painting, parking lots are hopelessly
crowded, and residents are tired of hearing noise from apartments on
all sides.
Then there are the roommate problems. Since most of the
apartments are two-bedroom, usually four people attempt to live
together in one. They face constant problems of one eating everybody
clses food, and work piling up for them to clean the dirty dishes,
floors, rugs and the bathroom.
The average sin city apartment has no regular maid service even
for major jobs like cleaning carpets or windows while tenants are
occupying the apartment.
Add to all this the fact that there is not near enough closet or
drawer space for the four people these apartments are supposed to
accommodate-not to mention desk space for those who want to make
a feeble attempt at studying and going to school.
With so much money wrapped up in rent, utility, rent and breakage
deposits and monthly bills, it really costs to set up shop in one of
these apartments. Roommates taking off without paying bills are not
an unusual occurrence.
Everyone says, when it comes to partying, that's when Sin City
shows its true colors. Maybe so.
But when you spend 10 minutes looking for a parking space in an
apartment complex which has allotted 1.3 parking spaces per
apartment in its lots, your ardor may cool.
Or, to top it off, when you try to leave, you find you're blocked
by a locked double-parked car, whose owner has long since
disappeared.
Yet, students, fearless as they are, are willing to reserve apartments
months ahead of time. They like being together hundreds to the
acre. They live separated only by thin walls and arc brought together
daily at the Dempsey Dumpster carrying their daily accumulation of
garbage.
Perhaps Sin City isnt all that bad. Many other apartment
complexes in town share some of its problems. But where on earth
did the idea get started that Sin City was a college student's paradise?

U.S. Constitution was written and
this was the manner in which our
state and national legislative bodies
work.
What is essential to the success of
the conference the oil which will
enable the machine to run well is
the element of compromise and
discussion.
OConnell touched upon this
when he said, We must recognize
that as a conference member, each
person here is on an equal footing
and his views and voice are entitled
to equal respect whether he be
faculty, student or administrator.
A remarkable ideal. We shall
watch all members of the conference
to see if it is realistic.
An essential element to the
success of the conference is the
ability to compromise. Although the
three divergent groups in the
conference, students, faculty and
administration, can be expected to
represent their own interest groups,
everyone must be willing to
realistically deal with UFs problems
and to make sacrifices for the greater
good.
We call upon all conference
members to do so, for without such
willingness and, indeed, such
sacrifices, the conference can come
to naught.

i i | i t(
l I j
- 1 t
-
_
w

Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know **
1%8 Harold Kennedy
O i Editor
roaMMVv Haro i d Aldrich Paul Kaplan
RVu Managing Editor Executive Editor
All Margaret OBrien Neal Sanders
News Editor Sports Editor
Florfcto Ail letter's official position on luom Is uprosasd
only to ten column* Mow. Otter material to ttto tom may
redact the opinion at tta writer or cartoonist and not aaeaaaarlly
tfc.i gs mo Florid* Al ffy** >l ""*** npscfflrally Indicated.
pThe Fifth
Lost fnnocence^M
L=i===Jason Straight==3S=!

America is entering the post-puberty
period, the last stages of her national
adolescence. Invariably, this is instigated
by a loss of innocence, and usually
followed by a subsequent identity crisis.
An example of a nation that has
recently undergone this change is England.
Her loss of innocence was the 1956 Suez
crisis. Her identity crisis has continued
through the past twelve years since then,
and if anyone doubts that England has
changed, one has only to look at the
present day mini-Britain as compared to
the still-glorious Commonwealth of the late
4os and early sos.
There are certain subjective impressions

that an adolescent forms in his mind as he
grows up, and there is an analogous
national personality here in this country
that closely parallels this youthful
state-of-mind.
First and foremost, there is a feeling of
immortality, of invincibility. Possibly
down, but never out. An adolescent never
thinks of death, never wonders about it,
never FEARS it.
Death happens only to old people who
have lived the good life and now are no
longer useful (England).
In the rare instance where a person is
struck down at an early age, then either it
was his own fault, he was driving too
recklessly (The Third Reich, Red China);
or it was an inexplicable bolt out of the
blue, an unavoidable accident decided by
fate (Greece).
Americans feel that this country is
immortal; we are good and we will always
triumph. We cant imagine anarchy in
America, an Army coupe, any kind of
dictatorship; in short, we as a country,
have been the national equivalent of the
physically healthy, well-dressed naive
middle-class teenager -a sort of collective
senior in high school waiting for his
acceptance from Yale or Cornell, not at all
apprehensive of the rejection slip.
Like most youths, America has had its
rocky roads, its bad times. But like youth,
Americas memory represses these bad
times (the War of 1812, a failing grade, the
genocide of the American Indian) or else
convinces itself that the same mistake
wont happen again, we have learned our
lesson. (The Civil War, striking out on a
curve ball, the Depression.)
Although we have done wrongful acts,
we really arent a bad people. Just like our
mother and father will take care of us in
times of stress, so also will God watch over
this teenaged America and right any
wrongs, soothe any pains.
And if we have any ailments (pimples,
riots), they are nothing but a passing stage,
a part of growing up, and after a while they
go away all by themselves.
This then is our America. We have been
the hero in our share of football games
(World Wars l and II), have romanced our
share of attractive women (Puerto Rico,
Philippines, SEATO, NATO), thrown our
share of hell-raising parties (Hiroshima,
Dominican Republic). But weve never
doubted that we were a good people, a
nation of manifest destiny.
Until now.
For now we are witnessing a stampede.
The do-nothing sos have been obliterated
by the shocking events of the 6os. The
whole civil rights problem, the war in
Vietnam, the deplorable political
assassinations have all coalesced; we are
now a nation plagued by self-doubt and
ridden with dissent.
We have lost our innocence.



38

WASHINGTON The
student revolt which started
with an attack on Springer
newspapers in Berlin last spring
has now swept around the
world. Did it result from an
international conspiracy? Is
there a student underground
linking the ivy halls of Columbia
in New York with the crowded
communist universities of
Belgrade, Warsaw, Cracow and
Prague?
This column, after extensive
research, is able to report that
there is an international student
conspiracy. Mark Rudd, who for
a time closed down Columbia
University, visited Fidel Castro
in Cuba shortly before he
brought anarchy to Columbia.
A delegation of Latin
American students visited the
United States this spring shortly
before trouble broke out on
American campuses. Danny
Cohn Bendit, the
French-German student
revolutionary, also visited the
United States shortly before
trouble erupted here.
The spiritual, though perhaps
unwitting, godfather of the
campus revolt is Professor
Herbert Marcuse of the
University of California at San
Diego, who recently visited Rudi
Dutschke, the left-wing German
student hospitalized after the
Berlin student riots.
It was Dutschke was
beaten up that leftist German
students stormed the Springer
newspaper building in Berlin,
occupied its lower floor,

OPEN FORUM:
jAfwiaml ViAAmt
There is no hope for the complacent man.
FROM ALLIGATOR
Truth, Courage Gone

MR. EDITOR:
Meet the new Alligator
editors, as they so modestly
confess, Not everyone can talk
with President OConnell but
we can. (May 27 Alligator.)
Sure. The last time OConnell
had a little talk with them, they
resigned in support of the
censorship of an Alligator
editorial critical of OConnell
and the Administration.
LETTERS
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

ww^ wwwwww MERRY-GO-ROUND
7
A Student Conspiracy

1 DREW PEARSON

paralyzed its delivery trucks and,
for a time, disrupted publication
of the biggest newspaper empire
in West Germany.
The attack on the Springer
publications was widely
interpreted as pro-Communist
since Axel Springer is so
vigorously anti-Communist that
he has built a $25,000,000 new
publishing house practically
astride the Berlin Wall as an act
of defiance to East Germany.
His newspapers, including Die
Welt, the New York Times of
West Germany; Bild-Zeitung, the
largest circulating paper on the
European continent; and half a
dozen others, all follow a
strongly pro-American,
anti-Hitler, pro-Israel line.
It was the riots against the
Springer publications which
touched off a chain reaction of
students all over the world in
which, incidentally, Communist
universities have suffered almost
as much as Western institutions.
Other factors besides the
conspiracy between Rudi
Dutschke, Mark Rudd, and
Daniel Cohn-Bendit, however,
have caused student unrest. Two
of them are:
1. Many universities are out
of date. The Sorbonne in Paris
now has a student enrollment of
over 100,000, yet hasn't built a
new building in ten years.
Classes average around 1,500 ~
and professors have no idea of
who attends classes.
Columbia University in New
York, though not as bad as the
Sorbonne, has become an

Subsequently, these
resigned editors took up
supervisory positions in the
paste-up laboratory and with the
Administration-appointed Board
of Student Publications (BSP).
The Administration takes care of
its own.
Now the BSP has chosen as
Alligator editors for the next
four quarters these same
resigned editors. To choose
them, the BSP had to pass over
other far better qualified
applicants. Surprise, anyone?
Just to make sure there are
no accidental deviations from
the Administration line by these
journalistic Uncle Toms, they
are scheduled for weekly talks
with President OConnell.
It looks like its going to be
quite a while before truth or
courage make much of a
showing again in the Alligator.
RANDY SIDES

educational machine, the
president serving as a public
relations man and money raiser,
out of touch with the students.
Many big American universities
have similar problems.
2. In the United States
students have taken a healthy
interest in politics. Sen. Eugene
McCarthy was the first to
awaken them, followed by the
late Sen. Robert Kennedy.
In Czechoslovakia, students
helped throw out the cold
Communist regime in favor of
new Czech semi-democracy. In
Paris the revolt of Sorbonne
students led to the gravest
French political crisis in 100
years.
Today students are playing a
more important role in
American and European affairs
than at any other time in
history, though Latin American
students are not.
There was a time when the
University of Havana was the
chief spawning ground of
revolutions. Fidel Castro is one
of its products. Today, however,
Castro has put a crimp on
student revolution.
There was also a time when
the University of Caracas in
Venezuela and the University of
Mexico were hotbeds of revolt.
However, the Mexican
government closed down its
university the last time students
went on the rampage; and in
Venezuela, President Raul Leoni
sent police into the hitherto
sacrosanct grounds of the
university, unearthed a cache of
arms used in conducting guerrilla

taMlfibK
wUr' Jm
-t: 'wjjy s -/"'
HBIHb
aBB|BB|iBBk wmfiam
/Mm
Jp 1 .§<*s£' "%
; '? : ; : # /W -^
/f t**'y*~ W* / I&Uf*'--* Vvv^..
-''/ :\Vv"3> ; /' \r
"f fr
Sow/ Mates
x\lligator Staff
V
Arlene Caplan Steve Hulsey j e( j R ern ley
Campus Living Editor Copy Editor Entertainment Editor
STAFF WRITERS: Janie Gould, George Cunningham, Don
Yokel, Bob Wickham, Joe Knight, Susie Halback
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS: Nick Arroyo, Gus Mus teller
STAFF ARTIST: Lois Parks

Tuesday, June 18,1968, The Florida Alligator,

JACK ANDERSON

warfare. Since then the
university has been under police
scrutiny.
The deflation of Latin
American student activities was
one reason for the outbreak at
Columbia this spring. Here is
what happened:
On May 31, President
Johnson had removed the No. 1
issue of American students by
announcing truce talks with
North Vietnam. This left
students without their main
issue.
They had been protesting the
war in Vietnam and the draft.
But when Johnson removed the
issue, demonstrations planned
for late April were deflated.
At this point, a delegation of
Latin American students came
to New York to urge the
Students for a Democratic
Society to proceed with the ten
days of strikes and sit-ins as
originally planned for May.
Mark Rudd, president of the
Students for a Democratic
Society, agreed. He hurriedly
selected the new Columbia
gymnasium to be built in a
Harlem park as a new issue, plus
the severance of university ties
with the Institute of Defense
Analysis.
Rudd, an A student, now a
Columbia junior, had been
planning a university sit-in ever
since last summer. He has been
in touch with student leaders
around the world, from the
Berliners who sparked the
demonstration against Axel
Springer to the leaders of the
Sorbonne revolt.

B[_ Jsj

Page 7



* GATO R CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
M
FEMALE ROOMMATE for summer
quarter SIOO.OO Starlight. Inquire
after 5. 809 S.W. sth Ave.
(Cls 4
UNFURNISHED DESK SPACE, air
conditioned, preferably near north northeast
east northeast part of campus, wanted by doc doctoral
toral doctoral candidate. 376-0036. (C-152-
st-p)
HELP!! Our cook has graduated. If
you are a girl who likes to cook and
is tired of Cafeteria food call
3767873. (Cls 3
Coed, 22, desires apartment for
summer with same age group girls (s).
Prefer Williamsburg but will consider
other modem apartments. Call
3787469. (Cls32t-p)
WANTED 1 or 2 female roommates
to share 3 bedroom AC house
SIOO.OO for summer. Also 2 26"
lightweight bicycles one boys one
girls. Will pay around $15.00.
Telephone 3760109.
(Cls 3
I LOST A FOUND |
4
FOUND: 1967 P.K. YONGE
graduation .ring with blue stone at
Circulation Dept, of Research
Library. (Lls43tnc)
LOST DURING UF registration
Friday, 7th. Raper portfolio with
aceacm programs in Pockets.
Reward. 3722658. (Lls42tp)

Campus
Tuesday, June 18
Painting for Fun: Painting, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Program Office: Bridge Lessons:
150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: Meeting, 363
Union, 8 p.m. New members
are invited.
Wednesday, June 19
Gator Band Twilight Concert
Univ. Aud. Lawn, 6:45 p.m..
Admission Free, Everyone
Invited.
Florida .Speleogical Society:
Slide showings, 349 Union, 7
p.m.
Engineering Dames: Meeting,
Perry House, 8 p.m. Guest
speaker will be Mrs.
Strickland of the Union Arts
& Crafts Shop. All student
wives are invited.
Thursday, June 20
Christian Science College
Organization: Meeting, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Veterans Club: Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Yoga: Lessons, Towers, Bldg. C.,
9 p.m.

REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
TUESDAY NIGHT
SPECIAL
Red Pin Bowling 8-10 p.m.
WIN FREE GAMES
Shoe Rental 10$ Game 40$

| SERVICES |
THESIS, dissertations and short term
papers typed in my home. Pica type
and Spec. Characters on typewriter.
T elephone 4663338, Mlcanopy,
Florida. (M 1536t p)
SERVICES: Bass player available for
established rock group. Have mike
and 4 years experience. Jim
372-4618. (Mls34tp)
ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS,
STARTERS, Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 S.E. Second Street.
3787330. (Mls3tfc)
A GENERATOR Alternator or
starter Problem? We rebuild them all,
Cat! J ar d J Auto Electric.
3788301, 1726 N.E. Waldo Road.
Electrical systems checked free.
(M 153 tsc)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services. 378-
2489. (M-153-16t-p)
v>%v-v.v.vxv;*x*x-;-y.v ;
FOR SALE
>
FOR SALE. Lunch and Dinner
Specials. Quality food for low prices.
Hungry Students stop by L 4 W
Cafeteria, 313 W. University Avenue,
Downtown. (A15220t p)
FOR SALE: 1966 MGB B. Wire
Wheels. $1,550; 100 lb. weight set,
$7; Sun Lamp, $5. Call Fred
378-7148. (A 153 2t p)

Calendar
Friday, June 21
Men's Interhall Council: Movie,
"Key," Towers Rec. Room, 7
& 9 p.m.
Union Movie: "Good Neighbor
Sam," Union Aud., 7 & 9:15
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Summer Frolics, IAN AND
SYLVIA, folksingers, $2.00
per person; FATHER IAN
AND CAROLINE
MITCHELL, 50 cents for
students, SI.OO for faculty,
staff and general public; and
Florida Cinema Society
Subscription tickets, SI.OO.
The following events have been
canceled or rescheduled
because of the cancelation of
classes on July 4th and sth,
1968. I. "Mickey One" has
been canceled. (A movie
sponsored by Men's
Interhall). 2. The dance on
the terrace sponsored by the
Union Board has been re rescheduled
scheduled rescheduled for the 29th of
June. The KIDZ will play
from 8:00 12:00.

Page 8

l # The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 18,1968

FOR SALE
i i , s
GUNS GUNS GUNS Inventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading Supplies, Custom
Reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY
4663340. (Als4tfp)
HOT this summer?? Get a 2 speed,
20 inch fan. Has been used only 2
months. SIO.OO. Call
(Als3 2t p)
1957 FORD FOR SALE (VB)
Good running condition/clean,
like new inside, $200.00. Call
3769420, Mark Slsyin for
information. Leave name and number
if not in. Also, 9xl2 white
blackgreen speckled rug $9.00.
(A 15312 p)
120 lb. Weight lifting outfit, good
condition, $15.00, 20" 3 HP
Lawn mo we r, year old, $25.00. Phone
3786545. (Als4lt p)
TOPCON SuperD with F 1.4 Lens.
Finest TTL meter system. Excellent
for scientific and professional. List
$420., sell $240. New. Call
3763578. (A-1533tp)
FOR SALE Gibson LG-0 Guitar
$55.00. In good condition with used
hard case. Call Russ at 378-4790
after 7:00 nights. (Als42t p)
FOR SALE: Blackmasked African
Lovebirds. V 2 price. 3725767. See at
107 S.W. 26 St. (Als3st-p)
PUPPIES for sale: Half shepherd. Will
be large good natured dogs. Need
good homes. $5. Call 3786433.
(A-1532tp)
MOVING. Must Sell. Remington
Typewriter. Excellent condition. Call
3784657 after 6 p.m. or all day
Sunday. (Als 42t p)
AUTOS |
5* s
1965 MUSTANG GT, White, Best
offer, after 5 p.m., call Mike Boring,
3725911. (G 154 2t p)
Main Feature 9:00 '* mmm
at 12:15
Jerry Lewis
"The Nutty Professor"
[ SRfU
THRU WED AT 7:00 & 9:05*
pS Tory
Wt sa Twvtomcnmwoiiu rmr ana too mum nmtt K
THE FACE OF \
IWWW 1

AUTOS |
PORSCHE 912, White with fawn
interior, five speed, konis Tuned
exhaust* Chrome Wheels, Radial tire*,
all tinted glass, fog lamps, Blaupunkt,
Rallye and autocross extras
consistently maintained, complete
records of Gas, oil and repairs,
$3795.00, 4663509 (Local).
(Gls 42t p)
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: 1 Bedroom Apartment,
Furnished and Air conditioned. 5
Blocks from campus, available
immediately. 1533-35 N.W. sth Ave-.
(Bls2stp)
Room for Rent, Large comfortable
corner room lavatory, 2 closets, use
of kitchen. 2 Blocks C. 1., Day, week,
or month. Summer rates. 3784645.
(Bls3lt p)
ROOM & BOARD slO per
quarter. Males and Females.
Collegiate Living Organization. 117
N.W. 15th Street. Phone: 376-9420.
(B 1534t p)
WOULD YOU BELIEVE $250.00??
Thats all it takes to live in the
luxurious LA FONTANA hirise for
the entire summer quarter! Adjacent
UF Post Office. See Apt. 506 or call
378-4134. (81534 t

I Bj (IVI | MvwUmjT >1;30-3:30-^30-*
I *1:55-3:55-6:55-7:55-9:55 |
# *** ****## J
\ George K What's
i Peppari m : \ .soad ;
Imgiyteffh tiiS! i
Mnn | Goodp
I fTCOULD HAPFtN HERE! I
52% of the Nation is under 25 and theyve got H
the power. Thats how 24 year old Max Frost H
became President of the UnitedSti^&_^M
..... - american_Q|lTEN^ion a l Suggested For Mature Audiencesjl
HoiloM ~m HM mm

HELP WANTED f
K v
HELP WANTED. Part time waitresses
days and nights from 7:00 to 12:30.
Apply at Anthony's 921 W.
University Ave., or phone 3729223
for appointment. Must be 21.
(E 154 3tp)
ASSISTANTS needed for rat sleep
deprivation study, $1.50/hour. Call
Karen, Health Center, Ext. 5804.
(Els32t-c)
DELIVERY BOY WANTED;
Transportation furnished. Apply in
person Larrys Poreboy Sandwich
Shop. 1029 W. Unlv. Ave.
(Els 3
3 MO HITS ASM. SI-00
STARTING AT DUSK
"NO.! ~ I
| KttrS BK PARADE Iff COMEDY |
| NOJ WIItOKWh I
I lWl**t I
I aomonaM I



1 1

Tuesday, June 18, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

these people
are the
Seminole
i iN
N iN
they are the
people who have
made your years
at the University
oj Florida
the most exciting
and challenging
of your life,
you can
remember these
days with the
Seminole,
your record
of your
college career.
there is a limited
number of
1968 Seminoles
left.
Buy yours
today in
330 Reitz Union.

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 18,1968

8
M lf§i ;ir
an ,i ia t
% ** lily aijOjl 1 ..JP ~..'|
I *|| I
P X y wf
asite ~*?£ IP ;1L
: <^^yPi vx4i. .'>> $& > "Mb p:
f* Ipll -*~ § JIL JSlp
Pw a g| { / -. m
f Mjmmggm
A : Ip Jj |

Among currently popular college pastimes, the
gentle art of tubing" is almost exclusively
restricted to UF. Most affacionados prefer the
Ichatuckee River north of here near Fort White on
Highway 27.
Try it yourself. Collect some people, a bunch of
tubes, a couple of cars, and some refreshments to
help weather the waves; and partake.
Mike Howell, 3JM to the right, contentedly eyes
his can of brew.
Below, Connie Giddens, 2UC, and Bill Oswald,
4JM, have a quiet conversation as they glide down
the river.
In the center below, Stephanie Wiley basks in the
warm sun.
On the lower right. Bill Oswald exhibits his sense
of balance. Nick shot this just before Oswald
tumbled into the cool spring water.
Give tubing a try. A fair warning, however,; it
may be habit forming.

0 wLS ''
WA I f
m B -1..
M BP Jk- '** ' S^BHHHh^^H^ s

Photos by Nick Arroyo
flSim Hg4||j||aH| | 5 %?1 1'' wag** ,\
*. Hgws h ~ ii Ny|iHH9BH
1 k ; HHaii^P-
W % : *' 7% i f hL s % *.
' llk -- s 1H ~ -> £_ jflP y^yxi s \y '-
B: : # f i *|N|| ; |
K,-.; *'* < i&£t v - t "V
- .-.r, > .*..., i ~..i.iSW*'
SiS
- v- < .-V % ''* jMffiP'f %i. A*£r V*
t^^P S9? *7> \^l J -^*^***y~ i#iff iKHiteTfM

A i B
*K ~<4& jHKjHkIK ?*;*
|HI ... Z

J

fl I jM' C| fl
1 .^^MIBIiIMBiiHME^ 8 sfErxJPf HHgl
SHI K^fifl^HHlMP
< : & I
i" 1 "*"""
* P A 1 F >; H
MMHMWy : 3.Hk 1
Jr S
v^asi
jfcf.:::.

Mmmmm -w
life- wIHI
:, hk vh Is fIQIiBHHi fIQIiBHHiL
L fIQIiBHHiL V
B Bbl
bl Bbl
p Sg. :ig
B 1
1-
m J mkmXMlmJM
Jt TwMHmmk
.jwe&jL., im^BfIKFMSM:
i f mmtzjmf^Ki
nr ImUk Bp-^'V:^^,;:;
sb^hi
& |3H IS
H > :
H 4 'T-,-1 /.' '. *' IH v-' 11 I



Nicosia Gets Contract,
Undecided On Signing

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligitor Sports Editor
Nick Nicosia is a UF baseball
great who had some hard breaks
this year. However, it looks like
the bad breaks are all over,
because Minnesota wants Nick.
Nicosia was offered the
contract with the Twins last
Thursday but he still hasnt
made up his mind.
Its really something to
think about, said Nicosia.
Everyone thinks about playing
for the pros, but when the time
actually comes to put your name
on the line, then it just doesnt
seem like its happening.
But it certainly has happened
to Nicosia. Carlos Pasquel, agent
for the Twins, has guaranteed
that Nicks remaining year of
school will be paid for, and there
is the possibility of a bonus
when he signs.
My dad and his lawyer are
working on that right now down
in Miami, said Nicosia. He
wants me to wait until we can all
get together and talk the thing
over before we do any signing.
Nicosia, a senior in business
administration, could lose up to
half a year of school if he signs,
however.
I had to drop out of school
last quarter, explained Nicosia,
and that set me back quite a
bit. My arm was broken, and I
missed several weeks of classes

Gator Pair Olympic Qualifiers

John Morton and Mike
Flanagan may be on their way to
the Olympics.
At least, they have passed by
the largest stumbling block, the
NCAA tournament held this past
weekend at Berkv ey, Calif. Five
with a hurl of
MORTON
185-3 and
Flanagan
repeated his 16 effort of several
weeks ago to take a fifth place.
This will be Mortons second
year on the All-America squad,
and Flanagan's first. Flanagan is
a sophomore.
From Berkeley, the pair will
many more of
FLANAGAN the five who did
not make it at
the Berkeley meet in the AAU.
In each case, the top six finishers
in each meet will be eligible for
the Olympic trials in July.
At the NCAA meet, favored
Southern Cal squeaked by
Washington State, 58-57.
Villanova finished third,

while in the hospital. Then,
there were the games away
where I missed class for a few
days at a stretch. I was passing,
but I had missed too much
school.
Nick then signed up for the
summer term, taking the same
courses he was unable to
complete last quarter. If he
signs, he will almost certainly be
asked to play the summer term
out in a minor league.
Thats the part that could
hurt, commented Nioosia. Ill
have missed a full six months of
study time. Still, Im thinking
very seriously about it.
pHL y
O',- ai w mm
NICK NICOSIA
.. Twins signee

Brigham Young, fourth, and
UCLA fifth.
Five meet records were set
during the tournament. Gerry
Lindgren, Washington State's
""120-pound mighty mite, took
the three mile event in a time of
13:57.2. Villanovas Dave
Patrick took the 1500-meter

$306.
I Round trip to I
I Europe I
I No Strings. I
I Nassau to Luxembourg I
I for reservations call: I
I EI HOUSE ONi I
I BM£===lqP 378-1601 I I

Nicosia was selected 718th in
the college draft.
Two other Florida players
were picked in the draft. Glenn
Pickren, UFs top pitcher, was
drafted by the Washington
Senators, and Richard Trapp,
who also has been drafted into
pro football, was the third round
choice of the Yankees.
Intramurals
Registration
Due Today
All teams wishing to
participate in the summer
intramurals program should be
registered today in Room 224 of
Florida Gym.
A full summer of sports is
planned by the Intramurals
Dept, for all interested students
this quarter, and the opening
date for competition is June 24.
Baseball will head up the
calendar for the first part of the
summer. There will be one
league covering all segments of
the campus. Anyone interested
in registering a team for the
league should apply at the
Intramurals Office in the Florida
Gym. Deadline for registration
of teams is June 18.
Baseball will be followed by
handball and tennis for men, and
volleyball and softball for
women. Co-ed events will
include bowling and tennis.

event in 3:39.9, and Lee Evans
of San Jose State won the
400-meter contest in 45.0 to
round out the track records.
In field events, Dick Fosbury
took first place in the high jump
with a leap of 7.-2 1 /£ for a new
record, and Lennox Burgher
followed this with a triple jump
mark of 53-l */.

SPORTS

Florida carries a 23-1 record
and an SEC championship into
the NCAA title tourney this
week at San Antonio.
The meet, being hosted by
Trinity University, will last
throughout this week. Initial
competition got under way
yesterday.
Last year, the Gators finished
seventh, and are hoping to
improve on that record for
1968.
Top starter for the Gators
will be Armi Neely, who carries
a ranking of No. 28 among the
nation's top players. Three other
players are in the tournament
along with Neely. Jamie Pressly,
Steve Beeland and Greg Hilley
all have made the trip. Pressly
won the No. 2 singles title, and
Beeland, the No. 3 singles title in
the SEC Championship this
spring.
The Gators lost only one
match this season, that coming
at the hands of Miami. However,
in that match, Neely beat Jaime
Fillol, UMs No. 1 player who
also finished second in the
national tournament last year.

QUALITY FOODS A
LOW PRICE
49$ SPECIALS X
EVERY DAY
SERVICE NO TIPPING T
I 313 w UNIV.
I
C VOLKSWAGEN OP AMERICA# INC.
M *r
I The VW Squareback.
I Put your luggage in the front trunk
I and your worries behind you.
I MILLER-BROWN
I MOTORS INC. I
I 4222 NW 13th Street SEX I

Timday, June 18,1968. The Florida Alligator,

UF's golf team, too, is on the
road this week.
At Las Cruces, N.M., the
NCAA Golf Giampionship will
begin today with at least one
Gator pegged to win individual
honors. Steve Melnyk has been
selected by a panel of judges
representing the NCAA's six
districts as one of the possible
contenders for the individual
NCAA championship. In
another poll, for the team most
likely to win, Texas was listed as
the favorite, with UF selected as
fifth.
Along with Melnyk, John
Dan, Wendell Coffee, John Sale
and Richard Spears are entered
in the tournament for Florida.
Sales 5 Service
typewriter, adding machines,
calculators, mimeographs,
duplicators
M W
Rentals
Handcock Office
Equipment
528 N.Main 376-5551

Page 11



I we care
FLORIDA OR GEORGIA FRESH GRADE A
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG BSS
Two Convenient Locations
601 S.W. 2 Ave. OQI ~
1130 N.E. 16 Ave. 2t031b. Avg. M
super right corn-fed western
SPARERIBS 49<
SWEET PEAS GROUNDBEEF $1.39
CREAM STYLE GOLDEN pTOKLEY?^ JANE PARKER SPANISH BAR
corn ,0! GATORADE CAKE 3/SI.OO
CORN !2 z. I IqtOt 39< | JANE^PARKERLEMON
WHOLE KERNEL PIE Ilboz 39i
MEXICORN 12 Z I JANE PARKER CHERRY
LESUEUR WHOLE KERNEL WHITE HIT f" A
CORN ,2 - PIE 53{
LESUEUR JUNE LARGE RED RIPE nj1 njwljlA^^
PEAS BVi oz. I WATERMELONS 79( -rLTLn^LrLTLj
. ;i CARD TABLE $4.99 ji
ZL/MUA LARGE VINE-RIPE
V !' REG. 56.95 J[
I CANTALOUPES 3/SI.OO
1^ AHOY LIQUID
DETERGENT 1*..,. 3/SI.OO
ji A& P CUT GREEN
!; trtvrlCJ 5 BEANS 2/29{
A & p SMALL WHOLE WHITE
POTATOES 4/49<
FRESH SWEET WHITE SEEDLESS
A & P SLICED WHITE
GRAPES b 39d POTATOES 4/49<
iTTslo* Sol 794
BLUEBERRIES 4/29{
Pt 39 { ANN PAGE RED
GARDEN FRESH GREEN
BEANS 2 ib. 9 oz. 29(
CABBAGE 6< ANN PAGE RED KIDNEY
BEANS 2 ib. 9 oz. 29(
1 MARSHMALLOW ~ 954
r tip top frozen concentrate
3 VARIETIES MEAT, FISH OR LIVER '! 6o *' 10<
ji 15% oz. cans |! OUR OWN LOOSE
!; BUY 12 PACK GET 1 CAN FREE ii
\\ : q>, ry I TEA 1 Ib. SPECIAL 99*