Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Board OK's 'Censored' Editorial

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 60, NO. 121

Choice 6B
To'Elect
President
UF students can vote for a
President Wednesday.
Along with an estimated 5 mill million
ion million other college students, UF
students will have the opportunity
to participate in Choice 68, the
Time Magazine-sponsored na national
tional national collegiate primary.
The IBM card ballot will con contain
tain contain the names of presidential
aspirants as well as three
referendum questions two con concerning
cerning concerning the war in Vietnam and
one concerning priorities of
govenment spending in confront confronting
ing confronting the urban crisis.
The presidential choices in include
clude include Fred Halstead, Mark Hat Hatfield,
field, Hatfield, Lyndon Johnson, Robert
Kennedy, John Lindsay, Eugene
McCarthy, Richard Nixon,
Charles Percy, Ranald Reagen,
Nelson Rockefeller, Harold
Stassen, and George Wallace.
The referendum questions give
five possible answers. The ques questions
tions questions and answers are:
Wht course of military action
should the UjS. pursue in Viet Vietnam?
nam? Vietnam? Immediate withdrawal of
U.S. forces; phased reduction of
U.S. military activity; maintain
current level of UJS. military
activity; increase the level of
UJS. military activity; all out
UJS. military effort.
What course of action should
this U.S. pursue in regards to
the bombing of North Vietnam?
Permanent cessation of bombing;
maintain current level of bomb bombing;
ing; bombing; intensify bombing; use of
nuclear weapons.
All students currently enrolled
in an American university or
college will be eligible to vote.
This includes graduate, part parttime
time parttime and foreign students.
Registration
Slated For
Finals Week
Late registration will be held
during final examination week
this quarter, but according to
Louis V. Voyles, the registrar,
few students will be affected by
the scheduling conflict.
Students now enrolled who are
planning to attend the summer
quarter will be given advanced
registration appointments by
grade point average, as usual.
Advanced registration will be
held May 7 through 10.
Students who did not keep their
advanced registration appoint appointments
ments appointments and people not enrolled this
quarter will have to register Fri Friday
day Friday and Saturday, June 7 and 8.
According to Voyles, few reg registrants
istrants registrants are likely to have exams
all day Friday, and those who
do can still register on Saturday.
Voyles said the schedule was
planned a year ago by the Sched Scheduling
uling Scheduling Calendar Committee.

University of Florida Gainesville

PHOTO BY NICK

Ex-News Editor Aldrich Reads Charges Against Hull (2nd from left) during Meeting
.. .while Detweiler, board members Frye and Shepherd listen.

Tenure Hearing Change
Termed A Victory

By DAVE REDDICK
and ANN BARDSLEY
Alligator Staff Writers
Significant procedural changes
have been made in the Jones
tenure hearings which may pre prevent
vent prevent a repeat of Tuesdays pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings in which potentially
damaging testimony was given
only to be ruled inadmissable.

Staffers Voice Both
Support Criticism

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
Opinions of some Alligator ed editors
itors editors and staff writers on the
question of Editor Steve Hulls
stand versus the stand of the
five resigned editors:
Joe Torchia, entertainment ed editor,
itor, editor, stated his opinion at the
Sunday meeting of the Student
Publication Board.
One of two editors to remain
on the staff, Torchia said it was
rather late in a very important
game for the resigned editors
to scream incompetence and ir irresponsibility
responsibility irresponsibility if they have felt
that way.
The five editors used some
very pretty words to dig up some
very ugly segments of the re recent
cent recent past. If they have held their
feelings for the past seven
months, they should certainly
have spoken much sooner than
this.
Mike Abrams, executive
editor: I think that the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator has a right to comment on
anything that goes on between the
administration and the students,
and I think we. were very fair

Alligator editor Steve Hull,
who was critical of the hearing
procedure in his controversial
editorial, termed the changes
a victory.
Vice-President Frederick W.
Conner announced Sunday that in
the Tuesday open hearing, coun counsel
sel counsel for the Administration will
present some of its evidence
in writing. The Committee on

with the administration. I respect
them (the five editors) for their
position, but I think they were
wrong.
Nick Tatro, news editor: Os
course Im siding with Steve.
I dont feel that the Senate Facul Faculty
ty Faculty Com mittee is a judicial body.
I think censorship will effect a
court decision of the Jones case
(if Jones takes it to court) as
much as the editorial would have.
I also think Steve isnt an ir irresponsible
responsible irresponsible person and neither is
the editorial irresponsible, even
though it is taking a pretty definite
stand.
David Chafin, staff writer: I
think that both parties are wrong.
I think the five editors are wrong
in walking out because the sit situation
uation situation could have been handled
in another manner, such as rival
editorials side by side on the
editorial page. I think Hull was
wrong because he didnt handle
the situation very diplomatically.
Raul Ramirez, assistant
managing editor: I think both
have their points of view and
valid reasons for doing what
theyre doing. I do agree that
(SEE REACTION PAGE 2)

Monday, April 22, 1968

Academic Freedom and Tenure,
which is conducting the hearings,
will study any questionable tes testimony
timony testimony in private session and
decide on its admissibility.
Professor Hayford O. Enwall,
representing the Administration,
said Sunday that he would pre present
sent present what he called a proser
to the committee. The proser
will contain certain facts that
he plans to present at the hear hearing,
ing, hearing, allows the committee to
decide if the evidence is ad admissable.
missable. admissable.
Hull pointed out that this will
do away with the namedropping
that occurred in the first ses session,
sion, session, and will also save time.
I feel that because of our
editorial and the strong stand
in it, we have caused the ad administration
ministration administration to reevaluate the
procedures.
It is a victory for the Al Alligator,
ligator, Alligator, students and faculty of
this university, said Hull.
Tuesday, after a long presen presentation,
tation, presentation, a UF witness testimony
was ruled inadmissible.
E. T. York, agriculture pro provost,
vost, provost, testified for over an hour
only to have his statements ruled
irrelevant by the committee.
Following the new procedure
this would not have happened,
according to Hull.
The decision was made to
avoid going through what we
did last week, said Conner.
Professor Stanley Laughlin,
counsel for Dr. Marshall Jones,
said he had no comment to make
on the changes.
The handling of the hearing
came under editorial attack last
week by the Alligator and made
state headlines when five Alli Alligator
gator Alligator Editors quit their jobs
over the controversey that fol followed.
lowed. followed.

Ex-Editors
Blast Hull
At Meeting
By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Student Publi Publications
cations Publications voted Sunday to lift its
ban on an editorial written by
Editor Steve Hull and Executive
Editor Mike Abrams. (The edi editorial
torial editorial appears on page six.)
The Board, in what was termed
a vote of confidence also de decided
cided decided 4 to 2 not to accept the
resignation of Managing Editor
Harvey Alper, who along with
four other editors, resigned in
protest of the editorial. Alper's
job and Hulls are the only pos positions
itions positions over which the Board has
direct control.
Hull, who has firing power
over all other editorial positions,
said he did not intend to take
the other resigned editors back,
and had already replaced them.
The decisions came after two
hours of heated argument high highlighted
lighted highlighted by a statement read to
the board by the five resigned
editors in which they proposed
a change in the Alligators ed editorial
itorial editorial procedure.
In a seven page statement,
the five editors proposed an
editorial board which the editor
of the Alligator will consult be before
fore before writing any editorials.
We believe the editorial board
should be composed of the man managing
aging managing editor, the executive edi editor
tor editor and the news editor, with
the Editor-in-Chief exercising
a double-weighted vote, the
statement read.
The editors said the procedural
change was necessary because of
actions in the past by Hull which
were immature, irresponsible
and emotional.
Such actions, they said, in included:
cluded: included: Hulls near acceptance
of a GM automobile to drive
on campus for a month; Hulls
outburst of egotism in which
he instructed the editors to hold
space open for a picture of him
entering the premier of a Frank
Sinatra movie in Miami; his en endorsement
dorsement endorsement of a candidate in the
Student Government elections af after
ter after he said he would remain
Impartial; and his ridiculous
proposal that students should be
placed on the Faculty Senate.
Answering the allegations, Hull
remarked a newspaper is re responsible
sponsible responsible to the people it serves.
I feel I was a help to the uni university.
versity. university.
It is easy to pick out little
Incidents and personal idiosyn idiosyncracies
cracies idiosyncracies which take place over a
years time to attack a person,
he said.
Concerning the procedure
changes, Hull said that they would
(SEE CENSORED PAGE 2)
New Editors
Assume Posts
Florida Alligator Editor Steve
Hull named 10 people to editor editorial
ial editorial positions Friday.
Named were: Mike Abrams,
executive editor; Nick Tatro,
news editor; Raul Ramirez, as assistant
sistant assistant managing editor; Glenn
Fake, assistant news editor; Paul
Kaplan, sports editor; Neal San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, assistant spgrts editor;
James Cook, editorial assistant;
Janie Gould and Kathie Keim,
associate editors; Jim Holmes,
copy editor.



Page 2

5, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Bulletin News
State, National, International News
Hitler Aide Believed Found
CHICAGO (UPI) The man who hunted Adolph Eichmann and put
into prison 2,000 other German Nazis said Sunday he has information
that Martin Bormann, deputy to Adolph Hitler, is living in Chile.
Tuviah Friedman, who tracked Eichmann 15 years and seized him
in Argentina in 1960, spoke here Sunday at a commemorative service
marking the 25th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising in Poland.
'Nixon Tougher In '6B
NEW YORK (UPt) Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, who is
expected to announce his candidacy for the presidency this week,
believes former Vice President Richard M. Nixon will be harder
to beat in 1968 than in 1960 but if I get the nomination Ill beat him.
An aide to Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, already campaigning hard
for the Democratic nomination, said Sunday Humphrey had already
offered the vice presidency on his ticket to every southern governor.
Theodore Sorensen, an advisor to Kennedy, made the comments on
a New York television program WCBS- TV Public tearing. Humphrey
is quoted in the current issue of Newsweek magazine.
Humphrey, Newsweek said, is taking his time. You don't improve
hour case or argument by overexposure, the vice president said,
and added, I wont be doing much in the way of campaigning between
now and August.
Tlie magazine quoted the vice president as looking forward to
the campaign as an older, wiser, more experienced man.
UN Head In Middle East
TEHERAN, Iran (UPI) Secretary General Thant arrived Sunday
night to address a U.N, Human Rights conference and met with his
Middle East peace envoy, Gunnar Jarring. Thant told a brief news
conference that as yet, there has been no agreement on a place
where the Americans and North Vietnamese would meet for talks.
The Secretary General said he had nothing to add on the Middle
East problem, but we have to be optimistic. Thant met Jarring at
the Teheran Hotel where they are both staying, but declined to dis discuss
cuss discuss details of their talks.
Koreans Attack U.S. Patrol
SEOUL (UPI) North Korean infiltrators attacked a U.S. Army
patrol Sunday on the western end of the Korean truce line, a United
Nations command spokesman said Monday. It was the fourth border
Incident in a week.
The spokesman said there were no immediate reports of cas casualties
ualties casualties on either side.

I Staff
f FROM PA6E ONE
the editorial was written in a
somewhat emotional tone, but
I think Steve had a right to
run the editorial.
Roy Mays, staff writer: I
think Steve is right. The others
made a mistake by leaving. I
don't agree with everything in
the editorial, but its about time
the Alligator editorial page stood
up for something.
Lewis Rothlein, staff writer:

STEAK n SHAKE
Student Special
(With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15C Drink
$1.03 val ue Only 85{ tax I
Offer good Until April 30 Only
Steak n Shake
161 QSW 13th Street Gainesville
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five tiroes weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator Reitz
Union BuUding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (l) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several tiroes. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Reaction
The five editors who abruptly
walked out on the Alligator, walk walked
ed walked out on what is the first re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility of a newspaper, to
report (that's what a newspaper
is), for in their own words, The
leaving of the five editors leaves
a talent vacuum on the staff.'
* If they saw something wrong, they
should have tried to change it.''
Janie*' Gould, associate editor:
Those guys (the five editors)
are a bunch of showmen. I think
Steve's right. As editor he has a
right to write how he feels."

Sip?* lib m >
7** s i' v A 1 ; f . |jpjj ?s.'
MB k IpliL, jB I BbS-a! h %Jk?'
iSLSjmjjge w
Resigned Editors Doucette, Al per, Padecky, Kennedy and Aldrich Appear At Meeting

' Censored Editorial

f FROM PAGE ONE J
deprive the editor of running his
newspaper the way he wants and
deprive him of effective author authority.
ity. authority.
If one editor disagrees with
me the Alligator could be in dan danger
ger danger of either BSP or Admin Administration
istration Administration control, Hull claimed.
In their decision to allow the
controversial editorial to run,
the BSP decided that pre-censor pre-censorship
ship pre-censorship includes editorial matter
which is obscene, illegal or
libelous, and nothing else.
He said the board was con concerned
cerned concerned that if the Jones hear hearing

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* fW Jack Jones
in concert
ItC/l

ing hearing ever v went beyond the uni universitys
versitys universitys jurisdiction and into the
courts Hull could potentially be
cited for contempt.
But the Board decided to allow
the editor to run a revised version
of the editorial after potentially
libelous" matter had been re removed.
moved. removed.
Answering inquiries by newly
appointed Board member Dexter
Deloney, a UF Law Professor,
the BSP agreed that it did not
have authority to prohibit an ed editorials
itorials editorials publication on the basis
that the editorial might be in ex extremely
tremely extremely poor taste.

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Deloney requested that in
allowing the editorial to run a
statement by the board should be
run next to the editorial. The
statement would have read that
the board considered the editorial
intemperate, emotional and un unfounded
founded unfounded but because of our
high regard for the freedom of
the press we have permitted the
editorial to be run.
The board rejected the pro proposal
posal proposal after Hull refused to accept
it claiming the board hasnt
the right to tell me what to
print.



'Rockefeller Next U.S. President

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
New York Gov. Nelson Rocke Rockefeller
feller Rockefeller will be the next President.
He will have defeated Hubert
Humphrey, the Democratic op opponent.
ponent. opponent.
That is the way it looks to
Drew Pearson, national syn syndicated
dicated syndicated columnist and author of
Washington Merry-go-Round.
Brought to campus by the Forums
Committee of the Reitz Union
Board, Pearson addressed about
200 people in the UF Auditorium
Thursday night.
Speaking of Gov. Claude Kirk,
Pearson said, No matter how
must you want him out of the
state of Florida, Pearson said,
Kirk will not be the Vice-
President.
He predicted that Humphrey
Some Jobs
Left In SG
All staff positions on the Stu Student
dent Student Government have been filled,
according to Cheri V. Gill, di director
rector director of personnel for Student
Government.
The only help we need is
typing jobs and editors of the
public relations department,
Gill reported.
In the office of Secretary of
Labor, Glen Repple needs general
office help.
Tlie Public Relations depart department
ment department needs help with the newly
formed Speaker's Bureau and
editors for the Student Handbook.

Candidates
for
WSA
OFFICE- J
"""
Barbara Kleil Recording Sec.
JH §k
I
m. Jm
A M fc V
mmmn.
W
Pam Pemberton- Sophomore Rep.
Janice Halker Junior Rep.

KIRK WILL NOT BE VICE PRESIDENT

will defeat Senators Robert
Kennedy and Eugene McCarthy
for the Democratic nomination.
Kennedy has more enemies
than friends, he contended, and
McCarthy has no great following
among leaders of the Democratic
party.
Commenting on Richard Nixon,
Pearson called him a good Re Republican
publican Republican trademark, but said he
will be defeated because of scar
tissue and bad mistakes.
Shifting from the political
scene, Pearson commented on
the recent riots and looting in
many major cities.
The riots werent caused by
the death of King, Pearson con contended.
tended. contended. They had been planned
in advance by black militants,
for June 18. They moved up the
date when King was killed.
The riots were planned
tually down to the last firebomb,
according to Pearson.
They marked which stores to
loot, which gas stations to raid,
he said. They planned the move
to Baltimore when troops were
stationed in Washington.
Optimistic about what many
have feared will be a long, hot

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Dan Sapp Bin Worsham I
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DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS ]

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Marsha Madden President
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Kathy Waldman Recording Sec.
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Linda Satlof Sophomore Rep.
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Betty Jo Padron Junior Rep.

summer, Pearson stated a
belief that there will be no more
rioting in Washington.
Cities that rioted last year,
havent, so far this spring, he
noted, except for Chicago. It
will be a more peaceful
summer.
1 Pearson f
| Predicts j
About recent hopes for a ne negotiated
gotiated negotiated settlement in Vietnam,
Pearson said President Johnson
is making a mistake in not agree agreeing
ing agreeing to meet at Warsaw, one of
two sites Hanoi has suggested.
Johnson shouldn't listen to
(Walter) Rostow so much, Pear Pearson
son Pearson contended. He's done a ter terrible
rible terrible job as an aide.
Predicting that peace talks will
drag on for at least a year,
Pearson said results wont be
anything to get enthusiastic about,
but at least the war will be over.

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Joan Schaffel President
HPnj&k.
- milililljiiil ,i,ll, -Tr-Ty <
Kitty Hamilton Treasurer
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Susan Shapiro Sophomore Rep.

Not Pictured HH mm
Sue Ellen Wright 2nd Vice Pres. J** I I I J
Larrie Sikorski Senior Rep.
Babs Bower Junior Rep. I I Mk
Linda Dallager Soph. Rep. I MjL
Charlotte Biskup Recording Sec.
AnnMarie Steinberg Corres Sec. JB P% I I
Candie Wright Corresponding Sec. Jmm \m

After a settlement,
South Vietnam will unite, pre predicts
dicts predicts Pearson, and will probably
be Communistic for a while,
but then will move away from it,
as Eastern Europe has done.
A caustic crusader for im improved
proved improved ethics in Congress, Pear Pearson
son Pearson succeeded in exposing the
financial antics of Senator
Thomas Dodd, Representative
Adam Clayton Powell, and Senate
aide Bobby Baker.
He lashed out Thursday at the
recently passed Senate Ethics
Code, which leaves something
to be desired.
It doesnt' forbid Senators to
accept expense contributions
from labor, business, etc., ac according
cording according to Pearson, and thats
a serious loophole.
He lambasted Representative
Mendel Rivers, chairman of the
Armed Services Committee, for
what he called extreme alcohol alcoholism
ism alcoholism and traveling at the tax taxpayer's
payer's taxpayer's expense.

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Jk Hfcl
Joy Green lst Vice Pres.
Jean Mamlin Treasurer
_ njHR^Kr
H BlV r
Kerry Werner Sophomore Rep.

Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Comparing Rivers* free
ride* to Powells censure, Pear Pearson
son Pearson said, There is one standard
for Negro Congressmen and an another
other another for whites.
Though Powell juggled airline
tickets, he stated, Rivers has
an Air Force plane at his dis disposal.
posal. disposal.
In the executive branch, he
continued, alcoholics are fired
for security reasons. Rivers, as
chairman of the Armed Services
committee, has kept his job.

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1 Susan Stillman Corres Sec.
...
-
S E-- S B
K ;g '' 9
J:
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Connie Knight Sophomore Reo
1B v^..*
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Ronna Goldstein Junior Rep.

Page 3



t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Page 4

Plan Might
Keep Frosh
From Rushing
By JEAN LUEHRS
Alligator Staff Writer
Freshmen will not be able to
rush for sororities next fall,
according to the proposed
deferred rush system.
Dean of Women, Betty Cosby
told sorority rush chairmen at a
meeting Wednesday that fresh freshmen
men freshmen need a quarter to adjust to
campus life, and sororities need
more time to get to know these
girls before they pledge.
Freshmen would be able to rush
in the winter quarter, after they
have made their grades, and
have had contact with sorority
girls.
If Panhellenic agrees to the
new program, only upper class classmen
men classmen will rush in the fall. This
will be a definite advantage to
Junior College transers, and ad advantage
vantage advantage they don't have now,
said Dean Cosby.
The deferred rush system is
used at the University of Georgia,
and other schools on the quarter
system.
National Pahnellenic Council
has approved this system, as well
as Dean Cosby. Panhellenic will
vote on the issue this Thursday.
3,500 Buy
Seminoles
Approximately 4,000 of the
18,000 student at UF are ex expected
pected expected to buy a Florida Seminole
this year, Editor Nel Laughon
said.
As the deadline for ordering
the yearbook approached Friday
afternoon, Miss Laughon said
3,500 had been purchased and that
she expected sales to reach the
4,000 mark.
Miss Laughon considers this
a good percentage of the student
body." f

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w 376-7171

TUMHEWEEPS
' 7 GEE! SPRING IS GROOVY. 1 T (
( I LOVE SPRING-! ITS MY VERY )
> FAVORITE TIME OF aV
\tHEYEARL. v

IN ALLIGATOR DISPUTE
Pearson Commends Staffers

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
LEWIS ROTHLEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
In general, I believe the
editorial staff should say wliat
it wishes, especially if the editor
signs his name."
So said Drew Pearson, national
syndicated columnist, in an
early-morning interview Friday
with the Alligator.
He was commenting on the dis dispute
pute dispute over an editorial on the
Marshall Jones tenure hearings
which caused the mass re resignation
signation resignation of five Alligator
editors.
Freedom of the press is im important,"
portant," important," he continued, and
while I dont agree with irres irresponsible
ponsible irresponsible journalism, this is the
accusation frequently made to
cover courageous journalism.
I commend the remaining
staff in their fight to continue,
he added.
He went on to talk about his
editorship at Swarthmore Col College,

NEW
PLAYBOY
MAGAZINE
59c
REBEL DISCOUNT

/CAUSE SPRING IS THE \
C SEASON YOUNG MEN S <,
( HEARTS LIGHTLY TURN \
N TO THOUGHTS 0F. ..y

lege, College, when he wrote an editorial
to which the administration dis disagreed
agreed disagreed but did not censor. He
was advocating the possession of
arms on the Quaker campus.
'Purning to the national scene,
Pearson offered comments about
several issues:
on McCarthya
RECORD IN THE SEN-
A TE:
Its not too good. Hes abetter
man than Bobby Kennedy, but
Kennedy has a better Senate
record. McCarthy voted for oil
depletion allowances, and ex expensive
pensive expensive drugs instead of Medi-

)] SPRING QUARTER SPECIAL \
loss FRIED 1
iln i CHICKEN if
j 313 W. Univ. m ll
|||f

care for poor people. However,
he is a good man and will prob probably
ably probably improve.
ON WHAT WASHING WASHINGTON
TON WASHINGTON POLITICOS
THINK OF CLAUDE
KIRK:
They dont know hes around.
Theyve never heard of him.
ON KENNEDY USING
HIS SENATE STAFF
AS CAMPAIGN
WORKERS:
Its not ethical. Hie can get

by TOW YAK
j iH
C THINKING- ABOUT THE \ k
v. REST OF THE YEAR! J r
O^

away with it, though, because its
not illegal. All we can do is
publicize it.
ON COLLEGE STU STUDENT
DENTS STUDENT OPINIONS IN
NATIONAL POLI POLITICS:
TICS: POLITICS:
College students ought to take
an active part in politics, and I
dont care what side theyre for.
Its a healthy development for
students to work door to door
for a candidate, as in the New
Hampshire primary. I dont think
that mass rallies like Kennedy
has are representative of sup support.
port. support.



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Soul Drives
Gators Wild
By MIKE ABRAMS
Alligator Executive Editor
Ray Charles the blind soul man who drives
his piano like a sports car delivered his message
to a jammed UF audience in the gym Friday night.
And they loved him.
Look at all the lonely people, Charles sang
with a voice modulated to grind like flint > to
screech like a wounded ghoul to whine like a cat
with its tail in the door. ;
And all the lonely people looked at Ray Charles
and they were lonely no longer.
Ah don't mind tellin' ya as for me I'm feelin
perty good. shouted Ray.
G-a-i-n-e-sville, huh?"
Ray writhes in the agony of a martyr at the stake
when he plays his piano. The keys are molten
lead. He claps his hands mud-pie fashion. He is big,
black, and treacherous. He owns his piano. He owns
the world. He owns you.
His head jerks up. Up. Up.
I was busted, sings the blind man. I went to
my mother to ask for a loan for I was busted!"
The sun died, he sings in a voice which whips
cream and scours the ears.
Ray Charles and his band of brass and drums and
a guitar and his women the Raelettes stopped
at Gainesville to cut through the hot days of April
on their annual world tour.
The Raelettes joined Charles in several numbers
and the brass came through with sparkling solos.
Ray Charles was blinded at childhood. He was an
orphan at fifteen. And he climbed to fame from
Florida.
Georgia on my mind," he sings.
I cant stop lovin you." said the blind man.
And they cant stop lovin Ray.
PHOTOS BY NICK ARROYO

-:*. : B' 'M y ; "';; y;y;;/
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Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

''M IBr 1 H

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

The
Florida Alligator
pgaegjj* "The Florida Alligator Is A Student Newspaper*'
mi stev *J!f
J[Hl Harvey Alper Mike Abrams
Managing Editor Executive Editor
Nick Tatro Paul Kaplan
j News Editor Sports Editor

The following is a
slightly revised version of
Thursdays censored edi editorial:
torial: editorial:
The nightmare of the
Tuesday Jones hearing will
not be forgotten by teachers
* and students at the UF.
We are ashamed of-- and
for the university.
The cruel and shocking
treatment afforded Mar Marshall
shall Marshall B. Jones and several
students implicated in his
case has finally sur surmounted
mounted surmounted the pinnacle of
bombastic folly.
Dr. Jones was chastised
with arguments of guilt by
association, argument ad
hominem and general
smear tactics.
The administrations
case sought to link Jones
with the terrible suicide of
student James Harmeling
a year ago. It dredged up
the story of how Harmel Harmelings
ings Harmelings brother married a
Negro and how his sister
married a mental incom incompetent.
petent. incompetent.
Jones was guilty via
innuendo.
The names of innocent
students were dragged into
T : igerts evidence, despite
the numerous objections of
Jones counsel, Stan
Laughlin.
We believe an apology
from the administration is
due for allowing the names
of innocent students and
faculty to be injected into
this hearing. This action
could injure their repu reputations
tations reputations for life.
We also believe Dr.
Jones, who has been judged
competent by his peers,de-

Blatant Censorship

In an unprecendented de decision,
cision, decision, the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications, meeting
in emergency session twice
blatantly censored an edi editorial
torial editorial which was to have
run in the' Alligator,
No specific reasons were
given for the censoring ex except
cept except that the board felt
the article was in bad taste.
However, according to
board policy the only
reason an editorial can be
censored is if it is libelous,
obscene or illegal. The edi-

Justice?

serves jl hearing based on
facts not irrelevant ac accusations
cusations accusations which cannot
be proved.
Is UF President Stephen
C. OConnell, the former
chief justice of the Florida
Supreme Court, going to
stand by and watch every
notion of academic and ju judicial
dicial judicial decency thrown out
the window and students
and faculty alike defamed?
Unless Tigert Hall is
willing to make amends for
the damage already done
and assure that no more
such tactics will be em employed
ployed employed in the prosecution of
Dr. Jones -- then this ad administration
ministration administration deserves the
most thorough condem condemnation
nation condemnation in its 115-year exis existence.
tence. existence.
The UF can no longer
proceed with this witch witchhunt
hunt witchhunt and its shabby and pre preposterous
posterous preposterous McCarthy type
tactics. If it does it can
only expect intelligent
members of the academic
community to be insulted.
We pledge the resources
of this newspaper and our
honor to see that the free freedom
dom freedom and good name of every
teacher and student at the
UF is** not abridged in these
hearings or at any later
date.
If there is going to be a
fight, then let it begin here.
If Dr. Marshall Jones
is going to have a fair
and open hearing then
let it begin here. And if
the administration is not
ready to change its repre reprehensible
hensible reprehensible ways: we can only
hope that the Almighty will
forgive them, for they know
not what they do.

torial in question was none
of these. f:
The censorship tactics
by the board were uncalled
for. The Alligator must
remain a free press so stu students
dents students and faculty can be ex exposed
posed exposed to the truth.
By not allowing the editor
the discretion of his job,
the Board has suppressed
freedom of press on cam campus
pus campus and we denounce them
for their unreasonable
action.

fSt ffeteraburrj (Fitwa
editorial
([University Against Itselff
| A university,** said Benjamin Disraeli, s
| t( should be a place of light, of liberty 0/ |
| learning A* f
£ /n handling of the Marshall Jones affair, |
| University of Florida at Gainesville is |
| showing itself instead as a place of enforced |
| conformity and censorship |
§* We are not concerned about the future of f
| Dr. Jones. He is an excellent professor, f
| fully able to take care of himself. The uni- |
| versity apparently is not able to take care £
* of itself. We disagree with many of Jones $
£ ideas. His judgment has been faulty. To fire
| Jones for his political views hurts him not,
§ but it will deliver a serious blow to the uni- §
I versity |
| DR. JONES has been denied tenure not for
| professional incompetence, not for bringing £
| his cause into the classroom, not for break- £
| ing any laws, but primarily for expressing £
I unpopular ideas on student rebellion in a |
£ speech before a professional organization |
| and later published in a scholarly journal. $
I This week, the university seemed deter-
£ mined to prove that intellectual freedom was J §
| dead on its campus: £
| At a hearing on the Jones case before a |
I committee of the Faculty Senate, the ad- |
£ ministration*s attorney concentrated on Jones* £
| political beliefs. If the administration admits |
£ Jones is being fired for his politics, the hear hear|
| hear| ings should be discontinued immediately, Jones I
| should go his way and a funeral service |
£ should be conducted in Gainesville for freedom
£ of inquiry 0 £
5 With heavy-handed censorship, theadminis- §
£ tration then prevented publication in the stu stu£
£ stu£ dent newspaper of a signed editorial criticizing $
| the handling of the Jones case. £
£ Whether freedom of expression and inquiry
£ exist at the university is important to every $
| Floridian for this reason: No matter how many £
~ t ax dollars are spent at Gainesville, a great >;
£ university will never develop without academic $
| freedom. |
£ Firing professors for their political views, §
| whether right or wrong, will keep the best §
£ faculty members away from Gainesville as £
£ efficiently as an electrified fence. Blank places £
j|: on student newspaper editorial pages can only £
cause cynicism and disillusionment in young £
f people who want to use the tool of free f
% expression to help build a better university £
| cind a better nation. £
y *
! St. Petersburg Times £
Alligator Staff
T
GLENN FAKE JERRY SILBERBERG
Assistant News Editor Campus Livlng Editor
JIM HOLMES JANIE GOULD, KATHIE KEIM
Copy Editor Associate Editors
t
JAMES COOK JOE TORCHIA
Edtorial Assistant .
Entertainment Editor
v



A Tragic Division
BY JAMES COOK

Friday afternoon.
The upshot of this soon-to-be-notorious Alligator staff meeting,
which is just now subsiding, has been a turmoil of varied elements
milling around the newsroom like vultures around a corpse.

Ed Freeman is here rubbing
his hands in leftist glee. This,
to him, is the essence of all
the evils of the university system
come to life.
It is not.
What has happened here today
and what happened last (Thurs (Thursday)
day) (Thursday) night has been a spl it between
a number of reasonable people
who could not, in the final
analysis, agree upon the ex expression
pression expression of reason.
In the fever of last nights
rapid occur ranees, the Alligator
lost some valuable people. It lost
some of the people who have
been responsible for the
Alligators past excellence
~ excellence which, if it continues,
will be partly owing to the herit heritage
age heritage they have left us.
A tragedy within a tragedy has
be£n the repeated censorship of
honest and necessary ob observations
servations observations by remaining editor,
Steve Hull. This censorship was
an act, not of student editors
although evidently 5 out of 6
agreed with it, but of non-student
Director of Student Publications,
Jack Detweiler, whose motives
are, to this writer, questionable.
If Detweilter had not pulled the
original editorial, which was to
have run alongside a dissenting
view by the other editors, this
regrettable situation might never
have occurred.
But it did and nothing con constructive
structive constructive can come from it.
Some of those who attended
this meeting would like to see the
Alligator become an angry news newspaper.
paper. newspaper. They would like to seethe
Alligator abandon itself to vio violent
lent violent reaction to injustice rather
than calm consideration of al alternatives.
ternatives. alternatives. Editor Hull made it
clear that this would not happen.
The editorial that was censored
and will probably continue to be
censored, the editorial which
gave rise to the walkout, was
strong but not irrational. Infor Information
mation Information which may soon be avail available
able available to the students-at-large will
hopefully vindicate it.
If anything at all is to come
from this tragic division, it will
be a realization of the strength,
the unity, of those that remain.
The Alligator has lost some
outstanding editors people that
have received great and deserved
recognition throughout and be beyond
yond beyond this state.
We have some outstanding
people left. We need more.
Strong words are behind us
now. We still have a newspaper
to put out.
Gator Button
{g GEORGE
fflf WALLACE si
1 IS ADDICTED IS
TO GRITS Jl

PLEASE
Limit Letters To The
Editor Td 350
Words And Be
Sure To Sign Them.
We Will Omit
Writers Names On
Request.

OPEN FORUM:
J(doiaml ViMwt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."
THE JONES HEARING:
Tigerts Hypocritical Case

MR. EDITOR:
As an interested, but, until now, passive observer
of the Jones/Administrators dispute, I attended
Tuesdays open hearing on the tenure petition. The
tone of the proceedings left very little doubt in
my mind that Jones is morally, even if not legally,
above reproach, and that his statements on social
change are valid and pertinent.
It was also apparent that the Administrators are
of a basically hypocritical mould, even though they
are operating well within the framework of their
legal apparatus. Their concocted, arrogant mode of
presentation, their pettifoggery and evasiveness,
indicate well enough that they have no concrete,
indisputable evidence to offer in their own defense.
Actions (or antics) so obviously trite as these
should also be so obviously immature that persons
attempting to use them in serious debate would
find themselves generally ridiculed and ignored.

Let The People Judge

MR. EDITOR:
Censorship of the press is
always reprehensible, anywhere.
Censorship of the press at a
university is positively intoler intolerable.
able. intolerable. An institute of higher learn learning
ing learning bears a grave responsibility
for placing before its student

Editorial Impugned OConnell
MR. EDITOR:
May I be permitted space to make public the reasons which led
some members of the Board of Student Publications to vote to censor
editorials prepared for publication in last Thursdays and Fridays
Alligator.
It is our contention that some of the words used in the proposed
editorial and its general tone tended to impugn the motives of the
President of the University and its attorney and might prejudice
the outcome of the Jones hearing. There appears to be ample legal
precedent for this line of reasoning. No member of the Board had
any objection to an editorial being written dealing with the conduct
of the Jones hearing and so informed you, Mr. Editor.
Let me assure the readers of the Alligator that if the hearing had
been completed Tuesday night or if the editorial had not been concerned
with any hearing; the editor would be free to say whatever he pleased
about anyone. You could be free to decide for yourself if the language
could be considered intemperate or in poor taste and could register
your complaints with him.
Meanwhile, it will be our policy to try and protect the integrity
of the hearings from any external pressures of an emotional nature
that might be created by the campus press. If out of stubbornness the
editor chooses not to express his opinions about the strategy used in
the hearings in a reasonable manner, that is his business and the
readers' loss.
RALPH B. THOMPSON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

BSPMember Explains
Censorship Procedures

By BILL ZEWADSKI
Student Member
Board of Student Publications
Heavy- handed censorship
the St. Petersburg Times called
the refusal by the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications to permit Steve
Hull to print his editorial attack
on the administration for proce procedures
dures procedures used in the Marshall Jones
hearing. In its action, the Board
made it clear that it was not
what was said but the manner
in which it was presented that
was objectionable.
Notwithstanding, the action of
the Board was still censorship.
It was unprecedented and con contrary
trary contrary to the Boards previously
established standards of review.
As the Board member who
made the unsuccessful motion
Wednesday night to perm it publi publication,
cation, publication, I feel that the record

body all of the ideas, all of the
facts, all of the Issues which
are fighting for their place in
the worlds hierarchy of values.
One of the bases of democracy
is that of an Informed public
which has the information and
intellectual equipment at hand
TO JUDGE FOR ITSELF the

As the Administrators certainly know what they
want, and how to get it; and as they intend to get it
through current legally sanctioned maneuvers, I
can only wonder if a legal system which accepts,
and apparently rewards, such behavior as mature
and sincere deserves the label democratic.
It is unfortunate that the judges in this hearing
are bound to such a system, which intimidates them
to accept irresponsible behavior such as that dis displayed
played displayed by the Administrators as being potentially
meaningful.
Only one member of the committee appeared suf sufficiently
ficiently sufficiently disturbed to express open and direct dis disapproval
approval disapproval toward the Administrators that their
presentations were unsubstantial and immaterial to
their contention that Dr. Jones does not show proper
restraint (obsequiousness?) expected of a UF
professor.
GERARD M. MILLER, 4AS

Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

should he clarified so that this
incident will not be repeated in
the future.
In its February 7th meeting,
and after lengthy discussion, the
Board defined its standard for
rejection to comprehend only
material which is libelous, ob obscene
scene obscene or otherwise illegal. At
no time since has it been claimed
that any other standard applies
to advertisements, news copy or
editorials.
Soon after setting up this test
for rejection, the Board applied
it strictly when the We Accuse
advertisement came before it on
February 27th. At that time the
legal standard of libel was rigidly
Interpreted. Only after the infor informal
mal informal opinions of two attorneys
were heard did the BSP conclude
that the ad was not libelous and
could therefore be run despite

merits and cons of any particular
problem facing it.
In spite of any medium of com communication's
munication's communication's lack of adequacy
(what medium is totally ade adequate?),
quate?), adequate?), repression of its mode of
expression is unacceptable. The
latest such incident in an ever evergrowing
growing evergrowing list of intimidation of
free thought at this excuse for
higher learning Involves the sub subjugation
jugation subjugation of an editorial in this
journal last Thursday, April 18,
1968.
That the Board of Student Pub Publications
lications Publications could have the un unmitigated
mitigated unmitigated gall to crush a llgiti llgitimate
mate llgitimate vehicle of opinion is totally
shocking. Tliat the editor of the
student newspaper would buckle
under to this refutation of free freedom
dom freedom is equally unfathomable.
This student body, if it is
seriously engaged in the pursuit
of sagacity, cannot remain aloof
from this insidious suppression
by a small group of insipid,
uninspired arbiters of what we
must or must not think. More than
an outcry is needed. More than
a whimper must be forwarded.
We must ensure that such poison poisonous
ous poisonous behavior will never again
occur at our university.
We must take all action necess necessary
ary necessary to rectify this high-banded
derogation of our rights to know,
to weigh, and to make meaning.
ASHLEY I. ABRAMSON, 7AS

its objectionable content.
However, in last Wednesday
nights meeting of the Board two
faculty members of the Board
abandoned this standard of
*legality previously es established
tablished established and rejected what they
felt was prejudicial to the hear hearing.
ing. hearing.
Alhtough they expliclty found
that the editorial was not libelous,
obscene, or contemptuous of the
Jones case, they refused publi publication.
cation. publication.
I regret that the Board thus
violated what I feel were the re requirements
quirements requirements of due process
earlier agreed upon and instead
chose the path of personal pre predilection.
dilection. predilection. Personal feeling about
what is in bad taste and what
is irresponsible journalism
is too vague a test to safeguard
freedom of the student press.
Such feelings as to what may
be prejudicial offer little to
protect an editor and little to
guide the Board.
In February, when the Board
refused to adopt an indefinite
standard of responsible jour journalism,
nalism, journalism, it voiced confidence in
Its belief that participation in
student journalism should be an
educational experience and that
students should be solely respon responsible
sible responsible for deciding about matters
of journalistic taste. If criticism
results, it too is part of the edu education
cation education of the learning writer.
The limited standard adopted
in February, 1968, affirmed a
long tradition of student
responsibility for student publi publications.
cations. publications. For example, the Basic
Principles of the Board, adopted
four years before, emphasized
the need for freedom and re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility in the campus press
and stated: A publication may
print what In its best judgment
it deems proper; however it must
accept full responsibility for its
product.
I agree with the editors who
resigned that the editorial was
immature and irresponsible.
Objections to the Jones hearing
would have been approved even
by the objecting members of the
Board if they had been
ed with moderation and in good
taste. Rational criticism of pro procedures
cedures procedures used in the open hear hearing
ing hearing was approved by the Board;
the manner of presentation in the
editorial was not.
Specifically, the members
of the Board who voted against
publication objected to Hull's im improper
proper improper sentencing of
President O'Connell to the most
thorough and deserved condem condemnation
nation condemnation in the University's 115
years, because they felt the Pres President
ident President was in no way cotinected
with the conduct of the adminis administration's
tration's administration's counsel at the hear hearing
ing hearing or with what Steve
Hull termed the witchhunt of
Professor Enwall. Surely, Pres President
ident President O'Connell has not, as Mr.
Hull suggested In the editorial,
sumounted the topmost pinnacle
of bombastic folly, whatever
that meams.
In conclusion, it was dis disappointing
appointing disappointing that Steve did not re reevaluate
evaluate reevaluate and rewrite the editorial
substantially after the Board ex expressed
pressed expressed its displeasure. Equally,
I regret that the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications did not follow
its previously established stand standards
ards standards of due process and found
it necessary to censor the editor editorial.
ial. editorial.
After determining that the ed editorial
itorial editorial did not meet the standards
of obscenity, libel, or contempt,
the Board should properly have
found recourse after publication
and not before, and then only in
accordance with precedent and
previously stated principles.

Page 7



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B DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE 1
5K a ccici r' a TIKJ Count the words, omitting a, an & Sc 5
>jp> v-LMojlrlL-M 11win Addresses and phone numbers gs jj
B n fnr uia count as one word. Minimum charge E \
S Z rent ls SLO for 20 WOrdS F r et b 3
|r=j additional word add 3?. Multiply
n wonfoH the total by number of days the ad $5
n uIL Is to run. Subtract the discount gg
n Dersonal 0* applicable) and enclose a check | j
ri w* for toe remainder. For example, 3 1
n. 32-word ad to run 4 days costs |g
u services $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?).
WORDING
NAME DATE. |
STUDENT# PHONE §
ADDRESS 1
CITY STATE_ ZIP |
money cannot be refunded if ad is cancelledsftrG

FOR SALE
:
FOR SALE: COLLIERS
Encyclopedias. $40.00 equity take
over payments $12.00/mo. Call
376-3261, Ext. 2746 (A-110-st-p)
9' 8" Hansen Surfboard for sale.
1% solid redwood strip Square
taiblock.* 'Custom made. Original
price $175.00. Selling for SIOO.OO
two small dings on rail.
(Allo3tp)
NEW HONuA 50. Never used. Won
in contest. Worth $263.00 (Includes
tag). Sell for 195.00. Call 378-4254.
(All93tp)
1965 HONDA 150 $145.00, Yamaha
12String Guitar, and case $120.00,
Smith-Corona Typewriter $35.00,
Silvertone Color TV $230.00, 9' x
12' braided rug $15.00, 367-9791.
(All93tp)
MUST SELL!! Need $ Instantly
Complete set of Slingerland drums
and Zildsian Cymbols, $300.00. Call
Sandy 376-3834, from 7-8 p.m.
(All9st p)
"SAVE up to 60% on all items. Furs,
hats, old fashioned clothing,
antiques, furniture, desks, jewelry,
art lamps. Sutherland's opposite Art
Center, Micanopy, SaleSat. and
Sunday." (A-119-st-p)
GUNS-GUNS, ONE SHOT
DEAL' Have 20, Browning 9mm 13
Shot Automatics coming, $75.00
each, first come first serve. HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER'
MICANOPY 466-3340.
(All9lOtc)
ALL ELECTRIC, 3 BR, 1 Bath,
house in N.E. section. Close to
schools, park, shopping center. Small
down payment, take over low
monthly payments less than rent!
Call 372-1355 after 7:00 p.m.
(All Bstp)

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Page 8

FOR SALE
A L LSTATE COMPACTScooter,
60 cc, 6 months old. slso.oo, helmet
included. Call Ken at 376-9124, 424
Simpson. (A llo 3tp)
FOR SALE or Trade for Car of equal
value late 1966, Super Sport, Vespa
Scooter, See at Marathon Oil
Company anytime. Phone
466-3300. (All66t p)
TRIUMPH motorcycle '6l 650 cc
Twin carborator custom, $490.00,
'63 TR6 650 cc $575.00. Call
378-4384. (A-117-st-p)
1967 DUCATI, 100 cc motorcycle,
only 8 months old with 1900 miles,
$275.00. Call 372-8627 or inquire
at 1618 N.W. 4th Ave.
(All7stp)
FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE, Central
Heat, Air-Conditioned, No Credit
check, no red tapeEquity and
assume payments. After 'five.
378-3357.
ENGAGEMENT RING: Comon
Guys! Tie things up. June is just
around the corner. $275.00 takes this
exquisite beauty. 3764082.
(Al2l2tp)
FOR SALE "FLY HIGH. Stock
Available in 172 Cessna, sMember
Corporation. Reasonable offer
accepted. Call 3762264.
(Al2lstp)
HARLEY-DAVISDON -175 cc
Chromed and excellent condition.
Has rebuilt engined and new paint
job, $395.00. Call 372-4083.
(Al2l3tp)
1966 HONDA S-90, Only 3900
miles. Good Condition, also. (30' x
8') Great Lakes railer, AC, wall to
wall Carpeting, 3768707.
(Al2lstp)
>->
LOTS OF FROLIC'S tickets for sale.
Get them now. Avoid the rush! Get
them cheaper and delivered to your
door. Call 3729454 between 7 and
11 each evening. Hurry Supply
Limitted.(Al2lst p)
I FOR RENT
y v
X.:.yy.;.;.y;x;x;*XXtt*:*NNNvXXvX-x*x*>:-
SUMMER QUARTER and/or fall. 1
and 2 bedroom, furnished apt.
Everything comfort desires plus large
swimming pool with chaise lounges, 1
meter board, and pool slide, Model
unit open. Frederick Gardens, 1130
S.W. 13th Ave. 372-7555.
(B-11710tp)
2BDR Apt. Ready for immediate
occupancy. Air-conditioned. Close
to Campus. 1100 S.W. Bth Ave. Apt.
501. Call 378-2292. (B-119-st-p)
MOBILE HOME spaces for rent, nice
shady lots, located in Micanopy.
$25.00 monthly. Phone 4663300.
(Bll66tp)
SUMMER SPECIAL, 2 bedroom,
furnished. Extra large new central
Heat and Air, island kitchen extras,
sl2 5. Call 376-1546.
(Bllstfc)
THE PLACE to live this summer:
French Quarter. Sublease 2 br.
Apt.,AC, Pool. Cal! 376-2912, Apt.
15. (Bllostp)
[oyffiisT|

FOR RENT
FURNISHED AC one bedroom Apt.
2 blocks from Campus, 105.00 per
month. Call 376-8061
day 5,3721338 nights and weekend.
(Bl2lst p)
SUMMER SPECTACULAR.:
Spacious 1-Bedroom furnished
apartment for June August,
Air-Conditioned, woodpaneling,
PETS WELCOME. Call Dave at
378-6311. Now! (B-121-3t-p)
SUMMER SPECTACULAR:
SPACIOUS 1 BEDROOM
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR
JUNE AUGUST,
AIR-CONDITIONED,
WOOD-PANELING, PETS
WELCOME,' CALL DAVE AT
378-6311. NOW! (B-121-3t-p)
SUBLEASE: Large attractive
onebedroom apartment summer
quarter patio, kitchen, AC, wood
paneled, walking distance to golf
course and shopping plaza. $105.00
per month. Village 34 Apartments.
Call 378-8561. (B-121-3t-p)
WANTED
MICROSCOPE Medical school
quality. Prefer recent model Leitz.
Binocular only. Will Purchase now.
Receive at end of term. 3788688.
(C-1102tp) __

USED MAN'S 26 inch bicycle in
good condition. English or light
weight tires. Call 3788257 after
6:00 P.M. (Cll93tp)
LIVE FREE AT VILLAGE PARK
Male roommate wanted through
August. Move in immediately pay no
rent until May. Call 3769017.
(Cll4lOtp)
FEMALE KOOMMATE wanted
Please call again. Two blocks from
campus. $40.00/month. Call
378-7327, after 5:3 0.
(Cll7stp)
NEED ROOMMATE for next year?
Senior girl, graduating June '69 needs
place to live. Prefer upperclassmen
and Landmark II or 16th St. Call
376-1631, Rm 601 After 5.
(Cl2lstp)
| HELP WANTED
MALES Summer camp jobs in
North Carolina for eight weeks
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, N.
C. General Cabin Counselors or
Speciality Counselors (Water Ski,
Riflery, Archery, Tennis Waterfront
or Campcraft.) Write to: T.R.
Robertson, 1414 Flech Ave. Jax.,
Florida 32207. (E-118-st-c)
3 BIG SHOWS IN COLOR
[ Vtilley Ol the Dolls,
I NO IAT 9:22 S
Adm,sl.2s#Bfc'
1 NO. 2 AT 11:29 I
I Hombre means man... I
Paul Newman is Hombre! I
j N 0.3 AT 7:32
| Ttep>ion 370-3434 |
Shown
.at:
CHARLTON HESTON
\SICHAEIWILSON ROOSERUNG toS m J
PAHAVISION* COLOR BY DELUXE *

O
Use our handy
mail in order
' form.

HELP WANTED j
WAITRESSES: Must be 21, Part time
and full time shift available, evenings
only. Apply Gino's Italian Restaurant
- Experience helpful but not
necessary. 3761322, 2204 SW
13th St. (E-112-ts-p)
MARKETING MANAGER
Part-time evening work for rapidly
growing utility. Exceptional
opportunity to grow with young V
company. Call 3785377.
(Ell Bstp)
TYPE FOR PROFIT!!! Manual tells
you how and where Only SI.OO to
Advanced Products, Box 992
Melbourne,,. Fla. 32901.
(El2lltp)
AUTOS
ANTIQUE '4B CHEVY, Good
mechanical condition, recent valve
job and general overhaul, good
paint, custom leatherette interior.
Graduating, must sell, $3lO, or
best offer. Call Jim 3766628.
(Gll Bstp)
1961 Corvair Monza. Gocu Tires,
Radio, Heater, 4 on the floor, 50,000
original Miles. Call Dick Durnand,
3729454. Leave Message. $350. or
best offer. (Gllo3tp)
1963 FALCON Good tires, clean,
radio, heater, good mechanical
condition. Will pass forthcoming
state inspection. White with red'
interior. Best offer. 320 S.E. 7th St.,
372-2715. (G-1195tp)
-
MUST SELL!! 1965 Stingray
Convertible: 327/350, Full
Power, AC, AMFM, Reverb, K.O.
Mags, Runs perfectly, babied by
enthusiast. $2,950.00. 3769968.
(121G5tp)
VOLKSWAGEN, 1966, Excellent
Condition, VW maintaines, $13,000.
Call Williston 528-3761 after 6:00
p.m. or 528-2321 8-5 Weekdays.
(Gl2lstp)
19b4 TR 4?New rugs, uphostery,
excellent mechanical condition,
body, paint in very good shape;
asking $1,050. 378-6395.
(Gll4lQtp)
JteSeitos
1:23 ENDS
5:35 7:41 I THURS.
Mw
I Dowifowi GolwivlW#
M^O^l4-£2g^i4^
motion picture
could not
possibly have |
been made.MpM
Even a year VTi
ago, THE FOX j \I
could not have
been made...not Bk M
quite this way^l^H
| ANNE HEYWOOD I
I IN D.H. LAWRENCE'S I



CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
*. M
1960 CORVAIR, Radio, Heater,
Inside in Bad Shape but Runs Well.
$150.00 Call 378-3014.
(Gl2l4t p)
1965 CHEVELLE. Automatic, new
tires. Looks and runs same as when
new. Must see to appreciate. $1095.
378-1 130 or Ext. 28811.
(Gl2l3t p)
1966 VW, Excellent Condition, VW
maintained 13,000, $1,300, Call
378-3330 after 3:00 p.m.
(Gl2l3t p)
1963 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE New
WSW, tires, new exhaust system,
good paint. Best offer. Joe Crockett,
Ext. 2613 leave message if not in.
(Gl2lst p)
PERSONAL
TWO HIP U. F. Seniors desire
nocturnal companionship between 10
pm. and 7 a.m. Call Dick or Alan.
372-8339. (J.ll)2tp)
BUY WHOLESALE! From Foreign
countries and USA Direct from
Companys Manual $3.00, or free
details to Advanced Products. Box
992, Dept. APO3 Melbourne,
Florida, 32901. (Jl3lltp)
JAMAICA bound this weekend;
Going to play "Friendly American"
and celebrate my 25th year on earth.
Need cool chick with coins to wander
along the Island shores and Drink
Rum. (See my engagement ring, ad)
376-4082. (J2tl2lPT)

Advertise
IT'S GOOD BUSINESS

| LOST & FOUND f
LOST: Small gray long-haired cat,
white feet. Missing since April Ist.
Vicinity of S.W. 16th Ave. Turquoise
collar. Please call 378-8106.
REWARD (L-119-3t-p)
FOUNDKeys: Blade Leather Case
Identify. Call 825-0883, Jim.
(L-1193t-nc)
FOUND: Ladies wristwatch in Flint
Parking Lot Call 376-6797 to
identify. (L-110-3t-p)
r
<*
FOUND: Ford ignition key, in front
of JWR Union. Call. ext. 2832.
(Ll2o3tF)
SERVICES
.5
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
- 603 S.E Second Street, 378-7330.
(M-101-ts-c)
NEED A PAINTER? Professional
painting. Interior and exterior. Free
estimates. No job is considered too
small. Reasonable. Call After 5 p.m.
378-4855. (M-117-st-p)
NURSERY ATTENDANT for
Church Sunday morning 9:30 to
12:00 and evening 6:30 to 8. $5.00
per Week. Call First Christian
Church 376-6011. (M-110-2t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free Pick up
and delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
3782489. (M-104-18t-p)

5 Students
Put UF First
In Contest
By ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff Writer
The UPs College of Journal Journalism
ism Journalism and Communications has won
first prize in the 1967-68 Hearst
writing contest for the second
time in four years.
Florida was ranked with the
University of Nebraska as the
only schools that have won this
honor twice.
Five Florida students have won
awards this year in the six
monthly competitions among the
nations 50 journalism schools.
Former Alligator Editor Eddie
Sears of Ft. Lauderdale and as assistant
sistant assistant managing editor Raul
Ramirez of West Palm Beach
qualified for the individual
national finals and will go to New
York City Saturday to compete
for the first place gold medal
and $1,500 scholarship award.
Accompanying them will be
Hugh Cunningham, professor of
journalism and member of the
Hearst awards com mittee.
To qualify for the national in individual
dividual individual finals a student must be
first in a monthly contest of
place twice among the top 10 win winners.
ners. winners.
V
Ramirez qualified both ways
winning the first place in the
March contest with an Alligator
story about a Negro family in
Gainesville and taking fourth
place in the spot news category.
Sears was in the top 10 for
feature and spot news categories.
Among the 60 top ten winners
this year UF students won seven
places. The university has never
finished lower than sixth in the
years it has entered.
Dean Rae O. Weimer of the
College of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications will receive the
award for the UF at a banquet
in New York Saturday.

APPLICATIONS
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN FOR
EDITOR, SEMINOLE
MANAGING EDITOR, SEMINOLE
For 1969 Yearbook
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
For Term IV, 1968
AND
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MAHAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
For Terms I, 11, & 111, 1968-69
APPLICATIONS MAY BE PICKED UP IN RM. #330, REITZ UNION
Applications Must Be Returned To DIRECTOR, Student Publications By
5:00 P.M., Thurs., April 25, 1968

< "~'j -'v -'v,
, -'v, :v 'Wk
' :;
..xixvx-x'o.c. (S.;vS>Nv'
! f l^^^Wi'Bt>i. -"h. .'.<^is
>
I
.J|g|
wmmmmm hmhhmhmhmmh^
(Photo by Gus Mustelier)
GATOR GIRL
Todays Gator Girl is Dannie Solie, 1-UC,
from Tampa. Dannie is an SAE little
sister, belongs to the Florida Dancers and
would rather dance than do anything else.
Are there any partners around?

Gator Ads Sell
OLATUNJI
AND
THE SINGLE GIRL

Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

NEW
PLAYBOY
MAGAZINE
59c
REBEL DISCOUNT

Page 9



), The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Page 10

Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
PROGRESS TESTS:
Students in the following
courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
CSS 111: Tuesday, April 23, 7
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12,13,14, or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,112,
113,114,115,116,117,118, or
119.
CSS 113: Tuesday, April 2£,
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with (A) report to
Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D) to Little
121 or 125; (E) to Little 113;
(F) to Little 227, 233 or 235;
(C) to Peabody 101,102,112 or
114; (H) to Peabody 201, 202,
205, or 208; (I-J) to Flint 110
or 112; (K) to Walker 202, 209,
211 or 213; (L) to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; (M) to Little
213, 215, 217, 219,221, 223 or
225; (N) to Little 237; (0) to
Little 239; (P-Q) to Flint 101
or 102; (R) to Floyd 108; (S) to
Walker Auditorium; (T-V) to
Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171: Thursday, April
25, 7 p.m. All CMS 171
students report to Walker
Auditorium.
MS 301: Thursday, April 25,
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with (A-L) report
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16;(M-Z)
to MatherlyJ.o2,los, 10$, 112,
11$' 114, 118, or
119.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION: AU foreign
language functional exams will
be given Saturday, April 27, 18
Anderson Hall, 10 a.m. -12
noon.
*
GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION: The GRE is to
be given at 8:45 a.m., Saturday,
April 27, in Walker Auditorium.

y^^^NSA Money n av n 9 s by t ie 4ft |gj||BS6jjfe--iri
Earns Interest from the IstfepWilMiKjlMOl
/ ** eO'\ .VjX 5 1/4 % per year dividend credited semi-annually
f Minimum dividend earning account only
FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION!
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street. o Hours : 8:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. I

and
BLUB BULLETIN

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the speech screening
requirement before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE
300, 301 and 302). English and
Speech majors do not take the
test as SCH 201 is required in all
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124 Norman Hall. Phone
376-3261, Ext. 2893 or 2984.
GENERAL
NOTICES
ALPHA PHI OMEGA, mens
service fratemit will hold a
chapter meeting Monday, April
22, at 7 p.m. in Room 357,
Reitz Union. For information
call 372-5654.
FOREIGN STUDENTS AND
IMMIGRANTS ARE ELIGIBLE
TO JOIN VISTA (Volunteers in
Service to America) for service
in the U. S. Cubans are needed
to work in bi-lingual areas.
Contact Vista, Office of
Economic 0 pportunity,
Atlanta, Ga. 30303.
FRESHMEN MEN
PLANNING TO MAJOR IN
AGRICULTURE are eligible to
win the Danforth Freshman
Award which is a two-week
trip to American Youth
Foundation Leadership Camp at
Stoney Lake, Mich., Aug.
11-25. For information contact
Dr. Everett L. Fouts, Ext. 2861
or Jim Giles, Ext. 2532.
RECRUITERS FOR PEACE
CORPS will be outside the
Games Room of the Reitz Union
and in the Service Booth across
from the Hub between April
22-2 6.

PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Students must be registered with
the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the J.
WAYNE REITZ UNION Room
22. AU companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless indicated
otherwise.
APRIL 22, 23, 24:
THE BELL SYSTEM. Math,
Physics, AU Eng.
(
APRIL 23:
FLORIDA PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION. IE, EE, CE, ME,
Acctg. Must be U. S. citizen.
BOOZ-ALLEN APPLIED
RESEARCH, INC. EE, IE, ME,
Math, Stat., Com. Sci., Physics.
Must be U. Sfcitizen.
COATS & CLARK, INC.
APRIL 24, 25:
DOW CHEMICAL. ChE, ME,
EE, Met.E, CE, Chem, Mktg.,
Bus. Ad. Must be U. S. citizen.
APRIL 25:
U. S NAVAL AIR
DEVELOPMENT CENTER.
AE, EE, ME, Physics. Must be
U.S. citizen.
INTERNAL REVENUE
SERVICE. Acctg. Must be U.S.
citizen.
F.W. WOOLWORTH CO. AU
mojors. Must be U.S. citizen.
STONEROCK, HOLLINGSWORTH
& Simonet. Acctg
WEST CAHS & CARRY
BUILDING MATERIALS.
APRIL 25, 26:
. 7
AETNA LIFE & CASUALTY.
All majors. Must be U.S. citizen.
APRIL 26:
GRUMMAN AIRCRAFT
ENGINEERING CORP. AU
scientific and engineering
disciplines. Must be U.S. citizen.

CAMPUS
CALENDAR
)
-
Monday, Aprti 22
4
Peace Corps and Returned Peace
Corps Volunteer Comm.:
Information Center, Service
booth and Union Games Area
Lobby, 8 a.m.
India Club and Religion Dept.:
program on Indian Music and
Dance, 123 Union, 3:30 p.m.
Program Office: dancing lessons,
245 Union, 7 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club:
meeting, 525 E&I, 8 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar: Dr. George
0. AbeU, The Further
Limits of the Universe, Bless
Aud., 8 p.m.
Tuesday, April 23
Peace Corps and Returned Peace
Corps Volunteer Comm.:
information center, Service
Booth and Union Games Area
Lobby, 8 a.m.
Physics CoUoquium: Dr. George
O. Abell, Clusters of
Galaxies, Bless Aud., 4 p.m.
Program Office: bridge lessons,
Union 150 C, 7 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
dinner, University Inn, 7 p.m.
Membership open to singles
over 21.
Student FEA: business meeting,
250 Norman, 7:30 p.m. AU
members and interested
students.
Lyceum CouncU: Jerome Hines,
bass, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Political Forums: candidates for
State Representative, Union
Aud., 8 p.m.
Wednesday, AprU 24
Peace Corps and Returned Peace
Corps Volunteer Comm.:
information center, Service
booth and Union Games Area
Lobby, 8 a.m.
Fla. Speleological Society:
meeting, 361 Union, 7 p.m.
Concert Band: Twihght Concert,
Plaza of the Americas, 6:45
p.m.
American Assn, for the U.N.:
Hon. Alec Robertson,
British View of American
Foreign Policy and the U.N.,
Univ. Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Circle K: meeting, 357 Union,
7:30 p.m.

CAMPUS
CALENDAR
a>.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Jerome Hines, Agness
Moorehead, Olatunji, and
Mark Lane
SALES
Ar
00
Sc
I K
i~r~' \l T
Use
Gator
Ads

,t
* I,



CAMPUS
LIVING
1
Â¥ I
?L Jr I h:;:IH
V. JPlWflfv
*? v^ ,^-\ls^ j C3^.i3 | MF" f ,'f :,^^p ? ?
hm.. S
"The Great Zot" himself, at work calculating grades,
- -r J
BUDDY DAVIS OR:
'THE GREAT ZOT

By PATI SIEBEL
Alligator Correspondent
The bell rings to end class,
and a short, spectacled professor
with wavy hair graying at the
temples booms, Chin up,
chest out and keep your lense
clean! This motto has become
the familiar by-word of students
of H. G. Buddy Davis Jr.,
professor of journalism at the
UF.
With a microphone around his
neck, the wire trailing him around
the room and a mug of coffee
in his hand, Davis conducts jour journalism
nalism journalism classes in the stadium,
sometimes to either the laughter
or consternation of his students.
Davis, well-known as the
Horace Greeley of the UF, has
won several awards, among them
the Sigma Delta Chi (national
journalism society) Distin Distinguished
guished Distinguished Service Award for his
series of editorials that appeared
in the Gainesville Sun in 1963
during the city's first racial
trouble. This award, according to
Davis, is second in stature to
the Pulitzer Prize.
He has also received two first firstplace
place firstplace citations from the Florida
Associated Press one in 1955
for spot news and the other in
1956 for feature writing. But,
said Davis, the two that have
made him most happy were the
Distinguished Faculty Award
given to him in 1965 by Blue
Key, and the Teacher of the Year
in Journalism, presented to him
in 1967 after a Student Govern Government
ment Government and I.F.C. poll.
A self-proclaimed redneck
Floridian, Davis worked on
Jacksonvilles Florida Times-
Union for five years (four of which
he was capitol correspondent in
Tallahassee) before coming to the
UF and he has spent several sum summers
mers summers working for the Miami
Herald and the Atlanta Con Constitution.
stitution. Constitution.
He admits that his hobby was
photography, but that it was hard
to establish a reputation as a
photographer and besides, it
was expensive. So, he turned to
writing as an outside hobby and
now describes himself as a word
merchant.

NEW
PLAYBOY
MAGAZINE
59c
reb£.'Mscgunt

This gives me a chance to
blaze new paths and, besides,
playing God is a little fun some sometimes,
times, sometimes, he said with a grin.
And maybe some of his stu students
dents students would agree about his
playing God that is. Many of
Davis students are heard
grumbling about his be ng too
hard on his classes, but Davis
feels, A student doesnt mind
hard work if he is learning any anything
thing anything from it. I try to capitalize
on the competitive aspect between
students.
Davis says that teaching is
pleasant work and lots of fun,
and describes himself as a com complete
plete complete product of the University
of Florida.
If it wasnt for the second
World War and the G.I. Bill,
I might be pumping gas in Starke
and riding with the Ku Klux Klan
at night, he admits.
After the war, Davis came to
the UF and got his B.A. and
M.A. and during that time also
instigated the resurrection of the
Orange Peel. After Davis left
the university and worked for
about five years, Rae Weimer,
Dean of the College of Jour Journalism,
nalism, Journalism, offered him a position
teaching in the journalism de department.
partment. department. Although he refused
the first couple of times, Davis
finally accepted a position in 1954
after Weimer persisted in his
recruitment.
He also feels the quarter sys system
tem system is hard on the skill courses
because it doesnt give the stu student
dent student the same instructional op opportunities
portunities opportunities to mature with
the course as did the trimester.

COLLINS
IS COMING
[PAID PPL. ADI

Do You Feel Your
County Judge Should
Be A Lawyer?
EDGAR
,fyour c fl
answer is LLU
JOHNSON
FOR JUDGeI

Pulsars
And LGM
By BARBARA FISHMAN
Alligator Correspondent
Little Green Men that go beep
beep have been discovered.
Sure?!
Dont you believe me?
No.
Well thats what the new Pul Pulsars
sars Pulsars are called that astronomers
have recently recorded from
somewhere in our universe ap approximately
proximately approximately two hundred light
years away and nobody knows
what they really are.
I dont believe you.
I canflielp that. But if youre
curious, you will have an op opportunity
portunity opportunity to ask Dr. George O.
Abell, Professor of Astronomy
UCLA, and author of the
astronomy textbook used here in
Freshman Descriptive As Astronomy.
tronomy. Astronomy.
Dr. Abell, the leading authority
on clustering galaxies and the
structure of the universe, will
speak on The Further Limits
of the Universe at Bless Audi Auditorium,
torium, Auditorium, Williamson Hall, room
133, at 8:00 p.m., Monday, April
22nd.
Sports Car
Beauty Sought
The Gainesville Sports Car
Club is sponsoring a beauty con contest
test contest to find a Miss Gainesville
Glen.
Applicants must be at least 18
years old. Entrance forms are
available at the Reitz Union or at
115 SE 14 St. Applications will
be mailed to sororities, frater fraternities,
nities, fraternities, and girls dorms.
Entrants will appear Wed. May
1, at the Westside Recreation
Center at 2 p.m. (the public is
invited). Three finalists will ap appear
pear appear at the race May 12 and the
winner will be announced. Prizes
will be donated from Gainesville
merchants.
For further information call
Jeanne Lewis at 378-2531 Ext.
214 or 372-7816 after 6 p.m.
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BUSTLERS f
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Alpha To Zeta

PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta, history
honorary, initiated 21 new
members last Tuesday evening.
Membership is based on excel excellence
lence excellence in the study and writing
of history. The objective of the
society is to promote the study
of history, encourage research,
teaching, publication, and learn learning
ing learning and thought of historians,
and to bring students, teachers,
and writers of history together
both socially and intellectually.
The group plans Include an
original one-act play, Re Reflections
flections Reflections of the Great Awaken Awakening,
ing, Awakening, (an evaluation of the ef effectiveness
fectiveness effectiveness of history cur curriculum)
riculum) curriculum) and a department-wide
picnic;
PI KAPPA PHI
The Pi Kapps have installed
their new officers for the Spring
and Fall quarters. They are
President, Larry Nixon; Vice
President, Mike mil; Treasurer,
Ron DHaeseleer; Secretary, Bob
Lowder; Warden, Dave Lottie r;
Historian, Mike Goettee; and

I STUDYING ABROAD? ]
Students whove been there ;
tell students who are going
On a rock-bottom budget (well
V W under $7 a day!) in Europe, the Ba- I
MM hamas, Bermuda, Jamaica, Puerto I
MM Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Hawaii I
In this totally new guidebook, students who
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places for the high spirit, -''"
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shop, where to play, where | to Wm ly WM
to meet people. Where to f&W y v
swing: bistros, coffee- Ij
houses, ski resorts, surfing |i
beaches, non-sightseeing |[ j
sights. Plus straight facts f\
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color and how to live with I
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This guidebook
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COMPLETE INFORMATION ON
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more. I
Where The Fun Is, Pan Ams Young Travelers Guide written
by Students and Pan Ams New Horizons In Education are
available at all bookstores or at your local Pan Am office.
Published by Simon and Schuster

Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Chaplain, Bruce Pockey.
The Pi Kapp Little Sisters have
initiated seven new girls: Carol
Holmes and Jackie Diblasi, AOPi;
Jane Sleeper, Tri-Delt; Jody
Long, Kappa Delta; June Colin;
Leigh Rollinson; and Giidy Al Alfring.
fring. Alfring.
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
The A E Phis are extremely
proud of two sisters Babs Smith
and Linda Tarler for being tapped
for Mortar Board and Savant.
Judy fflrsch was named to the
executive board of Dialogue.
Susan Stillman and Jean Mamlin
are both working on the Florida
Coed staff.
Nancy Wolfson is a little sister
of Phi Tau and Andrea Jantel
of ATO. Andrea was also runner runnerup
up runnerup in the Miss International
Beauty Contest. Happy Arkinwas
a finalist in the Miss Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Contest.
Arlene Margolis and Dee Dee
Walshun are new members of
Angel Flight, and Jane Davis was
just selected a ROTC Sweet Sweetheart.
heart. Sweetheart.

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Page 12

K krctVvfty'v::: :v^V:^S^^Bgge§jBM^B^^^^^^^y
jKtt. s£g.: ; :-' :
R : ; # fr
The excitement in
engineering doesnt all |HHHF
happen in a development lab. r % w/^BB^
T:;B;kV-'p::: ; : .4';Sq: : :p:;vx-: s ys:vV^^^
"I found that out when I started selling computers. J||g|jk
"Obviously, theyre expensive. Nobodys going to buy one unless Hk Hk[
[ Hk[ can show him why it'll be worth the investment. (This is Bob A k IF A I
Shearman, Mtfchanical Engineer, an IBM Medical Representative A HL pi:- A
in Marketing.) '&
"M\ customers happen to be doctors and scientists. Natural Iv, yj&
1 have to find out what their problems are before I can hope to | v
build a case for installing a computer. Thats w hat I find excit- £B| .g
ing. This whole process of helping somebody solve a knot tv jfil ABBBBBB^UB
mBBBBBBA
JHHU jW ,;. ;
"For example, one of mv installations is at a cancer research MHggi.
institute. A problem came up when t!ie> decided to build a Kfl BEBI AH S
radio therapy suite about a block avvav from the compu computer.
ter. computer. The doctors wanted to communicate \\ ith the com computer
puter computer right from a patients bedside. Ip:;, A I
"The genetai solution was easy enough. We knew wed j) ;*V; f
have to use some sort of remote terminal. But horn
then on it was a process of exploration I asked a lot of J
questions, dug up a lot of facts, and generally helped .fw?*'-;*l;iS''
the custome) arrive at a detailed definition of his prob '?jv?.f ; g\^.'')i t a : VJ>Vr VJ>Vrlem.
lem. VJ>Vrlem. flien t worked closely with IBM and g ~4 ?: g" * *:[(' '. J 1 ;,. .* .'/ :.;
the customer until we had the right x ,..<- M e >. ,,; %.'.'Vo : ii -qxV.-'r
terminals msudled and functioning.
In a joh like this, von use your k\ h / a^^tlS *2; > c Vy \V?:' - f a- : w i'?X/X'i :-
niea! background all the time. : i T X f^u'*'***
Wltet iiei-\ oil -e defining a pi'ohiem >
or show eg he cusiumci him ic \ :
eipiipmem earn help sol\e it."
Ho!) s commons co\er onlv a small
part ot what !BM oilers an engineer- W
ing or science student who likes to
unk with people, for moiv taels,
wm t \ .mi campus placement < *tlice. ()i - : >; -.' >£ .'. xf >'V -J;;: y
s eiul an outliis' ol \micm cm inter -T J% t 'c
1 s lliK 'ducat loiial Ivu kg round i o -^; -Icjg V/-£.'^'
Tha lies (amm.uk IBM. Den: ( \^ s J *' : ?\^ f t? |
144 Pcachtim St., VI RoomslO. -\ 'v'
Atlanta, (ia. u'''d l >. \\c', can ctrual V As-*:.. pV h ?.<.hi- i :-! ;\ jXo.v; vp;{y^ : ;^^V
opportun"\ ci'ipioxci. Amw :mf t* c,., ,;w m *\;
MM
"He.'' 1 M tp,t



'Look Back: A Smouldering Log

By SIMON GISH
Alligator Feature Writer
John Osborne Is a demanding
playwright. He asks a lot from
those who produce his plays, but
he has a lot to give in return ~
if the price is right.
Gainesville theatre-goers had
chance to at least scent the
bouquet of Osbornes banquet in
the Florida Players recent pro production
duction production of Luther. This play
presented us with certain facts
about the body and soul of Os Osbornes
bornes Osbornes plays.
First, a dramaturgical
craftsman, he is brilliant: his
dialogue can flit like a butter butterfly
fly butterfly or fall like a meat-axe; the
motive forces, patterns of action
or Ideas within or between scenes
are always congruent and there
are no loose ends.
But with the soul of an Os Osborne
borne Osborne play it is a different matter.
It appears that the human con condition
dition condition is a loose end in itself.
Luther ends, but with no
answer; only hope remains
hope that the darkness wont be
quite so thick.
The darkness was much thicker
in Osbornes first successful
play, Look Back in Anger.
And this is the caldron that the
Gainesville Little Theatre chose
to savor when they elected to
produce the play. The GLT is
trying to pay the price (this week,
Aoril 25, 26, 27), but theyre
coming up a little short of change.
Anger is a play which rams
Itself like a white-hot catheter
through the most bilious sort of
identity crisis. It crys out, I
rage to live, which way If life?
Jimmy Porter is a man on fire,
but he cant endure his own
heat.
He is a conflagration burning
up wind, spewing cinders at any anything
thing anything combustible on the safe side
of the fire line. Three people
get too close. His wife Alison
is incinerated and must remain
in the flame to keep her ashes
warm. Helena is scorched but
flees to safety. And Cliff, the
friend, hardly even inflammable,
basks like a reptile in the warmth.
The play provide? fuel for a
bonfire. The GLT production of it,
to sputter the metaphor, is a
smoldering log which only oc occasionally
casionally occasionally bursts into genuine
flames.
* Ange r requires dialect dif differentation
ferentation differentation between several of the
characters. Jimmy Porter is an
educated, highly intelligent
prodigy from the English lower
classes; one would expect him
to speak somewhat enlightened
English with a tinge of cockney.
Michael Doyle, who played the
part, sounded like a Scotsman
with Irish laryngitis. Cliff,
Jimmys Welsh friend, played by
Alan Henderson, sounded like a
Witchita immigrant residing in
Palatka. Alison (Janice Tesh),
toe upperclass English society
deb, inserted ah into cant,

Union Board Fine Arts Committee
presents
AGNES MOOREHEAD
Dramatic Readings From
Carl Sandburg & Marcel Proust
Question & Answer Period
And Reception Following
Friday, April 26 8:00 p.m.
, Union Ballroom

but that was all.
The entire cast mostly uni university
versity university bred actors showed
great evidence of being conpetent
performers. Certain criticism,
however, regarding characteri characterization
zation characterization (perhaps casting?) have to
be made. Mr. Doyles voice as
1 Theatre
LJlsviewj
the fiercely virile Porter, is
about three octaves higher than
the resounding baritone of the
aamp-souiea Cliff, who, more moreover,
over, moreover, looked like a stoop stoopshouldered
shouldered stoopshouldered Rudolf Valentino in instead
stead instead of a scruffy Welsh rough roughneck.
neck. roughneck.
This detrimental contrast was
amplified by Doyles movement
and general physical attitude. In Instead
stead Instead of the intense muscular
motion that Jimmy should have,
Doyle jerked, fidgeted, and swung
about on his heels. Such move movement
ment movement seems more aopropriate to
comedy, and Mr. Doyie* s success
in the humorous scenes would in indicate
dicate indicate that he is very accomp accomplished
lished accomplished in that area.
There are a number of flames
in the smolder of Anger, how however,
ever, however, the brightest being Ruth
Helwig as Helena Charles, who
damns the coals, takes Alisons
place on the Porter brazier, and
with tail feathers singed beats a
retreat. Miss Helwig brings po polish
lish polish and understanding to her
performance and of all the ac actors
tors actors turns in the most consistent consistently
ly consistently believable characterization.
Janice Tesh as Alison is cred credible
ible credible as the emotionally haggard
wife of Jimmy Porter, but much
of the class-consciousness of

COLLINS
IG COMING
[PAID POL. ADI

TEACH SCHOOL IN SARASOTA
FLORIDA
A co-ed prints boarding
school and summer camp,
non-graded for children of
ability, 10 to 18 years of ace,
Is seeking non-smoking male
teachers from 18 to 30 years
of age for openings on June 11
and Sept. Ist, 1968.
No teaching certlfiauc re required.
quired. required. One year of college
will satisfy the academic re requirements
quirements requirements to enter this In
service teaching Internship
while you train In oor methods
to be a master teacher In a
private educational school
system with unlimited chal challenge
lenge challenge and financial opportunity
for creative people of per personal
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persons with a strong Inter Interest
est Interest In teaching young people
basic academics and camping,
or sailing, or crafts etc
Send personal and educational
resume, phone number, snap snapshot,
shot, snapshot, Immediately for full par particulars
ticulars particulars ahdT application
forms.
Write to The 4 IPs School,
7700 S. Tamlaml Trail. Sara Sarasota,
sota, Sarasota, Florida 33581. Phone
- 924-3207.

AT GAINESVILLE LITTLE THEATRE

Porters vituperation is lost in
that she is not obviously the roost
well-bred of the household. But
when it comes to expressions
of despair, torment, and emotion emotional
al emotional disintergration, Miss Tesh has
no equal. Her Tearful outburst
at the end of the playis very
moving, and probably accounts
for at least of Angers curtain
calls.
David Lane appears as Colonel
Redfern Allisons father, and
coming to take his daughter home,
provides a very enjoyable
moment of wistful respite in this
otherwise turbulent play.
There is nothing bad about
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Check the Yellow Pages for your local BSA dealer...over 70C coast to coast

Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

GLT*s production of Anger.
Director Craig Hartley has set
his sights high (much higher than
Tennessee Williams) in attempt attempting
ing attempting this play. As a director he
steps far above most in
community theatre production.
He makes excellent use of a very
functional set (by Joe Fillipo),
manages scene transitions nice nicely,
ly, nicely, and accomplishes some tricky
sound sequences (the trumpet and
radio concert)" ably.
It is hoped that the cast of
Anger will not be dismayed
by this criticism. In attempting
such heights one might expect to
slip on a few loose stones. This

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season, indicates that the GLT
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Page 13



Page 14

l, Hie Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22. 1968

A Handy Guide For Draft Dodgers

By ALLEN PIEFLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
Theres a new lost gener generation
ation generation of Americans: a stream of
expatriates that makes Heming Hemingway,
way, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and the rest of
the Bohemia-seekers of the
1920s seem like a troop of Boy
Scouts heading for a Left Bank
campout.
Or so states the of an
article about draft dodgers en entitled
titled entitled When a Man Forsakes
His Country which appeared in
a recent issue of This Week,
a national Sunday newspaper sup supplement.
plement. supplement.
The article says that there
are an estimated 2,000 to 20,000
draft dodgers residing in Canada
alone, and that any accurate re report
port report of the number would be
impossible because so many are
hiding.
article continues by giving
other statistics:
The Justice Dept, admits that
in the year which ended on June
30, 1967, there were 58,090 cases
of violation of Selective Service
laws.* Whatever the name for it,
only 1,388 of the 58,090 cases
resulted in indictmants, only 789
resulted in convections, ond only
58 men got the maximum sen sentence.
tence. sentence.
This information presents a
rather optimistic picture of the
risks that a draft dodger might
run: out of all of those who
dodged the draft only a handful
received any punishment. How However,
ever, However, the article lays down the
hard facts about penalties for
dodging the long arm of Uncle
Sam: ..
1. Prison terms of up to five
years. 2. Fines of up to SIO,OOO.
3. Draft dodgers (leaving the
country) can never visit the U.S.
or any of its territories again.
Even if they become citizens of
a foreign country, the charges
of desertion or draft dodging re remain
main remain and they are subject to
arrest.
4. If they want to travel out outside
side outside their adopted land, even if
not to the U.S., they dont dare
do it until they become citizens,
for fear of getting into trouble
there or of being nabbed by MPs
without being able to call for
formal help.
5. Most countries hospitable to
draft dodgers are cold. Temper Temperatures
atures Temperatures of 25 to 30 below zero
are standard in Canada and can
bet almost as bad in Sweden.
Snow often doesnt finish melting
in Montreal until May.
6. Salaries are lower out outside
side outside the UJS. The average man
earns about $4,000 in Sweden
$4-6,000 in Canada.
7. Income taxes abroad are as
high as here or higher. A
Swedish bachelor earning $6,000
pays 30 per cent, Canadians and
Americans pay about 14 per cent,
and Sweden has a whopping 11
per cent sales tax.
8. Its generally difficult for
Americans to adjust to living
under monarchies or even to
forms of democracy different
from our own.
9. Its a life filled, to vary varying
ing varying degrees, with loneliness and
fear. Draft dodgers in Canada and
Sweden report being rollowed ...
by the FBI.
10. Whether they stay in their
adopted land or come home and
take their medicine, theyll
always be marked. This can
affect the caliber of jobs they
get and influence their lives in
other, subtler ways.
t
Thus is the fate of those who
would defy the word of Gen.
Hershey, Lyndon Bird, the
Selective Service machine and the
rest of the fanatics and fanatical

WHEN A MAN FORSAKES HIS COUNTRY

democratic government or organizations.
ganizations. organizations.
The College Male is, never nevertheless,
theless, nevertheless, trying to do something
about it, according to the article.
At Harvard, 94 per cent of the
seniors voted against UjS. Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam policy and 22 per cent in indicated
dicated indicated they would rather leave
the country or go to jail than
become part of the military.
At Berkeley, some pro professors
fessors professors are sending anxious stu students
dents students to consult with anti-draft

/ Where have \
/ all the heroes gone? \
-+
I. iIRIMHKM
11 | Hi -j
A young woman cries out her agony to
The Brooklyn sky
/(s good citizens dim their lights
S 9 they may watch unseen
The late show in the streets.
A pregnant mother is harassed by hoodlums
While spectators stand mutely by.
And the young men?
The young men stand aside
Too smart to get involved.
In the current lingo they "keep their cool".
Well, listen here
No great civilizations have been built
By men who kept their c 001...
No frontiers conquered
No revolutions waged
No brave new societies forged
By men who kept their cool.
All of mankind's shining achievements
Have been propelled into being
By hot-blooded young men, fired by an idea.
When the heroes take to the sidelines
Civilizations decline and disappear. #
Right now this country needs heroes
To stick out their necks
For better schools
Better housing
Better jobs
Better government.
It's up to you to take it on.
You are our life insurance.
1 Phoenix ii
\ Mutual ii /
\ LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY pig /
HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT flfl ?N M

lawyers. At Yale, some 300 stu students
dents students have signed cards saying
they refuse to go to Vietnam.
It is characteristic of the UF
that there is no organized plot
to help eligible students get out of
the draft. The way things are
going now, the UJS. will eventually
have the best-educated and least
efficient army in the history of
the world.
For those of you who still
have the courage or foolishness
to buck the system, the article

lists several countries and tells
how hospitable and safe for draft
dodgers they are:
Sweden is listed as the
safest country. France is
listed as almost equally safe.
Switzerland is described as safe
inside but sometimes they
give you trouble at the border.
Denmark, Norway, Holland and
Belgium are categorized as
supposed to be unfriendly, but
in fact they try hard to avoid
seeing things.

Italy is bad the police
are unfriendly. West Germany,
also tough, arrests and
returns. England is listed as
a risky place to be.
There are virtually three
choices left to the college man:
he can go, he can refuse to go
or he can hang himself. Three
very pleasant options for a very
pleasant situation. Has anyone
ever tried to bribe the head of his
bradt board?



UF Jolts Bulldogs Twice, 2-0, 9-4

By PAUL KAPLAN
Alligator Sports Editor
The UF baseball team slugged
Its way Into sole posession of
first place In the SEC this week weekend,
end, weekend, as the Gators took two
consecutive wins from previous
leader Georgia, 2-0 and 9-4.
Florida now stands 7-2 in con conference
ference conference competition, with Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee second at 6-2. Auburn,
who before this weekend was tied
with the Gators with a 5-2 mark,
travelled to Lexington, where
they dropped three consecutive
games to strong Kentucky.
On Friday, Florida blanked the
Bulldogs 2-0 and then the Gators
made it two in a row in Athens
when they put together a 12-hit
attack on Saturday.
Tony Dobies, a freshman
center fielder who has sparked
the UF team since the loss of
the club's leading hitter Nick
Nicosia, did it again Saturday,
as he cranked out three hits in including
cluding including a two-run homer in the
third inning.
In the sixth inning, catcher
Mike Ovca put the game on ice

Jourdan Paces UF Victory
In Gulf Coast Track Meet

By NEAL SANDERS
Assistant Sports Editor
UFs track team, led by Ron
Jourdans seven-foot high jump
effort, rolled past four other top
southern schools to win the Gulf
Coast Five-Way' Track Meet,
Saturday, in TaPahassee.
Florida took first place in only
five of the 17 events, but won
the meet easily, scoring 62
points. FSU placed second with
53, Alabama, third with 39, Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, fourth with 28, and Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State fell in last with
five points.
Pacing the Gator victory was
Ron Jourdan, who became the
second UF jumper to clear seven
feet. Jourdan took .first place in
the high jump with an official
height of 7 -3/4, and also
established a new meet record.
Two meet records were set by

o ranae And Blue Saturday


Spring practice officially ends
Saturday, April 27, when the
Gators take the field at 2:00p.m.
for the annual Orange and Blue
game.
"Spring practice is real drud-
Ssry, little more than getting
beat all over the field/' said
iNorm Carlson, of the Sports
Publicity Dept. The Orange
and Blue game is traditional,
and it gives the team something
to look forward to.
Garlson pointed out tnat the
Pre-season game also elves the

CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS
will have a representative on campus on
April 23, 1968
6B salary: $7,000 up plus 10 days paid
vacation, 10 days sick leave, paid hos hospitalization,
pitalization, hospitalization,
For information about certification pro procedures
cedures procedures and teaching opportunities, arrange
for an appointment at:
EDUCATION PLACEMENT OFFICE

as he pounded a three-run homer
over the left field fence. Ovca
had two hits and four RBls on
the afternoon.
The win went to Jim Courier
who brought his record to 3-2
on the season, and who finally
.v.-'v ___
~' V 9
JIM COURIER

John Morton, first in the Shot
Put, with a throw of 55 11/2,
and second, in the Discus Throw,
at 175' 6.
Coach Jimmy Carnes called
the meet fantastic. The times
demonstrated at this meet should
prove once and for all that the
South has the program and the
talent to compete with any school
in the nation.
Jourdan especially deserves
some praise, added Carnes.
He has been looking for that
seven-foot mark for a long time,
and I was especially glad to see
him reach it in this meet.
FSU, which the Gators will
face next, provided especially
stiff competition for UF. Carnes
thought that the meet would be a
good one
Neither team was up to full
strength, said Carnes. Several

&
coaches an opporunity to see how
individual players will react
under pressure.

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is showing signs of regaining the
sharp form he showed last
season. Courier pitched the first
six innings and gave up three hits
and two runs.
Floridas Leon Bloodworth
broke the scoring ice when he
MIKE OVCA

of our sprinters had to miss the
meet, and this cost us several
first places. I think the same was
true for FSU.
UF will face FSU May 4, at
home. The Gators next meet will
be this weekend when they travel
to Des Moines for the Drake
Relays.
OLATUNJI
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An Affiliate Os
The American Management Association

lifted a sacrafice fly in the second
inning for a 1-0 lead. Dobies
homer and the five-run sixth
put the game away. Ovca got his
fourth RBI and the Gators ninth
tally in the seventh inning when
he cracked a single to left field
driving in a run.
Georgia managed one run in
both the fifth and sixth innings,
and then tallied two more in the
seventh.
Bulldog right fielder James
Bradshaw drove in one run and

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Monday, April 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

scored two others as he led his
team with two hits.
The Gators next return home
for a two-day rematch with the
Bulldogs here on Friday and Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, April 26-27.
COLLINS
IS COMING
[PAID PPL. AD]

Page 15



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 22, 1968

Page 16

aIOVES TO CSU
Moore Quits As
Graves Assistant

Perry C. Moore, assistant to
the athletic director at the UF,
Saturday decided to give up his
position here in favor of a job
offered him as athletic director
of Colorado State University.
Last week Moore traveled to
Fort Collins, Colorado for talks
with the CSU board that was
making the selection. The univer university
sity university first contacted him about one
month ago.
On Saturday afternoon, Moore
contacted Athletic Director Ray
Graves and informed him that
he had accepted the position.
I want to congratulate
Perry, Graves said. He has
the ability and the background in
both athletics and business which
will enable him to do an out outstanding
standing outstanding job. Everyone here
wishes him well.
Moore, will replace CSU
Athletic Director Jim Williams
who is giving up his position in
order to devote all of his time
to his duties as head basketball
coach there.
The 36-year old Belpore, Ohio

Trapp Named MVP

Richard Trapp, Florida's ex exciting
citing exciting split end, Saturday, added
another laurel to his growing
list of grid awards when he was
named recipient of the Fergie
Ferguson award as the 1967 foot football
ball football teams most valuable player.
Trapp, a senior who was draft drafted
ed drafted in the third round by the
AFLs Buffalo Bills, will receive
the award at Homecoming cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies next year. Last season's
winner was Steve Spurrier.
Gridders Ron Ely and Bobby
Downs also received awards.
*
Ely was named winner of the
Walter J. Matherly trophy for
academic excellence. The en engineering
gineering engineering major compiled a 3.7
average for the fall quarter.
Downs, who was a standout
member of Florida's corps of

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native is a graduate of the Uni University
versity University of Maryland where he
performed on the basketball and
track teams. He has received a
four-year contract at his new
position with an undisclosed
salary.
While at the UF, Moore was
assistant basketball coach under
Norm Sloan for two seasons, and
also helped manage the Uni University
versity University Golf Club.

safeties last season, was named
the squads top defensive player
by the coaching staff.
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