Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
SG Swamps Gator Staff At Carnigras

Kicking off the first
annual Florida Carni Carnigras
gras Carnigras Monday, the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator and Student
Government clashed
with bumper cars,
eggs and water pistols.
SG forces, obviously
inferior, managed to
pull a surprising upset
with their bumper
cars. At right, below,
Student Body Pre President
sident President Clyde Taylor
prepares to lead his
charges. T
Above, Alligator
Editor Steve Hull pleas
for mercy as he is sur surrounded.
rounded. surrounded. Far right,
Hull faces ex execution
ecution execution for the
humiliating defeat.

Weather
Fair Skies
High In The 80s
Low In The 50s

Vol. 60 No. 117

r ik.,
j ,jph||B^£-j|B^
Jl *(*v
= B mm
K ijj^>
Ray Charles And The Raelets
Ray Charles Show
Slated Friday Night
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
The Genius Ray Charles, appearing with the Raeletts, will
perform in Florida Gym Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Tickets at $1.50, $2.25, $3.00 are now on sale at the Reitz Union
Box Office, Belk Lindseys and the Record Bar.
Charles, vocalist, pianist, alto saxist, writer and arranger, has
been on the musical scene for the past two decades, recording
jazz, rhythm and blues, country and western, and popular music.
Blinded when he was six, Charles grew up in a school for blind
children in St. Augustine, Fla. When he was 15, he left the school
and was hired to play piano and saxophone with a variety of bands
throughout Florida.
At 17, he organized his first trio, and the group eventually made
its way to Seattle, Wash.
They appeared on a regular radio show became the first Negro
act to have a sponsored television show in the Northwest.
In a publicity release, Charles said that this first trio sounded
much like Nat King Cole. Charles later developed his own par particular
ticular particular style of soul music.
According to the release, Charles tries to bring out this soul
in all the music he writes or performs. He spends hours listening
to his records in an attempt to improve on this style.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

'DEFINE KATZ ROLE

Taylor Orders Funds
For AWS Held Back

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor ordered treasurer Phil
Burnett Monday to withhold funds
from the Association of Women
Students (AWS) until Dean
Katzs role is fully defined.
He made the order in the wake
of charges made by Charles Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd Sunday that AWS is domin dominated
ated dominated by the Office of Womens
Affairs through Assistant Dean
of Women Loyce Katz.
The former student body pres president
ident president urged Student Government
to suspend funds and recognition
from AWS.
Dean Katz declined to comment
Monday.
Calling the suspension of funds
childish, AWS elections chair chairman
man chairman Janet Dippenworth said Dean
Katz has been instrumental in
making womens organizations
more potent.
Budget and Finance Committee
chairman Tom Blackmon said
AWS budget requests for next
year will not be considered
until the charges are cleared.
He cited a section of the Fin Finance
ance Finance Law shich states that stu student
dent student government cannot appro appropriate
priate appropriate funds to organizations
other than those run by students.
Burnett, however, contended
that administrative control of
student organizations is a sub subjective
jective subjective question.
Burnett said money will be
allocated, first, if the organiza organization
tion organization is in accordance with the law,
and then, on the basis of the
merit of the projects planned.
A search of the student body
constitution by Burnett and the
Alligator failed to find the fin finance
ance finance statute in question.
Not only is AWS budget on
the line, but other aspects are
also being checked out by Jake

Schickel, chairman of informa information
tion information investigation of the Student
Senate.
Even though their constitu constitution
tion constitution hasnt been approved by the
senate, he said, theyre imple implementing
menting implementing changes in the new con constitution
stitution constitution in their elections. One
change is electing two vice-pres vice-presidents.
idents. vice-presidents.
However, Miss Dippenworth

Jones Hearing
To Start Today

By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Today at 3:45 p.m. in Mc-
Carty Hall Auditorium Dr. Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Jones will get his long longsought
sought longsought open hearing for tenure.
It is doubtful that the hearing
will conclude today or even that
any significant decisions will be
made. But the evidence for the
first time will be presented
openly by counsel for both the
Administration and Jones.
What, if anything, can the Fa Faculty
culty Faculty Senate Committee on Aca Academic
demic Academic Freedom and Tenure de decide
cide decide today?
It is certain that the committee
cannot decide to grant tenure to
Jones outright. They can only
recommend it. According to the
UF Constitution, President Ste Stephen
phen Stephen C. OConnell still has the
ultimate authority either to ac accept
cept accept or to reject any recom recommendations
mendations recommendations made by the com committee.
mittee. committee. And Board of Regents
could also exercise a veto.
So it would appear that, with
discretionary power in the
hands of both the Administration
and the Board of Regents, the
evidence presented on Jones be-

Inside
Three Law Professors
Resign Teaching Posts
See Page Two

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

contended that it is legal be because
cause because provisions were made in
by-laws of the old constitution
for the changes.
Schickel is also studying the
applicability of the Fair Spon Sponsorship
sorship Sponsorship Law, passed by the sen senate
ate senate two weeks ago, which states
that faculty members, instead of
administrators, should sponsor
organizations.

half will have to convince more
than just the Faculty Senate com committee
mittee committee that he deserves tenure.
It is not certain what criteria
for judging this case will be
emphasized.
There is a procedural ques question.
tion. question. Was Jones given due pro process
cess process and treated fairly in his
efforts to get tenure?
The local chapter of AAUP
has previously reported to O-
Connell that there are problems
in the procedure for granting
tenure.
Questions which are likely to
be raised at todays hearing are:
Should the Personnel Board of
the President be above the de departmental
partmental departmental board which rules
on tenure?
The departmental levels cur currently
rently currently initiate tenure procedures.
They have the authority to rule
on the professional competence,
personality and character of a
colleague who is up for tenure.
But the Presidents Person Personnel
nel Personnel Board can review any de departments
partments departments decision, as was done
Jones case, and can overrule it.
It will probably be asked:
(SEE JONES PAGE 3)



Page 2

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Bulletin News
*
V*'
State, National, International News
* i
Hee Seeks Committment
SEOUL, South Korea (UPI) South Korean officials Monday said
President Park Chung Hee will seek a firmer U.S. commitment
to guarantee this nations security when he meets President Johnson
in Honolulu Wednesday.
Following the pattern of creating turmoil in advance of important
talks between Washington and Seoul, the North Koreans Sunday night
sent a small group of infiltrators into the Demilitarized Zone where
they ambushed a U.S. Army truck. The raid killed two Americans
and two South Koreans. Two Americans were wounded.
Similar forays were staged in October 1966 when Johnson was
visiting Seoul for talks with Park, and the attacks in both instances
appeared to be a Communist attempt to assert Nother Korean opposition
to the American military presence here. Six Americans were killed
in the 1966 truce violations.
King Assassin Sought
ATLANTA (UPI) -- Indications mounted today that the most wanteu
man in the nation, Eric Starvo Galt, never actually existed but was
carefully contrived before Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated.
Authorities pressed their search without a warrant -for the
man but indicated they feared Galt maybe a blind set up to hamper the
search for the killer, or killers, of King.
It was learned that investigators have been unable to trace his
existence beyond last summer, and pointed out that it is virtually
impossible for a person to leave so few traces.
The ma? who called himself Galt purchased a car in Birmingham,
Ala., on Aug. 30. He did not apply for an Alabama drivers license
until a week later, at which time he gave his occupation as unemployed
Merchant Marine seaman.
Hanoi Refuses Sites
WASHINGTON (UPI) The State Department needled Hanoi today
about its failure to accept one of the five neutral locations proposed
by the United States as a site for exploratory peace contacts.
Department spokesman Robert J. McCloskey said: We do not
understand the difficulty the other side has in accepting a site that
would be neutral and that would provide a proper atmosphere for
contacts.
The United States has not received any official reply to its formal
message to North Vietnam late last week rebuffing Hanois proposal
that Warsaw be the site of any talks.
The UJS. message restated a preference for Geneva or one of
four sites in Asia Rangoon, New Delhi, Jakarta or Vientiane, the
capital of Laos.
German Students Riot
BERLIN (UPI) Thousands of leftist students in West Berlin and
half a dozen cities in West Germany laid siege tonight to newspaper
plants owned by publisher Axel Springer in an all out effort to cripple
the newspapers they blame for the shooting of their leader.
Red Rudi Dutschke, left-wing youth leader was critically wounded
last Thursday by an assailant inflamed by a hatred of Communism
and spurred on by reports of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. The students said the Springer newspapers created this
'hate atmosphere.
Police forces armed with tear gas and backed by water cannon
set out steel barricades and barbed wire around the printing plants
in Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Esslingen, Essen and Han Hannover.
nover. Hannover. It was the fifth consecutive night of violence in Germany.
F NORTHSIDE'S m
1 GATOR DISCOUNT ASSOCIATION |
| Join now and SAVE REAL MONEY i
1 Drive a little, save a lot 1
o
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I NORTHSIDE 66 SERVICENTER 1
jSK 4411 NW 13th St. 376-9481
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five Umes weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to *he Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, GainesvUle, Florida, 32601. The Alligator is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

3 UF Law Profs

Three UF law school professors are resigning
to accept posts at other schools the Alligator
learned Monday;
They are professors John Flackett, Sanford Ka z
and Stanley Laughlin. They have reportedly re received
ceived received salary boosts.
-Flackett, who teaches evidence and criminal law,
and Katz who teaches family and contract law,
have accepted positions at Boston College Law
School.
Laughlin, who is Dr. Marshall Jones co-counsel
in Jones fight for tenure and who teaches con constitutional
stitutional constitutional law, will be going to Ohio State.
We are sorry to lose these three professors,

DFS Carnival
Tickets Are
Still Selling
Pre-sale tickets for Florida
Carnigras has been extended
through Tuesday, according to
Allan Casey, Dollars for Scholars
chairman.
The tickets will be on sale
throughout the afternoon at the
Reitz Union box office.
Presale tickets are six for sl.
Tickets purchased at the Carni Carnigras
gras Carnigras will range in price from
$.25 to $.50, depending on the
ride.
Florida Carnigras proceeds
will go to the National Defense
Loan Matching Fund.
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but tms sort of thing happens in the law school
world. Our.salary system is not the best and almost
anyone can outbid us, said Dean Frank E. Maloney.
It has been rumored that the three professors
who have in the past been politically active, are
leaving because of political difference with the Law
Schools Administration.
But Katz, serving as spokesman for all three,
would not comment. He said they wish to wait until
the Jones case for tenure is concluded before issuing
any statement.
He said the three would hold a press conference
Wednesday.



IFC Planning Greek Newspaper

Interfraternity Council plans a
fraternity newspaper for this
quarter, IFC secretary Bob Hud Hudson
son Hudson said recently.
This papers purpose will not
be to compete with the Alligator,
Hudson said, but will be to

Jones Hearing

FROM PA6F OWE
should the department have sole
authority to judge a professors
fitness in the academic commun community
ity community or should the Personnel Board
comprised of representative fa faculty
culty faculty exist to represent the en entire
tire entire academic community? If so,
how is it to be assured that
such a board is truly represen representative
tative representative of the entire university?
TTiere is another criteria for
judging this case and it is far
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Morris L. West
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FRIDAY
Is the last day to order your 1968 SEMINOLE
... Room 330 Reitz Union $5.00
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present fraternity news in a
strictly Greek paper, published
and financed by the IFC.
We intend to publish the frat fraternity
ernity fraternity news, events
mentaries and special features
which do not presently get cover-

nore serious. It concerns whe whether
ther whether the Administration in deny denying
ing denying tenure to Jones violated his
academic freedom.
The Administration will pro probably
bably probably distinguish between advo advocacy
cacy advocacy and action. It will probably
ask if Jones* advocacy of re rebellion
bellion rebellion becomes overt action,
does not Jthis raise questions
concerning his fitness in the
academic community? <
Jones will probably ask if it
is not his own professional col colleagues
leagues colleagues who should judge, ra rather
ther rather than the Administration.
It has been speculated that
Jones' recent identification with
Black Power advocates could be
a factor in the hearing.
Jones, however, is likely to
contend that his Constitutional
rights permit his activities.

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age in the Alligator.
Hudson said that the publica publication
tion publication will be named something
along the line of Gator Greek
Commentary.
The paper will be published
quarterlypossibly monthly. It
will be a tabloid, similar in
make-up to a magazine.
About four years ago,
Hudson said, a Greek newspaper
was attempted. It was not a
sucess though partly because
its subject matter was too tri trivial.
vial. trivial.
We are aiming for a quality
publication not a gossip
column. The paper will include,
besides Greek news, an editorial
section which will allow us to
view our ideas and opinions on
campus subjects, events, and
controversies.
The planned Greek Com Commentary
mentary Commentary will not be as large as
the Alligator. Hudson said that
he expected it to be about eight
pages.
Hudson also stated that an
editor has not been chosen yet,
but the editor and staff will be

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fraternity men, preferably those
in the College of Journalism.
We want to have fraternity
correspondents so that we can
have an equal representation in
articles from each house, he
added.
The paper will have a multi multitude
tude multitude of audiences and purposes.
Hudson said that the intention is
to have mass circulation. He also
said that he wants to have a mass
circulation. He also said that he
wants the publication to be
meaningful to independents as
well as Greeks.
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Tuesday, April 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

W HATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
%
IN PEOPLE WHO NEVERGOT
CAMPUS POLITICS OUT OF
THEIR SYSTEM: TTiere will be
a political forum in the Reitz
union auditorium at 4 p.m. today
at which some of the candidates
for State Senator will speak.
IN PEOPLE WHO THE CAM CAMPUS
PUS CAMPUS SYSTEM CAN NEVER GET
OUT OF POLITICS: The Student
Senate meets tonight' at 7:30 in
room 349 of the union. Party
caucuses are at 7.
IN AND THAT TALL SKINNY
THING IS CALLED THEEIFFEL
TOWER : Persons going on
the Union-sponsored tour of Eu Europe
rope Europe will see slides and films
of some of the high-spots of
Europe tonight at 7:SO in rooms
363 and 362 of the union.
IN QUICK AND EASY WAYS TO
RAISE THE DEATH RATE:
Gamma Beta Phi, a national
Honor Service Organization, will
have a rush tonight in room 123
of the union at 7:30 p.m. Pre Prerequisite
requisite Prerequisite is a 2.75 overall grade
point average.
IN AND IF WE GAVE YOU
A JOB .. WOULD YOU GIVE
US THE SAME OLD SONG AND
DANCE? PUTONAGRANDGRA?
BE A HOSTESS WITH THE
MOSTEST? REMEMBER THAT
IT'S NOT WHETHER YOU WIN
OR LOSE, BUT HOW YOU PLAY
THE GAME? AND OTHER
CLICHES?: The Union Board
will have interviews for chair chairmen
men chairmen of all the preceding com committees:
mittees: committees: Dance, Gator Gras, Hos Hostess,
tess, Hostess, and Recreation at 4 p.m.
today in room 310 of the union.
IN UNANNOUNCED VIST(A)-
ERS: Vista recruiters were on
campus yesterday from 9 a.m.
till 5 p.m. on the ground floor
of the union. But you havent
missed them, even though this
column (true to form) didnt an announce
nounce announce their presence: they will
be in the same place at the same
times until this Friday.

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Friday Last Day
To Buy Seminole

Deadline for students to pur purchase
chase purchase a copy of the 1967-6B
Seminole, UF student yearbook,
is Friday, Seminole editor Nel
Laughon announced recently.
She noted that only 4,000 copies
of the publication will be printed,
and reserved copies are nearing
that number.

Pearson Here Thurs.
Controversial Washington news reporter Drew Pearson will speak
at University Auditorium at 8 p.m. Thursday.
His lecture topic will be Washington Merry-Go-Round, the title
of his well-known book and daily newspaper column.
The book, written with Robert S. Allen, appeared during the Hoover
Administration, causing a stir in the nations capital. The column
is written in partnership with Jack Anderson.
Both the book and column are critical of government officials
Sherman Adams, White House assistant during Dwight Eisenhowers
second term; the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin; Sen.
Thomas Dodd of Connecticut, and Rep. Adam Clayton Powell of New
York, in particular.
Admission is $1 for students, faculty and staff members and
$1.50 for the general public.
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Youll drive safer with our brake and tune-up service,
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no matter what make car you have.
Were the students friend, so stop in and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
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Advance price for the yearbook
is $5. The annual is expected
to be distributed on or about
May 1.
Student may reserve Seminoles
by submitting their name and
identification number with $5 at
the Student Publications office,
room 330, Reitz Union between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

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Guarantee V
376-26)5 103 W. Univ. Ave. & Gainesville Mall JEWELERS
iii 1 rnmmmmmmmm n i n
- f wT UF '$ REPRESENTATIVES I
Mel Ward Jim Bartlett |
Dan Sapp 0111 w orsham
T om -Stewart Arlle Watklnson I
George Corl
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 I
V
MEET THE CANDIDATES FACE TO FACE
V-
" ' .. v. .
Cast an Informed Vote
HEAR THE REITZ UNION- AAUP POLITICAL PANELS
TODAY CANDIDATES FOR STATE SENATOR
R. L. (Bob) Saunders Edwin (Ed) Peck
J. Emory (Red) Cross Incumbent
REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM 4 ; oo p.m.
Moderator J. Manning Dauer
Tues., April 23 8:00 p.m. State Representatives
Tues., April 30 4:00 p.m. County Commissioners
Thurs., May 2 8:00 p.m. School Board Members

by TOM RYAN



UF Student Part Owner
Os Carnival On Campus

By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
H i'
A UF junior may be the youngest carnival owner in the world.
Gary Neely, 25, is associated with the carnival which starts
today on campus. The carnival, brought here to raise money for
Dollars For Scholars, is called Carnigras.
Neely, coordinator of the carnival while its on campus, first
became interested in amusement rides at a fair in Daytona Beach
in 1963.
In the fall of that year, he imported a ride from Germny, the
Trabont, and began traveling with it as a part of the Deggeller
Amusement Co.
Trabont is a German word meaning satellite, or flying saucer,
Neely pointed out.
And the ride does look like a saucer, he explained.
The ride will be one of the rides featured at Carnigras, he said.
After traveling with this ride, Neely bought an amusement com company
pany company in Maine in the spring of 1964. He was 21.
At one time he hd 28 tractors and trailors traveling all over
the country.
During this time, Neely managed to attend Daytona Beach Junior
College, from which he graduated last year.
In the winter season, the company came to Florida because of
the weather, Neely explained. Sometimes wed work it and some sometimes
times sometimes wed just store it.
Neely stopped traveling with the company last August, and en enrolled
rolled enrolled in the College of Journalism here in September.
My lifetime ambition is to go into law, so I decided to quit traveling
and concentrate on finishing college, Neely stated.
He sold part of his equipment, but is still associated with the
company and is responsible for bringing it to the UF for Carnigras.

Tuesday^^M
ALL DAY
Box
60c
J-BOY SANDWICH ASHfe-
FRENCH FRIES BSSSjlgft
cole slaw
I CURB OR CARRY-OUT *}&§££[
W 5 TIL 9 P.M.
Filet of Whitefish
Dinner $1.19
GENEROUS HELPING OF .. B||||l|
llplm WHITEFISH FILETS HBI
JMb french fries Mms/Egm.
COLE SLAW M'MMBSam:
HUSHPUPPIES MmKBKKrn..
ROOM CARRY-OUT^
CURB
on d a
W 5 TIL 9 P.M.
Spaghetti Dinner
99c
ALL
SERVED IN THE
CANDLELIT MsfflSEm K
DINING ROOM
1 TWO GAINESVILLE LOCATIONS
BifflTfffgr 2310 S. W. 13th Street
I 1505 N. W. 13th Street I

Es m
IBBPrr J'
GARY NEELY
. carnival owner

l .'jKdflfl I JjKKk
I ' A.
ACM \ if vim L li iiinrr-iriti J
M f jLW.., Hr y r
I. Jm/F
' /ifW&r *V JojjaaggKa^gayEf W .. "y'uHLj*..
Full 10-rib treid design. H#
Four full plies of nylon cord. Ll 1 III
wMi.ilekw.N |
Size D7O-14 (replaces 6.95-14) whitewall tubeless corrected prices
plus $1.92 Federal Excise Tax and tire from your car.
See MISS RADIAL AGE present the . TI D C rAiID AK| V
M| BFG Spectacular Undersea World I UWIM lIKt LUIYIrMIN I
of Jacques Yves Cousteau, plus Your Complete Car Care Center
of election primaries on ABC-TV.

Tuesday, April 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Computer Goofs!

Juniors who had been pre prematurely
maturely prematurely classified as seniors %
have been demoted back to
juniors. This move corrects
computer error made last March.
According to Director of Reg Registration,
istration, Registration, a programming mis mistake
take mistake caused to Tigert computer to
double all transfer hours earned

SHOE REPAIRS
I SOLES ATTACHED HEELS ATTACHED I
15 MINS. 5 MINS.
MODERN SHOE REPAIR 'SHOP
CAROLYN PLAZA 101 N. MAIN ST. I
1 376-5211 I

by Florida students at other col colleges.
leges. colleges. This gave many juniors
enough credits to be promoted
to seniors.
Voyles stated that the computer
has been correctly programmed
now, and students are properly
classified.

Page 5



Page 6

>, TTie Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

mmmmrn m i
The
Florida Alligator
To let 77je People Know
Steve Adi
M **
Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
AmmkUl * l ** Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
Sport* Editor

IFCs Good Deed

Laurels are in order as
the first significant step
has been taken to realize
the dream of UFs sports
coliseum.
The Interfraternity
Council (IFC) has done UF
a great service. Machinery
for the further raising of
fundfe has finally been set
in motion by the Beach Beachboys
boys Beachboys Benefit Concert
an event which put $2500
into the planning and con construction
struction construction funds for the coli coliseum.
seum. coliseum.
That UF needs a new
sports coliseum is undeni undeniable.
able. undeniable. A basketball game
viewed from the rafters
of UFs gymnasium is
enough to convince just
about anyone that the world
is suffering from a popu popuexplosion.
explosion. popuexplosion. Even though the
capacity of the gymnasium
hovers about 7,000 the
campus is a city of over
20,000 students most of
whom like to watch basket basketball
ball basketball once in a while. And
in the past two years, es especially,
pecially, especially, UF basketball and

Jones, Free Speech

Marshall Jones at long
last today gets an open
hearing before the Faculty
Senate Committee for Aca Academic
demic Academic Freedom and Tenure
to present his case for
tenure.
It has been a long up hill
fight for the controversial
UF Psychologist since he
learned last summer that
he had been denied tenure
for his unpopular espousal
of < rebellion ,, as an effect effective
ive effective means of causing social
reforms.
And it is not over yet.
Chances that the committee
will recommend a reversal
of President J. Wayne
Reitz* original refusal of
tenure for Jones seem
slight indeed.
According to repeatedly
quoted UF administrators,
the entire case for denying
tenure to Jones centers
around his loudly broad broadcasted
casted broadcasted championship of
civil disobedience.
No one of Jones
opponents have attacked his
ability as an instructor.
He has the endorsement
of the psychiatry depart department
ment department of the College of
Medicine and the respect

SEC talent has climbed to a
high regard across the
country.
It is a fact that the UF
has one of the most out outdated
dated outdated and obsolete gym gymnasiums
nasiums gymnasiums in the SEC. With
the atmosphere of a mauso mausoleum,
leum, mausoleum, the space of a
cracker box, the con construction
struction construction of a flavet, and
the facilities of a fifth rate
Catskill health spa the UF
gymnasium quaintly re resembles
sembles resembles the Wreck of the
Hesperus dropped from the
cosmos by the powers that
be.
Who needs it? Why is it
there? UFs gymnasium is
as obsolete as the ptero pterodactyl.
dactyl. pterodactyl.
That is why the IFC de deserves
serves deserves a round of applause.
We hope that in the future
the events sponsored by the
IFC will be attended by
more students for it is only
for our benefit and with our
interest that the sports
coliseum at UF may be
transformed from a pipe pipedream
dream pipedream to a reality.

of his fellow instructors
and his students.
What is at stake, then,
is the question of free
speech on campus. Are UF
faculty members to be
allowed complete reign to
say whatever enters their
head in the name of aca academic
demic academic freedom or are they
representatives of the UF
who must be guarded in
their speech so that they
do not embarrass the UF?
There are other ques questions,
tions, questions, Was Jones denied
due process when he lost
his tenure? Has Jones
overstepped the bounds of
conduct for professors?
- The Alligator does not
purport to know the path
from this quagmire. The
arguments are complex and
exceedingly intricate.
What seems clear to us
is that the case centers
around Jones claim to the
right of complete freedom
of speech and the adminis administrations
trations administrations insistance that a
UF professors actions
must reflect favorably upon
the UF.
It is upon these grounds
that the committee will
judge the Jones case.

Oh, For Pete's Sake, Westmoreland!

Hide The Headlines

i! the newspaper editors of America
would listen to me and stop the silly
practice of putting the big news on page
one they would all be better off.
This particularly applies to those big
headlines and I've been trying to tell
editors that for years. But you know how
they are once they get a preconceived
notion.
As a working newspaperman I wonder
where that term ever briginated? I
furiously resent all the sales of papers
we lose by sticking important news out
on page one. I will give you one example.
The other day while oozing home in the
traffic jam I came to a red-light halt
behind one of those big shiny cars with
the ostentatious look which only comes
from being paid for. A newsboy was walk walking
ing walking up and down at the stop, hawking papers.
The driver poked his head out the window
and read:
JOHNSON RECALL OF WESTMORE WESTMORELAND
LAND WESTMORELAND SEEN AS REBUFF.
Then he drove on, without buying a
paper. I see this on all sides, every day.
Why should he buy a paper? He can drive
on out to the country club, or wherever
he was going, secure in the knowledge
that he is a well-informed man.
Let a conversation come up and he can
look wise and say, Well, the way I look
at it, Johnson recall of Westmoreland
seen as rebuff.
Everybody will shake their heads in ad admiration
miration admiration and say, That B.J. hes deep.
He will bask in the warmth of respect
and later be given an honorary degree.
Meantime, my newspaper will have lost a
sale.
It takes money to run a newspaper
Its not as easy as people think. You got
to smash big trees out flat and buy a lot
of machines and rubber bands and lots
of technical things like that.
Will editors listen to my logical plan
on how to triple circulation overnight? They
will not. No telling how many sales we are
losing right now from people rubber necking
at headlines, or even standing at newstands
and glancing over the front page.
It should be obvious that all interesting

BY JOHN KEASLER

news should be inside the paper where
freeloaders cant see it. Hardly anybody
has the nerve to ask a newsboy to hold the
paper open, and anyhow the light isnt
red that long: Some of the lights hardly
give you time' to doze off completely.
What, you may ask, should be on page
one: Nothing?
I shoud say not. Lots of things should
be on page one and certainly big head headlines.
lines. headlines. Peopl# are conditioned to seeing
big headlines and would miss them.
However, the current headline theory is
all wrong. For instance, you could get
just as big headline out of saying: GUESS
WHAT WESTMORELAND RECALL SEEN
BY JOHNSON AS? (Story on 33 B.)
Editors keep trying to justify their
ridiculous position by telling me that head headlines
lines headlines actually help to sell the paper. They
must not get out of the office much. My
headlines would be cannily thought out.
WELL, KENNEDY DID IT!
Or: THAT SURE MADE NIXON HAPPY!
Or: WILL GEORGE WALLACE?
Or: HUBERT HUMPHREY REPORTED
SEEN. >
Or, whatever.
The only trick is that absolutely no
real information should be given in the
headline. This would not result in un unemployment
employment unemployment of headline writers, but, indeed,
lend a new zest to their lives.
Their art can be devoted to giving the
feel of a story without blowing the punch punchline.
line. punchline.
WOW! SOME DISASTER!
Or: SEX NAMED AS CAUSE!
Or: LITTLE HOPE SEEN.
A few all-purpose head (WOULD YOU
BELIEVE?) could be kept in stock. What
remains of Page One could not be left
blank, of course, but should contain no
real information: Perhaps it could contain
public service messages, such as how to
read the weather map; inspirational sayings
and/or some nice poetry or other culture
like that.
Additionally, more information would
actually be read if important stories were
back further. They would be closer to the
funnies.



EDITORS NOTEBOOK

Our Sick JPlfc
Quarter f

The change to the quarter system has drawn praise from state
legistators but from affected students nothing but criticism has
emanated.

The quarter was adopted by the
Board of Regents last year for
the expressed purpose of utiliz utilizing
ing utilizing university facilities more ef efficiently.
ficiently. efficiently. As usual the Regents
and the Legislature did not take
into account the effects the calen calendar
dar calendar change would reap.

Instead of giving university
students more time and less
pressure to pursue studies, the
quarter system has caused noth nothing
ing nothing but headaches.
UF professors, many too lazy
to change course requirement,
have taken the change in stride.
The typical attitude is why
should I change my course
schedule to coincide with the
quarter system."
Many professors still are
teaching the same course outline
in which they taught students
under the now defunct semester.
Simple mathematics clearly
shows that many UF students
are being taught material in ten
weeks which was originally
scheduled to have taken 18 weeks.
The quarter system has
caused the drop out rate to sky skyrocket.
rocket. skyrocket. Lack of time has caused
shortages in personnel to staff
student government positions, the
most notable being the teacher
evaluation program.
Attendance to many UF spon sponsored
sored sponsored cultural events has plum plummetted
metted plummetted to new lows, recent
figures show.
And most critical of all is
the attitude that students are
developing toward school.
Instead of a place to culti cultivate
vate cultivate ones mind, students are
thinking of the UF as a robot
factory in which knowledge is
stuffed into the would be machine.
What can be done to solve the
quarter problem?
The answer is difficult, how however
ever however from recent observations I
have concluded that the crux of
the quarter crush is the failure
of UF professors to properly
re-evaluate course loads.
When the quarter system was
first enacted, the deans of all
colleges consulted with then vice
president of academic affairs
Robert Mautz over properly
changing courses which were
taught under the trimester to
courses under the quarter.
According to Mautz, before
any course was approved the
deans of the respectives colleges
promised to change the course
so that it jived with the quar quarter
ter quarter calendar."
Apparently many of the deans
have gone back on their promises.
It is time that work loads be
geared to what the student can
humanly assimilate in the short
space of 10 weeks.
Before the UF can cross the
threshold into greatness it must
first patch up the problems that
have been caused by the trans transition
ition transition to the quarter system. Tbe
place to start is the complete
re-evalutation of course loads.

BY STEVE HULL

UF Remains
'On The Brink
MR. EDITOR:
Is it not worthy of note that
the leadership of a university
on the brink of excellence" re remained
mained remained unaware of the tragic
national event just passed?
DANIEL KUBAT

OPEN FORUM:
* / y
ViA&wt
There is no hope for the complacent man

Writer Clarifies Use
Os Dorothys Name

MR. EDITOR:
In regard to Mrs. David M.
Chalmers letter which appeared
in Wednesdays Alligator, there
are two points which I hope to
clarify.
Mrs. Chalmers states in her
letter that Dorothy was hu humiliated
miliated humiliated because of the appea appearance
rance appearance of her full name in a story
I wrote about her plight:
Despair: A Way of Life for
Dorothy, 6 Children."
Mrs. Chalmers further states
that although Raul Ramirez
wrote a very good account of
her situation, he, unfortunately,
forgot his promise to conceal
her identity."
First of all, it should be pointed
out that Dorothy and I did NOT
at any time discuss whether or
not her name was to appear in
the article. Since she consented
to have several pictures of her
and her children appear with the
story, I made what at the time
seemed to be a safe assumption
and included Dorothys name.
Previous to the storys pub publication,
lication, publication, I contacted Mrs. Chal Chalmers
mers Chalmers to once again double-check
the accuracy of certain facts and

Carnigras (Fat Flesh)

MR. EDITOR:
I wonder if you could tell me who thought of the appalling name
Carnigras for the forthcoming UF Festival. The literal meaning
of this name is fat flesh, and sounds somewhat revolting, quite
apart from the unaesthetic mixing of Latin and French roots in the
word itself.
Presumably the author of this word was hybridizing the terms
Mardi Gras, the famous pre-Lenten Festival in New Orleans, and
Carnival, the pre-Lenten Festival of Rio de Janeiro, among other
places. These manes, signifying respectively fat or festive Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Farewell to flesh, both refer to the custom of a final period
jf indulgence before the onset of Lenten abstinence on Ash Wednesday.
To have a celebration called Carnigras in the middle of April is
about as logical as having a Christmas party in mid-August.
, PETER C. H. PRITCHARD

Alligator Is The Cause
Os Apathy On Campus

MR. EDITOR:
RE: Student Apathy In Increases"
creases" Increases"
Why do thousands of students
sit in their rooms and vegetate
and not take action against what
is bugging them?"
The negativistic attitude of the
Alligator may not be the entire
cause of student apathy on this
campus, but I would agree with
Dr. Larson that People wont be
part of something that's bad."
I think the Alligator has failed
to recognize this fact. Alligator
editors and staff have failed to
realize the tremendous amount of
Influence the Alligator has in set setting
ting setting campus mood. As long as the
Alligator belabors in generalities
the problems of this campus,
the apathy will increase.
The Alligator should serve as a
forum for solutions to problems

quotes I was using in the story.
It was only then that Mrs. Chal
mers asked me not to use
Dorothys last name, and I agreed
to delete it from the already
written and typed copy. Unfor Unfortunately,
tunately, Unfortunately, I overlooked one of the
places in which the name
appeared, and thus it was pub published.
lished. published. /
The second point I hope to
clarify is Mrs. Chalmers state statement:
ment: statement: It is also unfortunate
that the editor deleted the part
of the article explaining how
difficult it is for the poor to
help themselves."
Gator Button
(if' CHlS^^^k
M FOR H
M LET'S NOT I
% DISAPPOINT fj)
H,M

Tuesday, April 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

rather than as an instrument of
cynicism.
We have read over and over
again and again that the quarter
system is bad.
But lets be more specific. For
example, beginning courses in
foreign languages are five-hour
course. Vocabulary and gram mar
must be learned for each class
meeting. The rapid pace result resulting
ing resulting from five days of class pro progress
gress progress leaves little time for con consolidation
solidation consolidation necessary for learn learning.
ing. learning. Beginning languages should
be three-hour courses.
Another course that needs re revamping
vamping revamping is organic chemistry.
Presently set up as a three threehour
hour threehour course with two lectures
and one discussion period, there
simply is not enough time to allow
adequate penetration into the sub subject.
ject. subject. Organic chemistry lecture
should be a four-hour course.

No such deletions were made
from the story. Hie explanation
Mrs. Chalmers referred to I
omitted from the story because
of space limitations. This I ex explained
plained explained to Mrs. Chalmers prior
to the storys publication but
it seems that she somehow mis misunderstood
understood misunderstood me.
Having spent a considerable
amount of time investigating the
nature of these obstacles, the
decision to omit these facts from
the story was not an easy one
for me to make but it was
nevertheless a necessary one.
Fortunately, as Mrs. Chalmers
stated, the account of Dorothys
plight succeeded in awakening the
consciences of various sectors
of the community, and I was
pleased to have had a part in
achieving this.
I expected to be and was
criticized because of the story, as
bitterness seems to be a by byproduct
product byproduct of truth.
RAUL RAMIREZ, 3JM
Poetic Wit
MR. EDITOR:
The subject of the following
poems is the sprinkler system
at the UF. The first poem is
a modified Clnquain; the second,
a Haiku.
Water, water, everywhere..."
Student
Late for class, cuts corners,
charges forward
Hurrying, rushing, running,
not seeing
Watch out!" (A U.F.O. oer
head?)
No a U.F. H 2 O sprinkler!
Rainbows twinkle in its twirl.
Twitterpated birds refresh
and rest.
Splat! damn that sprinkler!
LINDA ROZIER, 3ED

What I am suggesting is that
constructive criticism of specific
causes and even instructors
should not be taboo in the Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator. The Alligator's style of
non-directed, non-constructive
can only perpetuate apathy.
JIM RADIKER
Find A Cure
For The Ills
Os Gainesville
MR. EDITOR:
An Open Letter to the City of
Gainesville:
It is time for us, all citizens
of Gainesville, to take the bull
by the horns, call a spade a
spade, and find a positive ap approach
proach approach to curing our own socio socioeconomic
economic socioeconomic inequities.
Most of the problems are of an
ingrained local and personal
nature. No amount of Federal
funds and legislation crammed
down our throats, either willingly
or unwillingly, is going to al alleviate
leviate alleviate that basic fact and pro provide
vide provide a truly adequate solution.
Only we individuals can, or should
have to, work toward and achieve
a lasting, natural, and working
solution in, of and among our ourselves.
selves. ourselves.
I do not believe that there is
a single man, woman, or child
in this city that cannot afford to
spend a little time, money, heart,
and effort toward helping Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville to stand tall and proud on
its own.
We should promote a fund rais raising
ing raising campaign to provide the
capital needed for a program of
low-interest loans for education educational,
al, educational, self-help, and community im improvement
provement improvement projects. Public
seminars and lectures should be
held in buildings which are cur currently
rently currently used sporadically. These
seminars would deal with topics
of general interest and necessity;
such as.family economics (even
college does not help to pre prepare
pare prepare a budget), government func functions,
tions, functions, taxes, etc.
Our business leaders should
form advisory groups to help re resolve
solve resolve personal financial difficul difficulties.
ties. difficulties. We should encourage better
students to tutor weaker students.
We should make available study
areas where students could go
if they do not have a suitable
study atmosphere at home. We
should even form round-robin
baby sitting arrangements to en enable
able enable parents to attend adult edu education
cation education classes.
In short, every possible step
should be voluntarily taken to
encourage people to help people
to help themselves. We can, we
must make this work.
The responsibility rests
squarely on our shoulders and
we cannot shake it. Let us prove to
ourselves, the state, and the
nation that not only is Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville the cleanest city, but also
the proudest; a city in which
every man will always stoop to
help his neighbor so that every
man can stand tall.
CHARLES SCHULTZ, JR.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;:x-:-:-V.v.*X-x-X-X-X-X-:-v.-.v:\-:-X\-:-X-V.Sv;;\
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Console stereo.
Garrard changer Grommes
amplifier Altec Speakers. In
beautiful Walnut cabinet. Top
condition. SIOO. Call 378-5129.
(All3stp)
FOR SALE: 1967 Honda 50.
Excellent condition less than 800
miles. $175 or best offer. Call
378-3939. (A-115-4t-p)
SCIENCE FICTION book collection
25 Hardbound volumes. Call
3728675 for list Prices variable.
(Alls3td)
1967 DUCATI, 100 cc motorcycle,
only 8 months old with 1900 miles,
$275.00. Call 372-8627 or inquire
at 1618 N.W. 4th Ave.
(All7stp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340.
(A-106-ts-p)
9
8' x 27' 1966 PATHFINDER
TRAILER Suitable for single
student or couple. Call 3763915
between 4:30 and 8 p.m.
(All3stp)
SW: ARCHITECTURALLY
DESIGNED HOME, central heat and
air with large family room two large
bedrooms, two full baths, built-in
kitchen and carport. SI,OOO down,
$125.00 per month. No qualifying.
372-0328, S.W. 10th St.
(All3stp)
ROBERTS TAPE RECORDER,
Stereo Model 1630; New Condition;
two dynamic mikes; Philmore bulk
tape eraser; $300.00 value $150.00
cash. Call Bill Massey 378-7783.
(All3stp)

*DO-lt-Yourself
*CLASSIFIEDS*w
DAYS TO RUN *3s!
igs To order classifieds, use the ag
uEZ form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive) |pg
tance to: Alligator Classifieds, O 1 da Y
I Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- O 2 days 7ZQ
ville, Florida 32601. 3 da y s (* lO % discount)
4 days (*lO% discount)
Orders must he RECEIVED Q 5 days and over |!gj
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount)
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE f|
n ACCicirATinM Count lhe words omitting a, an & H
pi count as one word. Minimum charge
or sa e is si.oo for 20 words. For each SS
n wILT additional word add 3?. Multiply
help wanted the total by number f dayS the ad 1!
autos is to run Subtract the discount
n Dersonal a PP licable ) and enclose a check
m fnnnH for the remainder. For example,
n lervlZ 32-word ad > 4 ** costs i
u services s4>9o ($5>44 less 54?)>
WORDING ;||
I NAME DATE |j
STUDENT # PHONE_ |{
ADDRESS ||
CITY STATE ZIP J|
jJafes>money cannot be refunded if ad is concell ed-jig^f;

FOR SALE
vXvMX'X'XV-V'M;*.jv.'.v,;
1965 HONDA S-90: 5000 miles,
runs perfectly, well cared-for.
Convince yourself. $230.00. Call Ned
or Sandy, 372-9289. Room
473.(A1163tp)
TYPEWRITER, Model Remington:
Quiet-riter good condition 530.00
or best offer. 376-9440, after 6:00
p.m. (All62tp)
SUZUKI 1966 150 cc in good
condition. Has electric starter and is
very dependable. First $325, takes it!
Call Jim at 372-7834.
(All6stp)
_
64 Bonnevile 650 Extra Chrome
including bell Helment Need Cash
$475. PH 372-5169, after 5 p.m.
(All62tp)
FOR SALE or Trade for Car of equal
value late 1966, Super Sport, Vespa
Scooter, See at Marathon Oil
Company anytime. Phone
466-3300. (All66tp)
1967 YAMAHA 250 cc, CANDY
APPLE RED WITH CHROME TRIM.
Low mileage, well cared for. Call
378-7903 after 5:0 0.
(All46tp)
1966 SUZUKI, 50cc recently tuned
$ 120.00. Smith Corona electric
portable, one year old $50.00 please
contact Joe at 3784707, 929 S.W.
13th Street. (A-114-st-p)
HONDA SCRAMBLER 305, very
good condition. Engine has only
4300 miles. Helmet in- eluded. Call
3729358, ask for Dave Mitchell
after 7. (Alo94tp)
TWO CUTE, friendly, 4 month
halfDoberman Puppies. Distemper
shots, wormed. Male and Female.
$20.00 each. Call 378-8687 after 6.
(All4stp)

Page 8

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

FOR SALE
TRIUMPH motorcycle '6l 650 cc
Twin carborator custom, $490.00,
'63 TR6 650 cc $575.00. Call
378-4384. (A-117-st-p)
AKAI 4 spd. tape recorder (same as
Roberts 770 x) 2 Internal, 2 Externa!
speakers. 3M Model 70 Photo Copier.
Never., been used. S T Rice.
378-3977. (A-116-st-p)
4 FOR RENT |
SUBtEASE SUMMER: Upstairs
twobedroom "Sin City" Village
Park Apt. Great condition.
Excellent parking. Call 3787265
NOW. (B-113-st-p)
WILL SUBLET nicely furnished Air
Conditioned office June, July,
August close to campus. 372-8998
(Bllsstp)
FURNISHED 2 bedroom apartment
in Landmark to sublease for summer
quarter. 114 baths, AC, on the pool.
Call 378-3117. (B-115-st-p)
MUST immediately sacrifice
furnished two bedroom apartment at
Universtiy Gardens. Retail $170.00
mo. Ready to accept best offer thru
June with option on new lease.
376-0003. (Bllsstp)
8 x 43 TRAILER for rent $70.00
month. Utilities included. Phone
3726157 between 59 p.m., non
drinkers. (Bll73tp)
SUMMER QUARTER and/or fall. 1
and 2 bedroom, furnished apt.
Everything comfort desires plus large
swimming pool with chaise lounges, 1
meter board, and pool slide. Model
unit open. Frederick Gardens, 1130
S.W. 13th Ave. 372-7555.
(Bll7lotp)
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY One
bedroom furnished apartment with
central heating andairconditioning,
private patio, drapes and rug.
Apartment only three months old.
Located two miles south of campus
on 3425 S.W. 24th St. Can be shown
anytime. Ext. 5872 or 2011 during
days, 3761134 after 6 p.m.
weekdays, anytime weekends.
$105.00 per month (Bll6stp)
SINGLE room for male student one
block from Matherly Hall. Central
A/C, Maid service and linens
Telephone. 372 6263.
(Bll63tp)
MOBILE HOME spaces for rent, nice
shady lots, located in Micanopy.
$25.00 monthly. Phone 4663300.
(B-1166t-p)
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM Apt.,
wood paneled, patio, AC. Available
immediately. Free rent until May Ist.
$105.00. Village 34 Apt. 22.
376-6600. (B-1133tp)
SUBLEASE FURNISHED Apt.
Modem Air contioned, TV Cable,
quiet. Available July 1. Prefer
married or graduate students. Village
34, Apt. 15, $lO5 per month.
376-6777. (B-114-st-P)
MMUM 3:30-6:00
#HVlll 8:30outl0:45
{BEST
FOREIGN FILM OF
THE YEAR!
iHpf THE I

AND IMPORTANT MOTION PICTURE >.
LgSL AUTHOR OF BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI" l
| Titihnermn
ffR charLton hESTON j
mad! HTI W I I -
VShown At i ;UH3: ano /
v MICHAEL WILSON RODSERUNG '

FOR RENT
THREE BEDROOM unfurnished
house on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student only. $65.00 per month for
long term tenant. Water furnished.
Phone 372-9903 (B-113-st-p)
SUMMER SPECIAL, 1 bedroom
furnished apartment, heat AC,
private patio SBO.OO a month, 2
bedroom, furnished extra large new
central Heat and Air, island kitchen
extras, $125. Call 376-1546.
(B-115-ts-c)
WANTED
LIVE FREE AT VILLAGE PARK
Male roommate wanted through
August. Move in immediately pay no
rent until May. Call 3769017.
(Cll4lotp)
M/LE ROOMMATE wanted: own
bedroom in large apt. Located 3
blocks from campus. $30.00 a month
plus 1/3 utilities. 303 N.W. 15th
Terrace. 378-5836. (C-116-3t-p)
MALE roommate to share 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 others. Immediate
occupancy. No lease. All utilities
paid. $50.00 per month per person.
Directly above Gator Groomer. Come
by and see any time after 3:30 p.m.
(C-1135tp)
ROOMMATE wanted immediately at
Williamsburg Townhouse Apt.
Luxury living. Call Mary at
372-6978, 2000 S.W. 16th St.
(Cllstp)_
FEMALE roommate for Landmark
Apt. Preferably fall and winter
quarters 196869. Can arrange for
Apt. Spring quarter. Call 3726198
or 378-8563. (C-114-st-p)
M 3 BIG SHOWS IN COLOR
Valley ol the Dolls^l
I NO. 1 AT 9:22 9wi
X Hombre means man... 8
* Paul Newman is Hombre!
I Faye Dunaway
IBB
|9*£u&ua!!fii&3H|
CoLmb* Rdures n*
B Stevens I

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

WANTED
COOPERATIVE LIVING, onrblock
off campus. SIBO.OO per quarter for
room and 3 meals per day. A truly
independent organization (for men
only). Openings now for Spring,
Summer, and Fall. Apply to
Collegiate Living Organization. 117
NW 15th St. or call secretary at
376-9420. (Clo9lotp)
WANTED: 2 Male roommates to
share 2 bedroom apartment with 2
premeds at University Gardens for
this Quarter. AC/CH, stereo, pool.
Call 378-1921. (C-112-st-p)
FEMALE roommate wanted move in
now. Stay through June or August.
April rent free. Village Park. Cali
378-8458. (C-115-3t-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
Please call again. Two blocks from
campus. $40.00/month. Call
378 7327 after 5:3 0
(CllV -st-p)
| Downtown Gainesville |
1 1233 w!univ^ptYAv^
1 V V /
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...symbol of the male



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED |
WAITRESSES: Must be 21, Part time
and full time shift available, evenings
only. Apply Gino's Italian Restaurant
Experience helpful but not
necessary. 376-1322, 2204 SW 13th
St. (E-112-ts-c)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN for the
Florida Alligator. Must have car and
be available for summer term. Good
pay, good working conditions, great
experience. Ad majors preferred.
Apply room 330 Reitz Union.
(Elo6'-nctf)
Male part time permanent student
help wanted. Must be over 21. Apply
in person between 3 and 5, Woodys
Sandwich Shop. 3458 West
University. (Ell6tfc)
HELP WANTED MALE Men's
clothing Salesman, 5 day work week,
or part-time. Profit sharing and
discount privileges. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Apply Wilson Department Stores,
Inc. (Ell6--stc)_
RECEPTIONIST for pediatric office.
Write stating permanence, experience
and references. P.O. Box 573A,
Gainesville Sun. (Ellstfc)
AUTOS
1957 TR3. Needs work, but runs
(backwards and forward*.) SIOO.OO
or best offer. Call 3764969.
(Gll3stpi
FOR SALE: 59 TR3, hard and 9oft
tops, new paint, recent valve job, new
tires (Recaps) driving lights, $600.00.
Call 372-1603 after 5:30.
(Gll73tp)
FOR SALE: 1963 VW, Runs good,
recent tuneup; kept up well. Asking
$7 25. Call 372-6484.
(All43tp)

?
helpwanted
- ucrcCCiV Ittl one of the toughest alignment* in Arrr.c poverty
NO TEACHER TRAINING OR EXPERIENCE NECESSARY W uschxv your ctranca to mmkm a big ddfaranca in
If you can kw your cool working 60 hours a weak stay looua with a craw UKU lfV# of aoma poor kKla. And you gat 79 a waaK
r* hurw r-frve kids and stiM be hanging in there for 2or 3 graduate sarm- VI mtarastad?
of hyperecttvetnde ena W .choa officer eee your co.-
nmn- the Teecher Corps nreght be for you . W ntecement offioer Os ape* to the
You set two yeers of tuition-free graduate study P*oe on-ttie-)ob tremmffor 111 Pecennt Of
TEACHERSCORPS
U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION/ WASHINGTON. D.C. SOSOS
' -j
I

AUTOS
STINGRAY CONVERTIBLE, 1965,
Both tops. Power steering, windows,
brakes, antenna, AM/FM Radio, air,
4-speed, Excellent condition. Must
5e11,52,900. or Best offer See at Arts
Shell Station or Call 378-5443
anytime, leave message
(Gll4stp)
1963 SUNBEAM ALPINE. Wire
wheels, tonneau, new convertible top
DESPERATE! Need money to pay
debts! $600.00 or best offer.
*84869. (Gll6stp).
ALPINE CONVERTABLE Series M[l
new top. Tonneau, premium tires,"
radio, runs good, must sell $600.00
or best offer. 3785443 anytime
leave message. (G-114-st-p)
1964 Chevrolet Impala Convertable,
Excellent condition, white,
automatic transmission from visiting
professor who left U.S.A. Best offer.,
Call 372-0143. (G-114-st-p)
1964 TR 4?New rugs, uphostery,
excellent mechanical condition,
body, paint in very good shape;
asking $1,050. 378-6395.
(Gll4lOtp)
PERSONAL 1
* v
i
IS YOUR LITTLE GIRL going to be
May Queen for 1968? If you are a
student, staff or faculty member,
with a daughter between the age of 5
and 10. Submit one snapshot to
room 310 J. Wayne Reitz Union by
April 22. (Jll44tc)
INTERESTED in helping organize
and/or participate in a campus
Community Service Organization?
Call 376-3261 Ext. 2984,
7:30-10:00 p,m. (Jlls3tp)

PERSONAL
SEEKING CHEAP THRILLS?
SPECIAL TWO-DAY HIGH ONLY
$5. .when you dig the sports car
racing action at the GOLDEN
CROWN PRIZ SCCA National sports
car races, April 2021 at Fernandina
Beach Municipal Airport. Tickets at
Reitz Union Box Office. Check
student group discount rates!
(J-1165tp)
LOOKING FOR KIND, sweet,
understanding co-ed to help divorced
student adust to single life. No Joke.
If interested, send particulars to P.O.
Box 853 Gainesville. (J4tll6p)
SERVICES
NEED A PAINTER? Professional
painting. Interior and exterior. Free
estimates. No job is considered too
small. Reasonable. Call After 5 p.m.
378-4855. (M-117-st-p)
NEED A PAINTER? Professional
painting. Interior and exterior. Free
estimates. No job is considered too
small. Reasonable. Call After 5 p.m.
378-4855. (M-117-st-p)
FLYING TO FORT LAUDERDALE,
MIAMI, $25.00 RT. LEAVE
THRUSDAY 4/18, RE-TURN
SUNDAY ,4/21. DON KOZICH
378-1863, THIS IS DEFINITE.
(Mlls4tp)
INCOME TAX RETURNS ....
.$4.00 up. SPECIAL rates for
Univ. Students, Faculty and
employees. At Rebel Discount, 1227
W. Univ. Ave. 376-7430, 378-6127,
across from Wolfies.
(Mlollstp)
> __ __ __ __
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
- 603 S.E Second Street, 378-7330.
(Mloltfc)

Osborne Anger:
'PoignantToday

(EDITOR'S NOTE,: John Os Osbornes
bornes Osbornes Look Back In Anger
opens Thursday at the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Little Theatre; Luther,
another Osborne play, was re recently
cently recently presented by the Florida
Players. Since these two pro productions
ductions productions are the first Osborne
plays to hit Gainesville, Alligator
reviewer Anne Boyd discusses
John Osborne in terms of these
two productions.)
*
By ANNE BOYD
Alligator Correspondent
The coincident productions of
John Osborne's Look Back in
Anger by the Gainesville Little
Theatre and Luther by Florida
Players offer local theatre-goers
a unique exposure to one of the
most exciting playwrights of the
contemporary theatre.
Like the protagonists of his
plays, Osborne has had a turbu turbulent
lent turbulent career. He left school at
sixteen to become a writer for
various trade journals. He
entered the theatre as a tutor
of child actors in a touring re repertory
pertory repertory company.
Although he lost the job after
a few weeks Osborne stayed on
as an assistant stage manager.
Almost a year later he made
his acting debut with the same
troupe.
Soon after an abortive attempt
at founding his own company
Osborne wrote Look Back in
Anger. Produced in 1956 the
pltfy was an immediate success.
Luther,!' written five years
later, was received with even
greater acclaim. Osborne has al always
ways always been Interested in film
making and wrote the screen screenplay
play screenplay for Tom Jones.
One of the fifties' first social
rebels, Osborne resents being
called an angry young man. It is
difficult to understand why. He
once wrote a letter called I
Hate You England to a liberal
London newspaper in which he
expressed his ardent desire to
murder several members of Par Parliament.
liament. Parliament.
Neither is his anger restricted
to any ideological base. A trip
Tryouts Set
Tomorrow
Tryouts ~ for Molieres
Imaginary Invalid, Florida
Players next production, will be
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday
in the Constans Theatre of the
Reitz Union from 7 to 10 p.m.
All students are invited to
audition for the plays nine male
and four female roles.
Examination copies of the
script are available in room 354
Tigert Hall.
Imaginary Invalid will run
the week of May 20.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
Must be placed either by Mail or in person
at Room 330 Reitz Union between the hours
of 8:30 and 5:00 p.m Please do not attempt
to place ads or to make corrections at other
hours Thank you
' j

Tuesday, April 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

to Russia did not prompt Osborne
to genocide but he was savagely
disillusioned by the fact that
they don't have any fun over
there.
Osborne's anger, admitted or
not, is especially poignant today.
Jimmy Porters entreaty Why
don't we all pretend that were
alive? ~ and Luther's question
Have you never felt humiliated
to be living in a world that Is
dying? are the cries of men
caught between distrust of ration rationality
ality rationality and disbelief in salvation.
Anger is the logical product of
being boggled in a mud hole of
contradictions in which every
movement is pain and life Itself
is perversion.
Osborne refuses to make a
choice, but his presentation of
possible alternatives makes ex exciting
citing exciting theatre. It is interesting
that both the GLT and Florida
Players have picked plays so
suited to their respective re resources*
sources* resources*
The GLTs Intimate atmo atmosphere
sphere atmosphere is well matched to the
concentrated emotional impact of
Look Back in Anger** while
Florida Players have the equip equipment
ment equipment to give Luther's Brechtlan
panorama of crisis the theatri theatricality
cality theatricality it deserves.
Both theatres are to be con congratulated
gratulated congratulated for attempting a play playwright
wright playwright as difficult as Osborne.
He is an excruciatingly challenge
to actors. Osborne's characters
are emotional athletes who will
drown in shallow waters. Hie
actor must portray a range of
emotional depth and intellectual
comprehension that is harrowing
to achieve but marvelous theatre
when they get there.
TAKE
COMMAND
FIAT 124
SPORT SPIDER
it 5 -on-tho-tioor uU-tynchrommtb
trtntmittion it Speed* to 109
01PH 4-wheol dit c brake* it
Pracln stoorlng it Full lattru lattrumtntation
mtntation lattrumtntation it Taehomotor it
Sealed-tor-IHe bearing* it Spa Spadou*
dou* Spadou* touting it Low tud cm cmaumption
aumption cmaumption
Sue and taut drive
thia beauty today
H

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Korean War Brings Deferment Changes

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Campus Living Editor
The Navy wasnt to be out outdone,
done, outdone, so the V-12 Navy College
program was offered to men be between
tween between the ages of 17-22 years.
The plan provided entrance to
officers candidate school and
offered positions for specialists
and technicians {which depended
upon levels of education).
The Korean War brought about
severe changes in the offering
of deferments. As of September
1950, deferments were as
follows: to obtain an occupational
deferment, a student had to be in
the upper one-half of his class,
high grades, and no particular
field of study; pre-professional
courses; and veterans exempt
except those who served less than
12-months or 90-days between
December 7, 1941 and Sept. 2,
1945.
Graduate students were given
special deferments provided they
were in the top one-half of their
senior class. This did away with
the local board making decisions
concerning the fate of graduate
students. College students, and
high ranking high school students
were given special deferments.
In 1950 (as well as in the
latter part of the 60*s) a draft
exemption exam was offered. Lt.
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey required
that all college students take
the Army General Classification
Test. Those who scored over 120
would be exempt provided they
had high academic ratings. Those
who didnt pass, or fell below
their class rank, faced immediate
Induction. (Note: not so in the
60s)
However, this action proved
unfair. Students at the Ivy League
schools would have little
difficulty in scoring way above
the 120 mark. Classes would
split-up and an intellectual
elite would be established
among college men. Os course,
what if a man could or did not
want to go to college, what
chances did he have for defer deferment?
ment? deferment?
There were other military
training acts introduced. The
Universal Training Act advocated
drafting 18-year-olds even if they

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Al the perch you can eat.
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French Fries $ m qq
Cole Slaw I
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GAINESVILLE 2035 N.W. 13th STREET
TELEPHONE 578-2304

didnt finish high school. The
Trytten Plan, which was a modi modification
fication modification of the Hershey proposal,
but there would be a race to
enter easy colleges to avoid
the academic pressures, and an
easy way to obtain deferment.
TIME Magazine, Mar. 17,
1967, reported on the draft:
President Johnson, drawing
heavily on the recommendations
of his advisory commission, last
week proposed to Congress some
sweeping revisions of the system,
notably: 1) inducting younger men
first rather than the oldest
eligible for service, 2) end ending
ing ending deferments for most graduate
students and giving serious con consideration
sideration consideration to withdrawing under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate deferments, 3) sub substituting
stituting substituting a lottery scheme for
the present selection by birth
date ... .He (referring to the
would deny deferment
to all graduate students, except
those studying to be ministers,

M GRAND
|H OPENING
Wednesday,
I FRIED CHICKEN 1
April 17
Vfetchfor our
Grand Opening Special!!!
MARYLAND FRIED CHICKEN
516 NW 13th St.
Jobs in the
Catskills
.atskill Mt. resorts are now
hiring students for summer
jobs. Openings for waiters,
waitresses, chambermaids,
life guards, counselors, etc.
Experience helpful but not es essential.
sential. essential. Write for up-to-date
catalog of resort hotel jobs
including where to write, jobs
available and salary. Send
SI.OO to cover printing postage
and handling to Resorts Inter International,
national, International, Dept. B, 5314 Lee
Ave., Richmond, Virginia.

physicians and dentists.
In the Boston University News,
Jan. 16, 1945, students and fac faculty
ulty faculty members held a discussion
on postwar military training. The

Jpsir
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fl n gs^M
If you don't agree that
business destroys individuality,
maybe it's because you're an
individual.
V *-> s

Theres certain campus talk that claims
individuality is dead in the business world.
That big business es a big brother destroy destroying
ing destroying initiative.
But freedom of thought and action, when
backed with reason and convictions cour courage,
age, courage, will keep and nurture individuality
whatever the scene: in the arts, the sciences,
and in business.
Scoffers to the contrary, the red corpus corpuscles
cles corpuscles of individuality pay off. No mistake.
Encouraging individuality rather than
suppressing it is policy in a business like
Western Electricwhere we make and pro-

most disillusioning statement
was made by a student, Mary Lou
Warren: I am infavor of it be because
cause because I have enough faith in
mankind. I believe that such

Western Electric
MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY UNIT OF THE BELL SYSTEM

vide things Bell telephone companies need.
Because communications are changing fast,
these needs are great and diverse.
Being involved with a system that helps
keep people in touch, lets doctors send car cardiograms
diograms cardiograms across country for quick analysis,
helps transmit news instantly, is demand demanding.
ing. demanding. Demanding of individuals.
If your ambition is strong and your abili abilities
ties abilities commensurate, youll never be truly
happy with the status quo. Youll seek
ways to change it andwonderful feeling!
some of them will work.
Could be at Western Electric.

training will not lead to future
conflicts, not in a civilized cul culture."
ture." culture." I wonder how she reflects
upon this statement 23 years
later.



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Foresters
In University Agricultural
League bowling, Friday night the
Forestry Faculty team held onto
a slim first place lead, despite
a poor night. Agricultural
Economics B M advanced from
last place to next-to-last under
a members 213 final game roll.
Nancy Strickland, a secretary
with the Florida Citrus Com Commission,
mission, Commission, came up with the high
game of the evening of 213,
despite her first two games of
135 and 166. Nancys score put
her first among the womens
individual series, and third over overall.
all. overall.
The Forestry Faculty team
remained in first place with a
25-11 record, while the Soils:
Faculty brought up a close
second with a 24-12 season. Soils
Faculty captured both the high
team and high single game score
for the evening.
Model 1 600
"It's Here!"
Galding & Clark Motors
*Ol2 S. Main Street

Top Ags
Farther behind in the stand standings,
ings, standings, and finishing out the list
of the teams are: 3. Fruit Crops,
4. Animal Science, 5. Ag.
Economics A, 6. Soils Grad Graduate,
uate, Graduate, 7. Plant Pathology, 8.
Agronomy, 9. Forestry Club, 10.
Food Science, 11. Ag. Economics
B, and 12. Ornamental Horti Horti
GATOR ADS SELL
CMV 5 salsT
W fIC K GASOLINE
WITH UIK JOB
OIL FILTER CHANGE
SOUTHSIDE SUNOCO
?i?6 SW 13 ST

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend"
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
UNIVERSITY CHEVROLET
1515 N Main St. Phone 376-7581

Bacheler States Fastest Miler

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor
Jack Bacheler has 164 pounds spread very sparsely
over a lean 6-6 1/2 frame.
Most of it is bunched thickly in his thighs, while
the rest of the Bacheler body carries just enough
weight to qualify as a human being.
I guess you could say Jack doesn't have the most
imposing physique in the world, said his track
coach, Jimmy Carnes.
And when Bacheler sheds his street clothes and
dons his scant track togs, he looks like an under undernourished
nourished undernourished Ichabod Crane.
- That is, until he runs.
Putting it all together Saturday Bacheler ran
the states fastest mile ever, a 4:04.2.
1 was really surprised that I could run that well,
Bacheler said. I was shooting for a 4:10 or 4:12.
Bacheler ran an invitational mile for non-college
athletes. Bacheler runs for the Carnes-coached
Florida Track Club.
And Bacheler is one of the best.
Jack has a very good chance of becoming the
Souths first sub four-minute miler, Carnes said.

Netters Play Today
By ALLAN DOUGLASS
Alligator Correspondent
In a warmup for the big match against
North Carolina today, the Gator tennis team,
won their 37th straight victory against Ogle Oglethorpe
thorpe Oglethorpe College.
In winning 7-0 the following netters scored:
Armi Neely vs. Robbie Smith, 6-0, 6-2; Jamie
Pressley vs. Joe Dennis, 6-4, 6-1; Steve Bee Beeland
land Beeland vs. Woodie Hbblitzell, 6-1, 7-5; Greg
Bliley vs. Robbie Danner, 6-4, 6-0; Paul Lun Lunetta
etta Lunetta vs. Jeff Mandell, 6-1, 6-0; Will Sherwood
vs. Charlie West, 6-3, 6-2, and Pressley-Lee
Steele vs. Smith-Dennis, 6-4, 6-1.
Today's match pits the top player in the
SEC against the Atlantic Coast Conferences
top player in the No. 1 slot, Neely vs. Ken
Hamilton. In addition North Carolina carries
a 15-game winning streak to the Gator courts.

Sj Enjoy Personal Barber Service
f Relax in comfort and convenience at the best in the proses proses/
/ proses/ sional barber field in Gainesville. Specialists in razor cuts,
minings, washings and conventional cuts. See Kenny or Mac
SIM S BARBER SHOP
817 West University 378-2015
Do You Feel Your
County Judge Should
Be A Lawyer?
MB EDGAR
,fyour i rn
answer LLU
ZL. :.K4 JOHNSON
JUDGE

Tuesday, April 16, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Carnes said Bacheler has a good chance to make the
1968 United States Olympic team.
If he trains as well as he has, Jack can do it,
Carnes said.
Training for Bacheler consists of running 80-90
miles a week. Bachelers times were good in the
past but not like now.
I used to just' run 40 miles a week, Bacheler
said But after training harder and longer for the
Olympics, my times have come down.
If Bacheler does go to the Olympics in Mexico
City, it will be in either the 3,000 meter steeple steeplechase
chase steeplechase of 3- or 6-mile runs. But not the mile.
I just ran that mile Saturday to get an indication
on how my conditioning was coming along, Bacheler
said I haven't got good speed for a great miler,
I can't crank out a 46-second quarter like Ryun.
So as the distance gets longer I get faster.
That's why Im trying to get into good condition.
To get into good condition for the trials this summer,
Bacheler will occasionally run a mile to test his
condition.
His next mile test is against Florida State May 4.

Hart Rallye Set

The Hart Rallye Team is spon sponsoring
soring sponsoring its first annual D. J. Fun
Rallye Saturday night.
The event will be a dual com competition.
petition. competition. The four local radio
stations; WUWU, WDVH, WRUF,
and WGGG; will stand against
each other in one class while
the general public will compete
in a second class.
First, second and third place
trophies are to be awarded to
the winning radio stations. Prizes
for the general public will con consist
sist consist of trophies for the first
place driver and navigator, wall
plaques for the second place
driver and navigator, dash
plaques for the third place team

and LP albums for the top six
placers. Dash plaques will be
given to each car entering.
Registration starts at the Sears
parking lot at six p.m., and the
entry fee Is $3.50 for the general
public and $2.50 for sporty car
club members. The
meeting will be held at 6:45,
and the first car leaves at 7
sharp.
For further information call
Les O'Brien at 378-8260 after
5 p.m.
The
Sterling
they
couldnt
devaluate
BRITISH
STERLING
So fine a gift,
its even sold
in jewelry stores.
After shave
from $3.50.
Cologne
from $5.00.
: . T / ' .
t n ,
Essential oils imported from Great Britain.
Compounded in U.S.A.

Page 11



Page 12

' The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 16, 1968

ANNOUNCING
.
I '..* ; i
of the fabulous Landmark Apartments. ,Ready for occupancy in September 1968, phase II of the Landmark complex
. will continue to have the features which have made the Landmark the most distinguished and desired address in
Gainesville.
Phase II will be comprised of 94 total electric units featuring underground residential distribution coordinated by
your Gainesville Utilities. These units will contain electric range, refrigerator, garbage disposal, dish washer and
"quick recovery" water heater all served by dependable, flameless electric energy and supplied by General Electric.
In addition the new units will be comfort controlled for heating and cooling by flomeless electrically operated water waterl?
l? waterl? to-air heat pumps. ~,
J n-- . 1
IBPH aiEr ~~
JM Hu
. ' A** 0
eAn additional large swimming pool with Wall to wall carpeting
special cold deck patio around the deck.
Muay rooms
cpruirp
# Private Patios
.
Convenient to Uof F, Health Clinic Available with one or two bedrooms,
and VA Hospital furnished or unfurnished
A
Convenient to Restaurants and shopping Patio grills in the courtyards ifiV
Iwf
Townhouse design Ornamental gos lighting
ADDIICaIIOnS 3fG
n|f|*H*Hivii Ml v APPLICATION
*
\ m
| SI NAME...
being accepted j-
ii phone £!
, .._: ~ -. r ~ -' - .* a a
T
M VI PREFERENCE will be given to those
VVVV applications which are accompanied with
* WW ;: $!80 good fajth d it
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f A m frzL '""kii'i'ml!.!!!!!!! hm
1111 S.W. 16th AVENUE 372-6535 m