Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
V 4). .4/ / ; I -
Partly Cloudy
High In The 70s
Low In The 60s

Vol. 60, No. 114

H, W
' J1 Rff J 9
S* >?§*.% :?&?* j&?4sSffi&->. --- i2Tl >fe-.~ -. in
jgHai^ I MMWMWIf v v\.- : iflit s t:;,mA <. s&Hi §fe| ?> % * #* 1 % 1$ ::^HHm^ii^^'"-'-
ii gv^ap(sgCa~ 4sl ,.._.. ,_, t ,) ~ {
1
; ___ A 3fll|^lpC
Hf
: BHfb|
Ki&iL I B£sgEL .. H"' "* f
-.,IbHIHK
: m : wkao f
jh f v
HH. m : _v
*
I mk
NICK ARRO yo

SG President Clyde Taylor chal challenges
lenges challenges Alligator Managing Editor
Harvey Alper to a bumper car
match between the staffs of

Jones Gets New Hearing

By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Marshall Jones, who is
fighting to gain tenure, will re-
hearing open to the press
and interested parties where
evidence in his case will be pre presented.
sented. presented. The date is tentatively
set for next Tuesday.
Tuesday night the Faculty Sen Senate
ate Senate Committee for Academic
Freedom and Tenure denied
Jones a summary decision in his
favor and promptly arranged for
the open evidentiary hearing.
Senate by-laws prohibit Dr.
Paul Hanna from making any
further comment concerning the
proceedings of Tuesday nights
closed hearing.
Counsel for Dr. Jones, Prof.
Stanley Laughlin, said that he is
limited from making any com comments
ments comments on the substance of the
meeting because it was closed.
We were very disappointed
by the Faculty Senates decision,
but we still feel we have a
solid case and were confident

Devil And Daniel Webster
At University Auditorium

The opera workshop of the
UFs departments of music and
speech present The Devil and
V
| Classes Friday
**
x The UF will hold regularly :
x scheduled classes on Good |
Friday, according to Dr. Roy
j: l. Lassiter, assistant dean of $
v academic affairs.
>: The University has no ob obs
s obs jection to a faculty member j:-
excusing students on an
individual basis for religious
£ observance, he added. x

The
Florida Alligator

A CHALLENGE

well win eventually, he did say.
Counsel for the Administra Administrations
tions Administrations case, Prof. Hayford En Enwall,
wall, Enwall, had no comment on last
nights meeting.
Jones, the controversial psy psychology
chology psychology professor who Sunday
was arrested for blocking traf traffic
fic traffic at University Avenue and Main
Street during a civil rights
demonstration, said he was not
disappointed either way.
I felt I had nothing to lose.
I wanted an open hearing to be begin
gin begin with and so I couldnt have
lost either way, Jones said
calmly.
Jones said he has a strong case
and the evidence reinforces
it. He said the Senate commit committee
tee committee acted quite wisely because
they probably feel that a lot
of faculty and students are in interested
terested interested in hearing the argu arguments.
ments. arguments.
I dont believe the Senate
committees decision last night
was so much a ruling against our

Daniel Webster, a one-act folk
opera, tonight at 8:15 in the
University auditorium.
Admission is free.
The opera, from a book by
Stephen Vincent Benet with music
by Douglas Moore, centers
around a trial between Daniel
Webster and the Devil over the
ioul of another man.
The main actors in the pro production
duction production include Sid Heidtas Jabez
Stone, Ingrid Hell wig as Mary
Stoap, Gerald Langford as Daniel
Webster and Stan Harris as the
Devil.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

*" the Alligator and Student Govern Government.
ment. Government. The match will take place
Monday afternoon at Carnigras.
(See related story, page 4.)

motion than it was a ruling for
an open hearing, Jones said.
Jones was denied tenure orig originally
inally originally by ex-President J. Wayne
Reitz and has been attempting
ever since to get the new Ad Administration
ministration Administration under President
Stephen C. OConnell to recon reconsider
sider reconsider that ruling.
His motion requests several
things. First, it asks the com committee
mittee committee to acknowledge that Pres President
ident President Reitz violated academic
freedom in denying Jones ten tenure
ure tenure because of his political ac activities
tivities activities which he maintains are
protected under the First Amend Amendment.
ment. Amendment. *
Second, Jones motion requests
that tenure be granted to him.
Third, Jones is requesting that
the committee say that Presi President
dent President OConnell also violated aca academic
demic academic freedom in his handling
of the case.
He is also requesting some
statement from the Senate com committee
mittee committee concerning the keeping
of political dossiers by the Ad Administration
ministration Administration and its conduct of
political investigations of pro professors.
fessors. professors.
Jones said the committee does
not have to accept his entire mo motion
tion motion but is free to pick and choose.
Jones claims that a professor
does not have the right to ex exercise
ercise exercise hife constitutional polit political
ical political rights freely, that the Ad Administration
ministration Administration currently has the
power to make life difficult for
any professor whose political
activities do not please it.
He also said that he does not
believe the committee decision
was at all influenced by his
actions on Sunday.
My activities on Sunday were
no different from a dozen or so
other occasions. The committee
is well acquainted with the po political
litical political positions I have-- taken
all along, he said. f

House Okays
Civil Rights Bill

WASHINGTON (UPI) --The
civil rights bill with its open
housing provision passed in the
House Wednesday despite an ex expected
pected expected almost solid opposition of
Southerners of both parties.
Voting solidly against the bill
were house members from Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Mis Mississippi,
sissippi, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Virginia.
The few Deep South support supporters
ers supporters of the bill included Rep.
Richard H. Fulton, D Tenn.;
Reps. Claude Pepper and Dante
B. Fascell, D-Fla., Rep. Hale
Boggs, D-La., and six Texas
Democrats.
The Southern opponents of the
measure were joined by key op opponents
ponents opponents from other regions in
attacking the timing of the vote
both as being too hasty, and as
coming in the wake of riots
across the nation.
But the strategy did not work.
Rep. William M. Colmyr, D-
Miss., chairman of the House
Rules Committee, said he went
home Thursday afternoon last
week confident of enough house
support to send the bill into a
conference committee.
That was just prior to the as assassination
sassination assassination of Dr. Martin Luther
King and the wave of rioting that
erupted afterward.
Now we are legislating in an
atomosphere of hysteria and
threat, an unsavory atmosphere
surrounded by Marines/* Colmer
told the House.
Other objected to calling the
vote on the lengthy senate bill
without more extensive debate or
committee work to iron out dif differences
ferences differences with earlier house leg legislation.
islation. legislation.
In this they were joined by
House Republican Leader Gerald
R. Ford, who pointed out the
Senate bill is far different from
the brief civil rights protection
bill that originated in the House.
In the Senate it grew from five
and one-half pages to more than
50 pages, with additions of Senate
amendments on gun control, an antiriot
tiriot antiriot provisions, and safeguards

Scholarship Started
For Negro Students

Law students have initiated a
scholarship fund for Negro stu students
dents students and proposed to name it
the Martin Luther King, Jr.
Scholarship Fund.
It was announced at a second
meeting of the law students Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night in the aftermath of the
threat made on Negro professor
Spencer Boyers life which
caused him to flee back to How Howard
ard Howard University in Washington,
D.C. over the weekend.
Richard Birnbaum, 4LW, told
the law students that over SI,OOO
had been pledged by the meeting
Tuesday night.
Professor Joel Rabinowitz vol volunteered
unteered volunteered his services concerning
any tax problems which might
arise with the fund. Professor
Leslie Levinson said he would

Inside
Florida Faces
Kansas Saturday
See Page 14

Thursday, April 11, 1968

for rights of Indians.
The protection bill which the
house passed last fall was termed
as amounting at the time to an
antidote'* to an antiriot bill
v which # the House also passed.
, The senate merged the anti antiriot
riot antiriot bill with the civil rights
bill while adding the open hous housing
ing housing provisions and the sections
on gun control and the rights
of Indians.
Rep William C. Cramer, R-
Fla.,/author of the antiriot bill
in the House, complained it had
been altered by the Senate in
crucial ways that might becloud
its constitutionality.
In all, he said, 26 changes
were made in the house passed
civil rights protections bill
and the antiriot bill.
Curfew Lifted
In Gainesville
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Managing Editor
Normalcy returned to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Wednesday morning as the
City Commission, meeting in
special session, moved to lift
the 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew im imposed
posed imposed here late Sunday night.
Following a quiet night
throughout the city, Gainesvilles
city fathers made their move
warning that if trouble erupted
again, the curfew could be re reimposed
imposed reimposed in 30 seconds.
UF President Stephen C. O-
Connell commended all members
of the university community for
their cooperation in observing
the curfew.
The commissions action was
almost anti-climactic since local
law enforcement officers re received
ceived received orders Tuesday night to
stop and arrest curfew violators
at their own discretion.*
Only, four people were ar arrested,
rested, arrested, in comparison with 34
( SEE CURFEW PAGE 4)

aid in any accounting aspects
of the fund and Professors Ro Robert
bert Robert Berry and Henry Fenn said
they would provide any necessary
supporting services.
Forms have been put in the law
library for anyone who wants to
contribute to the fund.
Tfie students were still out outraged
raged outraged that neither the university
nor the law school administra administrations
tions administrations have expressed slny official
word concerning the threats
against Professor Boyer.
Dean Frank E. Maloney, who
had been in Tallahassee Monday
night and was unable to attend
the meeting, told the students
he was grieved over Professor
Boyer's leaving and hope that
he will return."
(SEE SCHOLARSHIP PAGE 2)

I



!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

Page 2

Bulletin News
State National, International News
Westmoreland Replaced
i
WASHINGTON (UPI) ln one of his few non-surprises of the
year, President Johnson Wednesday named Gen. Creighton W. Abrams
to succeed Gen. William C. Westmoreland as UJS. commander in
Vietnam.
Abrams, 53, who has been Westmoreland's deputy since June, will
assume command when Westmoreland becomes Army Chief of Staff
July 2, subject to routine Senate confirmation.
Adm. John S. McCain Jr., 59, London-based commander of U.S.
Naval forces in Europe for die past year, was named at a presidential
news conference to succeed Adm. UlyssesS.G. Sharp as commander of
U.S. forces in the Pacific. Sharp is retiring July 2.
McCain's son, Lt. Cmdr. John S. McCain 111, is a Navy flier
who was shot down near Hanoi last October and was seriously
injured. He still is listed as a prisoner of war.
Abrams will be succeeded by Lt. Gen. Andrew Goodpaster, 53,
chief of the National War College at Ft, McNair, Washington, D.C.,
and a former aide to President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Larry OBrien Resigns
*
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Johnson Wednesday accepted
the resignation at Lawrence F. O'Brien as Postmaster General
and named Marvin Watson, a White House aide, to succeed Mm.
O'Brien was not immediately available for comment on what he
would do now, but there were recurring reports be planned to help
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's presidential campaign. The Kennedy for
President headquarters had no immediate comment.
Johnson told an informal news conference that O'Brien came in
to see him Wednesday and submitted Ms resignation from die cabinet.
Johnson said he promptly accepted it
O'Brien was the first cabinet officer to depart since Johnson
announced that he would not seek re-election. That decision may have
been why O'Brien quit, y
Johnson named two special assistants, Jim Jones and Larry
Temple to take over Watson's duties.
Watson, 43, was a successful oilman in Texas before joining the
Johnson White House team.

f FROM mi OWE
But when Dean Maloney was
asked by the law students whether
he believed an official statement
should be made by the law school
concerning the threat to Boyer
and his subsequent departure he
said, No comment.*
Hie students nevertheless con continued
tinued continued circulating a letter to
Boyer for students signatures.
As of Tuesday night they had 400.
, The law students also sought
means for recruiting Negroes
to come to UF. A program is be being
ing being arranged whereby law stu students
dents students will visit other colleges
and junior colleges in search searching

GATOR DISCOUNT ASSOCIATIONMiI
Join now and SAVE REAL MONEY
Membership, SI.OO, Open to all U. of F. Students, 1
Faculty, and Staff. Valid for one year from date of issue. f>
1 - V o
1 .UV " Q O
2$ a gallon discount on gasoline or diesel fuel. |
: 10% discount on tires, batteries. Road service, i
oil, parts, or labor. §
I Conscientious professional care for your car. §
Free wash job with 15 gal. fillup of gas or diesel|
fuel.
PLUS o
Automotive assistance anywhere In Alachua County.
NORTHSIDE 66
44n NW 13 th St. 376-9481 IHm
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U th* official student newspaper of the I'ntversity of Florid*
and la published flee times weekly except during June, July and August when it Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reltr
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at Ue United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida,'326ol.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectioMble.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator wUI
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion at an advertisement scheduled
to run several Unas. Notices for correction must be given before Mxt Insertion.

Scholarship

ing searching for prospective Negro ap applicants
plicants applicants and perhaps inviting
them to visit the campus.
Hie students also discussed
possible special considerations
for Negro applicants because it is
maintained that the Law School
Admissions Tests are oriented
\ to a white society.
A student exchange program
with some Negro colleges around
the country was also suggested/
but no further action was taken.
It was also announced that the
university is working with the
local bar association to create
legal aid projects. It would en enable
able enable UF law students to serve
as clerks for the poor in the
community.

Drafting Grad Students
Will Cripple Education

By MIKE FEINSILBER
WASHINGTON (UPI) I
couldn'tqulte hack Canada, says
college senior Wes Hauze, 21,
who is about to join the Army
to avoid the draft. "But sir,
there is going to be hell to pay.
College students who go to
jail or to Canada to avoid
military service "will not be
placed in double jeopardy as
long as I am dean," says Dr.
Colin Pittendrigh, dean of grad graduate
uate graduate students at Princeton Uni University,
versity, University, ordinarily no school for
scandal or jailbirds.
But "if many intellectuals
leave the country when the going
gets rough,'* he adds, the re resulting
sulting resulting reaction "will make the
McCarthy era seem like cMcken
feed."
Baptists To Hear
Counseling Expert
A specialist in marriage and
family counseling will be guest
speaker at a 12:15 luncheon Mon Monday
day Monday at the Baptist Student Center.
Dr. Swan Haworth, associate
professor of the psychology of
religion at Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary, Louis Louisville,
ville, Louisville, Ky., will speak on the
topic "What Is the Message of
Viktor Frankl for Christians To Today?"
day?" Today?"
Frankl is widely noted for his
work at the Neurological Poly Polyclinic
clinic Polyclinic in Vienna, Austria.
Interested faculty and students
may make reservations by calling
the center, 372-4711.

I R Eb Uck. I
I -A K AN D CO. I
I March 22, 1968 I
/ 70 WHOM IT mav I
I 17 HAT CONCERN. I
I Tf fo l/fJHTv. I
' / Crested rv I
zzz aai s ~ /
If Am OCR CAT r I
I / X£fi*ffroE. T ffiVnL IJW WAS o Tml ALOG SALE I
/ I Moll7 >Ar, march I>en Sfo TS I
I \ 1
/ /
I 0,t ; |
Good Guys Get Results
I 980-wdvh /
L -thJ> to /
(#(.;& A-, I
- f
,h ;

INTERPRETIVE.

Hie lame, the halt, the blind
and the female will be left in
graduate schools unless the rules
are changed, says Nathan Pusey,
president of Harvard.
Hell, no, we wont go, says
38.4 per cent of the men at Yale,
according to a survey.
These comments are aroused
by a fact that is very likely
very quickly to have a pro profound
found profound effect on the United States,
its Army, its universities and
its young men.
The fact: It is entirely likely
that 288,000 young men will be
drafted in the 12 months starting
in July and that virtually all
of them will hold one or more
college degrees.
And these are a few of its
projected consequences, based
on knowledgeable estimates:
- There will be a 70 per cent
drop in the number of college
men entering graduate school
next fall and a 40 per cent drop
in overall enrollment.
- Newer and weaker graduate
schools may not survive as older
institutions find room for stu students
dents students who would normally be
turned down by the prestige uni universities.
versities. universities.
- Undergraduate college en enrollments
rollments enrollments will have to be cut be because
cause because of a shortage of graduate
students who, as teaching assis assistants,
tants, assistants, assume most of the burden
of teaching freshmen and sopho sophomore
more sophomore classes at many big
schools.
- The average age of Army
inductees will rise from 20 years
and four months to about 24,

and the Army, according to one
congressman, will be "the best
educated, least efficient army in
history.
It is going to take most of
its inductees from that portion
of the population which has been
most vocal in "'expressing and
most experienced in exhibiting
its distaste for the Vietnam war.
- One young man who is about'
to become one of the Armys
reluctant recruits is Wes Hauze.
Wes Hauze may or may not
speak for his generation, but
what he has to say about his
generation is interesting. He op opposes
poses opposes the war, and demonstrated
against it last October in front
of the Pentagon. y
"Being 21 put me at the top
of the draft pool, he says. "I
would hate to get that little notice
in the middle of a semester and
when I talked to my draft board
in Gainesville Fla., they were
pretty pessimistic.
"So the choice was to be drafted
or to enlist. The third alternative
is Canada but I couldnt quite
hack that. I cant see copping out
of the system. If you run, youre
out of the system and you cant
get bade in it. Fro foolish enough
to like it
"Im going to enlist For three
years. If I waited to be drafted,
theres no telling where theyd
put me. The war is the big
hangup. I hope to get into some something
thing something like the Medical Corps;
I realized Id still be part of
the system thats spewing out
bullets but at least I wont be
the one pulling the trigger."



o% iflTll^WGreenStamps M flB BBk
Swift's Premium 1 II
Half or Whole I |H ~
Fuiiy-Cooked I
Smoked Hams 1
(xiri Kt. April it. km) 9
waaaaasaaaaoaAaaaassoaoaasssaaaaaaaosr fmpF
PLUS 100 EXTRA S fir H GREEN ITAMPI
WITH COUPON
@*vg!| ||fe Jlp we reserve the
. quantities
~ isl
' 1 Kn ,4fl
-M -Al
rTKiITV
Dele Slice, Crashed, er Chunk ***'
Pineapple 4 *l. -
*** 2 39 dMBSaBk Canned
Golden Corne*es 1* Hmns
Libby's Tender Fresh 9
Garden Peas..s s l. S^B29
Crisco Oil --39*
PuMix Twin Pak Per Luncheons or Paitm Needs No Refrigeration
Chips e *+ 59
(Plus 50 extra S&H Green Stomps, No Coupon Needed)
m_ i Do Your Shopping at:
e down produce lone 111T11j4,/pma T B R , m Rnrt nu K ... ~
cH,, wpip icrbcr, ILLI
Lettuce 2 ~ 39* I sl oo f r More IL s RVA }m 2630 Nwi3thst
Grauefruit ~,,.* 5* -- Btimiidfl 125 sw 34fh st
SirUpCKHM ff Westgate Shoppina Center

_ MOS .* with

Thursday, April 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

Page 4

Investigation
Will Seek
Riot Cause
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) An
investigation is underway to de determine
termine determine who started the student
riots that forced closing down
of Florida A&M University last
week, Chancellor Robert B.
Mautz said Wednesday.
Mautz said law and order is
going to be strictly observed on
university campuses.
He said he would not hesi hesitate
tate hesitate to recommend closing of any
university in the state where
rioting gets out of hand or where
high emotion and tension takes
over for reason.
A&M University, a pre predominantly
dominantly predominantly Negro lnstutltion, was
closed for a week after large
numbers of students gathered
on the campus and hurled bricks
through windows of passing cars,
threw firebombs and began shoot shooting.
ing. shooting.
A white teen-ager died in a
fire nearby when a firebomb
was thrown into the family quar quarters
ters quarters over a grocery store, but
there have been no arrests and
no determination of whether it
was a part of the student riot rioting.
ing. rioting. ,
Gator Gras
Begins Soon
This years annual Gator Gras
show will soon be under-way.
Sponsored by Reitz Union Board,
Gator Gras will consist of a beau beauty
ty beauty pageant, minstrel show and a
Derby 500 down the Medical Cen Center
ter Center hill.
And Gator Gras wants students v
faculty and administrators to help
with the May 10 minstrel show.
Pushing toward campus-wide in involvement,
volvement, involvement, the Gator Gras Com Committee
mittee Committee is asking all those who
have any sort of talent at all alljug
jug alljug bands, dance teams, banjo
players, singers to contact
Linda Runion at 376-9163.
Judges for the beauty pageant
and soap box derby entrants are
also needed.

2 4 9 12 5 COUCHS ZENITH TV
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET GOLDEN
7 ; 00 Rifleman Andreas Rifleman What's New ANNIVERSARY SALE
7:30 Alan King pHso e r Second Hundred Alan Klng French Chel The best values ever for your
8:00 Zenda" Flying Nun Speaking Freely $$ TV Dollar $$
8:30 Bob Hope Bewitched Bob Hope
9:00 Movie Tl G,rl net ir 1 "lEB Never before * ,0W
Festival pictur# m __ ftft ; oi
9 :30 Dragnet Peyt " PUCe Dragne I I*l3B M Bu/ S X WayS
10-00 Dean Martin Avengers Dean Martin II H
,uuu II Jw All American Bui If
10*30 Dean Martin Dean Martin 1
," | P
j |,qq News NE\NS News News
~~7 " Performance guaranteed by Couchs
11*30 Johnny Carson 1116 Joey Bishop Johnny Carson 7 ..
Miracle : own Zenith Master Technicians
Fearless Foreccu,
- ALAN KING -a satiric revidw of contemporary fads and foolish- C-\ 'I 1 f| Mai**
ness by host, Alan King. 1 * PH 376-7171
More value for your TV Dollar

TUMBLEWEEDS

f? 1 ~rr7 / ANP LEAVE f J h=i=sA ( J-rW T
(IF I PONT FINP ) TL f POOR KNUCKLES [ gTOPI : ( M GETTINs)

Gator, SG Bumper Car Battle Set

A battle royale shapes up for
this next Monday afternoon at
5 p.m. as leaders of Student
Government meet the staff of
the Florida Alligator for an un unusual
usual unusual joust using bumper cars on

Curfew Lifted

FROM PAGE QBE
arrests for curfew violations
Monday night.
Although the city was generally
calm all day Tuesday, there were
a few scattered incidents.
At 12:11 p.m. there was abomb
threat reported at Howard Bishop
Junior High School. The school
was evacuated, as it had been
the previous day following a simi similar
lar similar threat, when a young Negro
male called and told school
officials, There, is a bomb
planted in your school.
No bomb was found.
At the Kappa Alpha fraternity
house on West University
Avenue, where a bomb threat
had been reported Monday night,
a second threat was investigated
shortly before midnight on Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday.

Cut-off date for
ADAM CLAYTON POWELL REFUNDS
Is
FRIDAY APRIL 12
No extension will be made. Until Friday
refunds will be made at Reitz Union Box Office

the first day of SGs First An Annual
nual Annual Florida Carnigras.
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor, representing SG, issued
the challenge Wednesday to Edi Editor
tor Editor Steve Hull, Managing EX&-

No bomb was found.
The only incident of major van vandalism
dalism vandalism recorded Tuesday was the
destruction of a plate glass win window
dow window at Hendrix Furniture Store
valued at SIOO. The store is on
NW sth Avenue.
The only unlawful act Tuesday
night involving a university stu student
dent student took place at the Delta Up Upsilon
silon Upsilon fraternity house.
An unidentified student was
reported to have shot a pellet
gun from the roof of the frat fraternity
ernity fraternity building'.
Traffic on the streets was
heavier than it had been Monday
night after the curfew hour
struck.
There were no fires of conse consequence
quence consequence reported Tuesday night.
Police and city officials said
Wednesday night promised to be
near normal.

tor Harvey Alper, and the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator staff.
Monday was chosen as the day
for the combat.
The. public is invited' to watch
the battle between SG and the
Alligator and then to enjoy the
bumper and other rides
themselves.
Other rides will include the
worlds largest portable roller
coaster and the giant double
ferris wheel skydiver.
All profits from the carnival
will be turned over to the Dol Dollars
lars Dollars for Scholars program.

SHOE REPAIRS
SOUS ATTACHED HEELS ATTACHED
15 MINS. 5 MINS.
MODERN SHOE REPAIR SHOP
CAROLYN PLAZA 101 H. MAIN ST.

A POLITICAL STUDY TOUR
OF EUROPE
will be conducted this summer by a professor of international
relations in the graduate school of a well-known university.
A two week course in contemporary problems (in English) at
the Sorbonne will be supplemented by seminars with leading
scholars and statesmen (such as Ludwig Erhard, Enoch Powell,
MP, Prof. Count Bertrand de Jouvenal, Archduke Otto von Habs Habsburg)
burg) Habsburg) in 10 countries. Social activities with European students
(Oxrord Balls, etc.) will be included in this non-regimented
tour for intelligent students. For more information, write Dept.
101, A. S. P. E., 33 Chalfont Road, Oxford, England.

by TOM RYAN

Advance tickets for the rides
are available at the Reitz Union
Box Office through Monday. The
books of advance tickets, pro providing
viding providing six rides for sl, will
not be on sale after that day
and persons will have to buy
tickets at the Carnigras ticket
booths.
The backs of the ticket books
will be used as ballots for the
contest for a new name for the
Dollars for Scholars program,
since the name Dollars for Schol Scholars
ars Scholars has been copyrighted by an
organization in Boston.



i $m
I Br jig m
;sj.' V ..-Ofo ;/'';a&fr ..
: -W 1
Ilfr *FL* i$PiK
| 1
til M
Tr
B .*
if|p.pJiW I J a
j^B
M E 111 --'^r
-x; JaP?> g# v-;'
mmSBM El k
flF V
i HP > v
Hi
H Bp JS B
P' E
JEf
m&mmmtKm wmHKKm % I#
NICK ARROYO
ENGINEERS FAIR
i
The Engineers Fair last weekend
. .drew thousands of visitors to the cam campus
pus campus to view the many exhibits and
displays.
A young visitor (above) admires a
talking robot at the fair.
Diane Litherland (above right) digs
into the guts of the robot to make a
minor repair.
At the right, an unidentified UF stu student
dent student plays a game of three dimensional
checkers with a computer.

Cuban Student :'l Lived In Hell Once

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Staff Writer f ~,'
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first of the series
of articles on Cuban students at the UF.)
"I lived In hell once."
With this statement, Martha F., a 23-year 23-yearold
old 23-yearold Cuban-born UF coed summed up her conten contention
tion contention that she would never return to her hatred hatredtorn*
torn* hatredtorn* homeland.
I have nothing to go back for,* she states.
Even if Castro were overthrown tomorrow, Cuba
would not return to normality in many, many
years." *.
Too much hatred has been generated there,
she says. If nothing else, the communist regime
has succeeded in splitting the once closely-knit
Cuban family, Martha claims.
Ive found a new meaning to life in the United
States," she says.
Martha is one of nearly 300 Cuban nationals
enrolled at the UF. An education major, Martha
left Cuba six years ago for what she thought
would be a short while."
But a few months later came the Bay of Pigs
invasion and Martha saw her hopes of returning
to Cuba fizzle out.
"It was only then that I realized I had left
Cuba on a one-way trip," she says. "I was
then forced to make a complete re-evaluation
of my goals in life, as up to that moment they
had been centered upon' my eventual return to
Cuba," she adds.
Now a senior, Martha plans to teach at a Flori Florida
da Florida school for a few years until I get married."
She is engaged to an American currently serving

HK
W./;.v
^w^^^kSb - jiV,*;. v;.'' H|;; *^^ t *-?*.*TF^ *.
B ~
pM| YjB
_ ~y ', ^^':l S'' J '' ? ui!l7i^^^^ ' X T i~wraK'~ 1 -Sffl^ra
: <^bh[ipp *gjjj[fl >^/~u..
' <"&*s ife'-
- *
9MHra| liiliill' i .-
L M :sf, ,, s '; f \A N -.;
la. JB
SSsilii - ; '- -. >
' s
'' : W j|" ":.' :v
IB Sa 1
9£ & \ 9R99[SH^HH
'
~ >: bbP^ <

with the UJS. Army in Vietnam.
Martha's case in away typifies the plight in
which hundreds of Cuban students found them themselves
selves themselves upon leaving Cuba.
Over 550,000 Cubans have left their country
since Castro came to power, nearly 400,000 of
which have come to the UJS.
To get out of Cuba, these people have to give
up everything they own money, most of the
clothings, property. Yet they still come.
According to Foreign Students Advisor
Farris, a larger number of Cubans are now en enrolled
rolled enrolled in UF graduate schools than ever before.
There is a new spirit in the Cuban students
which comes from their perceiving the possibility
of a good life, of work and service in the United
States," Farris says.
Most Cubans have put in the back of their
minds the idea of returning to Cuba," says Farris,
"but I am sure that, should the opportunity arise,
each individual would weigh his prospects for the
future before making a decision.'
Martha agrees. Seven years ago, before I left
Cuba, I viewed the UJS. as a far away, cold land.
Today, this is my home," she says.
I know of very few young Cubans who plan to
return to the island," she adds.
But many other puban students at the UF
disagree, with her.
True, there is much hatred in Cuba," says
20-year-old industrial engineering major Gustavo
Agusti, and it will be quite a task to once again
rebuild Cuba. But the responsibility of doing so
rests on all Cubans. ILwe_don't doit, no one will."
He says around 50 per cent" of his friends

INTERPRgfyE

Thursday, April 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

would return to Cuba.
Agusti, who came to the U.S. six and a half
years ago, says his own return to the Caribbean
island would depend on the circumstances.
If Castro were overthrown tomorrow, I would
stay here until I had completed my career, he
explains. But If that happens once I have grad grad
grad uated and established myself and my family, I
dont think I would return.
Manuel Carreno, 3EG, a former high school and
4 junior college basketball star in West Palm Beach,
says he has an open mind about returning to
Cuba.
It all depends on what Im doing at the time,
he states. There are others who would return
under any circumstances.
Angel Armas, 3EG, is one of them. I definitely
1 plan to go back to Cuba, he says. I like the
Cuban way of life and its customs better than
} those of any other country.
All of those interviewed agreed that most of the
older Cubans currently in the U.S. would return
to Cuba immediately.
The older people have a much harder time
with the language and differences in the cultures,
Martha says.
Some of my young friends also plan to return,
as they feel it is their duty to rebuild the country!
But I dont think I will. I lived in hell once.
Now, I think Ive found my place in the sun.
And that sun, the U.S., once looked at by thousands
of Cubans with apprehension and distrust for its
fiery greatness, has now become a radiant symbol
of freedom.

Page 5



Page 6

, Hie Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

The
Florida Alligator
JKijPiCf A Student Newspaper
gcn "To Let The People Know
mi Eatot 1
J[H Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
Amm i "-****'. Executive Editor
Harold A&rich Bob Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
H Florida AUlcator** official poattteo on Imum la axpraaaad
only la tfca Manna Mow. Otter material la tlds lasoa may
reflate the optetoa at tte writer or oartooalst aad ate aaeaaaarlly
tea* of tea FlarMa Alligator nniaaaapatefioally Indicated.

Look Ahead, Accent

Student Governments
annual Accent program is
still a good one. And per perhaps
haps perhaps the brilliant success
of the first program in
1967 ipade this years
bland, halting montage look
worse than it really is.
We must not let one bad
program end the annual
event. Instead, let us learn
from our mistakes and turn
with gusto to plan Accent
69.
Mistakes in planning Ac Accent
cent Accent 6B were many and be began
gan began months ago.
Charles Shepherd, who
created the program and
led it through its first suc successful
cessful successful season, made one
of the earliest mistakes.
He used the Accent chair chairmanship
manship chairmanship to pay off a
political debt when he gave
it to Sigma Nu Commodore
Frank Gramling. The
Sigma Nus were Shepherds
strongest supporters.
Gramling, taking over

Silence From Tigert Hall

All is quiet on the Tigert
front. And it makes us
wonder.
A visiting law professor,
the guest of this univer university,
sity, university, has left the community
after being harassed and
threatened by unknown per persons.
sons. persons. J
News of the circum circumstances
stances circumstances surrounding Pro Professor
fessor Professor Spencer Boyers de departure
parture departure from here have
been widely disseminated,
casting a shadow on this
institutions reputation.

The Time For ActionNO\M

The end of Gainesvilles
11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew
is a sign that noW we,
the residents of this uni university
versity university community, can sit
down and iron out our dif differences.*
ferences.* differences.*
We must not allow the
calm which has settled on
our city to deceive us.
Gainesville is still a city
in trouble because our
problems have not been
solved* True, the troops
are gone from the streets,
our civil liberties have
been returned to us during
the morning hours and

from there, must claim
credit for the errors of
his committed.
The committee never
really got to work lentil
the fall. Whatever pre preliminary
liminary preliminary planning took
place, few prominent
speakers were contacted
soon enough to allow them
to arrange their schedules
to include Accent.
Accent 6B relied en entirely
tirely entirely too much upon per personal
sonal personal contact to get
speakers. Shepherd, de despite
spite despite his reputation for po political
litical political prowess, was not
above hiring a name
speaker to beef up his pro program
gram program whenever it was lag lagging.
ging. lagging.
We can only hope that
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor will lead the
program out of doldrums
it seems to be in by ap appointing
pointing appointing an energetic,
capable chairman who will
avoid this years pit falls.

We deplore Professor
Boyers departure and the
circumstances surround surrounding
ing surrounding it, and we would like
to believe Tigert Hall
shares our concern.
But Tigert Hall, usually
prompt to clarify any situ situation
ation situation tarnishing the univer universitys
sitys universitys reputation, remains
strangely quiet.
And we can only wait,
wonder and hope the powers
that be issue a statement
on the professors sudden
departure.

things seem improved.
But, the problems which
caused the violence in our
streets remain.
Now, not later, is the
time for us to provide our
Negro citizens with better
jobs, better schools, a rec recreation
reation recreation center, the paved
streets they so much want
and a re-habilitation pro program
gram program for their homes.
We must not delay. We
must act. It is up to all
of us, individually and col collectively,
lectively, collectively, to move on the
problems immediately.

, j j|| .'
At hMkhh . j,,.|
';§§^^^HHEKjfw v| m W
Bfii:.-Tk l v \ jH| rW 11 In Ifi lIMJMIW1 I MJMIW
|E?- : J?'- .-
Jfjsip':' i V), C V\. J ; yffirairfll&i faff MKw- 1
MV PJ \VW*JT .'V. (^&HCJy If fr m'SaarfHy itt > millL'
'SKHHH vft, Pi vVc/Im
; iMMafe 1 ,- 3gl £ -V, \ \MRk I J& Vis A: SE
*p-| f&M
fcv 4c
3l f
, o* '
I
HAPPENING TO MY COUNTRY?"

EDITORS NOTEBOOK : : : :^
Doctor Jones aQ|
Deserves Tenure fey

Marshall Jones' speech Sunday calling
Gainesville a racist town and urging both
Negroes and white alike to join him in
blocking a busy intersection has not helped
the psychologist's fight for tenure.
A number of professors who have tacitly
backed Jones in his attempts at gaining
tenure have recently condemned Jones'
action. Also a high source in the admin administration
istration administration told this editor that because of
Jones' recent involvement with the civil
rights movement in Gainesville his
chances of being granted tenure are near
the zero mark.
Granted Marshall Jones fiery speech,
which disrupted an otherwise peaceful
memorial march, was uncalled for. How However,
ever, However, the fact still remains that a UF
professor should be able to separate his
private life from that of the university.
UF Vice-President Frederick Conner has
explained Jones tenure denial stemmed
from remarks advocating student rebellion.
The speech which didnt outline any specific
proposal most certainly hasn't caused stu students
dents students around the nation to revolt.
It instead has caused many people to think
and wonder about the role of student power
on campuses.
Professor Jones, while being a self
appointed activist, is truly a fine teacher.
His writings and teachings have gained him
nationwide acclaim from many of the most
respected psychologists in the world.
But according to the UF, Marshall Jones
is unfit to teach because of his political
beliefs.
During the past few months I have been

DAVE DOUCETTE
Assistant News Editor
JERRY SILBERBERG
Campus Living Editor


Alligator Staff

BY STEVE HULL

able to talk to many people concerning
what occurred during the personnel board
meeting last year in which Jones was denied
tenu-e.
According to reliable sources, no one
on the personnel board questioned Jones'
ability to teach or his character as a man.
What was instead questioned was Marshall
Jones political beliefs.
I have been told, that a red-faced J.
Wayne Reitz told the board that if Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Jones is granted tenure the University
of Florida will be no different than a
revolutionary Latin American campus
where rebellion runs rampant.
Reitz emotional speech reportedly
swayed two members of the board to switch
their votes and consequently Jones was
denied tenure by a 5 to 3 count.
Minutes of that now infamous board
meeting have been kept secret and will
probably continue to be.
The time has come for members of the
administration, the Faculty Senate's Com Committee
mittee Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure
and the Board of Regents to re-evaluate
their views on Jones and grant the pro professor
fessor professor tenure.
The Jones tenure case has already tar tarnished
nished tarnished the heralded image of the UF which
university officials have tried so hard in
protecting when they denied tenure.
Its time UF professors have the right
to express their views without fearjjf re repercussions
percussions repercussions from the administration. And
the only way to assure this freedom of
action is to grant Marshall Jones tenure.

GLENN FAKE
Editorial Assistant
JOE TORCHIA
Entertainment Editor



THE AMERICAN DREAM

Gainesville
Nocturne

Walking home tonight, your racially integrated reporter is wondering
11 someone In a car might not slow down and shoot him in the head
and at the same time, why such things have to be.

Obviously whether or not things
have to be this way is a dead
question since they indisputably
are this way right now and may
continue to be for some time.
There are National Guards Guardsmen
men Guardsmen and police on nearly every
other corner tonight. This Is no
great comfort when you consider
that they have loaded guns too
and seem somewhat nervous.
White Is white and black is
black White Black Militant
Carol Thomas notwithstanding.
This close to a race war, we
find our uniforms a little hard
to discard.
An old Black farmer in baggy
is walking across the
street just ahead of me. From the
shadows emerge four National
Guardsmen and a deputy sheriff.
The farmer sees them, hesitates,
too late, keeps on walking. He
is facing a semicircle of white
faces. The Guardsmen have bay bayonets
onets bayonets on their rifles. They are
asking him questions. Five, ten,
fifteen minutes pass. Still talking.
He's pointing toward the Black
ghetto probably toward his
home.
Poor is poor but middle class
Is middle class. What might have
happened if the government had
paid as much attention to housing
as they have to highway con construction.
struction. construction.
The story goes that when the
Cossacks were about to sack
Moscow, the Czar invited them
to the palace. He gave them com comfortable
fortable comfortable beds and good food. They
stayed to become his private
army.
"I'd hate to be a Negro, a
cop, or a store owner tonight,"
I say to a friend. "How would
you like to be a Negro cop who
owns a store?" she replies.
Martin Luther King Is dead
tonight. Medgar Evers is dead.
James Reeb Is dead. Other
Negro leaders are dead. We call
them Negro leaders now. They
used to be called "uppity
niggers."
How many "uppity niggers"
have been killed in the last four
hundred years? How many times
has a Black woman waited up
all night for her man to come
home, wondering if he had dared
to sass a White man, look too
hard at a White woman; if he
were hanging from a tree, face
down in a swamp.
White students are gathered
around two parked highway patrol
cars. They seem excited, en enthusiastic.
thusiastic. enthusiastic. Something Is finally
happening in Gainesville.
It's three-thrity a.m. A lot of
people will be staying up all
night tonight. Some angry, some
excited, some worried, some
scared. -j
I doze off from time to time,
waiting for the morning paper.
Gator Button
a POWER \

BY UNCLE JAVERNECK

Jones Had A
Small Role In
King Service
MR. EDITOR:
The April 8 Alligator's
emphasis on the participation of
Dr. Marshall Jones In last Sun Sunday's
day's Sunday's memorial service for Dr.
Martin Luther King is vastly
out of proportion to the role he
played. Several hundred people,
including my wife and myself,
went to the little church In which
the service for Dr. King was held.
With one exception, the speakers
were quiet, their manner re restrained,
strained, restrained, as each attempted to
express his personal sadness
and that of those who sat and
shared the communion of people,
both black and white, of good
will.
Following that service, many
then walked in an orderly fashion
to the courthouse, where the ser services
vices services were concluded. After the
service, Dr. Jones spoke, with
the obvious disapproval of the
ministers there and the great
majority of the audience.
I believe that the mass media
often help to create badly dis distorted
torted distorted perspectives for the vast
majority of people who obtain
their information (on which they
form opinions) only by these
means. If a race war develops
in Gainesville, It may well be
in part caused by those who have
been frightened and confused by
what they are told.
The Alligator's emphasis on
Dr. Jones and his small band of
protestors rather than on the
memorial services is re regrettable.
grettable. regrettable. I hope this letter will
not be construed as anti-Jones
or anti-demonstrations, but
rather pro-responsible jour journalism.
nalism. journalism.
JAMES W. BUCHANAN, 7AS

Today is trivia day. All sorts of weird
questions for all sorts of weird people.
Here we go.
(1) Name the five Great Lakes.
(2) What is meant by the latus rectum of
a parabola? (no funny answers, please)
(3) Who said, "Let them eat cake"?
(4) Who wrote "Peter Pan"?
(5) What is the poisonous element in
parts green? (Variation: what is parts
green?) (Variation; Is Paris Green?) (Ugh)
(6) What was Houdlni's real name?
C7) An easy one for those who aren't
doing too well: What is Governor Kirk's
position? (No funny answers, please.)
(8) (15) TRUE or FALSE?
(8) Mother Goose was an imaginary
character.
(9) A cork ball 6 feet in diameter weighs

OPEN FORUM:
Adoiami ViA&Mt
< - i
"There is no hope for the complacent man,

ALLIGATOR BRAINOSITIES
By LEWIS ROTHLEIN

Jones Isnt Rational

MR. EDITOR:
In the April 9 edition erf the
Alligator, Marshall Jones was
quoted as saying that the de deployment
ployment deployment of heavily armed troops
in Gainesville would be a sure
way of provoking a riot. Cer Certainly,
tainly, Certainly, Jones has been keeping
up with the latest events. Sure,
the deployment of troops led to
rioting in Memphis, Chicago, De Detroit,

Professors Departure
Shows Need To Reflect

I address this letter to the students, faculty,
and administration of the University of Florida:
Monday night In the law school there was a
significant meeting of concerned students and
faculty who assembled to discuss the departure
from the university by Spencer Boyer, the Negro
professor In the college of law.
Threats to his life and to the lives of his
family were made to him by a phone call Im Immediately
mediately Immediately after his discovery of the shocking
news of Rev. Martin Luther King's assassin-
Now Maybe People
Will Do Something
MR. EDITOR:
I am sick about Dr. King's death, first that
a great man was killed, and second that Is is
our guilt and responsibility that he died. I
despair of my idealistic, seemingly naive no notions,
tions, notions, about the American Ideals of equality,
peace, and reason. My disillusionment on hear hearing
ing hearing of this senseless violence came hard upon
my disillusionment and surprise that men in
high political office in this state voted against
open housing and reacted in a negative way to
the report of the National Advisory Commission
on Civil Disorders.
If we cannot recognize our sin of racism and
inhumanity then we can't begin to take positive
action toward the positive goals of open housing,
equality of opportunity and education, and the
eradication of extreme poverty.
Here in Gainesville I know of children having
to eat out of garbage cans and of Negro workers
being exploited. I can't believe that we have
reacted to this crisis of our own making by
sending more police in to quell riots how
blind can we be?
I pray that this great man's death will wake
people from their non-involvement to do some something
thing something in the name of common decency and human
dignity.
CLYTIE COLEMAN
CLASS OF *64

more than 1,000 pounds.
(10) Betsy Ross made the first American
flag.
(11) Only femalemosqultoesbite.
day that came after Sept. 2,1752
was &ept. 14, 1752.
(13) The smallest state west of the
Mississippi is lowa.
(14) The largest state east of the
Mississippi is Georgia.
(15) Reno, Nevada is farther west than
Los Angeles, California.
Answers to yesterday's Mrs. Adams
bought the book; Mrs. Baker, the dress;
Mrs. Catt, the handbag; Mrs. Dodge, the
necktie; Mrs. Ennis, the lamp; Mrs. Larson,
the hat.
(Note to roosters: if at first you don*t
succeed, try, try, a hen.)

Thursday, April 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

troit, Detroit, and other cities. I think
if Jones knew the facts he would
see that the rioting led to the
troops. Hopefully, Jones will note
that even though troops are in
Gainesville, there has not been
a riot yet.
i
Jones was also quoted as say saying
ing saying the inaction of the other 800
people at the rally caused the
unrest that led to the deploy-

atlon. ms state of grief, Isolation, and fear
are impossible to imagine.
Our disgust with the regrettable threats and
our sadness at what Professor Boyer has had
to endure were poignantly expressed by Pro Professors
fessors Professors Berry and Flackett, of the law school.
The group of about three hundred approved the
Idea of sending a letter to Professor Boyer
expressing the sentiments of the students and
faculty. Individuals were also encouraged to
send letters telling of their own personal feel feelings.
ings. feelings.
v It is doubtful that Boyer will return, but as
Professor Flackett pointed out, there is a deep
need to explore collective conscience by some
manifestation of our feelings on the events
causing Professor Boyers departure, as well
as the racial situation In general at the univer university.
sity. university.
Civil liberties, freedom, equality of all men
are causes worthy of enlisting the most sincere
and dedicated proponents. But for us who were
fortunate enough to have been born White in the
White World, the terms freedom and equality
are almost meaningless because we have not
had to do without them. We have not had to
identify these abstract ideals in some mean meaningful,
ingful, meaningful, concrete way, to relate to us as in individuals.
dividuals. individuals. 1
I personally find the tragic barriers between
the races the more immediate and crucial prob problem
lem problem for us to solve than the distant threats
of communist expansion. If we solve our prob problems
lems problems within this country, the threat from out outside
side outside forces will not be nearly so great. And
we can not be an effective symbol of democracy
around the world until we first achieve the
principles of freedom In country.
I do not agree that Professor Boyers leav leaving
ing leaving has set the university back five to ten years
as some have suggested. I feel rather, after
having observed the enthusiasm and sincere
quality of a growing number of concerned stu students
dents students and faculty, that the departure will act as
a catalyst to speed up this universitys attempts
to achieve a student body and facylty which
is truly racially representative.
We should profit from this unfortunate ex experience
perience experience and realize the greatest need now is
for communication. Communication among our ourselves
selves ourselves as Whites yes, but particularly com communication
munication communication with the Negro himself. The most
effective way we could have prevented Professor r
Boyers leaving would have been to successfully
convey our feelings to him, to make him feel
we are trying to overcome prejudices and show
that we reject discrimination. But we failed to
convey those feelings and to show any such
intent. $
Granted we must try to establish programs
to effect change, but we must not think in terms
of how many of Them We can get to come
and teach or learn. We must include Them.
Together we should plan not in terms ofVhat
Whites can do for Blacks but rather in absolute
terms of what must be done. Instead of having
White administrators, faculty, and students be bestowing
stowing bestowing conscience-gratifying benefits upon the
Negro, the effort should be bi-radal even from
the planning stage. Whites do not have the right
to take credit for what is being done to help
the Negro. They have rather their failures to
regret an from which they must learn.
FRASER HIMES, ILAW

ment of the national guard. Very
logical, Dr. Jones. Because 800
more people didnt join you, the
national guard had to be called
in.
Os all the quotes in the Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, I believe Dr. Scudder hit
the nail on the head. He said,
I think Jones has lost his mind.
CHARLES E. MITCHELL,3A3
Say What?
MR. EDITOR:
I know what you have done,
watch your step there may never
be a next time.
NAME WITHHELD

Page 7



it i pH I ormtnfs
k J r j m ik7(OMF4 f
- Con ""* KT 1 ~ GRADE "V' FRESH FLA. ALL WHITE MEDIUM
Mfe; Medium Eggs 2 79
Quorta DEEP SOUTH . ] $5.00 Food Qj
uul MAYONNAISE 39
50 FAVORITES
'W&ijt S£ ndw ich Cookies 3/sl.
... IP Cake Mixes 4/sl.
IMa Sweet Potatoes 4/Sl.
Can STOKEIY W W J W | 0
Cut Green Beans s/ IHH|Hi Tomatoes 6/Sl
Mushrooms A/ No. Can ASTOR FRUIT ****# | £
Fruit Cocktail 4/Sl
Tissue...... 2/39* ... -!*"*
Arrow Foil c BRKRIIIIH * £
SL rOW ron 43 lM'i¥iiifHp-|ife Razor Blades.... 99'
Charcoal.. 20 89 c mUJLU& Tooth Paste 58'
SWIFTS LUNCHEON MEAT DIXIE DARLING W
Prem 2/89 c I
Cracker Jaclot 14 'fHP 2/49'
S K6r bJ-y B EliJ?!- Angel Food Ca ke.29'
i I |



' %
*i
SUNNYLAND Half or Whole SMOKED MM
I I :| [llif E
I :lUl>l TOPVALUI STAMPS ;
n#llllH inll ssrac **
lUllllv |H
-KtTwTmtiniiiiiiu.uir!
W
* JK CHOICE LAMB
cannTd o biscuTts OT I _2/35c Ijljiflp LB qoc
AMERICAN CHEESE-_ 35c .llUs ROAST 59
cheese _ 7sc SHLDER CHOPS 69 c
cottage cheese S 9c LAMB PATTIES 39
DAISY CHEDDAR CHEESE I AMD BDCACT .. IQc
ALL FLAVORS DIPS ,t_ _.__ 49c LAIVItS BKtAd I 19
CH| P pp T ED O RFFr H>TURKEV COI,NEDBEEF * ~, USOA CHOICE W D ,RAND >*< > " CUT BONELESS quantity rights reservedprices good thru ahul m
2 lb*. SUNNYLAND 4 w.hn.diki. woo. ,Nc.-Oorri.HT-iM^^
s ,^ t .! i ;: £ Round Steak 99 c
.1 -lb. Pkf. RATH BLACK HAWK
SLICED BACON _V 69 e uspa grade A" fresh frozen boneless jennie-o
FRANKS __. 69 c $I 99
FRESHMRK ROAST 49c | ||l ICGV KOSSi .. 3^ B 1
PORK ROAST ia 59c U.S.D.A CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED BEEF BONELESS BOTTOM W-D BRAND BEEF
4 Vi-or. Pk* PLUMROSE :1..39 Round Roast c Plate Stew 29 c
COOKED HAM 59c U.S.D.A. CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED BEEF SIRLOIN W-D BRAND GROUND CHUCK OR ALL MEAT
BESSES Tip Roast.. 99< Beef Stew.:~*l"
FISH STICKS 99c W-D BRAND CORN FED BEEF LEAN W-D BRAND LEAN
whTtTng of.sh 0 f.sh __B9c Short Ribs.49 c Gr. Beef ...s^*l"
Fla. Fresh Strawberries.... 3 *1
BAKERS 10- 59' LEMONS 49'
CELERY. 2/39' POTATOES.. 10 49' M1 iflih
young. TENDER SPEARS CELLO BAGS FRESH
ASPARAGUS .-29' CARROTS. .. 2 -29'
FANCY. GOLDEN BANTAM
ENDIVE -9' HB.
M k M SWISS STEAK. CHOPPED SIRLOIN
MMfla meat DINNERS .. 59c
WTTJIKk STRAWBERRIES. 4/sl.
liiiiloftraiS potatoes 3/si.
GREEN PEAS. .
CREAM CORN . 5/sl.
astor or peas &
Half Cation SUPERBRAND SHERBET or PADDOTC C/d
a JBM jb |%pi m jb a vMitnU I 9 v/4lli
1 ET f>DCAU Cue
bntMm... 0 U MARGARINE... lb. 39c |
j #l7 Tl J n ** # as rKa #0"
I t II TM J t n U AW>I L ** | 9000 THRU APRIL 14 I

I Fo r Croorf Things To fat jSs|



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
> i ...>
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy SeH
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340.
(A-106-ts-p)
e
MO3ILE HOME 8 x 42 $1650,
1960 Sprite $650., Zenith Portable
Stereo S7O. Phone 3784146.
(Allostp)
64 HONDA; 305 cc Modified
"Dream". $250.00, with helment call
372 9454 after 3 p.m.
(All3tp)
-I, -1 i'
1967 660 cc. Triumph Excellent
condition, 2,100 miles. Extra
Handlebars, Helmet, Make offer.
SmithCorona Standard Typewriter.
Call Hank 372-6939.
(All33tp)
FOR SALE: Harley Davidson M-50,
50cc, $125.00, excellent condition, 8
months old. TV Antenna and 40'
mast, S4O. 8 months old, also
excellent condition. PH 3784881.
(Allostp)
1968 HONDA 90 Scrambler
perfect condition sharp looking
cycle. Tool Kit included. $350.00.
Call 372-9145. Ask for Mark.
(A-111-st-pl
SUZUKI 50. Have car and must sell.
SIOO or best reasonable offer. Call
378-3231 or 378-3609 Helmet
included: (A-112-3t-p)
65cc HONDA MECHANIC'
REPLACE 2ND GEAR. WILL PAY
LABOR PLUS PARTS. LABOR
OPEN TO NEGOTIATION. DON
KOZICH 378-1863. SUZUKI: Bearcat 1967 120 cc. Trail
and road bike. Includes dual sprocket
and many extras. Only 350 miles. Car
Carrier included. S3OO. Call
'762797. (Allostp)
FOR SALE Console stereo.
Garrard changer Grommes
amplifier Altec Speakers. In
beautiful Walnut cabinet. Top
condition. SIOO. Call 3785129.
(All3stp)
G.P. RACING leather suit, 1966
Honda CB. 450 Chrome Fender. Run
Dumb good. See Shosei at Robbies
Billiards. (A-113-2t-p)
REFRIGERATOR for sale, Norcold,
3% Cu. Ft. Perfect for Dorm or Frat
room almost new, $40.00 Phone
376 4044, Ask for Dave.
(All33tp)
CP EN
1 Aw"llil> RTOISI
[FEATURE AT 7:20 & 10:45
I Pjjjjuttjmm
I PLUS AT 9:00
I pug /Nancy
| *Nobo 1
I PetfeSt- I

v LAST DAY
iH Warner Brothers Presents
DAY Vp

A.
y,... ~ ~ t
ft" -. .y.v.vv.v.VAv
I FOR SALE
LAROUSSE ENCYCLOPEDIA of
Art, 4 Vols., originally SBO.OO, Now
$35.00 set or SIO.OO each.
(All33tp) n,
8' x 27' 1966 PATHFINDER
TRAILER Suitable for single
student or couple. Call 3763915
between 4:30 and 8 p.m.
(All3stp)
SW: ARCHITECTURALLY
DESIGNED HOME, central heat and
air with large family room two large
bedrooms, two full baths, built-in
kitchen and carport. SI,OOO down,
$125.00 per month. No qualifying.
372-0328, S.W. 10th St.
(All3stp)
FOR SALE: Classical Guitar, like
new. Call 376-3429 (Rick) after
6:00 p.m. (A-113-4t-p)
CLASSICAL GUITAR $25.00.
Portable VO A stereo, 47.00.
Portable TV and Stand $60.00, 2
rugs $15.00, Portable short wave
radio $15.00. 378-3820.
(All33tp)
ROBERTS TAPE RECORDER,
Stereo Model 1630; New Condition;
two dynamic mikes; Philmore bulk
tape eraser; $300.00 value $150.00
cash. Call Bill Massey 378-7783.
(All3stp)
1963 VESPA 125 cc with helmet.
Runs good, $75.00. 376-0181,7:00
8:00 p.m. (A-113-3t-P>
MOBILE HOME for sale, 10' xs6'
carpeting and kitchen appliances
otherwise unfurnished. Central air
conditioning and heating. Excellent
condition, pick up payments of SIOO
per month for 30 months. Call
378-2747. (A-114-2t-c)
SAVE Big! Do your own rug and*
upholstrery cleaning with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(All42tp)
1965 YAMAHA 125 cc in excellent
condition, Manual, tool kit and
helmet included. $225. or best offer.
FR60476 after 5. (A-114-3t-p)
.
~v' 'a :
I THE SILENCE
PORNOGRAPHY OR
MASTERPIECE?
There is no doubt that this
film contains more overt
sexuality than we have
sen on screen. The fascin fascinating
ating fascinating question is, however,
how much of it is communi communicated
cated communicated to the viewer and how
much of it offends. Cer Certainly
tainly Certainly the prudish and even
the modest may be repelled I
by the several scenes of 1
sexual gratification in which (
the two sisters indulge, but 1
even they would be hard I
put to argue that these ex- \
emplify gratuitous eroti- I
cism on Bergmans part or I
are irrelevant to the prob- I
ing character studies he has I
set for himself. 1
Judith Crist I
Nw Yurt Herald Tribune 1
THRU SAT \
SUITE
35*7*9 out j0?35 (

), Tbe Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

Page 10

FOR SALE I
y
1966 SUZUKI, 50cc recently tuned
$120.00. Smith Corona electric
pdrtable, one year old $50.00 please
contact Joe at 3784707, 929 S.W.
13th Street. (All4stp)
______________
TWO CUTE, friendly, 4 month
halfCoberman Puppies. Distemper,
shots, wormed. Male and Female.
20.00 each. Call 378-8687 after 6.
(All4stp)
1967 YAMAHA 250 cc, candy apple
red with chrome trim, low mileage,,
well cared for. Call 3787903 after
5:00 (All46tp) .
- - & 'i _
1966 YAMAHA YMI -305 cc runs
perfect, looks like new $475.00 or'
bedt offer. Call 378-3653"
(All42tp) ?
FOR SALE: 1963 VW, Runs good,
recent tuneup; kept up well, Asking
$7 25. C all 372-6484.
(All43tp)

REITZ UNION THEATRE
T Is the key to his secret locked in his
mind...or in her arms?
Easter Speda/ I 1 GREGORY
111 fiJE PECK
Da
SaRD BURTON ||f|^B^gfjPKE
FRDAY 700, 4 lowa. h Pf!E* SIOW BetW h IWAHI EMYIRU PntaiA Ti HARDY AIILER I UNIVERSAL PICTURE I
9:30 PM. SATURDAY, APRIL 13 7:00,9:15
f Pewefowe GolwesvlWe | MBMHNNRHRiHH
1.. ONE OF THE YE A*SIOBEST!":^-
l mf
* KylvE
BS
At a* a 1 Jtt JtJah av. mn ABp : v.l V.Dk'l K t .rs/'-.-ff- y VX
I tecklef dkeir Twh I
JiiLj i wm
L- Endslonight I CO starring CLAUDINE LONGET i
Gi|k "BLACKBEARD'S GHOST" A JJjcJEMyj|§§§
COLOR by DeLuxe MNAVISION

|T roRREW |
, KWWWXWS W W : X< X*K
SUBLEASE SUMMER: Upstairs
two-bedroom "Sin City" Village
Park Apt. Great condition.
Excellent parking. Call 3787265
NOW. (Bll3stp)
THE ONLY PLACE TO LIVE THIS
SUMMER VILLAGE PARK:
upstairs, end apt. one bedroom, pool,
Ac, close to UF sublease for
summer, contract available for fall.
Call after 7:00 p.m. 378-6265 ready
for immediate occupancy/
(Bll33tp)

1 n ACADEMY AWARD
MS-IU NOMINATIONSx
l wsTe-awj Spencer. Sidney i Katharine
JZ. v TRACY 1 POITIER 1 HEPBURN
Si guess who's
com n <^nner

Use our handy
mail ?n order
form.

FOR RENT
>: ¥
SPACIOUS one bedroom Apt., wood
panelled, private patio. Available
immediately. Village 34 Apt. 22 Rent
$105.00 per month 376-6600.
(Bll32t p) v
SUB LEASE Merge attractive
onebedroom apartment summer
quarter patio, kitchen, AC, wood
paneled, walking distance to golf
course and shopping plaza. $105.00
per month. Village 34 Apartments.
Call 378-8561. (B-113-3t-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
'£.,v.ssy:v:*;*;yx<*x\<*x*x-x*:*x-x-x : ;
THREE BEDROOM unfurnished
house on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student only. $66.00 per month for
long term tenant. Water furnished.
Phone 372-9903 (B-113-st-p)
. 153335 NW sth Ave. 1 bedroom
' apt. furnished and air conditioned. 5
blocks from campus, available
immediately. Call 376-8475 or
376-1065. (B-107-st-p)
SUBLEASE FURNISHED Apt.
Modem Air contioned, TV Cable,
quiet. Available July 1. Prefer
married or graduate students. Village
34, Apt. 15, $lO5 per month.
376-6777. (B-114-st-P)
TWO BEDROOM apartment just one
block from campus. Air Conditioned,
nicely furnished. Available May 1.
Call 378-3060. (B-114-3t-p)
,!
I WANTED
V
WX*X*X*XX*!i X X*X*X X*>XX*!?XrWX*XXX
MALE roommate wanted!
Williamsburg apt. ACCH, pool,
cable TV. Full kitchen. One bedroom
with 2 double beds, carpeted.
Moveinimmediately. $67.50 per
mo'nth. Call 378 8338.
(Cllostp)
NEED roommate to share large,
two-bad room. Air Conditioned
attractive apartment 10 minutes from
campus. $52.50 utilities included.
Jim 372-1574. (C-111-st-p)
COOPERATIVE LIVING, one block
off campus. SIBO.OO per quarter for
room and 3 meals per day. A truly
independent organization (for men
only). Openings now for Spring,
Summer, and Fall. Apply to
Collegiate Living Organization. 117
NW 15th St. or call secretary at
376-9420. (Clo9lotp)
FURNISHED 1 bedroom apt.
Available immediately near campus,
$62.50 per month, water furnished.
Phone 372-8819. (B-2t-114-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE for
Landmark Apt. Preferably fall and
winter quarters 196869. Can
arrange for Apt. Spring quarter. Call
372-6198 or 378-8563.
(Cll4stp)
LIVE FREE AT VILLAGE PARK
Male roommate wanted throutfi
August. Move in immediately pay no
rent until May. Call 3769017.
(Cll 4 lOtp)
MALE roommate to share 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 others. Immediate
occupancy. No lease. All utilities
paid. $50.00 per month per person.
Directly above Gator Groomer. Come
by and see any time after 3:30 p.m.
(C-1135tp)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted, 1967
12' x 60' Mobile home, utilities
included, $45.00 per month. Call
372-5640, Calvin Martin.
(Cll33tp)
ROOMMATE wanted immediately at
Williamsburg Townhouse Apt.
Luxury living. Call Mary at
372-6978, 2000 S.W. 16th St.
(Cllstp)
MALE roommate to share centrally
air conditioned house with Ist year
medical student. Own bedroom with
double bed, own study. 5 minutes
walk to medical center. Call
3788620. $50.00 per month and
utilities. (C-110-st-p)
NEED 1 roommate. Immediate
occupancy. Central Air Conditioning
and pool. Fully carpeted,
$38.25/month. No lease. Across from
Med. Center. Call 378-8806.
(Cll23tp)
:*x*x*x cx-:-x-x-vxviv; :*x-x-x*: x x*x x*x*j;
HELP WANTED
V ........
WWWW'NNV.v.v.v.v
WAITRESSES: Must be 21, Part time
and full time drift available, evenings
only. Apply Gino's Italian Restaurant
Experience helpful but not
necessary. 376-1322, 2204 SW 13th
St. (Ell2tfc)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN tor tne
Florida Alligator. Must have car and
be available for summer term. Good
pay, good working conditions, great
experience. Ad majors preferred.
Apply room 330 Reitz Union.
(Elo6nctf)
STUDENT ASSISTANT, 11:46 a.m.~
to 1:45 p.m. .Monday through
Friday, $1.26/hour plus free hmch.
Call Mrs." Avery, .ext. 5771
Ell3-ltc)


Thursday, April 11, 196fc> The Florida Alligator,

| HELP WANTED §
:^XSX :-X-X*X-X*X-WiVX*X*X-X<-MMs;t
FEMALE curb Hostess Night shift
- 6 days a week Jerrys Restaurant
South- SW 13th St. (Elllst4)
MALE curb Boy Night shift 6
days a week Jerrys Restaurant
South, SW 13th St. (Elllstc)
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, Rank
111 or better, sday a week, top
salary beginning May 1. Phone
376-2563. (E-114-3t-p)
COUNSELORS wanted (male and
female) at Camp Oquago in Catskill
Mts. Openings: Swimming, Tennis
Fencing, Guitar, and general
counselors. 372 9l 08.
(Ell4ltp)
AUTOS
1956 FORD. New battery, new brake
job, new starter good tires, good
engine, recently tuned. Dependable
transportation. $lB5. or best offer.
Call Don 378-8640. (G-112-st-p)
STINGRAY OONVERTiI LE, 1965,
Both tops. Power steering, windows,
brakes, antenna, AM/FM Radio, air,
4speed. Excellent condition. Must
5e11,52,900. or Best offer See at Arts
Shell Station or Call 3785443
anytime, leave message
(Gll4stp)
ALPINE CONVERTABLE Series 111
new top. Tonneau, premium tires,
radio, runs good, must sell $600.00
or best offer. 3785443 anytime
leave message. (Gll4stp)
1957 TR3. Needs work, but runs
(backwards and forwards.) SIOO.OO
or best offer. Call 3764969.
(Gll3stp)
GROOVY 1949 Volkswagen, a rare
classic, completely restored must see
to believe. $700.00, Gary Howell,
378-3215. (Gll32tp)
FORD CORTINA. 1964 White, good
shape. Welded trailer or boat hitch,
heater, very economical. $650. or
Best offer. 378-3820.
(Gll33tp)
VOLKSWAGEN 1966. Immaculate
inside and out, 13,000 miles. Never a
major repair. Ski Racks included.
$1,350, or best offer. 378-3820.
(Gll33tp)
LEAVING town. Must sell. 63
Bonneville convertible. Power
steering, power brakes, four on floor.
Excellent condition. Call 3783686
or Santa Fe Junior College Library.
378-5311. (Glo6Btp)
CREAMPUFF. 1962 Buick Electra
225 Convertible. White, pink leather
interior, auto, trans. R & H, Full
power No Air. One owner. Excel.
Cond. $995 firm. 376-2771 after 6
p.m. and weekends. (Gllostp)

APPLICATIONS
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN FOR
EDITOR, SEMINOLE >
MANAGING EDITOR, SEMINOLE
For 1969 Yearbook
. ~ :-y ------- - : -it:..!1..-:,, .. ~ ~
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
For Term IV, 1968
AND
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
* i
For Terms I, 11, & 111, 1968-69
' APPLICATIONS MAY BE PICKED UP IN RM. #330, REITZ UNION

;?ws*cwxx^x-ss%x:*x-x*x-x-x.x-v; : :
I AUTOS I
Sw;^x.:.:W->xw:-x-:.x.:x-: x-:x-:-:-: ::v:-
VB FORD, 1953, Standard Shift,
good tires, heater, $85.00. Call
378-6231, or see at 722 SE sth Ave. <
(Gll2stp)
66 MUSTANG GT, radio, heater.
Warranty, 225 HP, first reasonable
offer, 372-7140; 500 mm f/8 mirror
reflex lens, sharp! 3761258.
(Gll42tp)
1964 Chevrolet Impala Convertable,
Excellent condition, white,
automatic transmission from visiting
professor who left U.S.A. Best offer.
Call 372-0143. (G-114-st-p)
1964 TR4?New rugs, uphostery,
excellent mechanical condition,
body, paint in very good shape;
asking $1,050. 378-6395.
(Gll4lOtp)
FOR SALE: Porsche 1961.
372-0888. (Gllostp)
CAR COLLECTOR selling 1940
Ford Sedan in beautiful original
condition, $835. Invested best
reasonable offer. Days 3764512,
Nights 376-0201. (G-110-st-c)
f SERVICES |
TENNIS RACKET RESTRINGING,
satisfaction guaranteed. Free Pick up
end delivery on and near campus.
Call M and R Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-104-18t-p)
ALTERNATORS-GENERATORS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS
STARTERS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
- 603 SE Second Street. 378-7330.
(Mloltfc)
INCOME TAX RETURNS... $4.00
- up. SPECIAL rates for Univ.
Students, Faculty and employees. At
Rebel Discount, 1227 W. Univ. Ave.
3767430,. 378-6127, across from
Wolfies. (MlollStp)
GERMAN LESSONS and/or
tutoring. Graduate *PHD' Language
exam or Undergraduate levels. Tel.
376-7964 after 5 p.m.
(Mlll4tp)
. ....V, .%v.v.v.v.v.v^v.v.w.y.v.sx.w!'!;<
y
PERSONAL
y V
s.y.viv : x x.x.x-x*ss*x x*x x*xx*s x*x xw!
T-OPERATOR from ghetto: It is
Really I! I must Know! You have the
ANSWERS. Pleeeze! Box 20-0146,
UF Campus Friday Nite's GDI.
(Jll33tp)
IS YOUR WIFE working to put you
through school? Give her a dignified
Bxlo CERTIFICATE OF
ACHIEVEMENT on parchment-like
paper which honors her contrbution.
Only $2.25. Wilset Co. Route 2,
Concord, N. H. 03301.
(Jlo6lOtp)

Page 11

I PERSONAL
!'t v
AM LOOKING for a blonde junior
(Female) who used to be in my Ist
quarter physical science class, sth
period (M. T. Th) (Teacher Mr.
Wilson). Chuck, 3729495.
(113-J-p)
WANTED: one female student under
20 years old who is shy, lonely,
quiet, shorter than 5' 4",
independent, interested in rediculous
paintings, and would like to be
friends to a male with similar
characteristics. Call Mark, 3769578.
(Jll33tP)
COMPLETE set 4 Woods, 10 Irons,
Macgregor Tourney Pro Golf Clubs in
good condition. Just over $7.00 each
at SIOO.OO. Call John Baldwin at
376-5757 or 376-4201.
(J-1115tc)
IS YOUR LITTLE GIRL going to be
May Queen for 1968? If you are a
student, staff or faculty member,
with a daughter between the age of 5
and 10. Submit one snapshot to
room 310 J. Wayne Reitz Union by
April 22. (Jll44tc)
SPORTS CAR ENTHUSIASTS
Don't miss North Florida's sports car
racing classic the eighth annual
GOLDEN CROWN PRIX, April
2021 at Fernandina Beach
Municipal Airport. Over 100 of the
Southeast's finest drivers and hottest
machines competing for SCCA
National Championship points. Just
30 miles north of Jacksonville. Great
for a weekender. Free camping at the
racecoune. Advance sale tickets at
Reitz Union Box Office $5.00
for weekend pass, or $3.50 for
Sunday, $2.50 for Saturday. FREE
infield passes. Check at box office for
group discount rates (15 or more).
(J-111-stb)
WALLET FINDER: Thanks for the
return of some of my I.D.'s I'd
appreciate your efforts if you could
return the wallet and the rest of the
contents Keep the Driver's Licence
and Draft cards I can replace them.
Thanks for your cooperation in the
matter. Andy (J~ll4-Itp)
WHO is the Tall Stranger who likes to
visit until 5 aim.. Likes bridge and
tall people and then disappears?
(Jll42tp)
f
/
BIKINI MATfe MISSING. Wild Pink
Print estranged from lower half in
vicinity of Women's Gym. Any
information as to whereabouts of
missing and/or abductor: 3788561.
(Lll23tp)
§ LOST i FOUND |
:.'>:*x*xx*>xx*vv.v.vvv.v. , : x :*:*:*: >:**.
FOUND . SIAMESE Cat found on
Campus call and Identify. 3765660
after 5. (Lll43tnc)

CAMPUS
EVENTS

By DAVID CHA FIN
Alligator Staff Writer

IN DOING ANYTHING FOR A
BUCK: "Hie Devil and Daniel
Webster/' the story of New Eng England
land England farmer who sold his soul
to the Devil, will be performed
in operatic form in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium at 8:15 tonight.
SPEAKING OF HELL: The Is Israelites
raelites Israelites give it to their unfriendly
neighbors in the movie "The
Six Day War," to be shown by
the Maccabee Student Organiza Organization
tion Organization in the Reitz Union auditorium
at 7:30 and 9 tonight.
AND NOT SPEAKING OF
HELL: The Unitarian Student
Forum has a luncheon at 11:30
a.m. today in room 150 F of
the union; the Baptist Student
Center (BSC) has a fellowship
supper at 5:30 p.m. at the BSC;
and the Christian Science Organi Organization
zation Organization has a testimony meeting at
7 p.m. (no place available).
IN THE BICEP BUILDERS: The
Student Association for Health,
Physical Education, and re recreation
creation recreation meets tonight in the
south end of Fla. Gym at 7:30.
Elizabeth Lessard will elaborate
on behind-the-scenes activities
in modern dance; and Joseph
Regna will speak on "Teaching
Gymnastics with Limited Fa Facilities
cilities Facilities and Equipmen."
IN BUILDERS OF ANOTHER
KIND: Tlie Student Contractors
and Builders Association meets
In room 347 of the union at 7:30 to tonight
night tonight to hear about "Man,
the Builder."
IN "DOCTOR, I DON'T KNOW
WHAT'S THE MATTER IT'S
JUST THAT WHEN I SLEEP
WITH MY TEDDY BEAR
THERES NO THRILL ANY ANYMORE":
MORE": ANYMORE": "Psycho-SociDepri "Psycho-SociDeprivatlon
vatlon "Psycho-SociDeprivatlon Among is
the topic of Emory U. psycholo psychologist
gist psychologist Boyd McCandless' sppeech
in Norman Hall Auditorium to tonight
night tonight at 8:30.
IN UF(E MIS MS): "Productivity
Trends and Changes in Economic
Aggregates and Structures Since
1948," (which is just a nice
way of saying "the rich get
rich and the poor get poorer,"
I guess) is the topic of a talk
by Dr. John W. Kendrick in room
18 of Matherly Hall at 3:30 p.m.
today.
IN SPOUTING OFF: The Gar Gargoyle
goyle Gargoyle Honor Society meets in
room 10-C of the Architecture
and Fine Arts building at 7 p.m.
tonight. (A gargoyle is an ornate
water spout on buildings' roofs.)
IN THE ORGANIZATION (WO)
MAN: The Woman's Student As Association
sociation Association and the Panhellenic
Council, two women student or organizations
ganizations organizations for organized women,
meet tonight. WSA meets in room
349 of the union at 7; Panhellenic
is in room 346 of the union,
also at 7.
AND SPEAKING OF GETTING
ORGANIZED: The Florida Cin Cinema
ema Cinema Society has an organizational
meeting in room 357 of the union
at 7:30 tonight.
IN BEING ALL KEYED UP:
Union rooms 361, 362, and 363
get that way at 7:30 tonight when
Florida Blue Key has a lecture
there.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS GOINGSON:
ON: GOINGSON: Gamma Beta Phi meets in
room 150 G of the union at
7:15 p.m. and Alpha Kappa Psi
is in union room 150 D and B
at 7 p.m.
i GATOS! B
J/IOST n
I REACH 1 n
[pEOPt-tIVT
Buml.it.2H2 V



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

Florida Players 'Luther Is
Ardent,lntense, Well Acted

By JOE TORCHIA
Alligator Feature Editor
Mr. Donald Creasons pro production
duction production of John Osbornes
Luther (now at the Constans
Theatre of the Reitz Union) is an
aggressively adequate, ardently
acted achievement, and it more
than deserves the approbation it
is receiving.
Mr. Creasons scenic designs
have set the stage for Twelfth
Night, Marat/Sade and other
Florida Players productions in
Luther, he shows that he can
put his imagination to work on
the other side of the lights as
well.
Creasons dazzling sets have
always been exceptional so
exceptional, in fact, that youd
rather enjoy them than the per performance.
formance. performance. Take him from the
drawing board and put him in
the directors seat and you may
not have something as dazzling,
but its just as exceptional.
So it is with Luther.
BRILLIANCE
Luthers brilliance is not
outward the stone-gray colon colonnade,
nade, colonnade, the barren, near-furniture near-furnitureless
less near-furnitureless stage, the isolated lighting
areas are all adequate, neces necessary
sary necessary to set the scene for Martin
Luthers internal, then external
battle.
(It must be noted that D. Donald
Demree is responsible for the
fine sets in this play.)
Add this to the slow fade-outs
at the end of each scene, the
diction-perfect Latin-singing
monks, the fine costuming (with
just the right touch of lavish lavishness
ness lavishness in the pope and other high
church officials) and near nearperfect
perfect nearperfect make-up (complete with
special monks hair stales and
costly wigs), and youve got a
technically fine show.
(Creason even observed such
fine intricacies as the proper
procedure of dressing the Catho Catholic
lic Catholic priest before he says Mass.)
The timing of Luther, al although
though although somewhat slow in the
latter half of the first act, was
generally fine throughout the rest
of the production. The slow pace,
however, gives you a chance to
admire one of the most beautiful
and effective set pieces used by
the Players: a huge, wooden cross
with a papier mache Christ,
angled over center stage through throughout
out throughout the first act.
Later in the play, during the
peasant revolt scene, there is
also an overshadowing wooden
cross this time there is no
Christ on it and it has been
moved stage right.
Christ has been taken off the
cross, presumably a symbol of
change in Martin. But it doesnt
end there: after the revolt, one
peasant lies outstretched in a
crucified Christ position, with
blood dripping from his forehead
and staining his cheeks.
Christ has not only been taken
off the cross, but hes dead,
and it doesnt appear that he
will be resurrected.
It is at places like these that
Creason shines.
ACTING
The acting in Luther is, for
the most part, as equally fine
as its technical make-up.
Like Osbornes earlier play,
Look Back In Anger, the suc success
cess success (or failure) of the show rests
on the protagonists shoulders...
in this case, Jim Richardson,
who plays the title role.

This reviewer did his best to
find fault with Mr. Richardsons
performance. A graduate student
in theatre, Jim Richardson has
more often than not openly con condemned
demned condemned this reviewers lousy
reviews.
It grieves me to say that Mr.
Richardson is no less than ex excellent
cellent excellent as Dr. Martin Luther;
he very powerfully carries the
full weight of this show, probably
even more powerfully than Christ
carried the weight of his cross.
(This blasphemy, no doubt, will
arouse criticism; Mr. Richard Richardsons
sons Richardsons performance will not.)
It takes great stamina to pur pursue
sue pursue the emotional environs of
Osborne; Mr. Richardson suc succeeds
ceeds succeeds particularly well, es especially
pecially especially in his epileptic fit scene
and hearing of the papal bull
where he says, I have been
served with a piece of paper;
it has come from a latrine named
Rome ...
Tbe best and most successful
scene of the play, however, must
be attributed to Herschel Conner
who plays Tetzel, seller of in indulgences.
dulgences. indulgences. In the opening scene
of act two, Mr. Conners cun cunnlng,

irf ;3p|jk
fm m A ] r Mm, w [ 1 H I 1 W &A
I iliti 11r I l
WT* 1 1 ifiiWii \il il H Stlrl f 5 aifyil
ijp -/.JplpM Jr
& jgm
; w _.-ss.
:?w 'op96goag^^BWwg^SsS?S3SM||lfe.
: If ->~ \ '~ ;* ,*7 k
mm bf jm
JH % W Jjij
.gjjg % J
1? f jm
Im I I
Pre-period tablet helps relieve that 2 to 7 pound
monthly water weight gain that can cause
. nervousness, irritability.
-. v:
rm
Discover Pamprin, the medical formula that helps Ust^ ng /
relieve your normal periodic weight gain. You see, ;v%-% **
in those 4 to 7 days before your period, your body
begins to retain extra water weight. You look puffy, i; J< lr/ et :
feel stuffy. The extra weight puts pressure on f, t delicate tissue causing simple headaches, irri-
Pamprin gently relieves your body of the extra
water... puffy look ... stuffy feeling. Works before
and during your period. jTinriri
Get Pamprin now and be ready to break your **
date With monthly Water build-Up! Now at the drug sdtt.ort of your store.

nlng, cunnlng, commercial, convincing,
hilariously funny salestalk is su superb
perb superb (theres no other word for
it).
William Perley as Staupitz and
Tim Denesha as Cajetan turned
in, as expected, their usual fine
and very professional perfor performances.
mances. performances. Mr. Perleys age tran transition
sition transition from act two to three was
very polished and effective, and
his last scene with v Martin was
especially moving. Mr. Denesha
took a minute to warm up, but
a
e -'
Theatre
Review
when he did you wanted to bless
him to death out of dislike and
admiration.
Matthew Faison's short papal
appearance was quite nicely done,
and Claude Pinkston was a
fiercely fine knight.
It is unfortunate that Thomas
Hussey as Luthers father was
not more vocally flexible; his

rasping voice achieved a cer certain
tain certain intensity and stayed there,
and it was impossible to find him
believeable. Mr. Hussey has
great potential, as he showed
in Marat/Sade; more vocal
range on his part would have
made the end of act one the most
Intense part of the play.
Hardld Klein as Lucas was
delightful, and his stage presence
was very nice to watch; good
performances were also turned
in by A1 Pinan, Victor Hulslander,
Rebecca Hoodwin and the mar marvellous
vellous marvellous cast of Augustlnians, Do Dominicans,
minicans, Dominicans, Nobles and peasants.
Luther is possibly Os Osbornes
bornes Osbornes best and most difficult
to present play; the Florida
Players must be congratulated
for the attempt, and praised for
the success.

:.*i : v :
| .; I . :
X. '- .. ..
gator ads sell

HERES
WHERE
YOU SAVE
=50%
HIEI DISCOUNT
1227 W. UNIVERSITY
Prices good
TODAY AND
TOMORROW
WT^r^ism
f EGG SHAMPOO M
I CREME RINSE 1
I SI.OO AO* 1
1 value M
W NEW REVLON
I MOON DROPS 1
I CLEANSING CREAM I
k,:.5i.69j
W REVLON
MOON DROPS I
I OILY SKIN CLEANER I
Lssl.49 J
w m I
| FANCIFUL 1
I $2.25 QQ I
B value OO V 1
W LACTONA B
I TOOTHBRUSH I
jGHh c*
I Reg CQi I
I 89< JOV J
B m"
OUANITY RIGHTS
RESBtVED
REBEL
DISCOUNT



ACADEMICS

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. W. Eugene ganders Jr.,
assistant professor of medicine
and microbiology, has been
named a Markle Scholar in Aca Academic
demic Academic Medicine by the John and
Mary R. Markle Foundation.
MEDICINE
Sanders has conducted re research
search research which has resulted in
pinpointing a group of drugs drugscarbonic
carbonic drugscarbonic anhydrase inhibitors inhibitorswhich
which inhibitorswhich have the potential ability to
curb epidemics of spinal menin meningitis.
gitis. meningitis.
One of 25 winners from 82
medical schools, Sanders' is the
ninth member of the College of
Medicine to receive the Markle
Award. The award will provide
ths college with $6,000 a year for
five years.
The Markle Foundation was es established
tablished established by the late John Mar Markle,
kle, Markle, to promote the advancement
of knowledge.
Its scholars in academic
medicine program was instituted
in 1948 to relieve the faculty

Campus Comedy

By DUFFY
YOU KNOW YOURE A
COLLEGE STUDENT
WHEN:
Your allowance comes two
weeks late and the cafeteria food
starts tasting good.
Greek News
Kappa Alpha Theta
r
Newly elected officers for 1968
include Jean Luehrs, president;
Nancy Casey, Ist vice-president;
Peggy Tribbett, 2nd vice-presi vice-president;
dent; vice-president; Susan Clarkson, rec. sec.;
Katherine Graves, corres. sec.;
and Linda Forbes, treasurer.
Alpha Delta Pi
A D Pi members have received
many honors so far this quarter.
Ann Dore and Marilyn Marcy
were tapped for membership in
Mortar Board, and Janie Wanless
was tapped for Savant.
Chi Phi
Chi Phi's had winter elections
and their new officers are: Bob
Wattles, president; Bill Sykes,
vice-president; Walter Wood Woodward,
ward, Woodward, secretary; Rich Supinsky,
treasurer.

If Records Those Things You
Did When You Weren't Studying
" "r*
f
I
1 Mail to: Seminole 330 Reitz Union
I 1
1 Name:
" | Address:
I
| Enclosed is a check for $ __
$5 per copy |
DEADLINE APRIL 15
L J

-news and views views

shortage in medical schools by
giving aid to young teachers early
in their careers.
ART
A
David Weinbaum, 3AR, won
honorable mention in the Univer University
sity University of Miamis Graduate
Competition in Art for college
seniors. Winning entries are on
display at the Lowe Gallery in
Miami April 20 to May 12.
ACADEMIC
AFFAIRS
The purpose of the competi competition
tion competition is to make tuition awards
to prospective graduate students
throughout the country on the
basis of ability, which is judged
through the submitted art works,
and to familiarize the public with
art work currently being done
by college students.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter Jr., as assistant
sistant assistant dean of academic affairs,
has been elected president of the
Florida Association of Colleges
and Universities.

Your parents hand you famous
lines as: I am heading for the
poorhouse. Youre giving me
an ulcer.* Quit and go to work!
The pep pill you took to stay
awake during an exam turns out
to be a sleeping pill.
You can find better excuses for
explaining grades to your
parents.
Drive-in movies become obso obsolete.
lete. obsolete.
You repeat your high school
English courses over again.
You can go drinking with your
professor* and convince him to
give you an A.
Being involved in a scandal
builds your image as a swinger.
Free love becomes expensive.
You despise everyone and
everything.
Its Friday night and there are
47 people waiting in line to use
the community shower.
Its Saturday night and the same
47 people are waiting.
You wear a pair of Weejuns
and someone says you look like
a fraternity man; and you do be belong
long belong to a frat.
You spend Saturday night (in
a sports coat and tie) helping your
girlfriends sorority sister pass
her Math I course while your
girl is out with your best friend,
and HES the math major.

FREEWAY
NATIONAL
'j

]C=J' with FREE 6 oz. Reg* 83c
rrr $3.00 ulu I
I Vttalisj II
H $1.69 tsi 59<
<>
4 a
HEAD & I Bir DEfcic
SHOULDERS BIC PENS
Family Size Tube
-.% $1.09 - 195 12<
SCHICK HOT LATHER COIL BOUND
SHAVE CREAM NOTE BOOKS
Reg. QQA Reg CQI
sl-0 Om y 98< ? Jir y
NEW ...
CALM ROLL-0N
DEODORANT sl-00 HAIR ROLLERS
1.5 oz.
. 57C 77 C
REVLONS INTIMATE REVLONS
SPRAY COLOGNE AQUAMARINE LOTION
12 oz.
$3.00 VALUE $2.19 $2 5 VALUE 99 C
- J- Im. u,'
Have you tried FREEWAY yet? Did you know we discount all items every day?
We are the store designed with the "students in mind" . ~ |
THURS., FRI., AND SAT. ONLY I SAVE UP TO AQQ? ATJ

Thursday, April 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 11, 1968

Page 14

UF Faces r Unbeatable Kansas

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Writer
- v \ ?o ?_
i ..
Track Coach Jimmy Carnes
has called Kansas, the toughest
team well face all year. And
no wonder; Kansas dumped UCLA
two weeks |igo 102-42. UCLA
was the runner-up in the NCAA
meet last year, and won it in
1966. Florida gets an opportunity
to take a crack at unbeatable
Kansas Saturday at 2:00 p.m.
Matched event for event,
Florida stands only a slim chance r
of beating the mighty Jayhawks.
Even though Kansas will be with without
out without the services bf Jim Ryun,
worlds record-holder in the mile
run,- the team has a depth that
Florida will be hard pressed to
find a flaw in.
In the mile, Gene McClain
has been moved down |i&m the
for Kansas. McClain clocks a
4:06 mile, and the best Florida
can muster is Frank Lagotlcs
4:15. Lagotic, who has been in injured
jured injured since before the season be began,
gan, began, had clocked a 4:06. The 4:15
represents his best effort since
the foot injury.
In the 440, UK boasts two top
runners. Randy Julian has a 47.3,
and Julio Meade, a 47.7. UFs
Jay Schickel has timed a 48.5.
For the 100-yd. dash, it is a
toss-up between UF and Kansas.
UK has three runners, Ben
Olison, John Jackson, and Stan
Whitley, who all run the 100
in 9.5. Floridas Tom Brown
and Barry Handberg also have
9.55.
Florida has a good chance
for success in the 880-yd. run,
as Bob Lang and Don Hale each
hold times better than UKs top
880 man, Roger Kathol. Kathols
time is 1:53, while UFs Lang
has a 1:50.9 and Hale, a 1:52.6.

. 1 ' -'* ~ ft
. s . .. ' -r
IF YOU ARE AN
ENGINEERING SENIOR...
Each day we challenge
interested in on exciting career our engineers
with excellent opportunity for advancement ... ,0 ,md be,,er WQys to
then we would like to talk with you! And to help them,
Representatives of our company will be on mosfmode
campus on Tuesday, April 16, and we invite you engineering facjliti^.
now posted in the University Placement Office.
.. ... ... ... ... ......... 1 1 j jlj j

CLIP THIS:
DEADLINE j
APRIL 19
- I

Florida will again have an ex excellent
cellent excellent scoring possibility in the
440 intermediate hurdles.
Kansas has two hurdlers in this
event, Dave Stevens and Lee
Adams, both with times of :57.
The Gators will have Clint
Fowlkes, who has posted a :52.9.
V
T|Xi! IJH
RJ
I
MORTON

Room 337, Reitz Union f
Date
Please reserve copies of the 1968
Seminole in my name. Enclosed is |
a check for $ ($5.00 per copy) |
Name . I
Address |
|
.

IN SATURDAY MEET

Florida will be hurting in the
3-mile event. Frank Lagotic, who
had posted a 2- mile mark of
8:52 before being ijured, has
been able to run 9:20 since, which
doesnt stand too well against
UKs Jim Olson, Kathol, or Glenn
Cunningham.
The 200-yd. event should be
close. Kansas has John Jackson
and Olison, who both have times
of 21.2, and three runners for
Florida, among them Toro Brqwn,
have marked a close 21.7.
The two relays to be run should
provide considerable compe competition.
tition. competition. Florida has consistently
had the top mile relay team in
the south, but Kansas should pro provide
vide provide a good challenge. Florida
clocks 3:15, and Kansas, 3:11.
Florida will be close in the 440-
relay. Here, UFs best time is
41.9, compared to a 40.5 for the
Jayhawks.
Floridas strength will come
in the Field events. In the pole
vault, UF has a clear advantage
with Mike Flanagans 157 at attempt.
tempt. attempt. Oliver and Hamilton both
have gone 15 for Kansas.
The shot-put should go down
to the wire. Doug Knop for Kansas
has a throw of 55. UFs John
Morton is two inches below this
at 54*10. These two athletes
will square off again in the dis discus,
cus, discus, but UF has the edge this
time. Knop has a throw of 165
for UK, while Morton has a 188
effort for the Gators.
,V i.l.
The same story goes for the
javelin throw, where UFs Mike
Burton has 227* mark,- com compared
pared compared to UKs best of Ron Shelley,
with a 216.
This team has overall tre tremendous
mendous tremendous depth. said Carnes.
Theyve got an excellent chance
of winning the NCAA this year,

and if they do, theyll certainly
deserve it.
Carnes is looking for a large
turnout at Saturdays meet.

Connecticut
Drops UF 5-3

Florida dropped a 5-3 decision to Connecticut College
yesterday, but remained tied for the lead in the SEC with Auburn.
The Gators, down 5-2 through most of the game, rallied in the
ninth inning, but it wasnt enough to pull victory into UFs reach.
Mike Ovca and Mike Picano scored early in the game, to give
the Gators their scoring until the ninth inning. Then, with bases
loaded, Terry Stromer walked, giving Florida Jack Frakes final
score. * ; Ui
Losing, pitcher for the Gators was Larry Sheffield.
UF remains tied for the SEC lead with Auburn. Both teams have
5 n2 records within the conference.
Floridas next game will be this afternoon against High Point
College, at Gator Field. Starting time will be 3:30. With yesterdays
game, Florida opened a six game home schedule which will in include
clude include Miami and North Carolina.

Tuesday^^^H
ALL DAY
Box
Ifl|l 60c 88l
J-BOY SANDWICH AWgSt
1 % L FRENCH FRIES
COLE SLAW
CURB OR CARRY-OUT
Friday
W 5 TIL 9 P.M.
Filet of Whitefish
Dinner $1.19
GENEROUS HELPING OF .. Ajgfigjt
AAAKA WHITEFISH FILETS
"'W-'-B. FRENCH FRIES
?. B COLE SLAW A
.f HUSHPUPPIES AJBKMKK-
room carry-out^ i;^^^s.
4 s CURB
Mon d a
W 5 TIL 9 P.M.
Spaghetti Dinner
99c
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SERVED IN THE A
CANDLELIT
DINING ROOM
I TWO GAINESVILLE LOCATIONS I
rrmw
mm 2310 S. W. 13th Street
I 1505 N. W. 13th Street I

Were certainly going to have
the competition, he said, and
even without Ryun, Kansas is cer certainly
tainly certainly a team worth seeing.



A Tribute To Dr. King
by Bob Padecky
sports editor Jm

Many of the nations businesses commercial
and non-profit,* paid homage to Dr. Martin Luther
King this week by closing their establishments
for a day.
Tlie major-league baseball season, scheduled
to start Monday, has been postponed to Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday and Thursday.
Many dances and the like had been postponed.
But the UF sports scene rolled along.
We did not close down any of our athletic
events because we felt Dr. King would have wanted
it that way, said Ray Graves, athletic director.
When President Kennedy was killed we played
a football game the next weekend in Miami,
Graves added.
It wouldnt be a decision on my part, Graves
said. But I think the Board of Regents would feel
Dr. King would want these games played.
The UF had tennis, golf, track, and baseball
events during the days immedlatly after Dr. Kings
death.
Neely, A Friend In Defeat
For Armi Neely, last Saturdays tennis win over
Miami, was especially satisfying.
Neely led the Gators to their greatest tennis
net win ever, 7-2, with a three-hour 10-8, 6-8,
6-3 win over Jaime Flllol, who finished runner runnerup
up runnerup in ttie nationals last year.
The win came over the nations No. 2 ranked
team, but it also came over a friend.
Jamie and I are close, Armi said. We know
each others game so well than its just a mat matter
ter matter of whos on.*
I do think, however, that conditioning helped
me win this one, said Neely.
Neely was mobbed by dozens of tennis buffs after
his singles win over Flllol. Neely thought he jijst
beat the Miami Hurricane and not clinched a vic victory
tory victory 5-1.
I was a little preoccupied you might say,
Neely said. I thought we would be fairly even
after I finished my match.

| CAHNI-GHAS jj
1 '/Mir ;-| \e TICKETS ADVANCE SI.OO f
3
| BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW-SAVE $1.40 J;
* advanced tickets at union box office jj;
]: - , DOLLARS for SCHOLARS |
o \ X Ji D V -. 4
f /jRMi
HHk IftMdl
4 : " ~*. "" ''V" .-.' u 4 ;l 3

I had no idea that we had won all but one of
the doubles, Neely added.
Neely was ranked No. 28 in the nation last year
as a collegiate netter. Flllol, meanwhile was in the
top 15.
A Hjuman Tragedy
Last Saturday afternoon an accident occurred
which unfortunately happened. Jim Yarbrough tackled
Steve Tannen, breaking his collarbone.
Yarbrough and Tannen wore the same color
jersey and through a coaching error were placed
on opposite teams.
The accident regretfully happened, but it hap happened.
pened. happened. However, and as in tragedy, as will happen,
it had human drama.
Just after Yarbrough collided his 258 pounds
headlong into the 190-pound Tannen, defensive coach
Don Brown came rushing over and said, Q.K.
boys, lets clear out, 0.K., Steve, get up, chop chopchop.
chop. chopchop.
Steve tried, got about two inches off the ground,
and fell like a sack of potatoes back to the turf.
Coach, I got something wrong, and as Tan Tannen
nen Tannen said that, he lifted away his jersey, exposing
his collarbone breaking the skin.
But Tannen is expected to be near-healthy in
three weeks. Coach Ray Graves will keep Tannen
out for the rest of die spring, hoping to have his
all-star in one piece next fall.
At first glance, bitterness was executed on Yar Yarbrough.
brough. Yarbrough. A few of the players smelled dirt and
yelled, Get Punjab.
But Jim realizes he was just doing his job, Tan Tannen
nen Tannen said. I would have done die same in the same
situation.
So in a few weeks the wounds and the memor memories
ies memories will have healed. In fact, die Gators have been
relatively free of injuries this year.
Last year, at the same time, there were seven
operations and 50 players sidelined. Now there
are just feelings aroused.
And theyll soon be healed.

Thursday. April 11, 1968, The Florida Alligator,
w Iv

Martin
Marietta
Careers
The Orlando, Florida, division of the Martin
Marietta Corporation is currently producing
SPRINT, PERSHING, WALLEYE, SHILLELAGH,
SAM-D and AGM-12 missile systems. An extensive
backlog of vital defense contracts provides
stability and professional growth opportunity.
If you were unable to schedule an
interview, please send resume directly
to: DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE RELATIONS
MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 5837, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32805
or call collect: 305/855-6100 Ext. 2082

M>i#yrw mmjmmsTtj*
Martin Marietta is an equal opportunity employer.

Page 15



\ t The Florida Alligator, Hiursday, April 11, 1968

Page 16

oil Jtt EXTRA SPECIAL 1 'll
.\i(^P F IVORY LIQUID J J
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG DETERGENT
>: . l v
Two Convenient Locations * f\ f\
601 S.W. 2 Ave. 1130 N.E. 16 Ave. ($ .13 off label).
1 ]lDDJllLl_LJit|_in~ p[jiqu[j; /_ S .. ....... j|
DD AH! irr grade a fresh fla. or ga.
rKUUUCt FRYER BREAST QUARTERS
jffWWWTTHW 39< ib.
WmgXkfi fryer leg quarters
FRESHTEMEK 39( IB
CARROTS 2 lb. bag J9d SUPER RIGHT COOKED DELICIOUS I
LARGE PASCAL SHANK PORTION HAM
CELERY 2/29< 39 OSONE RUSSET BAKING WHOLE OR BUTT PORTION I
POTATOES 59c CENTER CHUCK 49 FRESH GREEN GARMN HAM ROAST 79< 18.
ONIONS bunctes 2/2 5 d
, Y SUPER RIGHT DELICIOUS COOKED
H *;.-' 'JS&Stt fit .VA V* .jQtf*. -jQ..
SUNNYBROOK GRADE A NED. EAjfElflP CfluflK 4 lb. can
EGGS 3 doz./SI.OOMiCmPi) $3.
BUTTERMILK BREAD mMjjjjilk
2/49C ASP WHOLE or STRAINED I
WHITE BEAUTY > CRANBERRY SAUCE 2/39*
SHORTENING 3,tran 4B{ wen* on
MARGARINE n 29*
AWN PAGE
CAKE MIXES 3/79C grTen peas ,*.2/4*
WHkUtf P '"THOLE KERNEL
GOLD CORN ifc ran 2/43*
2 PLY FACIAL
SCOTTIES TISSUES 3/79*
:. ..
WHITE & COLORS
SO FT WEAVE 2/49*
v UKON CLUB CANNED
| BEVERAGES 15/SI.OO
ASSORTED FLAVORS