Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
High In The 80s
Low In The 60s
Showers Likely

Vol. 60 No. 108

More Grief
For Accent

By TED JESSUP
Alligator Correspondent
More grief for Accent* *6B.
The UF was to have been host
to members of the Florida Leg Legislature
islature Legislature and editors of Florida
dally newspapers this weekend,
but the plan fell through.
The invitation will not be ex extended,
tended, extended, said Frank Shepherd,
Accent public relations director,
because Tower B, where the
guests were to have stayed, is
not completed.
According to Shepherd, the
purpose of their visit was to pro provide
vide provide them with a first hand
view of the university. It would
also give them a chance to see
that the vocal portion of the
campus is not necessarily the
majority as it would have us
believe.
In addition, the visit would
provide an opportunity for alumni
to renew their acquaintance with
UF and Introduce it to those who
attended other schools.
The project began about six
months ago when Shepherd took
his plan to Stephen C. OConnell,
UF president. President OCon OConnell

FROM DEAN COSBY GOODRICH

'Dorm Residents Deserve Apology

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich Monday called
upon Dean of Women Betty Cosby
to apologize to the staff and resi residents
dents residents of Graham Hall on grounds
that Miss Cosby falsely ques questioned
tioned questioned the competency of the
Graham Area staff and Area
Council.
In a prepared statement Good Goodrich
rich Goodrich referred to a statement
by Miss Cosby that improper
conduct** had arisen out of an
open house held by a floor in
Graham Hall and that the situation
was one of administrative mis mismanagement.*
management.* mismanagement.*
Goodrich stated that he had
' checked with Lt. Vernon Holli Holliman
man Holliman of the University Police,
the resident assistant on duty
that night, and the night desk
personnel and had found no one
aware of any questionable be behavior.
havior. behavior.
These three officials are the
only individuals who were pre present
sent present that evening. Dean Cosby
was not present during the open
house incident in question,**
Goodrich said. In view of these
facts, Dean Cosbys remarks
seem most improper and uncalled
for.**

The
Florida Alligator

nell OConnell approved the idea and sug suggested
gested suggested that the editors of Florida
daily newspapers be included in
the invitation.
In Tallahassee, Shepherd spoke
to several key members of the
legislature about the idea. They
also voiced their approval and
expressed deep interest in the
program.
>
The guests were to have stayed
in Tower B for the weekend of
April 4, 5 and 6. Their agenda
would have Included several
luncheons and dinners at various
sororities and fraternities on
campus, a guided tour of the
campus by a personal student
escort, free admission to the
Accent activities, including a
chance to have close personal
contact with UF.
Citing the failure to have Tower
B completed on time as the only
reason the invitation will not be
extended, Shepherd expressed
confidence that the plan will be in
effect for next years Accent pro program.
gram. program. He emphasized the ex exclusive
clusive exclusive handling of the plan by
students and said, While the uni university
versity university administration was very
co-operative, this was to have
been strictly a student program.

Also investigated, were the
charges of administrative mis mismanagement.**
management.** mismanagement.** Goodrich said that
the residents had complied with
rules and hours for open house
set by the Graham Area Council
with the approval of the Head
Counselor and that Graham Area
personnel had been advised that
the floor in question had planned
an open house.
These procedures (for open
house) have been in effect for over
Ipr mm
fl jjflj m.
GARY GOODRICH
SG Veep,

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

"
ML _Jm Imw
jl
(Photo By Mike Huddleston)
UF Student Ernie McGill Paints A Sign At McCarthy Headquarters
McCarthy Headquarters
Opens Locally Tonight

The University Concerned
Democrats open their McCarthy
for President headquarters at

three years, without comment or
concern for a change from the
Dean of Women's office,** Good Goodrich
rich Goodrich said.
Also noted was that Graham
has never required that an en entire
tire entire dorm request open house in
order to schedule one.*
The reason is that each floor
in Graham is an individual unit
with doors at both ends and that
access to individual floors is

Student Leaders Agree:
Dorm Living 'Reeks

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Students are down on the
dorms. And such incidents as the
Open House in Graham Area and
new rules requiring sophomores
to live in dorms arent helping
any.
For most people,* said Mens
Interhall Council (MlC)president
Mike Moore, the dorm is Just
a place to rack. Rooms are im impersonal
personal impersonal and ugly, and theres
no way to entertain, guests.**
The social life and atmosphere
of the dorms is the students*
biggest gripe,** said Moore, not
to mention deficient facilities.

1107 N. Main St. tonight at 7
p.m.
The organization of faculty and

through a staircase that does not
lead one through each section/*
he said.
In short, a male guest is
taken straight to the section he
is visiting, without entering any
other section that may not have
open house.**
Goodrich concluded that as
absolutely no proof of improper
(SEE HOUSING* PAGE 2)

Its a poor comparison with
the lives of apartment
dwellers, added Moore. Peo People
ple People who have to live in the
dorms are penalized for it.**
Recognizing these and other
problems, such as evening open
house at Graham when Dean of
Women Betty Cosby called
campus police to break it up**
when a side door was found open,
Student Government President
Clyde Taylor appointed a nine ninemember
member ninemember Housing Commission to
recommend regulation changes.
We hope to help make the
(SEE STUDENTS* PAGE 2)

Inside
Hume Area Protests
SG Carnival Site
See Page 3

Wednesday April 3, 1968

students hopes to elect presi presidential
dential presidential delegates pi edged to peace
candidate Sen. Eugene McCarthy
in Floridas May 28 primary
election.
Richard W. Clarke, a graduate
student from Jacksonville and
chairman of the group, claimed
membership of more than 400
volunteers recruited in three
days last week.
In addition to Clarke, speakers
will include UF professors and
Sidney Knight, a member of the
McCarthy convention slate and
chairman of Alachua County Con Concerned
cerned Concerned Democrats.
Refreshments will be provided.
Clarke credited the almost
unbelievable growth of the or organization
ganization organization to recognition that Mc-
Carthy is more than just a peace
candidate, pledged to de-escal de-escalating
ating de-escalating the Vietnam War.
The organization, said Clarke,
includes several students who are
veterans of military service and
therefore have nothing personal
to gain from a peace candidate
victory.
The campaign headquarters
opening was scheduled in advance
to take advantage of what Mc-
Carthy supporters hope will be a
victory for their candidate in the
Wisconsin primary on Tuesday.
After its formal opening, the
headquarters will be staffed dally
from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. Volun Volunteers
teers Volunteers will be in the office to
answer questions, distribute
literature and enlist workers,
Clarice said. \\Y \\V-\7
The climax of the student studentfaculty
faculty studentfaculty efforts will come later in
the campaign when a massive
voter canvass drive in Alachua
and adjoining counties is
mounted, Clarke said.



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3. 1968

Page 2

Bulletin News
Stole, National, International News
U.S. To Equip ARVN
WASHINGTON (UPI) The United States will equip major South
Vietnamese ground forces with the newest U.S. weapons to permit
them to assume a greater share of the war, the Defense Department
disclosed Tuesday.
In addition to the latest infantry and artillery equipment, the Pentagon
will also furnish the South Vietnamese with some modern jet aircraft,
helicopters, river patrol craft and tanks, officials said.
The ground force equipment will include the lightweight, rapid rapidfiring
firing rapidfiring Ml 6 rifle, grenade launchers, machine guns, mortars, Howitzers,
trucks and armored personnel carriers all the latest types used by
Americans.
Bombing Limits Outlined
SAIGON (UPI) A U.S. military spokesman said Tuesday that
American warplanes are permitted to bomb targets within 35 miles
three minutes* flying time -of North Vietnam's Hanoi-Haiphong
industrial complex under President Johnson's partial bombing halt.
The spokesman said American planes would bomb in North Viet Vietnam's
nam's Vietnam's southern panhandle, an area he defined as stretching 250 miles
due north of the Demilitarized Zone border strip separating North
and South Vietnam.
"The disclosure came as Hanoi's first response to Johnson's peace
move, contained in the army newspaper Quanh T X>i Nhan Dan, made
It clear the North Vietnamese regime does not consider the U.S.
President's offer acceptable. It complained that Johnson had not
agreed to an unconditional halt in the bombing and other military
actions.
10% Tax Passed
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate Tuesday passed the 10 per cent
tax increase that President Johnson has been trying to get since
last August and tied it to an enforced $6 billion cut in government
spending.
But the income tax increase Johnson called it a surcharge must
now be approved by the House, whose members show very little
more enthusiasm for it than they did when it was proposed.
By two separate votes, 53 to 35 and 57 to 31 necessary for parlia parliamentary
mentary parliamentary reasons the Senate approved a broad tax-spending package
that also included extending excise taxes on new cars and telephone
bills and speeding up corporate tax collections.
/428&K STEAK n SHAKE
W Student Special
(With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88t Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15t Drink
$1.03 value Only 85< tax
Offer good Until April 30 Only
Steak n Shake
1610 SW 13th Street Gainesville |
r* Room 337, Reitz Union
| Date
Please reserve copies of the 1968
Seminole in my name. Enclosed is
| a check for $ ($5.00 per copy)
| I 2
Name
I Address
I
I m mmm mam w
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and if publtst)*d five times .weekly, qxcept during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and holidays and exam pyfybds. Editorials represent only the
official .dpljflons of their, authors.* Address correspondence to tie Florida Alligator,-Reitz
Union Bull ding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at GainesvUle, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

Students Down On Dorms

t* FROM PAGE ONE
dorms comfortable and with a
minimum of regulations,'' said
Vice-President Gary Goodrich,
so people wont feel like theyre
spending two years in prison.
Housing Director Harold Riker
announced last quarter that
sophomores, as well as fresh freshmen,
men, freshmen, will live in dorms, to help
defray mortgage payments. Tele Telephones,
phones, Telephones, air-conditioning, and
carpeting will be installed to
make the dorms more liveable
The commission recognizes
the need to fill up the dorirs,
Goodrich said. There were 400
vacancies last quarter, he
noted.
Goodrich and Moore, and
another commission member,
Housing
FROM PACE ONE
conduct has been shown, the resi residents
dents residents of Graham seem to have
been subjected to unnecessary
and undeserved public rebuke.
Inasmuch as all facts and all
officials involved report that pro procedures
cedures procedures long standing were fully
complied with, Dean Cosbys
charges of administrative mis mismanagement*
management* mismanagement* have falsely ques questioned
tioned questioned the competency of Graham
Area staff and the Area Council.
Unless these charges can be
proven, I believe that the Dean of
Women owes the Graham staff
and especially the residents an
apology.

-ft. flflH \ 1 ffiiil!§ll
mSKm 9 flis
Theres a place for YOU
in a Florida fraternity
A
In fraternity intramurals the spirit is high and the competitior,
is rugged.
A well-rounded program of sports every quarter develops
skill and blends in with the fraternity teachings of sports sportsmanship.
manship. sportsmanship.
- - r *a
There s a great thrill in repre senting your fraternity in an
intramural sport. The competition for trophies and the personal
satisfaction of excelling makes you strive a little harder.
' Open House tonight .7.-/4
from 7-10 at \ ) ~. .w. -_-/V/V :
De 9 |ta Tau Delta 0 AI P ha p 1 UpS^?",
Pi Kappa Alpha

Marti Cochran, said visiting
privileges will be a prime con consideration
sideration consideration of the commission.
We feel that each area council
should be able to set up its own
open house policies, said Miss
Cochran.
We don't want to see rules
handed down from above, Moore
added.
0 They were again referring to
the Graham incident, which was
an evening open house. Dean
Cosby was shocked by having
open house at night, Goodrich
said.
The com mission also will study
women's curfew. The Rules and

Twilight Concert Tonight
On UF Auditorium Lawn

Todays sound, the sound of
the electronic amplifier, will
be featured in a special solo num number
ber number at the Twilight Concert to tonight
night tonight on the University Audit Auditorium
orium Auditorium Lawn.
Martha Stark, flutist from Key
West, will play Tarantella,writ Tarantella,written
ten Tarantella,written by John Dalby, with the aid
of a new electronic instrument,
called a Multivider. The
Multlvlder can alter the char character
acter character of the sounds transmitted
into it, as well as amplify its

HILLEL PASSOVER SEDER
APRIL 12th, 13th
Friday & Saturday. 6:30 p.m.
Reservations Requi red
call 372-2900
16 N.W. 18th ST.

Regulations Committee of Women
Students* Association (wsa) [ s
working to abolish curfew f or
juniors.
Jeanne Long, commission
member, said surveys are being
conducted to see whether sopho sophomores
mores sophomores are responsible enough
for no curfew.
Girls, for the most part,'*
she said, are willing to abide
by the regulations, as long as
they understand the purpose of
them.
The commission report will
get full consideration from the
Housing Office, said Riker.

volume, and raise or lower the
pitches played.
The Multlvider, still In an ex experimental
perimental experimental stage, is here at the
University on loan from the Conn
Corporation, which developed it.
The concert beginning at 6:45
p.m., is open to the public with without
out without admission charge and is en entirely
tirely entirely informal. The next per performance
formance performance of the Gator Symphonic
Band will be In St. Augustine at
the Inter-American Music Fes Festival.
tival. Festival.



Carnival Causes Rift
Among Hume Residents

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor and UF President Ste Stephen
phen Stephen C. OConnell met this morn morning
ing morning to discuss an alternate site
for the Student Government
sponsored Dollars for Scholars
Carnival, a week-long affair to
be held later this month.
The original choice of a site,
the recreation field behind Hume
Hall, drew a wave of fire from
the Hume Area Council, which
complained of disruption that the
carnival would create for area
residents.
The Council made known its
complaint in a resolution to be
presented to Taylor and OCon OConnell.
nell. OConnell.
The location of the Dollars
for Scholars carnival behind
Hume Hall will totally disrupt the
life of Hume residents,** the re resolution
solution resolution from the council read.
The carnival noise will make it
impossible to study. The influx
of people will encourage theft.
Moreover, the damage to the
grass on the softball field by
carnival machinery and carnival carnivalgoers
goers carnivalgoers will seriously impair our
recreational facilities. r
The Hume Area Council was
not consulted concerning the lo location
cation location announced by SG. The
Hume Area Coordinator and the
Director of Housing were not
informed,* the Council said in

Military Queen Contestants
Must Apply Before Friday

The 1968 Military Ball with a
SIOO wardrobe for the Queen
will be held April 27 with pre preliminaries
liminaries preliminaries starting Monday,
April 15.
UFs Army ROTC Scabbard
and Blade is sponsoring the event
which is open to advanced cadets
and special invitees. Organi Organizations
zations Organizations are invited to sponsor
girls in the contest. Contestants
will be judged on beauty and poise
in swimsuit, campus wear, even evening
ing evening gown and on a personality
interview with the judges. Re Requirements
quirements Requirements are that, the contes contestant
tant contestant be single and have her entry
blank and 10 dollar entrance fee
in by 5 p.m. Friday.
On April 25 three finalists will
be chosen at 8 p.m. at the J.
Wayne Reitz Union Aditorium.
These finalists will attend the
Military Ball April 27 in the union
ballroom where the queen will be
chosen at 9 p.m.
Prizes include a SIOO ward wardrobe
robe wardrobe from Jodys of Gainesville
and a 26 inch trophy for the win winner.
ner. winner.
Entry forms and checks for $lO
J) NIY ONe5
STOPLITE
AWAY
rom Campu!
\nd A Real
TREAT
en 2:00 11:30 pm
[PPER BAN
2reame Shoppe
STGATE
PING CENTER /
V. Univ. Ave; J

the resolution.
This Council opposes the
placement of the carnival be behind
hind behind Hume Hall. The Hume re residents
sidents residents deserve an apology from
SG, which did not have the cour courtesy
tesy courtesy to consider the rights and
needs of 600 students. We, their
representatives, demand that SG
change the proposed location of
the carnival.*
Greg Williams, president of
Hume Area Council, and Tom
Christman, a section advisor in
Hume, explained Tuesday that
the principal reason for the ob objection
jection objection was that no one connec connected
ted connected with Hume was consulted.**
The field the carnival is
to be placed on doesnt belong
to us, it belongs to intramur intramurals.
als. intramurals. But no one even asked for
our point of view, Williams said.
Were not trying to pick out
the location,* Christman said,
but were trying to think about
the life that will be disrupted for
a week.*
Also objected to was that stu study
dy study will be impaired and that some
students* sleep will be ruined,
for many sleep in the early
evening and study in the early
morning.
They pointed out that windows
in the dorm cannot be closed due
to the warm weather, so that
noise cannot really be shut out.**
We are not against Dollars
for Scholars; we feel, however,
that the 600 Hume scholars will
be hurt by having the carnival

should be placed in the Scabbard
ang Blade Box, room 104 Mili Military
tary Military Building, c/o Sergeant Haw Hawthorne
thorne Hawthorne by the deadline Friday.

GO GREEK

Latin American
CARNIVAL
Panamanian Combo 9 p m
Fla. Union Ballroom April 6

Eclasfl ring
Now Available off-campus
A college degree is an earned asset
worthy of pride. Wear your achieve achievement
ment achievement proudly with the University of
, \ v Florida class ring from Gainesville's
leading jeweler.
UNESVILLES QUALITY JEWELER
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Phone 376-2655 New Gainesville Mall

which is supposed to help them.*
We knew there would be pro problems,
blems, problems, but were trying to keep
them at a minimum,* Bill Neron,
Taylors press secretary, said.
Every possible means is being
taken to work the problem out,
and there will be a solution by
this afternoon.
A lot of work has gone into
this project,* he said. Because
of the time factor, Hume field
was the only one available, we
needed a large field, and it was
larger than some other fields
on campus.
Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich said that the Hume
Field was chosen because it was
the only one available.
According to Goodrich, the
Norman Field could not be used
because of conflict with classes,
while the ROTC Drill Field would
be in use that Saturday for park parking
ing parking for the Orange and Blue
football game.
I L&W
CAFETERIA
Wednesday Night
Italian
Veal Parmigiana
49c
Home Cooking
i
11:15-2 p.m.
jjlUilifl 4:30-8 p.m.

Wednesday. April 3. 1968. The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Page 4

Eg. Frats
To Salule
Professors
The two UF engineering honor honorary
ary honorary fraternities Sigma Tau
and Tau Beta PI have Ini Initiated
tiated Initiated an annual program for en engineering
gineering engineering students to recognize
outstanding professors in the
College of Engineering.
Nomination boxes for the sel selection
ection selection of the first recipients of
the award will be placed In each
engineering building today and
Thursday so that engineering stu students
dents students may Indicate their nom nomination.
ination. nomination.
After an intermediate screen screening
ing screening of the students nominations,
the president and vice president
of the two honoraries will visit
classes of the final nominees
to choose the award recipients.
According to a spokesman for
the groups, the purpose of the
award is to provide an Incentive
for improving the quality of un undergraduate
dergraduate undergraduate education in the col college.
lege. college. For this reason, the selec selection
tion selection of recipients will be based
mainly on teaching technique, ab ability
ility ability to stimulate student Interest,
and active concern for the wel welfare
fare welfare of students.
In order to be qualified for a
student nomination, the professor
must teach undergraduates. Stu Students
dents Students who wish to nominate a pro professor
fessor professor should indicate the pro professors
fessors professors name and department
and write a paragraph on the out outstanding
standing outstanding characteristics of the
nominee on a form which will be
provided in each building.
Correction
Dr. David Chalmers, history
professor, did not say that Robert
F. Kennedy would be the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic nominee for President.
Contrary to an article in Tues Tuesdays
days Tuesdays Alligator, Chalmers be believed
lieved believed Kennedy had the most to
gain by President Johnsons re refusal
fusal refusal to run in November, and not
that he would win.

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XZCXC

UF Honorary, University Circle
Now Full-Fledged ODK Chapter

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Managing Editor
The UFs University Circle
mens leadership and scholastic
honorary Thursday grew from a
colony to a full-fledged member
of the national Omicron Delta
Kappa (ODK) honorary.
Fred Breeze, ODK president,
learned by telegram that the
national parent organization had
voted to approve national mem membership
bership membership for the UF colony, in
record time.
The UF organization will now
be known as University of Florida
Omicron Delta Kappa Mens
Honorary. The name University
Circle will be dropped.
In other action Breeze
announced ODK is undertaking
the formation of a new organi organization
zation organization to be known as univer university
sity university Squires.
Squires, which will be a
division of ODK, is an organi organization
zation organization for freshmen and first
quarter sophomore men who rank
in the upper one-third of their
respective classes.
The purpose of the organi organization

WATCH FOR TOMORROW'S
SPECIAL GROCERY SECTION

c, wf A I

zation organization is to serve the UF and
ODK, to promote student-faculty
relations at the freshman level
and to further freshman partici participation
pation participation in all phases of university
life, Breeze said.
This will also give us an
opportunity to recognize out outstanding
standing outstanding freshmen, he added.
The ODK president said
Squires will have five areas of
selection, much as the parent
organization. These include
scholarship, athletics, organiza organizations,
tions, organizations, publications and the arts.
As far as I know this is the
only freshman service organi organization
zation organization on campus. It is hoped that
early involvement in campus af affairs
fairs affairs through an organization
such as Squires will arouse in
these outstanding young men the
desire to improve our univer university
sity university community, Breeze said.
The obvious benefits to the
campus from Squires are in involvement
volvement involvement of freshmen in service
projects through a service or organization,
ganization, organization, education of freshmen
personnel in campus affairs and
the availability of a new and eager
group to investigate problems in

the university community,
Breeze continued.

Squires, as a division of ODK,
will be supervised by an ODK
member. This person shall be
known as knight and will be
appointed by Breeze.
Tapping for squires will co coincide
incide coincide with tapping for the parent
organization. The parent organ!-

Enjoy Personal Barber Service
r / Relax In comfort and convenience at the best in the profes profesw
w profesw sional barber field in Gainesville. Specialists in razor cuts,
mmings, washings and conventional cuts. See Kenny or Mac
SIMS BARBER SHOP
817 West University 378-2015
| ROBBIE'S I
For The Best In Steaks^^^
rCOLOR TV & BILLIARDsI
11718 W. University Ave.l
I On The Gold Coast I

By TOM RYAN
~ 2rSaau lr 1

zation, ami not Squires, will do the
tapping.
Membership in Squires, as in
ODK, will be restricted to men.

GO GREEK



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(FUOIO uy WICK Arroyo)
GATOR GIRL
Todays Gator Girl is Jackie Elverum,2UC.
A math major, Jackie is from Minneapolis,
Housing Subject
Os Dialogue

Are you satisfied with your
students rights concerning hous housing
ing housing rules? Do you feel off-campus
dwellers should be required to
pay deposits or that curfews are
necessary in womens dorms?
Hie student body will be able
to seek answers to these ques questions
tions questions and speak out about Uni University
versity University and Off-Campus Housing
at this quarters first Florida
Blue Key Dialogue discussion
tonight at 7:30 in room 355 of the
Reitz Union.
A panel consisting of Dr.
Harold C. Riker, director of UF
Housing; John McCoy, vice presi president
dent president of Gainesville Apartment
Owner's Association; Carl Opp,
director of Off-Campus Housing;
Dean Donald D. Mott, assistant
dean of men; Ken Howell,
moderator of Dialogue; Bruce
Boker, research director of Dia Dialogue;
logue; Dialogue; Tom Blackmon, director of
survey of Dialogue; Lori Preece
and Bob Hollmeyer, research
staff members of Dialogue; Jean Jeannle
nle Jeannle Long, secretary of womens
affairs; Mike Moore, president
of Mens Interhall; and Bill Mc-
Bride and Jim Valentine, dormi dormitory
tory dormitory resident assistants, will dis discuss
cuss discuss housing problems.
Housing contracts for sopho sophomores,
mores, sophomores, open house rules,
curfews, and drinking in dorms

Got A Sick Corvair?
We specialize in Corvair service thats backed up J>y
30 yrs. experience with General Motors Corp.
Youll drive safer with our brake and tune-up service,
too. And let us put that air-conditioner in perfect order,
mo matter what make car you have.
Were the students friend, so stop in and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
1031 So. Mail Phone 376-7771

are on-campus housing topics to
be discussed while off-campus
dwellers will hear about uniform
rental agreements; deposits, and
recreation and maintenance and
improvements.
"This is an opportunity for the
people who make the policies
and the people who follow the
policies to come into direct con contact,
tact, contact, said Ira Leesfield, general
director of Dialogue, describing
the function of Dialogue.
The quarter system will be
the topic of the next Dialogue
to be held on April 18.
Jobs in the
Catskills
Mt. resorts are now
hiring students for summer
jobs. Openings for waiters,
waitresses, chambermaids,
life guards, counselors, etc.
Experience helpful but not es essential.
sential. essential. Write for up-to-date
catalog of resort hotel jobs
including where to write, jobs
available and salary. Send
SI.OO to cover printing postage
and handling to Resorts Inter International,
national, International, Dept. B, 5314 Lee
Ave., Richmond, Virginia.

FREEWAY
NATIONAL

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^PHONE^ STMMO^^^I

Wednesday, April 3, 1968, Hie Florida Alligator,

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Page 6

_ The
Florida Alligator
"To Let The People Know
15l
M Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
UaiMclq# Editor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
New* Editor Sports Editor
Ifce Ploftti Alligator** official poatttoa oa lasaas la npnmd
oat j la too eotaaaa Mo*. Otoar material la tkto leant nay
nflaot toa oytatoo a i tot writer or eartooatat aad not nteataarlly
teal of too norite Alligator float apaotfloally ladtoatod.
Accent On Nothing

Accent *6B is proving
to be a study in lack of
leadership and non di direction.
rection. direction.
This, years program,
pegged around the theme
* Politics: Impact on
Youth, isnt really about
anything in particular.
With the recent cancel cancellation
lation cancellation of Selective Service
Director Lewis B.Hershey
as keynote speaker, Accent
director has stretched his
imagination to the outer
limits and selected writer
Ralph Nader as a substi substitute
tute substitute for the general.
Undoubtedly Mr. Nader
has something to say, or
at least Congress thinks
so, but we seriously doubt
that the great crusader for
safer American autos can
set the mood, as a key keynote
note keynote speaker should, on
the impact of politics on
youth.
The truth is that Mr.
Nader wont even have had
enough time to write a de decent

Outdated Handbook

J lt Wayne Reitz is still
president of the UF.
The present calendar
System used here is the tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
Coeds, according to pic pictures,
tures, pictures, do not wear mini miniskirts.
skirts. miniskirts.
These statements may be
surprising, but if you read
the UFs Student handbook,
a type of public relations
periodical, all would be
true.
The handbook, which was

Alligator Staff
DAVE DOUCETTE GLENN FAKE
Assistant News Editor Editorial Assistant
JERRY SILBERBERG JOE TORCHIA
Campus Living Editor Entertainment Editor
714 ( 4
4
STAFF WRITIERS: Mike Abrams, Aipje Boyd, Beth Brandon;-David Chafin, James
Cook, Linda Daniels, Duffy, Sand Drechsler, Mark Dunn, Anne Freedman, Edward
Fox, Mary Gantt, Brenda Gevertz, Janie Gould, Simon Gish, Steve Hulsey, Dee Dee Horn,
Paul Kaplan, Kathle Keim, Roy Mays, John Parker, A1 Pierleoni, Raul Ramirez,
Dave Reddick, Neal Sanders, Janice SJzemore, Nick Tatro.
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS: Nick Arroyo, Mike Huddleston, Guj Mustelier.
STAFF ARTIST: Lois Parks.
The Alligator of the Air is heard each weekday at 3:55 p.m. on radio station WDVH.
Alligator of the Air editor is Dennis Watson.

cent decent speech on a topic which
just isnt his subject.
Whats more, the other
speakers at this years Ac Accent
cent Accent symposium, including
James J. Kilpatrick, F.
Clifton White, Harry Gold Golden,
en, Golden, Allen- C. Isbell, Earl
Faircloth and Ed Gurney
also just dont measure up
to the topic at hand.
Accent deserves great
speakers who are familiar
with their topics.
Accent and the UF stu student
dent student deserve better.
But this year one student,
by the name of Gramling,
attempted to run Accent and
all he seemed to accom accomplish
plish accomplish was to step on his
own hands.
A lot of people have been
kind to Gramling and others
are busy looking out for
his future as a student
leader but, as far as the
Florida Alligator is con concerned,
cerned, concerned, Mr. Gramling has
made what should be his
last mistake in student
leadership.

published in 1965, should be
updated to help portray the
University as a more pro progressive
gressive progressive institution.
The Florida Alligator
realizes a project such as
revamping the handbook
would be costly. But in the
interest of entering
Freshmen, student trans transfers
fers transfers and the myriad visitors
which come, to the UF, a
new handbook should be
prepared.

f g§§' wt y Jfr jfft^Y^^Ki
' jympf;, .; r Hp*jjriigmii%
1 jKyBt3QS|IBMtSBMBHt
9
Right Around Presidential Time, I Get This Compulsion
PERSPECTIVE , 1 , ====^=
.: N*-
The Paradox
01 The GOP
===================== BY BRUCE McCURRY

Since the era of Franklin D. Roosevelt
the Republican Party has been trapped in
a deep and seemingly inextricable malaise.
Because the Democratic Party has as assumed
sumed assumed the liberal role of amelioration of
the social dislocation in advanced industrial
society of the United States, the Republi Republican
can Republican Party has, in effect* abandoned its
position as a progressive influence in
American politics.
It has, instead, presented an image of
itself as a group of cantankerous nay naysayers"
sayers" naysayers" who, by their apparent negativism,
all too often constitute little more than a
professional Opposition. Whether justifiable
or not, the image nevertheless persists.
S y
The tragedy of this situation is that it
symbolizes a denial by the Republican Par Party
ty Party of effective leadership in the complex
modern society which, in the past, it did
so much to promote. The Republican Par Party
ty Party is, after all, the party of Lincoln, Sum Sumner,
ner, Sumner, Stevens, Blaine, Theodore Roosevelt,
LaFollette and Vanderberg. Today, how however,
ever, however, it is the party of Nixon, Ford, Gold Goldwater
water Goldwater and Reagan with the Hatfields and
Lindsays remaining ineffectually on the
frinees of the existing power structure.
One observer has remarked that the
party has always been torn between pro progressive
gressive progressive idealism and regressive oppor opportunism.
tunism. opportunism. flow, perhaps more than ever,
it is the opportunists who have the upper upperhand.
hand. upperhand. 1
The year 1968 appears to be developing
into an excellent example of the paradox
of the modern Republican Party, With the
abdication of Lyndon Johnson and with peace
candidates McCarthy and Kennedy as the

Democratic front-runners, the Republican
Party faces the danger of assuming the un unpopular
popular unpopular stance of war party, a position
which the Democratic Party has incurred
under the leadership of the now lame-duck
President Johnson. If it is to win in 1968
the Republican Party must eschew such a
role.
With the Democrats in disarray the
chances for Republican victory in this year's
presidential election are excellent, but they
hinge upon the party's return to the pro progressive
gressive progressive idealism which made it great.
To gain victory in this election year the
Republican Party must put forth a candi candidate
date candidate and a positive program capable not
only of channeling the rising disaffection
with the Viet Nam morass into Republi Republican
can Republican votes but also of intruding upon trad traditionally
itionally traditionally Democratic strongholds.
But at present the Republican Party is
not, availing itself of its potential for a
meaningful victory. All indications are that
Richard Nixon, a candidate who has not
been able to win an election on his own
since 1948, will lead the Republican ticket
this November. Those Republicans capable
of inspiring the support and devotion of
independent voters as well as the partys
rank and file are, ironically, outside of
the partys decision-making hierarchy.
1 i tiev IY.
*' t >
Thus emerges' the fundamental paradox
of the Republican Party. Although it pos possesses
sesses possesses a rich historical tradition and an
array of vigorous young office holders who
have demonstrated their vote-getting abili abilities,
ties, abilities, the Republican Party is saddled with
a national leadership which remains in the
bands of an impotent old guard who seem
resolved to once again lead the party down
the road to electoral defeat.



THE AMERICAN DREAM ===========
Keep Wallace
On The Farm
UNCLE JAVERNECK

George C. Wallace Is at it again.
Hiat 100% cotton-headed ball of lint in the Deep Souths own political
pocket, Alabama, is making his second bid for the Whitehouse.

Nobody is really worried that
hell make it not this time
anyway. All his candidacy and his
scattered but not insignificant
support points to is that, period periodically,
ically, periodically, the American people like
to sit down and reminisce. In
this case, its hack to the days
when we had the only A-bomb,
a Coca-cola culture, and Martin
Luther King could damn well wait
in the kitchen.
The only problem with Wal Wallaces
laces Wallaces hayseed back-yard ap approach
proach approach to politics is that although
thats where we came from, thats
not where were going.
Gone are the good old days
when a man could unthinkingly
empty his figurative shotgun into
the backside of anyone who dis disturbed
turbed disturbed his hen house. The Inter International
national International scene has evolved past
shotguns and to the point where
most nations are either chicken
thieves or chickens.
Wallace gives the appearance
of an over-emotional auctioneer
when he speaks. He sweats and
shakes like a poor mans Dick
Nixon.
His style, while probably ef effective
fective effective enough in bargaining for
livestock or winning elections
in Alabama, is not the kind that
sells treaties or trade agree agreements.
ments. agreements.
His intelligence may be ade adequate
quate adequate but nothing more. If it were
abundant it would have shown up
by now.
All in all, Wallace isnt the
best man for the job.
Running for the presidency is
part of the American Dream.
Italian boys are groomed for the
opera, Mexicans and Germans
have to be generals, and Rus Russians
sians Russians can play the violin or
walk on the Moon. Every Am American
erican American boy lucky enough to have
a mother is destined to be presi president.
dent. president.
Mrs. Wallaces boy, George,
is trying his best.
With Wallace at least we can
count on one thing. Before he
drops any H-bombs, hell want to
know what they cost the tax taxpayer.
payer. taxpayer.

ALLIGATOR
BRAINOSITIES

Oh, it's a toughie today. I
shall get right into it. Mr.
Neverong (Ugh) gave me a check
in lull payment for some work
which I had done for him. Tbe
check was in three figures and
for much more than my bill, I
was informed, so naturally I was
very pleased.
As a further gesture of his
great generosity, Mr. Neverong
told- me that if i promised'.not to
cash the Check* (which I 'hadn't
seen yet) he would give me the
difference between the product of
the three digits and their sum
and he assured me that this dif difference
ference difference would not be a small
number.
Os course I jumped at this but
when I saw the check, I realized

OPEN FORUM:
AdaUIOMIL VlMmt f
Vi
There is no hope for the complacent man.
r i l
' vfVÂ¥T-.: :
Supply The U.S. Army
With Sling Shots For Guns?

MR. EDITOR:
Id like to reply to these great
humanitarians, who think the
helping of a people a crime, and
who think their deaths, a portion
of which can be attributed to
American weaponry, our murder.
These humanitarians suffer
from Ho Chi Mania, a disease
which is characterized by con constant

A Safety Engineer
Needed For UF

MR. EDITOR:
The following is an open letter
to President OConnell which I
hope that-you will print.
President OConnell:
During the first week of March,
on my way to class I had ocas ocasslon
slon ocasslon to see a delivery man re retrieving
trieving retrieving four Kbottles (high pres pressure
sure pressure tanks) from the sloping
driveway behind the ENG Build Building
ing Building (E&I). They had evidently
rolled off of his truck as he
backed down the hill. Two were
under parked cars: NONE HAD A

what a fool I was. How much
was the check?
And to you llteraries, here is
yesterday's answer BenGunn-
Treasure Island, Uriah Heep-
David Copperfleld, Lucy Man Manette-A
ette-A Manette-A Tale of Two Cities, Carol
Kennicott-Main Street, Catherine
Farklay-A Farewell to Arms,
Roxanne-Cyrano de Bergerac,
Joe Harper-Torn Sawyer, Dup Dupstan
stan Dupstan Cass-Silas Jdarner, Philip
Bosiiipey-The Forsythe Sage,
Edmund Dantes-The Count of
Monte Cristo, John Rldd-Lorna
Doone, Old Marley-Christmas
Carol, Charles Strickland-The
Moon and Sixpence, Sam Will Williams
iams Williams Penrod, Amelia Sedley-
Vanity Fair.
Whew!

Vietnam... Auf Wiedersehn!

MR. EDITOR:
Having been obsessed with
basketball (at 57 I am more
a spectator than a participant),
its been hard shifting my
thoughts from John Wooden and
Co., to Vietnam. Moreover, the
thrill of becoming a 3AS has
kept me in a daze of late. But
Thursdays Alligator comments
prompted me-to write this letter.
Harvey Alper is correct in
passerting that the U.S. is Tra-

stant constant reading with one eye and
causes the person to believe that
everything is completely black on
one side of him.
These people tell us that we
are fighting against the South
Vietnamese people. But may I
ask, what is the S. Vietnamese
Army made up of? If the Viet
Cong are the people, as these
protestors constantly state, then

SAFETY CAP ON THEM. If one
of them had landed so as to break
off the valve, it would have been
a jet engine turned loose.
Three days later, during a
shower, I came to the end of a
sidewalk; about ten feet from the
next one. Noticing that someone
} had laid several boards across
the mud, I stepped on one of
them only to find it had been
painted with a paint that is very
slippery upon getting wet. I
almost broke an ankle.
The point I am trying to make
is that I think that this Univer University
sity University should have a Safety En Engineer.
gineer. Engineer. He should be a man with
authority to immediately correct,
or have corrected, any safety
hazard. (If the university pre presently
sently presently has such a man, I have
been unable to ascertain same.) I
am sure that there are many such
hazards around the campus and
the dorms that need correcting
(Re: Alligator article March 28,
1968, concerning pipes ob obstructing
structing obstructing traffic).
Although the first item men mentioned
tioned mentioned was reported to the campus
police (with a promise from them
to check it), I don't think that
they have the men, or proper
authority to correct this and other
situations.
We need a Safety Engineer that
anyone can contact at any time.
Many cities and almost all large
companies have one. Having
' wdfked in ohe of tjie most safe-*'*
ty-conscious areas of the United
States (Cape Kennedy) for a
number of years, I know and fully
appreciate the value of these men.
I hope, Sir, that you wil
seriously consider this, and act
promptly.
IVAN D. HARNAGE, 4EG

.Wednesday, April 3, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

ped in Vietnam. The napaiming
of civilians and the destruction
of villages to save them are
certainly hideous occurrences.
But equally appalling is the fact
that the undeclared war has pro produced
duced produced an adamantly bloodthirsty
mood in this country.
o
Old Mendel Rivers keeps
rollin' along, and Hershey bars
dissent through re-classifica re-classification.
tion. re-classification. Our leaders, particu particularly
larly particularly LBJ, who ran on a peace

why do they freely admit that
the Viet Cong have asked the peo people
ple people to revolt?
Then theres the question of
North Vietnam the great
liberator. Obviously the disease
is affecting both eyes in this case,
because it seems that this peace
loving 0 country has taken upon
itself to invade Laos. Today they
are moving in the direction of
its capital. It seems that Uncle
Ho wants to infiltrate troops to
S. Vietnam, and if a neutral coun country
try country happens to be where the road
is, then tough just icing on
their bullets.
Lastly, are our crimes. Ac Accidental
cidental Accidental bombings are just that
accidents. Is a car accident
murder? I call something mur murder
der murder when innocent civilians are
used as shields, which the VC
have recently done, or the de deliberate
liberate deliberate bombing of public build buildings
ings buildings in which civilians are hurt
or killed. I call something a crime
when civilians are kidnapped, and
often shot (which is murder) if
allied forces are about to over overwhelm
whelm overwhelm them ; many are women and
old men.
Napalm is an effective weapon
against the Viet Cong, and North
Vietnamese soldiers. Yes, it kills
and injures civilians, but so do
grenades, bullets, mortars, and
explosive bombs in general and
in greater quantity than napalm.
Perhaps we should supply our
men, and the S. Viet. Army with
sling shots armed with rubber
balls. Or perhaps stop fighting so
that no civilians will be hurt or
killed. But the Communists dont
care about civilians. So when the
communists finally try to com completely
pletely completely take over Laos we'll let
them. And when they completely
take over Cambodia and Thailand,
which they have already started
to do, we can take delight in
knowing that we have furthered
the cause of peace.
ALAN ESKENAS, lUC
Gator Button
I HEREDITARY JS

platform in *64, are intractably
hawkish. Eugene McCarthy has
other ideas, but he may not have
a chance. I am writing now be because
cause because I detest our senseless
Asian struggle. But I, too, may
be ignored.
Mr. Alper seems to think that
those who protest the war*
are degenerates. Well, sir, I dont
have long hair, and I dont smoke
pot or fags (nor do I associate
with the latter). Im wild-eyed
only when Im not wearing my
contact lenses. I dont consider
myself a pacifist. But I would
not fight over .there if ordered
to. I do not intend to kill for
a Pax Americana. F.M. Williams
writes: Dow does not kill any anyone;
one; anyone; they only make the
chemical. Sure, and the Nazis
were just following orders. Didnt
we learn anything from them?
Thomas Merton wrote a poem
entiled Adolf Eichmann. The
poems purpose was to show that
we, the good guys, are guilty,
too. We murder at a distance
and with bombs, but we still
murder. I, for one, dont want
to be guilty of the crime of
silence. Merton ended his poem:
Hiroshima . Aufwleder Aufwledersehen!
sehen! Aufwledersehen!
I say: Vietnam.. .Auf wieder wiedersehen!
sehen! wiedersehen!
DAVID RAVING MILLER,2UC
Please Limit Letters To
Tlie Alligator To 300-
500 Words. Due To The
Volume Os Mail, Not
All Letters Can Be Pub Published,
lished, Published, Nor Can Each
Letter Be Printed In Its
Original Length.
Gods Little
Circular File
MR. EDITOR:
God woke up one morning and
yawned. He had nothing in parti particular
cular particular to do so he decided to finish
some house-cleaning he started
previously. He collected all of
the dirt, smut, mud, and related
matter that was congesting his
domain into one big pile.
His pad was spotless but the
pile remained. Composed of the
most sinister elements he could
not let it remain within the prov providence
idence providence of its master and He
carefully plotted its fate.
He planned for it to be con contained
tained contained in a place where it could
not infect the rest of Creation.
No one would have access to it
and it would be avoided like the
plague for indeed it was. He
searched for a circular file in his
vast system of classification
where it could not interfere with
his curriculum. He remembered
a place a self-contained dis disposal
posal disposal unit far-removed from His
influence where it could be left
alone subjected to the evil in inherent
herent inherent within it.
((*,>' 'l* l * *.* '-.
That night God undressed and
went to bed. He smiled in the dark
and felt a great deal of relief
knowing that he had accomplished
a hard days labor. He fell sound soundly
ly soundly asleep as he happily remem remembered
bered remembered that he would never have to
think about Earth again.
ARLENE WEINBERG

Page 7



Page 8

I, Hie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

American Crewel Embroidery
HOMESPUN AND BLUE. By Martha
Ganting Stems. Revised Enlarged
edition with 32 pictures. A
fascinating account of early
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curtains and coverlets with
reproductions of their designs. Orig.
Pub. at $5.75 New, complete ed.
Only 1.98
LIVING HISTORY OF THE
WORLD. 1967 Year Book. Ed. by
Geo. D. Stoddard. Over 500
photographs plus numerous charts &
drawings. More than 100
outstanding writers have
contributed to this mammoth votum
recording in colorful words the
events of an exciting, historic year in
alphabetical arrangement. Important
and fascinating facts for the entire
family. Handsomely bound,
beautifully printed. 7% x 10. Pub. at
$9.95 Only 2.98
THE COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED
BOOK OF YOGA. By Swami
Vishnudenananda. Over 140 full page
photos. All the essential knowledge:
asanas, breathing exercies,
concentration, meditation* diet,
philosophy, longevity, training
programs, etc. Orig. Pub. at SIO.OO
New, complete ed. Only 3.95
CORTES AND THE CONQUEST OF
MEXICO. 60 lllus. in Color. The
amazing story of how a few hundred
Spaniards, cut off from home and
help, conquered the vast armies of
the Emperor of Mexico. Special 2.98
2 Discovery
and Exploration <
|
*
CLOSED MINDS. By Wm.
J. Reilly. How to achieve
understanding and cooperation, how
to deal with stubborn people,
building effectiveness in your job,
etc., illustrated with concrete
examples. Orig. Pub. at $3.50 New,
complete ed. Only 1.00
AMERICAN PAINTING. By Virgil
Barker, lllus. with over 100 plates.
One of the best histories of American
painting, a handsome (7x10) volume
covering the social cultural
background of American art from* the
17th century to the present Orig.
Pub. at $12.50 New, complete, ed.
Only 5.96

/ ... - J ''
Originally Published ||H |
- '"* r ''* % B
The Campus Shop and Bookstore Semii

CHILDREN'S ILLUSTRATED
TREASURY OF KNOWLEDGE. 2
Vol. Set With 576 Pages in Full
Color. A set of 36 great educational
books bound into two volumes a
wealth of exciting reading,
fascinating facts and information,
written by renowned educators,
magnificently illustrated, thoroughly
enchanting. Pub. at $7.90 The 2 Vol
Set Complete, Only 4.95
FAMOUS GHOSTS, PHANTOMS,
AND POLTERGEISTS. By A.
Tackaberry. A fascinating account of
sheets, spirits and apparitions from
the past and the present how
they haunt, what they seek and what
satisfies them. Orig. Pub. at $1.95
New, complete ed. Only 1.00
NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS OF
PREY. By A. Sprunt, Jr. Foreword
by Roger Tory Peterson, lllus. with
46 plates in full color 8i 4 pages of
identification silhouettes. The
beauty, grace and prowess of birds of
prey depicted in words and pictures,
the large majority of the color plates
by Allan Books. Orig. Pub. at $5.00
New, complete ed. Only 3.95
ESP FOR THE MILLIONS. By Susy
Smith. A basic introduction to
ExtraSensory Perception with
notable examples what to expect
from it, how it behaves and
misbehaves. Orig. Pub. at $1.95 New,
complete ed. Only 1.00
HOW TO BE HEALTHY WITH
YOGA. By S. Richmond. With 53
photos. The yoga system of
improving your health and
wellbeing, easing tension, insomnia,
fatigue, bad posture, arthritis and
other complainis by a system of
exercises with a valuable chapter on
foods. Orig. Pub. at $2.50 New,
complete
FIREARMS CURIOSA. By Lewis
Wfnant. lllus. with photos, drawings
& specifications of over 300
examples of weapons. Interesting and
informative book on the odd, strange
and novel forms of inventive genius
applied to the manufacture of arms,
weapon holders, combinations with
knivesf, flashlights, etc., as used by
the lawful and lawless through the
years. Orig. Pub. at $8.50 New,
complete ed. Only 1.98
HOW THE NEW WORLD WAS
WON. 56 pictures 8t maps, all in full
color. A thrilling history from the
time of Columbus until the settling
of the West after the Civil War.
Expeically written for young people.
9 x 12. Special 2.98
WILD FLOWERS. By J. G. Barton.
Over 100 different flowers described
and illustrated in striking full color in
detail with much useful information.
X x 10%. Only 2.98
AROUND THE WORLD IN 80
DAYS. By Jules Verne. New,
enchanting translation of the
fascinating chronicle of Phileas Fogg
by George M. Towle. Over 100 Full
Color lllus. by L. Marai*. Pub. at
$5.00. Only 2.98

MERRY ADVENTURES OF ROBIN
HOOD. Robin Hood, Will Scarlet,
Little John, Allan Dale and all the
other Sherwood adventurers in their
most enchanting presentation. Vivid
text by Howard Pyle. Over 100 Full
Color illus. by Benvenuti. Pub. at
$5.00. Only 2.98
THE AUDUBON BOOK OF TRUE
NATURE STORIES. Ed. by John K.
Tseres. Profusely illustrated with
delicately executed lithographs by
Walter W. Ferguson. 49 of the
bestloved stories from Audubon
Magazine by such famous writers as:
Edwin Way Teale, Alan Devoe,
Alexander Sprunt, and others. Orig.
pub. at $6.95 New, complete ed.
Only 3.49
GOURMET MEALS FOR EASY
ENTERTAINING. By M. N. Fried.
21 complete, time-budgeted menus
for festive dinners with more than
120 easytoprepare recipes for
delicious and distinctive food. Orig.
Pub. at $3.50 New, complete ed.
Only 1.00
History of Maritime America. THE
SEAFARERS. By Robt Carse. lllus.
Beginning with the learned to build
shallops and pinnaces, learned to kill
whales; oppose the mighty British
fleet with a tiny navy and privateers,
develop trade with the west coast to
Asia, etc. Pub. at $5.95. Only 1.98
THE REVOLVER 1865-1888. By
A. W. F. Taylerson. With 73 photos
8i 23 drawings. A lavishly illustrated
history of firearms using revolving
ammunition-feed systems in a
period which saw the founding of
designs for many revolvers used
today. Orig. Pub. at $7.50 New
complete ed. Only 2.98
Four complete books: Hop O'My
Thumb; Puss In Boots; Jack the
Giant Killer. Pub. at SIO.OO 75 cents
HIROHITO Emperor of Japan By L.
Moseley, lllus. with 28 photos.
Full-length biography revealing the
politics leading to Pearl Heritor, his
relation to his own military power
clique during the war and with Gen.
MacArthur afterwards. Pub. at $7.95
Only 1.00
i?

HUCKLEBERRY HOUND
TREASURY. 7 stories with
Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear,
Quick Draw McGraw and Pall the rest.
Over 100 large illus. in Full Color.
Pub. at $1.99 only .49
THE KINGS OF THE ROAD. By
Ken W. Purdy, lllus. with Photos.
Fascinating account of the fabulous
"royal family" of automobiles the
history and features of the Mercer,
Duesenberg, Cord, Auburn, Stanley,
Bugatti, Rolls-Royce, Mercedes,
MG, Stirtz, Marmon, HispanoSuiza,
and others including odd
one-of-a-kind cars and some racing
accounts. Orig. Pub. at $5.95 New,
revised ed. Only 1.98
*
THE BOOK OF RIFLES. By W. H.
B. Smith 8t Jos. E. Smith. Rev. Ed.
Over 2000 photos, nearly 700 pages.
An encyclopedic reference for the
facts about any military or sporting
shoulder arm from any of 51
countries. Pub. at $12.50 Only 4.95
FLOWER ARRANGING BY
NUMBER. For People Who Want
Artistic Results Immediately. By P.
Boehm & S. Matsuda. Over 50 illus.
A simple and quick way to learning
the basic flower arrangements and
the many seasonal variations using
garden flowers, branches, leaves and
grasses. Orig. Pub. at $2.95 New,
complete ed. Only 1.00
MUSHROOM COOKERY. By
Rosetta Reitz. A delightful book on
how to cook, can, freeze and hunt
this delicacy. In addition to the
traditional mushroom dishes, there
are many dazzling surprises like:
Flaming Mushrooms, Muffins,
Quenelles, etc. Orig. Pub. at $4.95
New, complete ed. Only 1.49
THE SMALL KITCHEN COOK
BOOK. By Nina Morellito. A small
kitchen need not be a deterrent to
prepanng meals in the grand manner.
An unusual cook book full of choice
recipes that are easy to prepare with
many features not found in other
books. Orig. Pub. at $4.95 New
complete ed. Only 1.49
E COMPLETE ETCHINGS OF
I? Y^^ Foreword *>y Aldous Huxley.
All of the 268 etchings the famous
print senes, The Disasters of War,
Art f Bullfighting, in this large
and handsome single volume. Orig.
JJ**?- ** $7 5 New, complete ed.
Only 3.95
F^S^Hl^rt LS F r? R C WPANY:
R^7!loi r9e Groups By Ei
foT* e menus
midnight suppers
luncheons, cocktail anrit**
all season n- tea P**** in
iftui£& YB -L R always,
3M Hkl V V H Loxton Over
Uvelv htaJ? P *? m FuM Color.
ft^JSsrs£x*v
rolling stock- skmak- .. ** at,on *;
lines';
22*2* ctric and g,?£riX£
etc. Pub. at $7.50 Only

THE OLD MASTERS:
Byzantine-Gothic-Renaissance-
Baroque. Text by C.
Lorgues-Lapouge. 131 Plates in
Color, 65 drawings in two tones.
Here is a magnificent panorama of
priceless paintings and drawings from
the 6th to the 18th centuries -a few
of the artists: Durer, Brueghel,
Titian, El Greco, Raphael, Rubens,
Michelangelo, Hogarth, Rembrandt
9% x 13. Pub. at $12.50 Only 7.95
COIN DICTIONARY AND GUIDE.
By. C. C. Chamberlain & Fred
Reinfeld. Profusely illustrated. A
comprehensive reference guide in
dictionary form. In addition to the
basic terms, there is fascinating
information on the history, naming,
inscriptions and uses of coins. Orig.
Pub. at $3.95 New, complete ed.
Only 1.00
SOUTHERN ANTIQUES. By P. H.
Burroughs. With 118 photos & 15
drawings. An account of the
furniture made in the 5 colonies:
Maryland, Virginia, North & South
Carolina and Georgia the makers,
woods, styles with superb
illustrations of desks, chests, chairs,
beds, sideboards, tables, etc. Long
outofprint and rare. 8!4 x 11.
Orig. Pub. at $5.00 New, complete
ed. Only 2.98
I DR AW INO
I *2* BOOK
§ Atfr* f
UA
MK:^
I JrnjWT r
1^
PAINTING CHILDREN IN
WATERCOLOR. By Herb Olsen.
Hundreds of illus. in color and black
& white. One of America's leading
wetercolerirti instructs in basic as
wall as specific technique. '<
painting pic turns of ehftdren mjj
truly beautthd^boah^uhieh^
painting ST nsnataL 8% x 10*. Orig
Pub. at tl#J6 Near, easnpiste ed
Osdy 3.M
THE WATSON DRAWING BOO*-
By Ernest & Aldem Watson. WOT
250 Illus. An introduction to the
techniques of black ft white dte* l "*
through the work of 80 artists ana
may diagrams in. pencil, pen a m*,
brush, quill, charcoal, wash, etc. 8/&x
10%. Orig. Pub. at $9.95 New,
complete ed. Only 2.96



V
-h' '
Handsome editions |||j
3*,4anKeH^^KV^NMMb"

Annual

* .-my
| foulM|E!£!?S
* Htwttc'H wAUVK>rE* ROTTM nf.Hi
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n
RELAX WITH YOGA. By Arthur
Liebers. With 29 photos. All the
pastures, breathing exercises and
principles of diet which lead to
success in body building, weight
reduction, increase in mental activity,
maintaining sexual prowess and even
achieving painless childbirth. Orig.
Pub. at $2.50 New, complete ed.
Only 1.98
SOUTHERN PLANTATION: The
Story of LAB RAH including its
Treasured Recipes. By LHlian Britt
Heinsohn. Illus. For all who enjoy
reading about gardens, food, birds,
fish and nature, this account of life
on a 1,000 acre plantation in Georgia
will be a delightful experience.
Throughout are mouth-watering
recipes for favorite and unusual
dishes: pressed chicken, pecan
waffles, onion pie, peach puffs,
spoon bread, etc. Orig. Pub. at $4.50
New, complete ed. Only 1.98
MASTERING YOUR MEMORY. By
F. S. Hamilton. An easy, effective
guide that tells you how to remember
n nes, faces, dates, numbers, cards
and many other important factors in
your daily life. Orig. Pub. at $2.50
New, complete ed. Only 1.00
PAINTING METHODS: A Guide to
Traditional and Modem. By Frederic
Taubes. With 100 illus., 11 in color.
The materials, techniques and
aesthetics of the artist from medieval
times to the present with notable
exapples from the works of Titian,
Ei Greco, Brueghel, Rembrandt,
Rubens, Renoir, Cezanne, Dali, J.
Pollock and many others. 7% x 9.
Orig. Pub. at $6.75 New, Complete
ed. Only 2.98
LAROUSSE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF
THE EARTH. Foreword by Sir
Vivian Fuchs. Intro, by Carrol L.
Fenton. More Than 500 Photos &
Diagrams, Mostly in Color.
Comprehensive and .authoritative
account of the anatomy and history
of our planet, the geology,
mineralogy, palaeontology answers
all the questions of how, where,
when and why, with an excellent
index Special 9.95

SIDEWALK BOOK SALE

APRIL 3,4,5

GOOD TIME CHARLIE.. A Real
Greenwich Village Cat. By V.
Criston. With 47 photos. Delightful
story of a marmaladecolored city
cat who invaded the author's
apartment and allowed himself to be
persuaded to make it his home. Pub.
at $3.95 Only 1.49
DISCOVERY AND
EXPLORATION: An Atlas-History
of Man's Journeys into the
Unknown. By Frank Debenham.
More than 200 paintings,
photographs & documents; 38 relief
maps, 5 world maps, 12 globes, more
than 120 detailed explorer's route
maps about half of them in full
color. A lavishly illustrated account
of man's most exciting and
significant explorations from
primitive times to today's ventures
into outer space. 8% x 11%. Orig.
Pub. at $9.95 New, complete ed.
Only 4.95
AN ASTROLOGY PRIMER FOR
THE MILLIONS. By Carl P. Tobey.
How to understand people, how to
make astrological forecasts in this
oldest branch of knowledge. Orig.
Pub. at $1.95 New, complete ed.
Only 1.00
HAUNTED HOUSES FOR THE
MILLIONS. By Susy Smith. An
intriguing tour of some of the most
famous castlea, homes and buildings
of the world including the weird lore
of the sea and ships. Orig. Pub. at
$1.95 New, complete ed. Only 1.00
MOSAICS: Principles and Practice.
By Joseph Young. More than 200
photos, 8 in ful color. Revised &
Enlarged edition of COURSE IN
MAKING MOSAICS which outlines
in detail all that $6.50 Only 3.49
THE NEW APPROACH TO FIGURE
DRAWING. By Wm. Anthony. Over
250 illus. A demonstration of the
common incorrect methods as well as
the correct methods for drawing the
clothed as well as the nude figure, as
a whole or in parts. 8% x 11%. Pub.
at $4.95 Only 2.98
t
Art Techniques for Brush & Pencil:
ERNEST W. WATSON'S SKETCH
DIARY. 19 reproductions in color,
41 in black 8t white. An unique art,
book combining lovely pictures with
instructive text for working in pencil
and watercolor. 7% x 10%. Orig. pub.
at $4.50 New, complete ed. Only
1.98
THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE
AMERICAN RACING CAR. By
Griffith Borgason. With 220 photos
& drawings. The complete story of
the men, mechinas, tracks and
engineering accomplishments from
the yeers just prior to World War I
when American technology started to
assert itself in the design of the
S urebred racing car. 8 x 11. Pub. at
12.50 Only 4.95

EXPLORERS AND
EXPLORATIONS. By Eric Protter.
Nearly 200 Illus. in Color. Hare are
all the great adventures of discovery,
including space; with details about
the explorers and beautiful
illustrations in full color. All ages.
Pub. at $3.96 Only 1.98
MAKE YOUR OWN DOLLS. By I.
StroblWohlschlager. 50 Lovely
dolls, animals and jumping jacks you
can make from scraps of cloth. Also
how to construct jointed dolls, hand
puppets, knit dolls, etc. 60 illus., 8 in
Full Color. 7 3/8 x 7 3/8. Pub. at
$3.50 Only 1.98
IH| oi mu
*** ** bb Wm
WAYS TO AMUSE A CHILD: Crafts.
Hobbies & Creative Ideas for the
Child from 6 to 12. By June
Johnson. With 122 illus.
Easy-tofollow directions for
hundreds of simple things for boys
and girls to make, to do and to enjoy.
Orig. Pub. at $3.95 New, complete
ed., only 1.00
THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF
OZ. By L. F. Baum. Only hardbound
edition in print with all the or !§! " o
W. W. Densiow illus. In Full Color
as much a part of The Wizard as
Tenniel's drawings are of Alice in
Wonderland. Now today's young
readers can enjoy every word and
wonderful picture of the original
book. New intro, by Martin Gardner.
23 Full Pages in Color. 268 pp. Pub.
at $4.00. only 1.98
SEAS, MAPS, AND MEN. An
Atlas-History of Man's Exploration
of the Oceans. By G. E. R. Deacon.
With hundreds of pictures & maps,
mostly in color. A lavishly illustrated
account oof the seas, its margins,
depths and vegetation, sunken cities,
wrecks and treasure, marine biology,
tides, navigators and explorers
through the centuries, etc. 8% x 11%.
Orig. Pub. at $9.95 New, complete
4. Only 4.95 J

Wednesday, April 3, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

HUCKLEBERRY HOUND AND HIS
FRIENDS. Every page illus. in color.
A giant picture-story book, the
adventures of Top Cat, Loopy De
Loop, Augie Doggie, Quick Draw
McGraw, and others. Ages 3-7. Size
10 x 12. Pub. at $2.95. Only 1.00
KING ARTHUR 8i HIS KNIGHTS
OF THE ROUND TABLE. 100
Paintings in rich color by Gustaf
Tenggren. The glorious adventures of
King Arthur, Merlin the Magician,
Lancelot and Guinevere, and all the
rest Pub. at $5.00 Only 2.98
COMPLETE WOODCUTS OF
DURER. Ed. By Dr. Willi Kurth.
Illus. with 346 woodcuts. All the
woodcuts Durer was known to have
made. One of the greatest artiitic
achievements of all time by one of
the masters in this field particularly
on sacred themes. 9x12 Orig. Pub.
at $7.50 New, complete ed. Only
3.95
DRAWINGS OF THE FRENCH
MASTERS. 2 Complete Books in 1
Volume. Book I FRENCH
DRAWINGS FROM THE 15th
CENTURY THROUGH
GERICAULT. Text by Jean
Vallerv-Radot. Book II FRENCH
IMPRESSIONISTS. By Maurice
Serullaz. Over 200 Drawings in
Natural Color. Book I Covers 53 of
the most important artists of the
period among them Fouquet, Clouet,
Claude, Poussin, Watteau, Fragonard
and David. Book II surveys the whole
of the 19th century, the
fountainhead of modem art, from
Delacroix and Daumier to Cezanne
and Seurat Orig. Pub. at $11.95
New, complete ed. Only 5.95
HUMPHERY BOGART: The Man
and His Films. By Paul Michael. More
than 100 photos in scenes from every
one of his 75 films with a concise
synopsis of the story and complete
cast and credits. The story of the
man and his mystique which made
him a legend in his own lifetime. 8%
x 9%. Orig. Pub. at $7.95 New,
complete ed. Only 2.98
ENDURE AND CONQUER. By Dr.
Sam Sheppard. Foreword by F. Lee
Bailey. The principal of one of the
mast controversial murder trials of
this century talk not only of his 12
year fight for vindication but an
account of student years and
courtship of his murdered wife, the
ordeal of police "third degrees," his
trial and shocking experiences in jail,
the sensation seekers, his eventual
release after 13 attempts. Pub. at
$5.95 Only 1.00
THE FLOWER FAMILY ALBUM.
By H. F. Fischer 8i G. Harshbarger.
458 pictures of flowers, vegetables &
weeds arranged in family groups and
drawn to scale for easy identification
and full of fascinating facts. 10% x
7%. Orig. Pub. at $4.00 New,
complete ed. Only 1.98

THE PERSONALITY OF THE
BIRD. Ed. by Brandt Aymar. With
25 full page illus. Wonderful stories
about birds by such authors as:
Terhune, Saul Bellow, W. Van
Tilburg Clark, Donald C. Peattie,
Ernest Thompson Seton, and others
each depicting a trait some are
courageous, lonely, uncooperative,
presumptuous, courting, etc. Pub. at
$4.95 Only 2.49
HANDWRITING ANALYSIS FOR
THE MILLIONS. By Dorothy Sara.
Illus. with examples. A noted
graphologist provides an
easytofollow approach to the
science of analyzing handwriting and
its use in revealing traits of
personality. Orig. Pub. at $1.95 New,
complete, ed. Only 1.00
PICTURE GALLERY PIONEERS:
First Photographers Os The West
18501875. By Ralph W. Andrews.
A photohistory of photography and
its infancy in the West a picture
gallery of wagon trains and railroads,
Indians, pueblos and tent towns,
early Denver, Salt Lake City, San
Francisco, Yellowstone and
Yosemite, mining camps, etc. 8% x
10%. Pub. at $12.50 Only 3.95
\ ;
New Illustrated HISTORY OF
WEAPONRY. By C. Canby. Over 175
Illus., 36 in Full Color. Exciting
praMntation of the history es
military tactics, development of
cavalry, armor, artillery, navies, air
forces, the rice and vaN of empires. A
vast, exciting tahlasu of human
invention, ambition, adventure and
achievement. PUb. at SSJ6 Only
2M
THE BEACH BOOK. By G. STeinam.
Introd. by J. K. GaMSraHh. Ilea. wHh
photos & drawings. Have fun on the
beach with this big treasury of
stories, songs, jokes, cartoons, games
and problems, miscellany of
information even the jacket is a
sun relector to help you tan faster.
8% x 10%. Pub. at $8.60 Only 1.98

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
form.

S^x*x.nvx*x*x*x < >mC"M.vx*x*x x-x*x.nn*xx
FOR SALE
.y C*!
.>:*:*x*xxx
1964 VESPA 150 Must sell
Perfect mechanical condition never
any trouble. New paint, new tires.
$150.00. 372-6003 or 376-9217.
(Alo4stp)
1962 LAMBRETTA 125 cc. Fair
condition. Tool Kit included. $85.00
or best offer. Call 3788959 after
5:00. Ask for Bob. (Alosstp)
SOLID STATE COMPONENT
STEREO, includes: 54Watt
Amplifier, AM/FM Multiplex tuner,
AR Speakers, Sony Tape Deck,
Weathers turntable. Many Extras
included. Best offer over $450.00.
372-7203. (Alo63tp)
CAMERA: Zess Icon Contena
(35mm), with flash $75.00. Call
David at 378-3937. (A-106-3t-p)
POSTERS! Wholesale to dealers. Free
catalog. Distributor Inquiries invited.
San Francisco Poster Company. P. O.
Box 38036, Hollywood, Calif.
90038. (Alo6stp)
GUNS GUNS GUNS
Inventory over 450 Buy Sell
Trade Repair. Reloading Supplies,
Custom Reloading HARRY
BECKWITH, GUN DEALER,
MICANOPY, 466-3340.
(Alo6tfp)
15' WINDMILL SAILBOAT
complete with 2 H.P. motor, trailer,
and all safety equipment. Less
$350.00. Phone 376-3922 after
5:30 on weekdays. (Alo63t-p)
LUDWING DRUM SET complete
Model 988 l-Pcx Downbeat.
Including set of 4 Paiste 602 Cymbals
and drum stool Pearl Finish
Excellent condition Almost new
$475. 378-6746. (A-107-4t-p)

* DO-11-Yourself
Wr DAYS TO RUN
J ft To or J 5 form below. Mall It with remit- (consecutive
( i tance to: Alligator Classifieds, 1 day g
( 8 Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- 2 S
8 Tllle, Florida 32601. 3 (*> dlscount > S
a Q 4 days (*lO% discount) a
( g Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over
I g 3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount) ||
1 DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE ft
j a a ccici^A TI^KJ Count the words, omitting a, an & jSJ
)g L.L/ODINL.M iivjin Addresses and phone numbers
i R count as one word. Minimum charge
II n Is SI.OO for 20 words. For each SB
jf n additional word add 3s. Multiply 9K
n the total by number of days the ad SS
S n he *S Wa ted Is to run. Subtract the discount jjejj
1 R Dersonal & a PP llcable ) and enclose a check 8
8 rn for the remainder. For example, ££
I n Let'lces 32-word ad to run 4 days costs M
11 services M-90 (,5.44 | eS s 64 !| WORDING |||
. .1 9 L
; *., ,--- T? > a J
'NAME DATE. 11
K STUDENT # PHONE ||
gj ADDRESS . VjiA I
|| CITY STATE ZIP J
jpfejtnimoney cannot be refunded If ad is cancelledsAflg

FOR SALE
WOMEN'S Spalding golf dub set, 7
irons, 3 woods. Excellent condition,
S4O. 9 x 12 Umbrella tent, excellent
condition, $35.00. Gold I and aqua
brocade drapes, elegant, $5.00 per
panel. 376-0397. (A-107-3t-p)
1963 DUCATI Motorcycle 125 cc.
Must sell; best offer. Don Miller.
376-9372, 417 East Hall.
(Alo3tp)
EGMOND 12-string guitar.
Beautiful. Almost new. Sacrafice at
$85.00 or best offer. 3788071.
(Alo3tp)
EXCITING midnight blue cartop
sailboat, all fillings, varnished spars,
gaff rigged. Ready to sail Ideal for
two on Wauberg. Make offer. Call
Rich 378-7069. (A-108-It-p)
STEREO Speakers: 360 degrees
round column speakers in ivory and
gold. Fuse protected. Advertised in
Playboy. New cost SBO.OO each.
Your cost $25.00 each. 3765525.
(Steve). (Alo-Itp)
MUST SELL: Gibson Amplifier, with
12" speaker, reverb, and tremolo,
excellent condition, $125. Call
376-9542 after 6:00 p.m.
(Alo3tp)
1965 Scooter 90cc, electric start,
windshield, etc. Very low mileage,
excellent, $l5O. 376-6670.
(Alo3tp)
1966 SCOOTER, 150 cc, windshield,
electric start, turn signals, racks,
mirrors, etc. Very low mileage,
excellent, $250. 3766670.
(Alo3tp)

Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

.;.^:.x<.x.:.nwt*n%?s:w*xsX^'XXvX*X£
| FOR RENT |
AVAILABLE NOW. Cottage, two
large bedrooms accomodate four
responsible students. Very attractive
interior. Panelled living-room,
fireplace, dining-room. 11 NE 7th
St. 372-0093 or 372-1402.
(Blo6stp)
ROOMS. AC and CH. 3 blocks from
campus. Senior or graduate men or
sorority or fraternity groups. Phone
378-8122 or 376-6652.
(B101lOtp)
*
UNFURNISHED two bedroom one
bath house at 1720 NW 7th Place.
$95.00 per month. Married couples
only. Call 376-5168 or 376-9990.
(Blo4stp)

3 BLOCKS from campus. One
vacancy in double room for male
student. Air conditioned,
refrigerator. Rent reasonable. 327
NW 15th Terr. 372-8929,
afternoons. (Blo3-stp)
APT. suited for couple or two
students located near mall. $75.00
per month, includes electricity and
water. Cali 378 1776.
(Blosstp)
SUMMER quarter for rent
Furnished apt., AC, 2 blocks from
campus. $60.00 per month
completely remodeled just this year.
306L, NW 16th St. 376-1596.
(B^los-st-p)
ONE AND TWO bedroom furnished
apartment, CH/AC, Summer rates.
Call Vem Hinson. 378-2558.
(Blo6tfc)
OLYMPIA Two bedroom apartment
to sublet for 3rd and/or 4th quarters.
Call 378-5274. (B-104-4t-p)
LARGE unfurnfched 4 bedroom, 2
bath for family only. Quiet
neighborhood. 5 miles from
University. Large Yard. $125.
monthly. 2144 SE 41 Ave. Call
372-2648 or 376-5849.
(Blo74tc)
153335 NE sth Ave. 1 bedroom
Apt. Furnished and air conditioned.
5 blocks from campus. Available
immediately. Call 376-8475 or
376-1065. (Blo7stp)
BEAUTIFULLY furnished Apt.
across from University. Central Heat
and Air. Wall to wall carpeting,
complete electric kitchen. 1236 SW
4th Ave. Apt 3.378-5278. $135.00
monthly. (Blo73tp)
FOR RENT: Garage2 car, can be
rented single or double for car,
storage, etc. 1840 NW 2 Ave.
378-4645. (B-108-It-p)
SUBLEASE Efficiency Apt. Modem,
AC, near Campus, $70.00 per month.
Available immediately. 3785438.
1222 NW Bth Ave. Apt. 10.
(Blo Bstp)
GRADUATE LAW STUDENT W|H
share comfortable suite of air
conditioned rooms (with bath and
refrigerator) with quiet gentleman
at 321 SW 13th St across from
campus. (B108Itp)
1 BR furn. apts. Heat-AC. Private
Patio. 376-1546. (B-108-3t-c)
Held Over!
Feature at 7:20 & 11:00 I
ITS NOT WHO YOU CON
ITS HOW YOU DO rrl ...3MB:
Paul nauminTS
, Hie Secret UJar of JJ3I
HRMW HUGO J'M
fajg* TECHNICOLOR-* J| l ljCofeature
jCofeature ljCofeature at 9:20 I
gjgia

FOR RENT I
EXTRA large, new 2 br. furnished
apt. Cent. HeatAC. Full Kitchen,
no park or noise problems.
376-1546. (Blo3tc)
BRAND NEW extra large furn. 1 BR
apt. Cent. HeatAC. Full carpet,
large kitchen, private patio,
compartmented bath. 3761546.
(Blo3tc)
3 Bedroom furnished house. Air
Conditioned, 1% baths living room,
dining room, 2 garages, nice trees. No
lease required, $145 per mo. 928 NW
11th Ave. Call 372-8818.
(Blo Bstp)
.vX-X-X.X.NVX-X-X'X-XvXX.X-X.V.vivXvXO;*
I WANTED
:*>:XX*x<*x*:*x.sxx*x*x*:*:*x*x*x.mwx*x^S
WANTED: One or two roommates
for Landmark immediate occupancy.
376-0516. (Clo2tp)
FEMALE roommate to share 2
bedroom Duplex apt. with 2 girls.
100 yds. from Norman Hall. $29.00 a
month. Air conditioned. Call
378-5254. (C-108-2t-p)
FEMALE roommate needed
immediately for French Quarter Apt.
$43.75 plus utilities per month. Call (
Jan, Candy or Pam. 3767401. Apt.
111. (Clo3tp)
FEMALE roommate wanted: Age
2025 to share 2 bedroom furnished
block house. SSO mo. Call 3728901
or 378-8145. (C-108-st-p)
WANTED Student Couple needing a
home. Private bath, bedroom and
meals in exchange for child care,
cooking and housekeeping services.
Two lovable daughers, 4 years and
first grader attending Littwood.
Leave name and number for
Professor Beard. 3783995 or
376-32 11 Ext. 5603.
(Clo3tp)
SPANISH tutor wanted. PhD
Candidate needs help to pass EST
exam on April 20. Call 378-8401.
(Clo2tp)
LOOKING for roommate (either sex)
to share wild, woodpanaled,
2-bedroom, air conditioned, garage
apt. Water and electricity included in
rent Jim at 3721574 after 10:00
p.m. (Clo63t p)
FEMALE roommate wanted: to
share one room Apt. Across street
from campus. $37.50 par month.
Immediate occupancy. Apply 321
SW 13th St. Apt. 2. (Clo6stp)
1 female roommate needed for 1
bdrm Landmark apartment Can
move in immediately. $70.00 par
month. Call 378-2703.
(Clo72to)

rrrrfl in academy award
lillffl |U NOMINATIONS N
- i j. Spencer i Sidney i Katharine
Si:, s 'jMO| TRACY 1 POITIER 1 HEPBURN iTis
guess who's fig
coming to dinner jj|o
Hes in color I
AS IT TOOK PLACE!
r VACATION- THE
EAL-MAYBE YOU |
MDS ARE IN THIS|
UST SEE PICTURE. I
|ldpL 1
'
I NO. 2 hurry sundown I
i Faye Dunaway, I
TOE

| WANTED J
MALE roommate wanted: Frederick
Garden Apts. AC, Pod, Cable T.V.
Only $88.75 for Entire spring
Quarter. Call 378 2967.
(Clo7stp)
ONE OR TWO male roommates
wanted to share large 2 bdrm Luxury
Gatortown Apt. Immediate
occupancy. Contact Chris.
378-1226. (Clo7stp)
ONE OR TWO male roommates
immediately for French Quarter Apt.
55. Prefer students intending to stay
summer term but not necessary.
378-3449. (C-107-3t-p)
HELP WANTED
v r
BELLMAN needed part time
morning and evening shift. Apply:
Mr. O'Neal, Ramada Inn.
(Elo3tc)
LUMS RESTAURANT Desires
part time waitresses and a cashier.
Must be 21 years of age. Wages, Plus
good tips. Apply 1621 SW 13th St.
Phone 376-9408. (E-106-st-c
VBBTg 3 5 7 9 I
In OUT 10=35
I Hi
I A Royal Films International presentation I
I A JEAN-LUC GODARD FILM I
f - £Re f
married
imonmn J



i nV, i ,V.V i
- ~
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.;*v.wiV3w
| HELP WANTED
ALACHUA GENERAL HOSPITAL
has immediate openings for: Medical
Technologist, Maintenance
Mechanics, Clerk Typists, Ward
Clerks and Registered Nurses.
Permanent employment with good
working conditions, good starting
salaries in all areas. Paid vacations,
holidays and sick leave. State
Retirement Plan and other fringe
benefits. Apply: Personnel Director,
912 S W 4th Avenue.
(Elollotc)
MAKE THE SCENE for a profitable
summer. PERFORM as Summer
Library Intern in outstanding Florida
public library. Enjoy BACKSTAGE
view of professional. library services.
Good pay, varied experience for
select juniors, seniors. By April 8, get
fact sheels, application blanks, make
interview appointment with State
Lbrary representative. University
Placement Center, Room G22,
Florida Union, Mr. Maurice
Mayberry. (Elos3tc)
EXPERIENCED grill cook wanted
part time and also part time
Waitresses. Fri. nights, all day Sat. and
Sun. Apply Trail Boss. Ponderosa
Steak House. (Elo73tc)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN for the
Florida Alligator. Must have car and
be available for summer term. Good
pay, good working conditions, great
experience. Ad majors preferred.
Apply room 330 Reitz Union.
(Elo6nctf)
AUTOS
'* *
FOR SALE: 1961 Simca. Running
condition, good rubber. First SIOO
takes it. Call 3721421. Jerri Rm
366. (Gloltp)
1957 CHRYSLER, Auto, P. Brakes,
P. Steering, Smooth running second
car, $ 1 50. 376-6670.
(Glo3tp)
1961 FAIRLAIN. Perfect body
engine and interior. Excellent
turnpike car. New tires, $375. Call
372-9297 3:00-5:30. See at Archer
Road Village Park, Delta Ave.
Cottage 9. (G-1085t-p)
FOR SALE: 1960 Renault Dauphine.
Good condition. $200.00 or best
offer. Call 376-1490.
(Glo4stp)
1965 LTD. Ford's luxury 4door
Hardtop. Dark Green. White Vinyl
Top. Beautiful car. Immaculate
condition. Call 376-3968 after 5 or
anytime. $1,595.00. (G->>lo4-st-p)
1964 SUNBEAM Alpine Convertable,
excellent condition, radio, heater,
premium tires, new top. Tonneau
cover, must sell. Best Offer.
3785443 anytime. (Glo4stp)
STINGRAY Convertable, 1965,
excellent condition, full power, AC,
AM/FM radio, removable hardtop,
327 engine, 4speed, 3785443
anytime. See at Arts Shell Station.
(Glo4stp)
PLYMOUTH Belvedere 1963, V-8,
Air Conditioning, Power Steering,
Automatic Transmission, Radio, 4
Door, $695 or best offer, 3762895.
(Glo63tp)
LEAVING TOWN. Must sell. 63
Bonneville convertible. Power
Steering, power brakes, four on floor.
Excellent condition. Call 378-3686
or Santa Fe Junior College Ltorary
378-5311. (Glo6Btu)
'64 DODGE Dart, Standard
Transmission. Excellent condition,
9as mitaage and tires. $650.00. Will
bargain. Call Bob, 378-5174,
mornings, 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m.
(Glo4stp)
- ft'*
#r*> 4 '
*4
DEPENDABLE transportation.' 1955
Ford V-8 automatic. Sharp on the
outride needs seat covers. Excellent
tires. Asking $250.00. Call Jack
378-4135. (Glos4tp)
*
1963 AUSTIN HEALEY "3000"
MKII, New top. Custom interior, roll
P windows, electric overdrive,
excellent mechanically. Call
37 2 0763 after 6:00.
(Glo64v- p >
**r *. jsl ft is* 4 # *

Wednesday, April 3, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL |
THREE good-looking male
sophomores (Gamma Delta lota)
need attractive girls for dates. Writer:
5960 SW 35th Way (Country Club
Estates). (J-108-3t-p)
PROJECT GRAY needs volunteers to
give recreational and educational
assistance to Negro children. If
interested meet in Rm 362 or the
Union Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
(Jloltp)
MARSHA Big Sis, Know its pickles
and Penn you miss. Happy Birthday.
Just the same. Your Bull Pledge I
Remain. (J-108-Itp)
TALENT needed for Gator Gras
Minstrel Show, May 10th Variety
acts, male singers including bass
voice. Contact soon! I Linda
376-9163 or 376-9363.
(Jlo63tp)
IS YOUR WIFE working to put you
through school? Give her a dignified
Bxlo CERTIFICATE OF
ACHIEVEMENT on parchmentlike
paper which honors her contribution.
Only $2.25. Wilset Co. Route 2,
Concord, N. H. 03301.
(Jlo6lot-o)_
NEW LEFT, Old Liberal, or just Up
Tight with the Draft: Beat the
Quarter System and get involved. Call
the Freedom phone: 3783711.
(Jlosstp)
| LOST & FOUND |
FOUND one pair of black framed
glasses black case lnscription
"Dr. S. Allen Garden, Miami", Found
at Wauburg. Call Dept, of Anatomy.
Ext. 5444. (Llo3tnc)

... ..
/ I GOT RESULTS \
f WITH 1
GATOR I
CLASSIFIEDS I J
vK 4
mt 9 0 # ** "> 9-* J- *

Page 11

LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Nikkorex Zoom 35mm
Camera. Brown leather case. Reward.
Call 376-9906. (L-108-3t-p)
FOUND Glasses in Women's room,
first floor of Med Science Bldg, about
3 weeks ago. Call 376-7502 after
six. (Llo73tnc)
SERVICES
PRIVATE ART LESSONS in my
home studio for "Boys and Girls" 7
to 14 years. 6 lessons SIO.OO. Call
Mrs. Martin 372-7273.
(Mlo3tp)
CHILD CARE in home.
Monday-Friday. NE section. Play
room, fenced yard with swings.
Lunch and snacks. SIO.OO per week.
376-8523. (M-106-3t-p)
REGISTERED NURSES WANTED:
Five days on duty, two days off; no
rotating or split shifts, annual leave,
state retirement, etc. Please contact
the Director of Nurses or Personnel
office, Sunland Training Center,
Gainesville, Florida. (Mlosstp)
ALTERNATORS-GENERATORS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS
STARTERS ALTERNATORS-GENERATORSSTARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric Service
603 SE Second Street. 3787330.
(Mloltfc)
INCOME TAX RETURNS ... $4.00
up. SPECIAL rates for Univ.
Students, Faculty and employees. At
REbel Discount, 1227 W. Univ. Ave.
3767430, 3786127, across from
Wotfies. (Mlollstp)

WHATS
HAPPENING
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer >
IN GAY OF GAYNESSVILLE: The Tragic: a Phenomenological
Approach' is the title of a lecture to be given by Professor Raymond
Gay at a meeting of the Language and Literature Club in room 1038
of the Architecture and Fine Arts Building at 8:15 tonight.
FOR UF SYMP HO MANIACS: Those crazy about symphonic music
can hear Richard Bowles conduct the UF Symphonic Band in the
Plaza of the Americas at 6:4s.tonight.
IN WAR AND PEACE: The Board of Student Publications, fresh
from its wars for autonomy, will meet in room 316 of the union
tonight at 7:30 p.m.
The Student Peace Union (which has, come to think of it, disa disagreed
greed disagreed with certain student publications in the past on one or two
points) will sit-in room 349 of the union at 8 tonight.
IN FATHERS AND SONS: Circle K, a club sponsored by Klwanis
International, will meet with one of its parents," the Klwanis
Club of Gainesville, tonight at 7 p.m. in room 357 of the union.
IN CLOSING THE CREDIBILITY GAP: Dialogue, Florida Blue
Key's committee for better student-administration communication,
commutes into rooms 355 and 356 of the union at 7:30 tonight.
IN THOSE WHO PROBABLY WENT TO THE KENNEDY RALLY
AND MADE FACES AT THE SPEAKERS: The Young Republican
Club meets in room 346 and 347 of the union tonight at 8.
IN ANKORS AWAY: The Lost City of Ankor" and Sienna"
are the two movies being shown in room 1058 of the Architecture
and Fine Arts Building tonight. (No time available.)
IN TABLE ETIQUETTE AMONG THE CIVILIZED: The members
of the American Civilization Seminar get to show off their manners
at a dinner meeting at 6:45 tonight.
IN THOSE WHO NO DOUBT HAVE CAVERNOUS APPETITES:
The Florida Speleological Society meets in room 361 of the union at
7 tonight.

7500 Books Changed
Hands During Sale

Five hundred and thirty dollars
worth of books changed hands and
1500 books were collected last
week at the Student Government
sponsored Student Book Exchange
on the Reitz Union Terrace, ac according
cording according to David McGriff, book
exchange manager.
McGriff recently replaced SG
Secretary of Interior John
Hotallng as manager of the Ex Exchange.
change. Exchange. Hotaling assumed his
duties as Secretary of Interior
saying the Exchange is only a
function of his department, the
Department of Interior.
McGriff, the new manager,
stated that only about $250 had
been distributed to students by

FBI
AFTER YOU LEAVE
THE BOOKSTORES?
The object of every mistake
is not to make it TWICE! {
. t,
We Sell At Prices
Theookstores Couldnt...
We Buy At Prices
The Bookstores Wouldnt
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
BOOK EXCHANGE
REITZ UNION COLONADE
THROUGH FRIDAY APRIL 5
.Will HE-OftN. AT .TERM'S. END

5 p.m. Monday following a full
week of Exchange operation. He
said the remaining students who
brought books to the Exchange to
be sold should stop at the Reitz
Union Terrace from 12 noon
until 5 p.m. through Friday
to pick up their money.
The Exchange now has enough
books to cover four display displaysized
sized displaysized tables, but McGriff is not
optimistic about selling them.
We just "don't think that
any more books will be sold,
this being the second week of
the quarter," said McGriff.
The Student Book Exchange
concludes its operation Friday
at 5 p.m.



Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Orange
and r-
. H; '
BLUE BULLETIN

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Wednesday, April 3
U of F Symphonic Band:
twilight concert, Plaza of the
Americas, 6:45 p.m.
Circle K: Meeting, 357 Union, 7
p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society:
meeting, 361 Union, 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: spring smoker,
122 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Kiwanis of Gainesville: meeting,
357 Union, 7:30 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Sienna and
"The Lost City of Ankor,"
105 B AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Young Republicans: meeting,
346 Union, 8 p.m.
Language and Literature Club:
Prof. Raymond Gay-Crosier,
''The Tragic: A
P h e n omen o 1 ogi c al
Approach, 103 B AFA, 8:15
p.m.
Thursday, April 4
Baptist Student Center:
fellowship supper, 1604 W.
Univ. Ave., 5:30 p.m.
Everyone welcome
Christian Science: testimony
meeting, 357 Union, 7 p.m.
Latin American Club: general
meeting, 2 McC, 7:30 p.m.
1.E.E.E.: Meeting, 310 Elec.
Eng. Bldg. South, 7:30 p.m.
Fair Plans and Policy
Accent: Ralph Nader and Gov.
Claude Kirk, Fla. Gym., 8
p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom:
business meeting, Union 150
B, 8 p.m.
College of Education: Robert
Chin, On Mating Change
Programs with Idea Models in
Education, Norman Aud.,
8:30 p.m.
Friday, April 5
Engineering Science Seminar:
Dr. F. Zeigler, Stochastic
Problems in Thermoelas Thermoelasticity,"
ticity," Thermoelasticity," 211 Mech. Eng. Bldg.,
4 p.m.
Engineers Fair, Engineering
Complex, 5 p.m.
Union Movie: "From Here to
Eternity," Union Aud., 7 &
9:15 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing, 214
Fla. Gym., 8 p.m.
Accent: Harry 'Golden and
James J. Kilpatrick, Fla.
Gym, 8 p.m.
; a i

Savings by the 10th...
Earns Interest from the IstS / A*)c\ cpy \m3\ 5 1/4 % per year dividend credited semi-annually TuTM
'O* Minimum dividend earning account only $5.00!!! .r^-
FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNIOnI
sth Avenue atrthe corner of 12th Street. Hours : 8:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. I

UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Florida Players production of
"Luther, Students 25 cents,
children and high school 75
cents, faculty, staff and
General admission $1.50; the
Beach Boys, $2.50/person;
v -.Albert Fuller, harpsichordist
(replacing Renaissance
Quartet) Students 50 cents,
faculty and staff, SI.OO,
general admission, $2.00; and
the Golden Crown Races in
Fernandina Beach, $5.00 for
a weekend pass.
i;
. i
ADMINISTRATIVE \
NOTICES
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING POSTPONED: The
meeting of the Graduate Council
scheduled for Thursday, April 4,
has been changed to Thursday,
April 11, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
235 Tigert Hall.
4
A VJ 4
GENERAL NOTICES
O
EASTER EGG HUNT for
children, sponsored by Business
Administration Dames, will be
held Saturday, April 6, 2-4
p.m., at Perry House, 2300
Newberry Road. Bring your own
baskets. Free Icees will be
supplied by Gainesville Icee
Corp.
FELLOWSHIP SUPPER will
be held at the Baptist Student
Center Thursday, at 5:30 p.m.
Anyone interested may sign up
by noon Thursday at the Baptist
Student Center.
PAINTING FOR FUN will be
held on Thursdays, April 1 -May
16, from 7-9:30 p.m. in Room
118, Reitz Union. Mrs. Gladys
Johns will be instructor. The
media is collages using paper and
other materials. To register,
contact Room 310, Program
Office, Reitz Union. Telephone
376-3261, Ext. 2741.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
FOR ENGLISH IN ACTION to
meet each week with a person
from other lands for English
conversation practice one or two
hours on Mondays and
Wednesdays from 4-8 p.m. at
the Baptist Student Center,
1604 W. University Ave.
GATOR GRAS needs talent
for its Minstrel show. Anyone
interested contact Linda at
376 -9163.
UP I

DIALOGUE program
sponsored by Florida Blue Key
will be held April 3, 1968, at
7:30 p.m., in Rooms 355-356,
Reitz Union. On-campus and
off-campus housing policies and
problems will be discussed. Panel
members will include: Dr. Riker,
Director of Housing; John
McCoy, Vice President of
Gainesville Apartment Owners
Association; Carl Opp, Director
of Off-Campus Housing, and
Dean Mott, Assistant Dean of
Men. There will be no charge
and students are invited to
participate.

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JJv* wjw JJw JJy JJw wjw wjw Jgt* JJw JJw wjw wjw wjv# wjw JJv# JJy JJy JJy JJU J|w Jjt
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1 CREEDISHFRAM $
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| ORDER I 1I
I Your I
j __ _ I Mail to: Seminole, 330 Reitz Union
t 968 if
| Seminole Address I |
| Enclosed is a check for $ I |j*
* $5 per copy
f 1
§I I
* i
*

PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the J.
WAYNE REITZ UNION Room
22. All companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless indicated
otherwise.
APRIL 5:
FREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL
DISTRICT. Education

HUMBLE OIL COMPANY.
APRIL 8:
PROBATION AND PAROLE
COMMISSION. All majors. Must
be U.S. citizen.
RICHS; INC. Lib. Arts, Bus.,
Mktg., Mgt., Eco. Must be U.S.
citizen.
LEGISLATIVE AUDITORS
OFFICE. Acctg. Must be U.S.
citizen.
UNITED AIR LINES.
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC
CORPORATION. All majors.
Must be U.S. citizen.



What I like about IBM is the
autonomy. I run my department
pretty much as though
it were my own business!
Well, thats the stereotype. When look at the reality, things j
different. (This 8.5.E.K.. IBM Manager
Development Engineering.) 1
IBM has over .>oo locations. Thev believe in decentralization, and 111
they delegate the authority to go with it. To me. its more like a lot K
of little companies than one big one. 11
Take my own situation, for example. I act as a kind of entrepreneur m
for my department. I decide if we should bid on certain government iL
contracts for my group, also decide thi* proposal strategy and come Bf
up w ith all the facts we need to set a bid price. Os course, upper man- If
agement reviews my decisions, but to a great extent I run my own show Wm
Another thing that makes this iiko a small company is the close rela- m
tionship with your boss. Youre almost always hired by the manager you're B* l^MHi
going to report to. And you work for him on your small team. y| 'IlKw
Its part of his job to know your long term goals and help you reach them. \
This same interest in the individual also shows up in IBMs educational pro- I ilij||flL
grams. Im getting my Masters now and I BM's paying the entire cost, and some J3BBBte
of the class time is on company time. It makes it a lot easier to get your advanced
Jm W
Genes comments cover only a small part of the IBM story. For more tacts, M
visit your campus placement office. Or send an outline of your career JF" jf #
interests and educational background to C. F. Cammack, IBM if' $
Corporation, Dept. <'. 1 447 Peachtree St.. N.E., Rm. 810, *Bp|j| pP^P|F
Atleuta. Ga. 30309. We're an equal uppurtunity employer. f
h 1 \} i
w" 4? I 'Wm B
f S|
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/'mmgL
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|&;.; : :W;>.-. ?& > : ?:
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*#* .*>* tH. 0,1 ..... <. w
<(*... , i ;<*<'

Wednesday, April 3, 1968. TTie Florida Alligator,

Page 13



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Page 14

Theater Review: Asolo Theater
'The Best In North America?

By JOE TORCHIA
Entertainment Editor
There are two theatres m
North America where one feels
that it is worth the price of
admission simply to enter and be
seated. One is the Stratford,
Ontario, Festival Theatre, and
the other is the Asolo Theater
in Sarasota/* said Henry Hewes
in the Saturday Review.
It is impossible for this re reviewer
viewer reviewer to disagree.
While visiting Sarasota over
the recent quarter break, this
reviewer saw two of the five
shows now being alternately per performed
formed performed at the Asolo Festival
both were of such high calibre
that the only regret this reviewer
had was that he could not stay
for the remaining three.
The five shows now being per performed
formed performed are Shakespeares'*Hen Shakespeares'*Henry
ry Shakespeares'*Henry IV, Part I,** Goldonis The
Servant of Two Masters,*
Molieres Tartuffe,* Mac-
Leishs J. 8. and Osbornes
Look Back In Anger.*
probably best, of the five plays
is Look Back In Anger, the
play which linked Osborne with
the angry young man movement
when it zoomed onto the stage
12 years ago.
Jimmy
Anger is basically about
Jimmy Porter an angry young
man who is reaching out for
something, anything, and in the
process wants those surrounding
him to understand him.
What Jimmy doesnt realize
is that other people are reach reaching
ing reaching out, too and he doesnt
understand them.
It is this lack of understanding,
especially on the part of Jimmy,
which provides most of the action
(visible and otherwise) in this
play.
The three other characters
(Jimmys wife Allison; his best
friend Cliff; his wifes friend,
Helena) react in terms of Jimmy
reacting and without a strong,
convincing Jim my, Look Back In
Anger would not be worth look looking
ing looking back at.
Robert Britton is an exciting
Jimmy he gives the audience a
sort of sensitive insensitivity,
making Jimmy a likeable
character (which is as it should
be).
Stuffed
Jimmy Porter is a stuffed
animal caught in some kind of
trap and he doesnt try to
escape (he knows he cant) but
only cries out in agony. And when
Mr. Britton cries out, the fat
lady in the back row hears it
. . and shudders. His painful
gestures, his beautiful angst, his
newspaper-gray groping is gran grandiose.
diose. grandiose.
Equally fascinating is Jimmys
wife Charlotte Moore, the woman
whose upper-class upbringing is
hated by Jimmy, in spite of the
fact that he married her for it.
The trouble with Jimmy is that
hes an educated man and he
1 shouldnt be. Re was born. 40 or
' 50 years too late to be satis satisfied
fied satisfied with his station in life .
so he takes it out on Allison,
the woman who is perhaps too
willing to accept the station
Jimmy wont.
Osborne draws a parallel be between
tween between Jim my and Allison with two
stuffed animals, a squirrel and a

i K JMIk Sd 1 w 1 Lk
| Sir
JHi w : w
W v\.-

"Look Back In Anger's" Cast: (Left To Right) Anthony Heald, Robert Britton,
Polly Holliday, Charlotte Moore.

bear, which rest on the Porters
bed. When Allison leaves Jimmy
in the second act, she takes both
of them with her she decides
not to separate the bear and the
squirrel, an obvious indication
that she will be back. She cant
leave. She wont stay gone.
Miss Moore is a convincing
combination of the determined
and mixed-up she accepts
Jimmys vented venom with the
right proportion of hurt and
honor. Her last speech, at the
end of act three, v is especially
shattering.
>
Language

Osbornes people listen to each
other, but they speak a different
language. This is best conveyed
by Helena, Allisons best friend
who lives with Jimmy when Alli Allison
son Allison leaves him. She lives with
Jimmy, she even loves Jimmy,
but she doesnt communicate with
him and is totally incapable of
understanding him.
Shes marvellous, and shes
played very convincingly by Polly

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Holliday, an Asolo veteran.
Completing the foursome is
Anthony Heald, who underplays
the part of Cliff as well as Britton
plays the part of Jimmy (if not
better).
Cliff is trying to find himself
in terms of Jimmy (and his re relationship
lationship relationship with Allison) and does
an especially noteworthy job of
not succeeding.
Mr. Heald possesses a sort of
Alan Bates-ish quality which is
extremely refreshing to see on
the stage nowadays. His easy,
mild, yet very convincing manner
is simply marvellous. His
smoothness gives Anger the
polished touch which makes it
the second best play this reviewer
has seen to date.
Failure
The only failure of Anger,
which must be mentioned, lies
with the playwright, and not the
exceptional acting and unusually

competent direction.
Anger In style Is natural naturalistic
istic naturalistic it might be called a
Twentieth Century ironing board
tragedy, filled with provocation,
quarrel, the middle class and
ironing boards. It follows beau beautifully
tifully beautifully in the line of Chekhov
and Strindberg, yet it betrays
itself in the final scene.
In the final scene between
Jimmy and Allison, Osborne
gives us an all-too-obvious
glimmer of hope which makes
it blatantly dishonest in terms of
style set up by naturalism.
If the final scene is indicative
of a true reunion, then why should
we see hope? Allison's back,
things aren't going to change,
theyre going to continue their
miserable existence, so why
should we be at all hopeful?
Jimmy has no character change,
and the end is inconsistent.
But Look Back In Anger
is still a marvelous production
go to Sarasota and see it.
(See tomorrow's Alligator for
guest reviewer William Perley's
review of Goldonis The Ser Servant
vant Servant of Two Masters.'')

*********
PUT (TUSK?
Who soft-landed the U.S. moon-picture machine? Congress?
The Army? No, the Government contracted for the job with
investor-owned companies. But who master-minded the proj project?
ect? project? The Government? No, that, too, was farmed out to one
of the nations biggest manufacturers.
Given the go-ahead, U.S. industry caught up and moved ahead
in the space sciences . with the entire world witnessing its
failures as well as its successes. And all the while delivering an
incredible bounty for the folks at home and the needy abroad.
Government contracting with business works so well that its
the new trend for state governmentseven in welfare work.
Costs less, too.
Investor-owned electric utilities also cost
,Y ;Y'V. W citizens less than federalized power systems.
AV.V > Vj£v\\V 'And ... when you hav£ to sHow.en/rithlis and
UM ' >< 1 4,, , r 1 S
'' Py t (lxes while keeping the cost-of electri electricity
city electricity trending clown, you have to find better
jHV ways to do things.
Floridas Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor-owned
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY GULF POWER COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY

Awfutisf
Movie
Contest
Movie Critics Arise! For those
who like to pick movies. .
apart, here is your chance.
The State theatre and The Re Record
cord Record Bar are giving away a tape
recorder, movie passes and
record albums in the First An Annual
nual Annual Worlds Worst Movie
Awards contest.
Classifications include Worst
Picture, Awfulest Actor, Most
Atrocious Actress, Lousiest
Director and Stinklngest Screen Screenplay.
play. Screenplay.
Entries can be picked up at
the State theatre, The Record
Bar or the Pickwick Theatre,
London.
You do not have to be present
or even sane to win. Judges will
be Jim Camp, Sun entertainment
Editor, Joe Torchia, Alligator
Feature Editor, Hank Farben, Bon
Vivant and Man About Town. In
case of a tie, the parties will
fight for the prizes. The judges'
decisions, while not necessarily
correct, are still final.
Car Buffs do it!
.....
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For men who want to be where the
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$2.50, $4.00, $6.50. From the com complete
plete complete array of ENGLISH LEATHER
mens toiletries.



UFs Linebackers: Specialized Speed

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
tjF football team will be with without
out without the services of Wayne Mc-
Call this fall but linebacker David
Mann will replace him.
Mann, a transfer student from
NE Oklahoma Jr. College, had
an exceptional junior year for
the Gators. He will be starting
at linebacker this fall.
He Gator linebackers are
specialized; the running game is
covered by the strong side line linebacker
backer linebacker and the pass coverage is
handled by the weak side line linebacker.
backer. linebacker. The strong side player
is bigger than the weak side
player but not as fast. The weak
side must cover the pass re receivers.
ceivers. receivers.
According the Assistant Head
Coach Gene Ellenson, Mann is
capable of playing either side
equally as well. Man at 6*2,
210 lbs., is big and fast.
David (Mann) does every everything
thing everything we want a linebacker to
do/* said Head Coach Fay
Graves. He is a vicious tackier,
always hunting the ball carrier
up, and has the speed to cover
the pass receivers going deep.*
Intramural
Softball Goes
Intramural softball batted its
way into the intramural picture
Monday as the Law League
started the action.
The Blackacres started the
season with a narrow 10-9 win
over the Nads. Harvey Baxter,
the pitcher, led the Blackacres
with a single and a homerun. Bob
Leventhal led the losers, and all
hitters with two homers.
Bergs Balls belted the DT*s
as Rick Perillo led all hitters
with two homeruns. The Balls,
behind 4-0 after three innings,
bullied over four runs in each of
the last two innings to win 8-4.
Team I behind the strength
of a seven-run third inning beat
the Deadlegs 8-4.
In other league action, the
Ball Busters busted the K-Nines
7-6 with three big homeruns, two
of them coming in a three run
second inning. The Clowns de defeated
feated defeated the Bull mooses 6-3, with
the aid of five errors by the
Bullmooses. Hie Harmless
Errors erred in their failure
to appear in a forfeit to Mandys
Marauders.
/ Good grief, I
I hed never heard ]
I about togetherness J
SOMETHING
ELSE,
CHARLIE
BROWN
" THE NEW
PEANUTS
CARTOON BOOK!
by Charles M. Schulz
ONLY A 4 at your college
m bookstore
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

The weak side is being held
down by Mike Kelley, a 6*2,
209 lb. sophomore who had an
outstanding year last season on
the freshman team. Kelley has the
size and speed, but lacks ex experience
perience experience as a varsity player.
Playing behind Mann is Tom
Abdelnour, a s*9, 191 lb. junior.
Abdelnour played a great deal
the second half of last season;
he is a returning letterman. Ms
size makes it necessary that he
play the strong side
We think a lot of Abdelnour.
He is too good to be playing
second team, we may end up play playing
ing playing him on the strong side and
starting Mann on the weak side,**
Ellenson said.
Donnie Williams, a sophomore
who started spring practice at
end, is playing the weak side
behind Kelleyr Williams, 6*, 210
lbs., was a strong side linebacker
on last years freshman team.
This is the first time that
we have had boys two deep and
all over 200 pounds at our line linebacker
backer linebacker positions. We are better
off than we have been in this
area,* Ellenson said.

.; .; sa
The CPA,
a quiet
revolutionary.
In the last few years business has
changed as much as skirt lengths. So
has the work of the CPA.
Today the CPA helps solve a host
of problems rising from new technol technology
ogy technology (including the computer) and the

changing social scene.
He must be able to develop and
interpret a wide range of economic
data as a basis for decision-making
and corporate planning.
If you are a creative thinker, with
a strong analytical ability, account accountancy
ancy accountancy may be the profession for you.
' You might join an independent
accounting firm, serving a varied list
of clients, perhaps becoming a part partner
ner partner eventually. Or you might start
your own practice.
Or you might become a key man
on the management team of a busi business,
ness, business, or join a non-profit enterprise,
or work in education or government.
What other profession offers so
many choices?
. You can select college courses
that can lead to your CPA certificate
soon after you graduate. Or you can
go on to graduate school. Ask your
faculty advisor about it.
If you'd like to learn more about
the work of a CPA, well send you a
r. booklet with th£ whote CPA Stpfy..'
Just drop a card'dr note to: Dept.
AlO, AICPA, 666 Fifth Avenue, New
York, New York 10019
American Institute of I
Certified Public Accountants
______
ft |

DAVID MANN
Bill Mcride has been switched
back to offensive team at full fullback
back fullback and Donnie Williamson was
moved to strong safety.
PMfV 5 GALS.
* GASOLINE
WITH LUBE JOB
OIL FILTER CHANGE
SOUTHSIDE SUNOCO
242 S SW 13 ST

Wednesday, April 3, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

The white team, third string,
has Mike Palahach, a 6*, 190
lb. junior, and Ronald Essmann,
a s*ll*, 197 lb. sophomore. Pala Palahach
hach Palahach started last season behind
McCall but due to an injury he
was slowed up. Essmann played
fullback on the freshman team
but was a linebacker in high
school.
G&tOR AOs
IRAKC Contacts!

posies how-ops
POSTER BLOW-UPS: Prom the Patter Palace- Pot yourself
on a 20" x SO*' poster for just $4.98. Send photo, any else,
any subject with return address and check or mousy order
lor $4.98 to: ROBERT R. FAVORITE PRODUCTIONS, P. O.
Box 10808, Jacksonville, Florida 82207. Prompt retarn ot photo
and poster, money bade guarantee. They*re graaint
Don't miss tomorrow's spring fashion edition!

Mike (Palahach) did well on
the white team in scrimmage,
but hasnt shown that he is ready
yet. Essmann may be able to
help,* said Ellenson.
The third team also has Wayne
Compton, a junior who has been
red shirted. Comption, at 6*2,
198 lbs., is playing the strong
side.

GO GREEK

Page 15



V. ;
.o'
ANNOUNCING
f fIHI fIH MM
' V ,~ '.
of the fabulous Landmark Apartments. JReady for occupancy in September 1968, phase II of the Landmark complex
will continue to have the features whicFhave made the Landmark the most distinguished and desired address in
Gainesville.
V'""'--- v .. ;
Phase II will be comprised of 94 total electric units featuring underground residential distribution coordinated by byv.
v. byv. ;
your Gainesville Utilities. These units will contain electric range, refrigerator, garbage disposal, dish washer and
"quick recovery" water heater all served by dependable, flameless electric energy and supplied by General Electric.
In addition the new units will be comfort controlled for heating and cooling by flameless electrically operated water waterto-air
to-air waterto-air heat pumps.
. i I.-*- ;
ei i
| An additional large swimming pool with Wall to wall carpeting
special cold deck patio around the deck.
H Full bath upstairs, half bath downstairs
Study rooms
Maid service
Private Patios
.
Convenient to Uof F, Health Clinic Available with one or two bedrooms,
and VA Hospital furnished or unfurnished
Convenient to Restaurants and shopping Patio grills in the courtyards
Townhouse design Ornamental gas lighting
ADDHCdtions arG
n|f|i%iuvii# Ml v APPLICATION
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I i: NAME...:....;
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BLB KLKM will be given to those
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