Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Little Relief Seen For Quarter Woes

By GLENN FAKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Two weeks after the UF Council of
Deans called for course and credit changes
to reduce the pressure of the quarter
system most of its members claim no
changes are necessary within their own
colleges.
After speaking with deans from each
of the UF colleges and schools, it is
apparent that the College of Arts and
Sciences and the School of Forestry are
the only divisions planning any signifi significant
cant significant changes.
Some others of the UF colleges and
schools plan to make various minor
changes, but according to the deans, most
are planning no changes at all.
The statement of Dean Dennis K. Stanley
of the College of Physical Education and
Health was representative of the deans
opinions.
I dont feel there are any changes
necessary, said Stanley. When the quar quarter
ter quarter system was created, we reorganized
our courses adequately. Nobody has com complained

Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 60s
Low In The 30s

Vol. 60, No. 96

Goodrich
Withdraws
From School
Newly-elected Student Body
Vice-President Gary Goodrich
has withdrawn from school for
the current quarter but will re retain
tain retain his SG office.
I had to figure whether I
could afford a disaster quarter
academically and not hurt my
chances of going to law school,
Goodrich said Sunday.
He said that an unusually long
campaign and the shortest quar quarter
ter quarter left him only three weeks
to catch up with a terms
work.
I talked with my professors
about my standing in class and
discovered I wasntgoingtomake
it, he said.
Goodrichs tenure of office will
not be affected by his withdrawal
this quarter.
The student body constitution
which went into effect last month
states that the three major SG
officers shall be required to en enroll
roll enroll as students for all terms of
their year in office.
Enrollment is defined in the
document as completing regis registration
tration registration for classes and paying of
required enrollment fees.
Goodrich said he is attending
most of his classes and comple completing
ting completing the assigned homework even
though he withdrew from classes
Feb. 23.
I wont take most of the
courses over again but I want
to get something out of what I
paid for them, he said.
Goodrich said he will enroll
again next quarter, adding that
his withdrawal did not set a
precedent.
Former SG President Charles
Shepherd withdrew from school
twice during his term of office.
SG President Clyde Taylor said
Sunday no other executive depart department
ment department members had to his know knowledge
ledge knowledge withdrawn from school.

plained complained about our system that I know of,
so the present organization will probaby
not be altered.
Despite student complaints and the
statement of Vice-President for Academic
Affairs Robert B. Mautz that many col colleges
leges colleges do not reflect a reasonable adjust adjustment
ment adjustment to the quarter system, the majority
of the deans feel that adequate changes
were made before the start of the fall
term.
Dean Rae O. Weimer of the College of
Journalism and Communications stated
that the problems his students had with
the quarter system didnt lie within his
own college.
Were not recommending any changes
here, said Weimer, as most of the
problems our students have are in other
curriculum areas.
The only college apparently studying any
significant changes is the College of Arts
and Sciences, but even there nothing is
definite.
Assistant Dean Ernest H. Cox of the
college stated, We have had no meeting

The
Florida Alligator

(Photo by Nick Arroyo)
___ FOLK DANCE
Members of the Brazilian Club*,enjoy a Bra Brazilian
zilian Brazilian folk dance at a carnival put on in the
Reitz Union Ballroom Saturday night.
Voluntary ROIC At USF
Subject Os Regents Meet

By JIM ALMAND
Alligator Staff Writer
A voluntary Army Reserve Of Officers
ficers Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
program for the University of
South Florida USF will be pro proposed
posed proposed at todays Board of Re Regents
gents Regents meeting in Orlando, ac according
cording according to Board Chairman Ches Chester
ter Chester Ferguson.
USF has no ROTC program at
present. It USF is granted a
voluntary ROTC program, the
University of Florida will be the
only state-supported university
in Florida to maintain a compul compulsary

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

sary compulsary military training program.
The UF faculty and student
body voted in 1966 to make the
program voluntary but the Re Regents
gents Regents vetoed the plan. Florida
State University in Tallahassee
has maintained a voluntary pro program
gram program since 1964. No other state
universities have ROTC pro programs.
grams. programs.
A request to reduce the ad admission
mission admission of juniors and seniors
to state universities unless more
funds are appropriated will also
be proposed, Fergusoh told the
(SEE REGENTS, PAGE 2)

of the curriculum committee recently,
but there is one planned in the near
future. A request to change course hours
may come up at that time.
A check with some department heads
within the college revealed, though, that
most were satisfied with their current
programs.
Dr. Alexander R. Bednarek, associate
chairman of the mathematics department,
said, I think our courses are quite con consistent
sistent consistent with the credit given.
Said Dr. J. Wayne Conner, chairman
of the foreign language department, We
already took into account the amount of
work you could get into the quarter system
and most of our courses are all right
at the present time.
Only one school, the School of Forestry,
has definite plans for revision. Professor
John L. Gray, director of the school
stated that his curriculum includes many
three-hour courses and changes are due.
He added that a committee would be
meeting this spring to go over the cur curriculum
riculum curriculum of the school.

BY TWO SIGNERS
Ad Against
Hale Refuted

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Staff Writer
Two former UF students whose
names appeared on a full-page
Alligator advertisement calling
for Vice President of Student
Affairs Lester Hales resignation
have disassociated themselves
from the move in letters to UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell.
But one of the two, Miss Lee
Ann Draud, a student at the
University of Pennsylvania, later
said she probably would not
have written her letters had she
seen the advertisement before
doing so.
Miss Draud and Miss Allison
W. Conner, now a student at
Cornell University, said they did
not read the advertisement before
it was printed.
In a letter to OConnell, Miss
Draud said the views expressed
in the ad in no way coincide
with my own, and I dissociate
myself from those views com completely.
pletely. completely.
But she told local newsmen
Sunday that she probably
wouldn't have written the letter
had she seen the ad before.
Alligator efforts to contact
Miss Draud at her Philadelphia
home were unsuccessful.
I did not sign the advertise advertisement
ment advertisement or the letter to you, Miss
Draud tod OConnell, nor did I
contribute any money to help
finance the payment of the ad.
She added that the full text of
the ad was never read to her,
adding she was unaware of
everything that was to be in included
cluded included in it.
Miss Draud said she had given
permission to use her name on
what I understood was a rather
general statement concerning
liberalization of the Student Code
of Conduct, concern for the Dow
demonstrators, and the walkout
by the FEA.

The concern as many of the deans
apparently lies not in the lack of ap-
propriate credit for courses, but in how
much work is being required.
Said Dean Weimer, Im concerned to
know whether were requiring the same
amount of work in 10 weeks that we
required in 14.
Despite this concern expressed by some,
no changes in the current work-load are
necessary, according to several deans
and department chairmen.
John K. Mahon, head of the Arts and
Sciences history department, said, In
our course, we realize we cant teach a
student all the history there is, so we
just teach less when we have a shorter
period of time.
Dean of the University College, Dr.
Franklin A. Doty, in fact sees more time
in the quarter system than under the tri trimester.
mester. trimester. We havent planned any changes
in the foreseeable future, said Doty.
As far as Im concerned the quarter sys system
tem system just gives us three more teaching
weeks in a year.

Inside
The Pros And Cons
Os Jones Tenure Fight
See Page Twelve

Monday March 4 1968

If I had seen this advertise advertisement
ment advertisement in its entirety before its
publication in the Alligator I
(SEE *AD, PAGE 2)
Cross, Mautz
To Address
UF AAUP
State Senator J. Emory Red
Cross and UF Vice-President for
Academic Affairs Robert B.
Mautz will address a meeting
of the UF chapter of the Ameri American
can American Association of University
Professors (AAUP) Tuesday
night.
An AAUP Executive Commit Committee
tee Committee report on how to improve
the university will also be re released
leased released to members at the Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday meeting. UF President Ste Stephen
phen Stephen C. OConnell requested that
the faculty make such a list of
suggestions last November, and
an Jn-depth statement was pre prepared
pared prepared by the group for release
to OConnell today.
The speakers will discuss the
recent appropriations for higher
education passed at a special ses session
sion session of the state legislature. Sen Senator
ator Senator Cross will discuss the pas passing
sing passing of this legislation and what
the future of higher education
funding appears to be. Mautz
will speak on the importance
of current education items on
the legislative agenda.
The nominating committee of
the chapter will also present
names of nominees for offices
to be filled this yearpresident,
vice-president, treasurer, and
three seats on the executive coun council.
cil. council. Members of the nominating
committee are Dr. Cecil Smith,
chairman; Dr. Richard H. Hiers,
and Dr. Corbin Carnell.



;, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Page 2

Double Jeopardy
Doubted By Hale
In Dow Protests

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
There appears to be* little
possibility that legal double jeo jeopardy
pardy jeopardy confronts students facing
Student Conduct Committee
charges for their roles in the
Dow Chemical Co. protests last
month, Vice President of Stu Student
dent Student Affairs Lester L. Hale told
the Faculty Senate Thursday.
Hale referred to a decision
given by Attorney General Earl
Fair cloth in reply to a question
raised by the Student Government
of FSU.
If (students) violate es established
tablished established rules and regulations
governing conduct and moral
standards/ Faircloth had said
in making his decision, they
may be lawfully denied admission
to the universities, expelled,
placed on probation, or otherwise
required to comply with reason reasonable
able reasonable standards of conduct es established
tablished established in the public interest.
Said proceedings are admin administrative
istrative administrative in nature and in no
way constitute trial, conviction
or punishment by a court with within
in within the meaning of the constitu constitutional
tional constitutional prohibition against double
jeopardy.
According to Hale, a section

Walkout Continues
By BARBARA FRYE
United Press International

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) Florida heads into the third week
of its statewide teacher walkout with no definite sign it will ever
end.
For the first time since the walkout began Feb. 19, there appeared
to be no meaningful behind-the-scene talks designed to return some
22,000 teachers and 500,000 students to class.
An anticipated settlement collapsed last week because one of the
compromise proposals offered by State School Supt. Floyd Christian
provided that all striking teachers be permitted to return to classes
without fear of retribution.
Several counties rejected it, and the Florida Education Association
(FEA) repeated its promise to maintain the walkout as long as one
teacher is prevented by fear of penalty from returning to work.
The National Education Association (NEA), the FEAs parent group,
said Saturday it was putting $2 million into Florida to finance legal
action by parents to safeguard their children from alleged bad con conditions
ditions conditions in some of the schools, ranging from improper supervision
to unsanitary conditions.
The NEA also said it planned legal action to halt alleged illegal
use of federal personnel and wives of military men to keep schools
open.
NEA president Braulio Alonso says that military bases, anti antipoverty
poverty antipoverty groups and other federal-financed agencies were being pres pressured
sured pressured into substitute teaching. He also said some military per personnel
sonnel personnel have been threatened with Vietnam duty if their wives refused
to serve as substitute teachers.
However, none of Alonsos charges were documented, nor did he
mention which military bases he was referring to.
Gainesvilles Newest Night dub
Dancing Nightly Til 2 A. M.
This is not a teen club . You must be 21, and you must prove
it. Our live entertainment features some of the swingingest
groups available on Tues., Thur., Fri., and Sat. nights. Admis Admission
sion Admission is SI.OO on Tues. and Thur. and $1.50 on Fri. and Sat.
For reservations, call 376-4792 or 378-7586. We specialize
in barbeque and catering to private parties, clubs, etc.
N.W. 39th Ave.-2mi. West Os of 1-75
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent jnly the
official opinions at their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union BuUdlng, University at Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The AUlgator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida AUlgator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

of the Student Code of Conduct
relevant to double jurisdiction
takes its wording from a joint
statement originally drafted by
the national committee of the
AAUP. The statement says that
institutional authority will not be
used in these cases merely to
duplicate the function of general
laws, but only to protect the
health, safety and academic rep reputation
utation reputation of the university commun community.*
ity.* community.*
Also, he said, the Association
of American Colleges endorsed
with Statement and took the pos position
ition position that the special authority
of the institution does not ex exclude
clude exclude institutional action merely
because a student has also vio violated
lated violated a civil statute.
According to Hale, the students
being brought before the Com Committee
mittee Committee on Student Conduct as a
result of their participation in
the Dow protest are being char charged
ged charged with the alleged violation of
several sections of the Code of
Conduct.
This action was taken, he said,
by reason of acts committed
against the university under pro provisions
visions provisions designed to provide pro protection
tection protection for all members of the
educational community.*

Advertisement _Refu ted

|T from page onet
would have had no part in it,
she stated.
Miss Conner also said she had
not seen the ad before it was
published, adding she did not sign
it or contribute any money to
pay for it.
She said the ad was a shock
to her, adding she had consented
to have her name used in what
she understood to be statements
concerning the student code of

Regents Meeting

f*""ROM PA6E ONE
i y
Alligator Sunday.
Student body presidents of the
state's universities will not urge
the Board of Regents to revise
its policies on student rights un until
til until their April meeting at Flor Florida
ida Florida Atlantic, Student Body Vice-
President Gary Goodrich said
Sunday.
A proposal must be submitted
at least 15 days before a Board
of Regents meeting, Goodrich
said. The Council of Student
Body Presidents didnt have time
to submit their proposal before
todays meeting.
The Regents search for a
chancellor has also been post postponed.
poned. postponed.
Hie search for a new chan chancellor
cellor chancellor for Floridas university
system has been held up due to
the educational climate in Flori Florida,**
da,** Florida,** Ferguson said. He expres expressed
sed expressed hope that Governor Kirk will
sign the new education bill pas passed
sed passed by the legislature so the
schools can get the monies which
they need.
The delay in picking the new
chancellor has nothing to do
with the striking teacher situa situation
tion situation in Florida, Henry Kramer,
chairman of the Regents selec selection
tion selection committee told the Alligator
Sunday. The problem is how
much money the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents will legally be allowed to
offer the new chancellor, Kramer
explained.
I definitely think we will make
the announcement by the 15th,
Kramer said.
Due to the current education
problem, Kramer said that he
hasnt pressed any of the legis legislators
lators legislators on how much money the
Regents could offer a chancellor
candidate. A state law now sets
the salary limit at $34,000.
He further said that the delays
in choosing a new chancelor does
not mean that no one in Florida
I ~~
--
mmt m rm &**
'
. v.v.v.vy.v?v
AVAILABLE AT
913 W. UNIVERSITY AVI.

conduct and in sympathy with
students who feel strongly
about the manufacture of napalm
by Dow Chemical Co.
Miss Conner added she would
never subscribe to a public
attack on any UF official in a
campaign to discredit the univer university.
sity. university.
She added she gave no permis permission
sion permission to anyone to use her name
in a letter to OConner listing
charges against Hale.
David Noble, 7AS, a spokes-

is still under consideration.
Were looking for the right man
for the right salary, Kramer
added.
Ferguson explained that to todays
days todays meeting will deal mainly
with routinematterswhichhave
come up and must be approved
by the board but there is not
a heavy agenda.

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man for the group organizing the
protest, said both of the giri s
letters had been written under
pressure."
We anticipated pressure/ he
said, and the reason they acted
this way is because of being pres pressured."
sured." pressured."
He said the girls over-react over-reacted
ed over-reacted to make a statement."
Noble added the group was in
contact with Miss Draud and said
her letter to OConnell and the
Alligator was a misunderstand misunderstanding."
ing." misunderstanding."
Miss Conners father, UF For Foreign
eign Foreign Language Department head
Dr. Wayne J. Conner said no
pressure was involved on the
girls letters.
I have received no pressure
from anybody in the university
and I have put no pressure of
any kind on my daughter," he
said.
The advertisement came as
a surprise to me because I could couldnt
nt couldnt imagine that my daughter
could have signed it," he said.



&, aEftf
!
.._

Ready to step out into a new atmosphere and a treat for
her taste buds is Jennifer Johnson, Delta, Delta, Delta.
Morrison's is the ideal place to eat while youre shopping
at the Mall. There you can wait for your friends or date
in the comfortable lobby. Once you smell the food, you
won't be able to wait long, so be sure you tell them to
hurry! __________

'/f /o .'-f .._ /-> r ..-
7 '.( V F (. K
D\ >' ,- > V 0 C7
\. c <_>
_c^,^rg/g-fa..-f?JT r <*,
p\

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T--^^7. -Jy V'^^atjJWgS'SiSSf.jr.'
<
s,
m a naMBBEBR I *,'
,^jf
fJM
JB^i
_ . -4

Ever wonder what Alligator Photographers do on Saturday
night? Dusty Hopkins (feet shown above) and Inga (the
dog) spent a quiet evening admiring these Alligator tassel
loafers from Mr. Mitchells. Not all of us are lucky
enough to go out with beauties like Inga, but anyone can
visit Mitchells and take home a pair of top fashion
loafers.

V t 1 rpi rp
xours tor The Feeping, lom
i .<

w
-! _S~
f s'
,- 9)ll ''*l
AmW
i 1
r L- * .v.-sOy i

Susan Silverman is wearing the perfect outfit for a game
of hide and seek. Its a Country Set multi striped fortrel
and cotton play suit in Go-With colors of urban brown,
yellow and orange. The skirt with belted waist, hides
matching short shorts in urban brown denim. See this and
peek at a few others the next time youre at Silvermans.

.


Sandy Unger reveals her Japanese floral splash print, two
piece bathing suit of 100% cotton by Beach Party. You
never know whos peeking in the windows of the AOPi
house and its a good policy to look your best so says
Sandy. Thats where the Twig comes in. When it comes to
looking your best see the Twig.
,. i

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Greene Film
Scheduled
By Interhall
Felix Greene's controversial
film Inside North Viet-Nam"
will be shown on campus through
Wednesday as a presentation of
Men's Interhall Council.
Hie film, which was shown
once on Channel 5 and then ban*
ned and labeled un*American by
the Board of Regents, has been
widely discussed on campus des despite
pite despite the fact that most students
have never seen it.
The film was praised as "a
superb documentary" by Sat Saturday
urday Saturday Review" magazine which
commented, it is so moving it
will make you first ashamed,
then angry, and finally determin determined
ed determined to make everybody you know
see it."
The action of the Board of
Regents shielding" the students
from the film has aroused their
Interest and provoked criticisms
from many of them.
In view of this, Mens Inter Interhall
hall Interhall Obuncil is presenting the
film to give students oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to see it and reach their
own conclusions," said Mike
Moore, Interhall president.
The film will be shown at
8 p.m. in the recreation area
of Graham area on Monday, Mur Murphree
phree Murphree on Tuesday, and Broward
on Wednesday. No admission will
be charged but students are asked
for a 25 cent donation.
Staff Named
For'Dialogue
'Dialogue' Assistant Chairman
Bill Zewadski, announced the fol following
lowing following people as new staff mem members
bers members for third quarter:
Bruce Boker, research direc director;
tor; director; Ken Howell, program dir director;
ector; director; Tom Blackman, survey di director;
rector; director; Valerie Williams, execu executive
tive executive secretary; Judy Hlrsch, di director
rector director of office affairs; Frank Franklin
lin Franklin Haris son, study director; and
Frank Rief, special research.

1.7. LOG

2 4 9 12 5
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET
7. 00 Zane Grey Hogans Heroa Dragnet It's Academic Whats New
7?30 Monkees Gunsmoke Monkees Youth 5
I V 11 ~
8:00 Gunsmoke NET Journal
Rowan & Martin Rowan & Martin
8:30 Ludlle Ball Rat Patrol NET Journal
9:00 Danny Thomas Andy Griffith Felony Squad Danny Thomas Viewpoint
- i i ' i.
9:30 Peyton Place Danny Thomas Richard Boone
10:00 I Spy Carol Burnett Big Valley ISpy Richard Boone
10:30 ISpy Carol Burnett Big Valley ISpy
I I I >ll MI l '!'' "11.
11:00 News News News News
11:30 J Johnny Carson Joey Bishop Johnny Carson
FEARLESS FORECAST
* l
Danny Thomas features a fabulous cast this week. Stars include
James Whitmore, Dorothy Provine, Walter Pidgeon, Jeanne Crain,
Hal March, Rose Marie and more.
9 w

TUMBLEWEEDS
/ wheee! rris \ H
HERE!...MY
V PACKAGE HAS
xJartovepL/ i

Choice 68, Campus Presidential

Election, Scheduled April 24

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Staff Writer
Choice 68, a nationwide presi presidential
dential presidential primary for college stu students
dents students has been scheduled for
April 24 on the UF campus.
The primary, sponsored by
Time magazine, will include over
1,000 colleges around the country
- more than five million students.
We hope to have a big turn turnout,"
out," turnout," said Barry Diamond,
campus coordinator for the event,
we're expecting over 15,000
students to vote."
Voters will have a chance to

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choose their first, second and
third choices for the presidency
from a list of 14 hopefuls from
varied political groups.
Voters will also have a chance
to express opinions on such
issues as military action in Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam and the urban crisis."
Diamond has asked anyone
wishing to help in the election
to contact him at the Student
Activities Center in the Reitz
Union or to call him at 372-
5500.
After the election the results
will be tallied on campus and sent
to Time in New York. Magazine

officials will feed the results
from all the colleges into a com computer
puter computer to analyze trends and pat patterns.
terns. patterns. The results will be made
public in the issue of Time fol following
lowing following the election.
Voters will also be given five

e.
[ EXTENDED
STAY
IN Cost : J
PHowe ; c,xV- 3141
310 ?. REITZ. UNION
deocil me
MARCH 15

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choices for action in Vietnam
ranging from immediate with withdrawal
drawal withdrawal of American forces to an
all out" American military ef effort.
fort. effort.
Other questions will concern
bombing of North Vietnam and
priority in government spending.



.iV
iffy%BH(r v
*. J* v mST .*<=
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^y --> : -v.-
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Hi ;:
% vHr^HHP>
\ aWHfeysara.s aWHfeysara.s---8
--8 aWHfeysara.s---8 PPpi? IjS JH
"I was wrong about
the mainstream here
with a liberal arts degree!
I used to think IBM was a place for engineers, scientists, l|H££Hp|
'But not for liberal arts graduates. And definitely not for P^HBBhb&
American History majors, like me. (This is John Robohm, 1
an IBM Marketing Representative specializing in banking.) I .yvyfdgF
Then I talked with an IBM interviewer. He explained that 1 4,p,
much of the work at IBM is solving problems. So if you have a S 5 mm
logical mind, you could go into areas like programming or market* 1 SS
ing. Both of which are in the heart of IBMs business.
My job is helping banks use computers. Which isnt nearly
as technical as it sounds. You deal with people a lot more than
with machines. JM
At first, the idea of sales appalled me. You know, you think
of Willy Roman and so on. But marketing at IBM is entirely |^
different. Youre a problem solver. You have to come up with 4| |ra rnmmm
new solutions for everv customer.
1 guess thats what makes the job so interesting. That and the
president of the bank. You get a lot of responsibility in this job *'
very soon after you start. And if youre good, your income goes Hvvy?
What John has said covers only a small part of the IBM story. For
more facts, visit your campus placement office. Or send an outline of
your career interests and educational background to C.F.Cammack, :"F' i
IBM Corpoi-ation, N.E., Room
r )) MS,

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

i
13jttt
AH
Am/WML

Our Haunted House

Claude Kirk and his
cabinet are agroup ofmur ofmurdererso
dererso ofmurdererso
They have, in the short
space of two weeks, killed
the high ideal of quality
education for Florida and
quietly layed the body to
rest in an unmarked grave.
In doing this awful deed
Claude Kirk and his cabinet
have not gone un-noticed.
An enMr3 legislature sat
on its hands and did noth nothing
ing nothing as the murder victim
screamed for help.
The general public too,
hearing the heart rendering
cries for help, sat apa apathetically
thetically apathetically by afraid to get
involved.,
Knowing that a crime
has been committed these
same persons continue,, to
do nothing as a group of
unqualified and untrained
amateurs tramp into the
classrooms to fill the void
left by Floridas resigned
teachers,
Floridas children are*
being asked topaytheprf.ee
of murder.
And so, education in
Florida is dead.
The ghost of the teachers

No Exams This Week

Today the final week of
classes, prior to the be beginning
ginning beginning of final exams, gets
underway. It will be a week
packed with in-class re review
view review sessions, a scramble
to finish the required
work, late night study ses
sions aimed at passing
exams and other sources
of almost unbearable pres pressure.
sure. pressure.
Because this week is one
filled with so much pres pressure,
sure, pressure, and because this week
is one traditionally devoted
to study for final exams,
former UF President J.
Wayne Itz-Uz issued a mem memorandum
orandum memorandum several years ago

The
Florida Alligator
"To Let The People Know
Steve Hull
Editor

Harvey Alper
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
News Editor

Tbs Florida Alligator*! official position on Imum la oxproaaod
only In tha columns below. Other material In this issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist sad not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically Indicated.

Harold Kennedy
Executive Editor
Bob Padecky
Sports Editor

who died defending quality
education will now haunt the
school system for yea? 3 to
come. Claude Kirk, his ca cabinet,
binet, cabinet, the legislature and
the public, all of whom did
nothing as education was
murdered, will be haunted
by this specter too*
The chains will rattle in
the closet.
The ghost of education
will be real.
It will appear again and
again as people refuse to
settle in Florida because
they want their children to
have a decent education.
The ghost will pass through
the state as industries de decide
cide decide against locating here
because they know that a
poor educational system
will not provide quality
skilled workers.
Yes, all of Florida will
be a huge haunted house --
unloved and unwanted.
The state that could have
led the south to a great
and spectacular tomorrow
will lag far behind in its
private and self-construc self-constructed
ted self-constructed purgatory.
Education is dead. Now the
sins of the fathers shall
be visited upon their sons.

forbidding all instructors
from giving ANY type of
quiz, examination or sim similar
ilar similar exercise during this
final week of school.
This rule is still in force.
We urge all instructors
to abide by this ruling for
the welfare of their stu students.
dents. students. Moreover, we urge
any student confronted with
a violation of this rule to
see the department head
involved at once. Should
this fail to stop an instruc instructor
tor instructor from giving an examin examination
ation examination in violation of the
Reitz memo we at the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator would like to know
about it.

/ MeTRBIRENT we A r
/ SETBACK IN IMM \ / GENERAL VJHEELER AND6OJERAL \
ATTACKS BY WORTH VIETNAMESE ANP WESTMOReLANP SAY THEY MAY
Vieras 7RQ3S. THE PACIFICATION NEED UPWARDS OF 100,000 MORE
PROGRAM IS NO IN IN SHAMED MEN- OUR CASUALTY WE IS
anp the duly-Elected govt, in alarming vie haven't gained
SSN MSfcWr^ oo */ W INOMF 6U WW?AND
r at this wie. vie Mian- be ite J
y Also CtMW. f /
13 03

/REMEMDER \
THE
4 r ALAMO. /-
/
: ;-.. {
' j '. \
MAGIC PUMPKIN===^=
Compassion
BY HARVEY ALPER

After four years in college many persons
know nothing.
The value of a sunny warm day, the cry
of a small child, the poignant portrait
painted in reality by an old Negro sitting
in a rocking chair perched on the porch
of a ramshackle shack go un-noticed in the
eyes of many educated persons.
Too many educated but unknowing people
walk from the halls of education into the
world.
A college is a place of learning . of
learning mere fact. A college is not a place
of learning how to live in life. And, because
many of us never stop to think about this
we never truly live.
A heartbeat is not life. Neither is a po position
sition position of prestige and leadership.
Man must have goals, and it is by these
goals alone that he can define values and
give life meaning.
Most people will accept Descartes' state statement
ment statement I think, therefore I am. But, few
of us ever stop under a warm sun and
and clear sky to take that thought another
step so that we might arrive at the reali realization
zation realization which give lives meaning and goals
reason.
Certainly because we think we are. But,
more important, we are what we think, and
to have a life of value we need some
motivation other than fame or fortune.
Undeniably there can be many high
* motivations in this world. We can seek to
serve fellow man, to heal, to relieve
pain, to wipe out disease, to spread know knowledge
ledge knowledge and to prevent war.
Yet, there motivations are not the stuff

Alligator Staff
A Student Newspaper

DAVE DOUCETTE
Assistant News Editor
JANICE SIZEMORE
Campus Living Editor

of life, for they must follow from a higher
realization and a higher definition.
No man can do more in life than seek
to live a decent life, free from what would
pain his conscience and constantly seeking
to do others no harm.
No man can do more in life than work
not for himself but for others seeking
nothing more than to respect others feelings
and natural rights to liberty, freedom and
self respect as defined in the highest
sense.
Such a goal, coupled with such moti motivations,
vations, motivations, can do more for a man than a
lifetime in college. Aware of the fact that
other human beings mean something, that
other human beings do in fact have feelings,
a man grows inwardly and is then all the
more respected by his fellow human beings.
To accomplish this growth requires more
than a simple decision. Growth of what
must be defined as the soul comes from an
awareness that life has much to offer that
costs nothing.
A man must be able to think and live
with his thoughts. A man must prize the
sun, the rain, the stars, the sight of that
old Negro perched upon that porch and the
cry of that suckling babe.
No man can be happier than the man who
values these things. It is this ability to
understand that all people have rights,
thoughts, ideas which they value knd hold
as truth that makes a person a true human.
Education helps one achieve these ends
but education is not the end in itself.
Only self-realization can create the end
goal that makes life worth living com compassion.
passion. compassion.

MICHAEL ABRAMS
Editorial Assistant
JOE TORCHIA
Entertainment Editor



OPEN FORUM: .
JkLiaiml ViAAmt
There is no hope for the complacent man."

Female Style Forestry

MR. EDITOR:
Your February 13th edition
carried a story on this quarters
UF enrollment under the heading
Men, Women Exchanging Roles
in Modern Society. This article
pointed out that women students
are enrolled in every degree
granting unit of the University
except the School of Forestry.
Speculating on a reason for this,
your reporter quoted an un unidentified
identified unidentified forestry official as
saying that women are not en enrolled
rolled enrolled in forestry perhaps be because
cause because they are afraid to climb
trees.
First of all an ability to climb
trees is not a prerequisite for
success in the forestry pro profession.
fession. profession. The only forestry pro professionals
fessionals professionals or forestry research
scientists who might be involved
in such activity are those few
engaged in tree breeding re research,
search, research, which is a high special specialized
ized specialized phase of forestry. Even here,
such work is generally done by
technicians, or skilled laborers.
I believe the person who wrote
the story had forestry confused
with arboriculture which deals
with the care of ornamental trees
tree surgery in popular
terms. This is more of an aspect
of ornamental horticulture than
| Irrelevant, j
But True
*!

V
* **
: MR. EDITOR: A
V *
>*
V i'
it may be irrelevant, but: §
*Claude Kirk looks like a £
gangster. S
*There are a lot of Jewish
kids who laugh at Hogans $
* Heroes.
S The acting in the ROTC :j:
: combat training films gets
Â¥ progressively worse. A
:j: *The acting of the ROTC |
cadet officers gets progress progressively
ively progressively funnier.
% Union Mqd! has become £
a battle cry.
* Half the demonstrators ¥
A last Monday were there just ¥
> for the fun of it. £
Is it possible that James ¥
Cook is related to Chester A
2 Fergu^op. u ; $
The hunters must >|
:|i have jnisied, Sundays experi- §
: mental films.
A Servomation hamburgers
£ are proportionally greasier
v now. $
Â¥ The quarter system is j;
Â¥ teaching quick memorization, j:
: but little learning. A
j: Little Hall between classes :>
Â¥ resembles high school. :ji
Â¥ ... And the beat goes on. A
GORDON GALBRAITH, 2UC |
Alliteration?
MR. EDITOR:
Concerning your headlines on
the open forum section of
Wednesday's Alligator:
AMORPHOUS ALLITERATION
ALIENATES AUDIENCE.
GEORGE SPELVIN

forestry and those engaged in it
may or may not be college
trained.
Foresters are not trained in
tree surgery. They are trained
for careers primarily as re resource
source resource managers on a large
scale. ,
Secondly, the School of For Forestry
estry Forestry offers training in each of
three major fields forestry,
wildlife ecology, wood science
and technology. Although none of
these is particularly feminine
in character, there is no reason
why women should not consider
any of the three as possible

Our 'Mickey Mouse Leader
MR. EDITOR:
Two weeks ago when our schoolteachers first walked out, where
was Governor Kirk? He was in California, touring Disneyland. In Instead
stead Instead of staying in Florida and trying to prevent the walkout, he
went on another of his ridiculous trips, leaving Florida in a turmoil.
My initial reaction, as well as that of an overwhelming majority
of Floridians, was one of shock and anger. But, on second thought,
Kirk would have been just as helpful solving the problem in Disneyland
as he has been in Tallahassee. In fact, the idea of our governor touring
the wonderful world of Walt Disney is rather amusing because Kirks
administration has been something of a fantasy.
I dont know what his staff planned in the way of a welcoming party
when he and his wife and child returned to Florida, but I believe it
would have been very appropriate to have assembled a childrens*
choir at the Tallahassee airport and as the Kirks left their plane,
let it sing, M-i-c-k-e-y M-o-u-s-e, because that is the perfect
description of the type of leadership we have in Florida.
TONY FERNANDEZ, 3AS

f You Got It Baby 1
Mixing The Issues

MR. EDITOR:
I am sorry to learn that the editorial staff of
our school newspaper is unhappy because you see
a clear and sinister trend in the demonstrations
being planned by ... ( you wrote S.D.S.) SNNC
and SSOC.
You dont particularly like ... the mixing of
the draft, civil rights, Dow Chemical, and the Viet
Nam war.
Now, I can final 1 y understand what is wrong with
the editorial staff of the Alligator. More than one
issue at a time is too much for you to comprehend.
In the past, the Alligator has come out in favor
of civil rights, within reason (your own reason, that
is), has come out concerned about the draft and the
war (now that graduate draft deferments have been
eliminated), and has come out In favor of Dow
recruiting here; all separately.
Mr. Editor, if you do not see a connection at

Gator Girl: Fanfare Amid Protest

MR. EDITOR: L
- F
We wish to bring some cheer
to the usual fare of complaints
about editorials, protests, and
demands for the resignation of
University officials addressed to
your desk, and for once, we want
to congratulate you.
We know that a letter of con congratulations
gratulations congratulations to the Alligator is
of such a rare breed that many
people are going to surprised by
it. Nevertheless, we are very
much inclined to compliment you
for selecting Miss Kim Antone
as Gator Girl (Alligator
February 28) and printing her

career opportunities. Each re requires
quires requires a reasonable aptitude in
chemistry, physics, mathe mathematics,
matics, mathematics, and certain of the bio biological
logical biological sciences such as botany
and zoology.
In summary, we would be de delighted
lighted delighted to accept well qualified
women students in our school.
We have had several take our
introductory course in recent
years but none has thus far
elected to go on for a degree in
the fields we offer.
JOHN GRAY
DIRECTOR

picture in the paper. of Miss Antones picture.
Little things" like Miss An Antone
tone Antone really make life worth liv- r. s. SANTOS, 4AS
ing, no matter how confusing and j. PASTORIZA, 4AS
alarmist journalistic writing ~G. PASTORIZA, 3EG
might become at times. From all j. a. MENDEZ, 4EG
of us many thanks for the solace C. CONSUEGRA, 3ED
Black Power Lauded
MR. EDITOR:
Regarding reader Pat Maxwell's letter concerning Jason Straight's
article that mentioned Brown and Carmichael: Yes, Stokely and Rap
make young negroes proud of being Black. Why not ask some young
negroes and find ojit?
Even Integratedjlacks (sic) secretly (or overtly) admire the Black
power militants. Miss. Maxwell's statements help to illustrate how
little the White liberal understands the Black man.
. A BLACK STUDENT

least between Dow, the draft, and the war, you
should not even be editor of a high school poop
sheet.
Now, far as "a distinctly racial tinge" is
concerned; you got it, baby! At least, you have
Inadvertently spouted a truism. There IS a connection
between the Afro-American in this country and the
previously mentioned issues.
Some simple facts, Mr. Editor: 10% of the pop population
ulation population of the U.S. is BLACK. 30% of the fighting
force in Viet Nam is BLACK. 40% of the casualties
in Viet Nam are BLACK.
It is totally irrelevant If you, Mr. Editor, under understand
stand understand the connection between Dow, the war and the
draft with the sentiments felt by Afro-Americans.
The point Is that they do, and they are going to do
something about it.
ED FREEMAN, 4AS

SPEAKING OUT
UF Student Rights,
Fact Or Fancy?

By STEPHEN HOROWITZ
Last year after the Pam
Brewer case 11 other students
and myself spent about l f ooo man
hours working on the recently
adopted Student Code of Conduct.
One of the most important and
highly discussed issues was
whether the university adminis administration
tration administration should be able to penalize
a student for a civil offense if
the civil authorities had taken
action.
It was decided and written into
law that students who had been
prosecuted by the civil auth authorities
orities authorities would not be liable to the
university. However, we felt that
offenses committed on campus,
such as breaking a university or ordinance
dinance ordinance should most certainly
allow university officials to take
some kind of action.
The recent arrest of the 11
Dow demonstrators has brought
this issue to the fore. By al allowing
lowing allowing the civil authorities to ar arrest
rest arrest the demonstrators the ad administration
ministration administration has forfeited its
right to prosecute the demon demonstrators.
strators. demonstrators. The administration
could have retained this right had
Gator Button

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

it not allowed the civil auth authorities
orities authorities to take action.
Regardless of whether we con condone
done condone or condemn the actions of
the eleven their case is our case
for if the administration is al allowed
lowed allowed to take any action, our stu student
dent student code, which we fought for
last year, is in every sense of
the word defunct, it is merely a
piece of paper, one which is
meaningless in every sense of
the word.
If Clyde Taylor is, as he said,
a SG president for the students,
now is the time he must come
forth and defend his fellow stu students
dents students in the rights he knows they
have, rights which will be vio violated
lated violated if the administration is al allowed
lowed allowed to prosecute.
If our student government
leaders do not go through the
proper channels to clear up this
infringement of students rights,
our university may be plagued
with another embarrassing Pam
Brewer type riot, one all of us
would like to see avoided in the
best interests of the university.
Cruel Father
Reminisces
MR. EDITOR:
After reading some of the edi editorials
torials editorials and letters to the editor
in The Alligator I was re reminded
minded reminded of: Lives there a man
with soul so dead, who never
to himself hath said ...
I was a student once and un understand
derstand understand that students know more
that parents and that Mom and
Dad and the State Legislators
are all a rather stupid breed.
They never really sweated and
bled and worked in order that
their kids could have it better.
It was true that the study load
was too heavy, money was too
scarce and fun was somewhere
else. So I dropped out of college.
After a few years of working
my butt off and while somewhere
over the Pacific in World War
II it occurred to me that my Dad
and Mother had made great sa sacrifices
crifices sacrifices to give me an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity and that I had been a
disappointment to them. I found
that the work load at my uni university
versity university was not to heavy to let
me also start a business and
devote a large amount of time to
that too while earning a degree.
Ye of little faith and perse perseverance.
verance. perseverance. It is sad that youth must
always suffer so horribly. Your
schools are so socially and
academically Inadequate
compared to what? Russia? Bri Britain?
tain? Britain? The Congo?
A CRUEL FATHER,
RAY COCHRAN
Not Just
Observers i
MR. EDITOR:
*>
I take particular issue the
statements in the Alligator
Brukner and Fristoe both Insis Insisted
ted Insisted that they were not partici participating
pating participating in any large part ir, .he
demonstration, but that they ware
for the most part observers.
That statement is incorrect.
Both T. Fristoe and myseti
were at the demonstration to .-how
our disdain of Dow Che i leal
Company and not merely .u ob observe
serve observe the melee.
IRA BRUKNi.R

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
' h
6 MONTH, papered, Dachshund
puppy. Just finished all worming
and shots, Owner leaving for
New York, only $20.00. Call 372-
5976. (A-92-3t-p)
FURS, 1930 clothing, collectors
items, glass, antique furniture,
Hall tree marble top buffet, oak
dining set with 2 buffets, desks.
Opposite art center, Micanopy.
Sat. p.m. and Sunday. (A-92-
st-p)
ROBERTS 770 four-track stereo
tape recorder. Cross-Field head,
three speeds, hysteresis motor.
Like new. $270.00. Call 376-
4160 after 5 or on weekends.
(A-92-st-p)

NOTICE
students will be allowed to use the University Advertising Rate
in The Florida Alligator unless the advertisement is sanctioned
by a bona fide student organization listed by the Board of Student
Activities. .4.
Any advertisements political in nature must be charged at the
political rate regardless of organizational affiliations.
This redefined policy superseded any previous individual agree agreements
ments agreements or concessions.
*DO-lt-Yourself
HP* I** 1 ** CLASSIFIEDS wwsb§|
DAYS TO RUN
gig To order classifieds, use the Ag
IvEs form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive)
tance to: Alligator Classifieds, Q da Y
Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- O 2 days
ville, Florida 32601. 3 da ys (*lO% discount) jgj
0 4 days (*lO% discount)
Orders must be RECEIVED 0 5 days and over
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount)
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE M
r\ Count the words, omitting a, an &
C. LM oo I r LA kj the Addresses and phone numbers w
r-j . count as one word. Minimum charge #§l
i-i f is SI.OO for 20 words. For each
wanted additional word add 3?. Multiply
help wanted the otal by u ber f lhe %
ygft q autos ls * run Subtract the discount
@ n personal ( w applicable) and enclose a check
{§2 n lost found for the remainder. For example,
m rvmp a 32-word ad to run 4 days costs
U services $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?).
jj WORDING
J 1 §
m 1
i
m ___ H
fe NAME DATE ||
|| STUDENT# PHONE ||
ca n no

%^^VAV.V.V.V*VW.V.V.V.V#V.V.V*V.VtVVtV.V
FOR SALE
1965 MUSTANG. Gold with white
interior. 6 cylinder. Standard
transmission. Radio & heater.
New wide oval tires. Asking
$1,295. Call 378-5133. (G-96-
st-p)
1961 HARLEY DAVIDSON 165.
SIOO.OO. Rebuilt engine single
seat, carrying rack for infor information
mation information call Rick. 378-6801. (A (A---93-st-p)
--93-st-p) (A---93-st-p)
1966 HONDA 50, Good condition,
SIIO.OO, Helmet included, See
at Apt. 27, 503 NW 21st Lane or
Call 372-0920. (A-96-3t-p)
FOR SALE 160 HONDA Scramb Scrambler,
ler, Scrambler, $450.00. Call 376-9420. (A (A---96-2t-p)
--96-2t-p) (A---96-2t-p)

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Page 8

FOR SALE
Rame Hair Stylist Fashions of
*6B Angel Curls Factory price
for $35.00. Permanent Waves for
$15.00. $18.50 frostings for
$12.50 with Edner or Geri. Call
372-5549, 319 W. University Ave.
(A-93-st-c)
0
FORTY 4-track car stereo tapes;
all types of music. $5.00 each.
Save $2.00 off regular price. Will
consider bulk discount. John,
378-1921. (A-94- st-p)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inven Inventory
tory Inventory over 400 Buy- Sell-Trader
Repair, Reloading Supplies
Custom reloading Harry Beck Beckwith,
with, Beckwith, Gun Dealer, Micanopy, 466-
3340. (A-95-st-p)
EXOTIC snakes and lizards from
all parts of the globe! Pythons,
monitors, true chameleons, etc.
Contact Wm. Thacker, Bth Str.
Zoo. 378-8810. (A-95-2t-p)
1966 HONDA 50. Good condition.
Only 1,300 miles. Call 378-3449.
(A-95-3t-p)
FOR RENT
APARTMENT for rent, air con conditioner,
ditioner, conditioner, heater, kitchen, patio,
pool and lots more. Only $95
per month. Available March. Call
372-1693. (B-96-lt-p)
SUBLET one bedroom apt. with
reverse-cycle air conditioning,
gas heat, patio. $95.00 per month,
1015 NW 39th Ave. 378-2788.
(B-93- st-p)
MOBILE HOME for rent: 10 x
50*, completely furnished, 2bed 2bedrooms,
rooms, 2bedrooms, very clean, water and
trash collection included, central
heating. $90.00 month. 372-5298.
(B-93-4t-p)
SUBLET for spring and summer
quarters; modern one bedroom
furnished air conditioned apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Call 376-0496 after 5:00.
(B- 94-3 t-p)
APARTMENT for rent. Modern
efficiency for two. Nc summer
obligation. Across the street
from campus. Ph: 372-0840. 08-91
91- st-p)
ONE BEDROOM apt. for rent.
$87.00 month. Red brick apts.
behind Univ. City Bank. Ask for
Mrs. Merrill at 372-1494, day daytime
time daytime only. (B-95-4t-p)
SUBLEASE: Modern 1-BR Apt.
AC, private patio, Spring Quar Quarter,
ter, Quarter, $95 mo., Ruby D Apts.,
2216 NW 3 Terr. #6, 376-1486.
(B-95-st-p)
LARGE HOME will rent to
students, family or club. 7 rooms
and bath downstairs, 3 bedroom
and bath upstairs. Furnished or
unfurnished, washing machine
and dryer. Large patio with 20 x
40 swimming pool. Large corner
lot with plenty of off street park parking.
ing. parking. 207 NE 7 St. Ph. 372-
2589. (B-95-6t-p)
i
1533-1535 Ave. One bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, air Conditioned, furnished
apartment. $95.00 per month.
Lease required. No pets. 376-
8475 or 376-1065. (B-96-st-p)

FOR RENT
* ..
SUBLEASE new large 2 bedroom
furnished trailer for spring term
at SIOO a month. See at Mobileer
Trailer Park, Lot 13, 2731 Ar Archer
cher Archer Road. (B-95- 3t-p)
LARGE, quiet, front room avail available
able available March 15, Golfview border bordering
ing bordering west campus; central heat heating;
ing; heating; air conditioning; some
kitchen privileges. Call 376-
5849. (B-95- st-p)
OLYMPIA 2 bedroom apt. To sub sublease
lease sublease for third and four 4th
tjtrs. $150.00 per month plus
utilities. Call 372-8728. (B-95-
m
FOR RENT: Spacious one-bed one-bedroom
room one-bedroom modern furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. University Gardens. Move
in from March s lB-April 1. Phone
372-3202. (B-94-st-p3>
TRAILER for rent large, clean,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, Private lot,
air conditioner, water furnished,
$ 100/month. 378-2453 or 372-
0396. (B-96-st-p)
APARTMENT furnished,
rooms, 1 bedroom, SBO.OO month
including water. 421 NW 15th
St. Couples. Available April Ist.
Contact 114 NW 14th St. 376-
3522. (B-93- st-p)
CLEAN, cozy apt. for two, $lO5
per month. Start of spring quar quarter.
ter. quarter. Away from hum-drum. Call
George or Bob at 376-3261, Ext.
2832 before 6 p.m. and 378-
6519 after 6. (C-91-ts-c)
VACANT APARTMENT. Spring
Quarter. Starlight Apartments.
$135 a month. Two bedroom.
AC/heat. 3 blocks from campus.
Call 378-8153 or 376-8553. (B (B---95-3t-p)
--95-3t-p) (B---95-3t-p)
IN QUIET residential area. Room
for rent, linens, maid service
and utilities included. Upper Upperclassmen
classmen Upperclassmen or graduate preferred..
Call 376-7660. (B-93-st-p)
TUi me
AUDREY
HEPBURN BViV
AI.ANP.Ht 41
arkinKuSW
richardEHSl
crenna^^^M
_ . Also Starring EFREM
ZIMBALIST, JR.
-- n-
EDawfewn SoUetWJte j
aI):illYill ENDS
I 233 W. Unlytrttty A-.-*, |
JULIE CHRISTIE
TERENCE STAMP
PETER FINCH
ALAN BATES

1 645 I
SI.OO
5.2 AT 9:03 NO. AT 10:35 f
i§H
ms\
Wpfjmrf*' DEAD I'

Use our handy
mail in order
form*

FOR RENT
>: ::
WHY UVE in a traffic-jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
of all parking problems. Fully
furnished spacious 1 bedroom
apt., AC, Gas heat, fully equip equipped
ped equipped kitchen including washing
machine. Call 372-3357 or 372-
5240. (B-96-lOt- c)
MOVE UP to apartment living!
Choice University Gardens
Apartment for 4 available March
19. Experience all of life's little
joys for only $165/mo. 378-4389.
(B-95-3t-p) ..
c-xvx*x-xssrwx*xx*xx.vw*x*x-x*:;:
WANTED I
ONE or two studious, swinging
male roommates for immediate
occupancy, Apt. 402 Olympia.
$37.50/mo., plus utilities. Call
376-6820. (C-96-st-p)
GUARANTEED
[GARBAGE
808 DYLAN
With
Joan
Baez
DONT LOOK BACK
Jt-5-7-9 out 10:30
(QNOitKAMi,
0000000 ** 0000000
mmmm
gw.w. irn ST. m-najM
First Run
open 6:15
main feature 7;is I
I CLINT B
I EASTWOOD I
I THE rji I
I
I : UGffffl
co- .'jff t j
I LEEVANCLEEF I
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I 'DONT MAKE I
1 WAVES



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
**' *** ** J**'
MUST have an apartment for
Summer Quarter. Prefer Star Starlight
light Starlight or French Quarter. Call
Cathy at 378-8153 or come by
855 Starlight. (C-95-2t-p)
STANDARD typewriter In good
condition. Call Richard Taylor,
376-9420. (C-93-3t-p)
MALE roommates wanted for
spring and summer quarters.
Olympia apts. Close to campus,
Sorority row. Central heat, AC,
wall-to-wall carpeting. Quiet!!
Security deposit and last month
(August) rent paid. Roommate
graduating. 376-8480. (C-95-
3t-p)
ROOMMATE wanted for next
Quarter. University Gardens, 716
SW 16th Ave., Apt. 107. $41.25
per month, and one fourth of
utilities. (C-88-12-p)
FEMALE roommate needed. But Butler
ler Butler Gardens Apts, on SW 16th
Ave. Move in immed. or after
finals. Security Deposit already
paid. 376-0635. (C-93-3t-p)
FEMALE graduate student or
approximate age to share nice
2 bedroom house. Reasonable.
378-4370 or 378-5059. (C-96-
st-p)
WANTED! One male roommate
for Gatortown during Spring
Quarter. Pool, AC-CH, Stereo.
$42.50/mo. Call 378-8982. (C (C---
--- (C--- st-p) _______
FEMALE roommate wanted:
Spring or Spring and summer.
French Quarter, Apt. 72 on the
pool. Call Peggy, Sue, or Jan,
378-7858. (C-93-st-p)
rrm T n
WANTED: Female roommate.
Spring and/or summer. Univer University
sity University Gardens Apt. S6O/month &
1/2 utilities. 716 SW 16th Ave.
Apt. 106 or call 378-5841. (C (C---96-st-p)
--96-st-p) (C---96-st-p)
HELP! Wanted female roommate,
University Gardens. $55.00 per
month for Spring Quarter. Call
Cathy, 372-5880 after 6:00 p.m.
(C-95-st-p)
FEMALE roommate needed for
1 bedroom University Gardens
Apt. for Third Quarter. Call
372-7247. (C-9Q-jst-p)
y
MALE roommate for 2 bedroom
apt. Summit House, Spring Quar Quarter,
ter, Quarter, S4O/month. 376-8133. (C (C---95-st-p)
--95-st-p) (C---95-st-p)
. f m
MALE roommate wanted: to
share wood panneled, two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment with two others.
1/3 of $140.00 month rent and
1/3 of utilities. Call 378-8352.
(C-94-ts-c)

STEAK n SHAKE
Student Special
(With The Coupon)
Our Regular 88$ Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15$ Drink
$1.03 value Only 85{ tax I
Offer good Until March 20 Only
Steak n Shake
1610 SW 13th Street Gainesville

WANTED |
FEMALE roommate needed for
immediate occupancy. Olympia
Apt. 2 blocks from campus. Se Security
curity Security deposit and last month* s srent
rent srent already paid. Call 376-0066.
(C-87-st-p)
-
FEMALE Roommate needed
starting in March. Present room roommate
mate roommate graduating. $43.75/mo.
Contact Susan: 373-5229. (C-92-
st-p)
to-
FEMALE roommates needed for
March or April. Summit House.
2 bedroom apt. by pool 16 3/4 mo.
Ph: 378-8604. (C-94-st-p)
HELP WANTED
FULL TIME TYPIST position
now open with Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications. Student Publications is
willing to train (on the job) a
person with typing skill to learn
sophisticated typesetting equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Applicant must be able to
type 50 WPM with 80 percent
accuracy. This is a clerk-typist
n position. Report to University
Central Employment, 2nd floor of
the Hub for details. (E-91-tf (E-91-tfncVREGISTERED
ncV- (E-91-tfncVREGISTERED
REGISTERED NURSE for ped pediatrics
iatrics pediatrics office. Write stating per permanence,
manence, permanence, experience, and refer references.
ences. references. P.O. Box 2427 Univ.
Station. (E-92-tf r c)
ADVERTISING salesman for the
Florida Alligator. Must have car
and be available for summer
term. Good pay, good working
conditions, great experience. Ad
majors preferred. Apply in room
330 Reitz Union. fE-92-tf-nc')
SALES Representative (Trainee).
Medium sized Central Florida
Printing Company is seeking the
services of Sales Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives to work in the Gainesville
and Ocala Area. Applicants
should have capability of pro producing
ducing producing at least $8,500 to SIO,OOO
sales vim. per month, and with
the desire to constantly improve
their potential. The company will
conduct a public relations and
advertising campaign. Co Coordinated
ordinated Coordinated with the sales effort
compensation includes base
salary plus liberal commission,
expense allowances, Company In Insurance
surance Insurance program and other fringe
benefits. Send written resume to
Storter Printing Co. 1024 S Main
Street, Gainesville, (Please no
phone calls). (E-86-10t-c)
I AUTOS |
*6B PONTIAC Firebird. Olive
with white interior, $500.00 be below
low below cost. *6B Magnovox stereo
Components FM, AM, Large
floor speakers. $250.00 or best,
.offer, 376-3261 Ext. 3178 or
376-2708. (G-92-st-p)

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

| AUTOS
XK-E Jaguar roadster, blue, new
michelin tires, needs hood work,
top running condition $1475.00
Archer Rd. Village Trailer Park;
Alpha 8. (G-84-4t-p)
*6l CHEV. power, heater, radio,
excellent condition, mechanically
perfect. Bought new car, must
sell. Call 372-3572 or 376-3261
Ext. 2896 or see at Landmark
Apt. 12. (G-92-st-p)
. J -I
1960 SILVER FIAT 1500 cc Sports
car. Double overhead CAM (osca)
engine, headers, new tires, seat
belts, roll-up windows, good top
and solid body. $595.00. Call
378-8867 or 376-3261, Ext. 2412
after 7 p.m. (G-95-6t-p)
1964 VW sun-roof Sedan Low
mileage, radio, new battery
- good condition $895. Call.
378-3836 after 5:00 p.m. (G (G---95-6t-p)
--95-6t-p) (G---95-6t-p)
MUSTANG 65 G.T., white, high highperformance
performance highperformance engine, rally-pack,
four-speed, disc brakes, post*
traction. $1550. Days call Ext.
3346, nights, 372-5911, Mike
Boring. (G-94-3t-p)
1965 PONTIAC Tempest Custom
sports coupe, V-8, 32,000 miles,
power steering, radio, heater,
3-new tires, excellent condition.
Call 376-4165. (G-94-3t-p)
PERSONAL
GINNY . But yesterday you
touched me/ and we drove to the
toll beach/ and ran in the sand./
Sorry no one could see/ how
beautifully happy we were ... Jay.
(J-96-lt-p)
LOTS OF LOVE and Sunshine
for your child in my home. Hot
meals with milk, snack and juice.
Down town convenience. Exper Experienced
ienced Experienced with good references. 378-
4108. (M-96-lt-p)
REWARD FOR RETURN of
papers and personal contents of
Handbag taken from Traders. No
questions asked. Contact Patti,
French Quarter #lO7, 378-8253.
(L-95-3t-p)
Car Buffs do it!
ft
.Vy
./.Mr
sjfl
English feather
For men who want tob? inhere the
action is. Very racy. Very mascu masculine.
line. masculine. ALL-PURPOSE LOTION.
$2.50, $4.00, $6.50. From the com complete
plete complete array of ENGLISH LEATHER
mens toiletries.

Page 9

PERSONAL
FREE 3 1/2 month old black
and white male kitten. Call 378-
4435 between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.
(J-95-2t-p)
SERVICES
SCUBA DIVERS get regulator
repairs, diving equipment, and
fast tank fills with highly fil filtered
tered filtered air from Merrit Enter Enterprises,
prises, Enterprises, 711 NW 16th Ave. Ph:
376-2145. fM-93-lOt-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up and delivery on and
near campus. Call Mand R Tennis
Services. 378-2489. (M-59-18t-
P)
INCOME TAX RETURNS ....
$4.00 up. SPECIAL rates for
Univ. Students, faculty and em employees.
ployees. employees. At Rebel Discount, 1127
W. Univ. Ave. 376-7430, 378-
6127, across from Wolfies. (M (M---91-10t-p)
--91-10t-p) (M---91-10t-p)

Once a
Wrangler-phile,
always a
Wrangler-phile.
_u- pi
W '*l i H
I-\ till
I
All it takes is one pair of Wrangler Jeans
and you're a Wrangler-phile for life. The fit. The
feel. The lean and easy look. Only Wrangler
jeans have it. And Wrangler sportswear has
the same thing. Because it's made the same
great way. Here, a fine example of Wrangler-ism
in an ivy button down shirt and gold glen plaid
slacks. Both are permanent press with a soil
release finish. Slacks, SB. Shirt, $5.
Mr. Wrangler Sports wear
Wremember the "W" if. silent!
J.M. FIELDS
w mmmmmmm -awxmrmmrMii

SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric;
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. fM-78-tf-c)
LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Lady's wristwatch. Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, February 25 in or near
undergraduate library. Reward
for return. Please contact. 378-
7327. (L-96-2t-p)
LOST Man's dark Herringbone
carcoat (MacGregor) at the
Scooner Room Friday night, 23
Feb. Call 376-6916. Needed. No
questions. Reward. (L-94-3t-p)
LOST: Brown pocketbook, 2/23,
Friday afternoon in Bldg. D.
Keep money. DESPERATELY
NEED identification, prescrip prescription
tion prescription sunglasses, keys. Please re return
turn return or report information to
Dianne Selditch, 207 Anderson,
Ext. 2268. (L-96-3t-p)



Page 10

', The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

"It So Happens..." Slide Show
Is Original Experiment In Arts

By NICK TATRO
Alligator Staff Writer
Two UF students have put to together
gether together a mixed media bag, a
montage of music, pictures and
humor, that is by far the most
original experiment in the arts
at UF this year.
It So Happens is a color
slide show coming to McCarty
Auditorium Monday and Tuesday
nights at 7:30. It was photo photographed,
graphed, photographed, arranged and produced
by Jamie Jobb, 4JM, and Jules
Pfeiffer, 3AS.
The show incorporates such di diverse
verse diverse elements as WW n film
clip, a TV news report, Lawrence

Film Bill Opens
Wed. At State

By ROY MAYS
Alligatpr Staff Writer
The techniques and philoso philosophies
phies philosophies of seven of the world's
most controversial motion pic picture
ture picture directors will be presented
in a Directors Festival at
the State theatre March 6 thru
23.
This will be the first oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity for many film goers in
this area to see these unusual
films of the past and present
in repertory.
Orson Wells first film,Citi film,Citizen
zen film,Citizen Kane revolutionized the art
of filmmaking with a new realm
of imaginative storytelling. The
story of Charles Foster Kane,
goliath of the publishing world
is told with dynamic editing,
backward and forward in time.
Camera angle and perspective
were shifted imaginatively to
swallow the viewer into Kanes
life.
Alfred Hitchcock established
his traditional guessing-game
style in The Lady Vanishes,
which combines most of his de devices
vices devices for comedy and suspense.
Awaking from a nap, a young
woman discovers that the lady
sitting in her train compartment
has vanished. Her suspicions un uncomfirmed
comfirmed uncomfirmed by everyone else, the
suggestion of conspiracy slips
into her mind and the rest is
madness and mayhem which
thrills the viewer and teases
his intelligence to out guess the
master of intrigue, Alfred Hitch Hitchcock.
cock. Hitchcock.
In Russia, Sergei Eisenstein
refined and developed D.W. Grif Griffiths
fiths Griffiths theories of editing to pro produce
duce produce Ivan the Terrible Part
I.
This film portrays the image
of 16th century Russia in epic
style. It follows the reign of
Tsar Ivan IV from his coro coronation
nation coronation in Moscow to his abdi abdication
cation abdication and subsequent popular
recall.

Ilrrr
is
your
or x/
form .

Ferlinghettis poetry, a panty
raid spoof, the Wyoming country countryside
side countryside in November, and a Mican Micanopy
opy Micanopy railroad signalman into a
well-unified look at and through
the eyes of the under-30
generation.
Backing up this unusual festi festival
val festival of the eye, there are the
musical creations of Ravel, Wag Wagner
ner Wagner and the Beatles. The sound soundtrack
track soundtrack has been expertly as assembled
sembled assembled and lacks nothing in
clarity of sound and logical co coherence,
herence, coherence, even though only a few
of the modern technical gimmicks
such as echo chamber have been
used.

Akira Kurosawa, one of the
foremost directors of Japan, rose
to international acclaim with
Rashomon. Set in the middle
ages, Rashoman probes the
nature of truth and subjective
reality.
Francois Truffaut, the French
critic-turned-director progres progressed
sed progressed through a spectrum of un uniquely
iquely uniquely different slims culminating
with Jules and Jim.
Starring Jeanne Moreau and
Oskar Weiner, Jules and Jim
evokes the romantic nostalgia
that proceeded World War I and
established Truffaut as the lea leader
der leader of the French New Wave
directors.
In *L Avventura, Mich Michelangelo
elangelo Michelangelo Antonioni depicts a uni unique
que unique way of communicating human
experience to an audience.
Italys foremost director tells
the story of Italys idle, estab established
lished established rich and gives a provoc provocative
ative provocative statement about modern
society. International film cri critics
tics critics in a poll recently voted
*L* Avventura number two
in a list of the greatest films
of all time.
Sixth in the list of Direc Directors*
tors* Directors* Festival presentations is
the widely acclaimed account of
a doctors journey through a
landso -j >f ir-am and mem memory
ory memory Wild Strawberries, by
Ingmar Bergman.
These seven films, each ac accompanied
companied accompanied by au award winning
short film, will run through
March 23. Admission for al!
seven will be $6.

'fjT% 5 n ly Personal Barber Service
N Relax In comfort and convenience at the best in the proses proses-1/
-1/ proses-1/ sional barber field in Gainesville. Specialists in razor cuts,
'w trimmings, washings and conventional cuts. See Kenny or Mac
SIMS BARBER SHOP
h 817 West University 378-2015
/e copies of the
le in my name. 0| JL
sed $ ($5 per copy)
er
State & Zip
Hfied in the Alligator when the
i arrived. Mail this;with remittance
130 Reitz Union, U off, Gainesville.

This feature length production
progresses in sequences of illus illustrated
trated illustrated song and has some ex exciting
citing exciting moments.
The best series is the Nor Norwegian
wegian Norwegian Wood song enacted by
coed Jean Hoehan and graduate
student Bob Shipman. Natural
acting combines with an exquisite
log cabin and woods background
to paint a moving pastoral love
affair.
The romanticism is heightened
by the skillful use of superim superimposition.
position. superimposition. One slide is placed
over another so we see two young
lovers near a cabin through the
wistfull eyes of a beautiful girl.
But there are two overall fail failings
ings failings in the show. First, the
roore-than-occasional mistake of
not matching picture with word
images or tonal suggestions of
the music. In the Ravel suite,
there is a long evolving climax
that finally explodes in triple for fortissimo.
tissimo. fortissimo.
In the music, it is achieved
by the dark evil low brass in instruments
struments instruments but on the screen the
climactic slide is predominantly
light blue with soft rays of white
sunlight. The colors should have
been dark and the picture startl startlingly
ingly startlingly unusual.
The second flaw is the pro projector.
jector. projector. It doesnt seem to be
easily adaptable to varying
tempos of projection.
In Ferlingettis Startingfrom
San Francisco, he mentions
several images in a row and then
says bang bang. Well, the
slides just keep coming not even
in tempo with the images much
less the onomatopoeia. This sort
of clumsiness is ruinous to the
media it was supposedly am amplifying.
plifying. amplifying. Perhaps this is merely
the mechanical shortcoming of
the media.
The humor in the show tends
to be topical occasionally sa satirical
tirical satirical and directed toward a col college
lege college audience if not the UF in
particular (good panty raid
shots!). Some of the interview
gags have been done before, thus
we rapidly weary of the broad broadcaster
caster broadcaster trying to shag some quere querelous
lous querelous nobody from the microphone.
But Father Joe Torchia darn darning
ing darning his socks by lamplight caps
the evening in the Eleanor Rigby
sequence.
The most outstanding accom accomplishment
plishment accomplishment of this mixed media
bag is the integration of straight
pictures with slides of other
media: TV, newspaper, posters,
classic and modern painting, etc.
This is accomplished with a cer certain
tain certain self-consciousness (witness

the McLuhan gag) but never in incoherently
coherently incoherently just to say the bag
is full.
Go see this interesting experi experiment.
ment. experiment. It has an uncanny profes professionalism
sionalism professionalism about it. It's modern modernism
ism modernism without slickness; it's
critical but at the same time
recognizes a positive force of
life.

[ ROBBIE'S I
The Best In
Meals, Klandwichet
"color T.V. & BILLIARDS^
1718 W. University Ave.
TSiSTV
I BRAKE JOB I
I
'7m I Sighltly Higher
\ n&ll HIRE'S WHAT WE DO X
Ml \ \ \ 7A m 1- New Broke Lining
2 Rebuild Wheel Cyle. £
ml / 3. Turn All 4 Drums f|^Hp
1/ ;T r /S'; / 4 Repack Front Wheel HHK-
I />T A /- ft/ Bearing* -|§f
|L / \T 5. Add Broke Fluid S'
v, Bl i;i /'" '*w.' *e. VS. < Check Creese Seals a^HR
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imm/ mm*. v>v. \ Lininqs MK
lW 25,000 Mile Cuaiantee f
__ v No Payment 'Til'; Apr 8)
taDQQIHOQCi
I# 405 NW 13ttl St Al otlcow^ny
IS I credit cards
P 372-5030 honored.
ennnnnnnimiuiiiiniainnnria
§ SPECIAL NOTICE |
To all students and university personnel
i
in flj
1 DISCOUNT
2 il OH Our Low-Low Prices Jj
i JMfro food tastes much better at i
lpre.i.Hg I
iflf CAFETERIAS*!^!
IMT Tl:30 AM 2:00 PM|
I TJf I (4:30 PM 8:00 PM |
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER £
5 ( Just For Minutes From Campus)

Europe
'6B
Why not use WHEELS to guide
you to those in* and very
special out-of-the-woy places?
Travel with Oxford-Cambridge
guides. Meet student hosts (who
know where the fun is) in each
country. A new approach to
student travel. And il swingsl
Interested or curious? Contact:
Student Wheels Abroad, 555
Madison Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10022.
(212)6884910.



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Monday, March 4
Mensa Members: daily lunch luncheons,
eons, luncheons, West Wing of Main Cafe Cafeteria,
teria, Cafeteria, noon
Program Office: dancing lessons,
243 Union, 7 p.m.
Paint for Fun: art lessons, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
IEEE: Mr. W. M. Crichton,
Power Transmission Lines/*
310 Elec. Eng. Bldg. S., 7:30
p.m.
Student F.E.A., A.C.E., &C.E.C:
guest speaker, Floyd Chris Christian,
tian, Christian, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club: meet meeting
ing meeting 525 Eng. Bldg., 8
Engineers Fair Queen Can Candidate
didate Candidate will be introduced.
Fla. Players: business meeting,
Constans Theatre, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, March 5
L.DJS. Institute: The General
Epistles and the Apocalypse/
L.DJS. Student Center, 7 a.m.
L.D.S. Institute: American
ligions and the Rise of Moi
manism/ L.D.S. Student Cen Center,
ter, Center, 12:20 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: pledges, 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Sigma Lambda Chi: business
meeting, 4-C AFA, 7 p.m.
All members please attend.
Program Office: bridge les lessons,
sons, lessons, 400 Union, 7 p.m.
Tues. Evening Supper Club: din dinner,
ner, dinner, Univ. Inn, 7:15 p.m. All
those single and over 21 are
invited.
U of F Stamp Club: meeting,
Gainesville Chamber of Com Commerce,
merce, Commerce, 7:30 p.m.
Semper Fidelis Society: meeting,
118 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: 18th Annual Variety
Band Jazz Concert, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, March 6
U of F Concert Band: twilight
concert, Plaza of the Am Americas,
ericas, Americas, 6:45 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 355 Union, 7 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Suburban
Living-Six Solutions/ 105 B
AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Benton Engineering Council:
meeting, 346 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Institute of Judaic Studies: be beginning
ginning beginning and intermediate He Hebrew,
brew, Hebrew, Jewish history, intro introduction
duction introduction to Jewish thought, Hll Hlllel
lel Hlllel Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
L.DJS. Institute: Building a Per Personal
sonal Personal Philosophy of Life,
L.DJS Student Center, 7:30p.m.
Business Administration Dames:
coffee given by faculty wives,
2222 NW Bth Avenue, 8 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Indianapolis Symphony, and the
Gainesville Little Theatre pro production
duction production of Arms and the
Man.

m Vitit lie At nr Wbw Hnnie
fiAiMFWIIIF FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNlONa^j^^.~-

BLUB BULLETIN

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
SPRING REGISTRATION FEES
may be paid now. Pick up fee
payment materials at the inside
counter in the Student Accounts
sroction of the Hub.
MUSIC LISTENING ROOMS
will present the Gainesville High
School Madrigal Singing Group
on March 8, 3:30-4:30 p.m., 2nd
Floor, East Gallery, J. Wayne
Reitz Union. The concert is free.

| ; -m
- :
i W
Jar A 3m
I m
- HP jflf
B BB 1 fr 4 1411

GENERAL NOTICES
£
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR
ENGLISH IN ACTION to meet
each week with a person from
other lands for English conver conversation
sation conversation practice one or two hours
on Mondays and Wednesdays from
4-8 p.m. at the Baptist Student
Center, 1604 W. University Ave.
Contact Mrs. Bernice D. Harvey,
372-4711 during the above hours
for information.

Yes, Ole J. Fred got his picture
in the Seminole twice. Now in
the years to come he can look
back and reminisce at his college
days at UF.
You can do the same if you get
your Seminole. Its only $5. And
you can order it by coming around
to room 330 Reitz Union or by
mailing a check with your name
and address in c/o The Seminole
> to room 330 Reitz Union.
Order yours today who knows,
you may be featured too!

GENERAL NOTICES
GATOR GRAS needs talent for
its Minstrel show. Anyone in interested
terested interested contact Linda Runion at
376-9163.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
Dosteti two weeks in advance of
me interview date at the

| Room 330 |
J. Wayne Reitz Union
| Date I
Please reserve copies of the 1968
Seminole in my name. Enclosed is
I a check for $ ($5.00 per copy)
Name |
Address

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

THE SEMINOLE
FEATURED
J. FRED MUGGS

PLACEMENT NOTICES
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. a !' companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Mar. June and Aug.
Craduates unless indicated other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.
MARCH 6:
PUBLIC SCHOOLS PLACE PLACEMENT
MENT PLACEMENT DAY. Elementary and sec secondary
ondary secondary education.
GEIGY AGRICULTURAL CHEM CHEMICALS.
ICALS. CHEMICALS. Agriculture.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Jones Believes Tenure Denial
Violates Constitutional Rights

By MARSHALL JONES
The controversy surrounding
my separation from the faculty
centers in the Administrations
reasons for denying tenure.
I was recommended for tenure
by my department chairman and
college dean with the support of
the faculty in my department
and college.
In these circumstances, the
conventions of the academic
world, as expressed in the AAUP
Statement on Government of
Colleges and Universities
(1966), are explicit:
Faculty status and related
matters are primarily a faculty
responsibility; this area in includes
cludes includes appointments, reap reappointments,
pointments, reappointments, decisions to re reappoint,
appoint, reappoint, promotions, the grant granting
ing granting of tenure and dismissal
. . The governing board and
president should on questions
of faculty status, as in other
matters where the faculty has
primary responsibility, concur
with the faculty judgment ex except
cept except in rare instances and for
compelling reasons which
should be stated in detail.
Valid Reasons?
The Administration has re repeatedly
peatedly repeatedly asserted that tenure
is a privilege not a right and
that it may be as arbitrary as it
chooses in denying or granting
tenure. And in law it may be,
at least state law. But the
standards of the AAUP require
the Administration to give valid
reasons when it overrides the
faculty on a matter in which it
has primary responsibility, as in
this case. And these reasons,
moreover, must not be violative
of academic freedom.
The question, then, is what
were the Administrations res ressons
sons ressons for denying tenure and are
they valid? These reasons are
best given in the first and second
Conner statements. They are (a)
that I advocate a principle of
action which is contrary to and
potentially destructive of the
principles on which true univer universities
sities universities must be organized, and
(b) that I practice what I preach.
The second point is the one that
matters; as Conner points out, the

Reasons For Tenure Denial Explained

EDITORS NOTE: This is the text of a statement
by Vice-President Frederick W. Connor to the Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Board on June 8, 1967, concerning tenure for
Dr. Marshall B. Jones. Prior to its reading, then-
President Reitz announced that he joined with Conner
in making the statement, though Conner had written
and would read the statement. Shortly after the read reading,
ing, reading, the Personnel Board voted 5-3 to deny tenure
to Dr. Jones. Since the Personnel Board is a purely
advisory body, the only vote that really mattered was
Reitz' and he, with Conner, was in the majority.
By FREDERICK CONNER
UF Vice President
Tenure is not something to which a faculty mem member
ber member has ,an automatic claim. As is clearly indicated
in the Faculty Handbook, the Constitution of the Uni University,
versity, University, and the Statement on Academic Freedom and
Tenure of AAUP, the period in the employment of
a faculty member before the time when a tenure de decision
cision decision must be reached is a probationary period and
the decision itself is a discretionary one.
'ihe decision to award or not to award tenure in
the University of Florida is made by the Board of
Regents acting on the recommendations of the depart department,
ment, department, the department head, the college dean, the Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Board, and In some areas of the University
of other groups and individuals In addition.
It is arranged also that a department head may ini initiate
tiate initiate a nomination for tenure and the President may
recommend for or against the awarding of tenure
without the agreement of other individuals or groups.

Administration is not boggling
at a theory.
In his secondstatement,Conner
cites the protest that I and others
have mounted over my firing as
illustrative of what I mean by
rebellion. The meaning is
well illustrated in the conduct of
the present case, which has been
until very recently conducted by
pressure and agitation rather
than by following the avenues
indicated in the University Con Constitution
stitution Constitution and the Manual of the
Board of Regents.
Rights Violated
It does not seem to me that
the right to dissent or to ex express
press express dissent is at issue here,
but rather the means of trans translating
lating translating dissent into action, which
is quite a different thing.
Is it? In what precisely does
the pressure and agitation to
which Conner refers consist?
What are* the behaviors in the
conduct of the present case
which Conner finds incompatible
with my continued presence on
campus? Well, I have given
speeches and press conferences,
I have issued press releases, and
in these speeches, etc. I have
advocated reorganization of the
university and attacked the
present structure of the univer university
sity university as authoritarian and bur bureaucratic.
eaucratic. bureaucratic. On other occasions I
have marched and picketed and
even been arrested for doing so,
though never convicted or brought
to trial.
All of these behaviors are
forms of dissent and protected
by the First Amendment to the
Constitution. Vice President
Conners phrase about the
translation of dissent into action
means nothing because the ac action
tion action to which he refers is simply
more dissent. What Conner is
trying to say is that neither I
nor anyone else on this campus
have a right to dissent except
in channels or possibly in an
occasional talk provided what we
say is sufficiently moderate.
Above all, dissent in Conners
understanding does not include
the advocacy of university re reorganization
organization reorganization or determined re resistance
sistance resistance to the status quo. The

crucial word is determined,
not resistance. I have never
advocated the use of violence and
the Administration has not
charged me with it. What they
have charged me with is deter determination.
mination. determination. A professor is sup supposed
posed supposed to be accommodating, at
least, preferably collaborating.
Veto Power
Conners reference to the
avenues indicated by the Univer University
sity University Constitution and the Manual
of the Board of Regents is
also crucial. What are the powers
of the Board of Regents and what
does the University Constitution
provide? The statutes of the
State of Florida declare that it is
the intent of the legislature that
the board of regents of Florida
be granted the necessary powers
to govern, regulate, coordinate,
and oversee the institutions and
agencies in the state university
system. The University Con Constitution
stitution Constitution provides that the presi president
dent president shall have a veto power
over all actions of committees,
college faculties, Councils and
the UniverslTy Senate, which
power shall be exercised by send sending
ing sending a written executive order to
the body concerned. The
channel-work that spreads out
beneath the presidents chair is
all of it subject to the absolute
authority of the regents and the
president. Nothing can be de decided
cided decided in it that is contrary to
presidential or regental inten intentions.
tions. intentions.
What happens, then, to one of us
who approaches this channel channelwork
work channelwork with a proposal or request
that the Administration does not
want to grant? (If the proposal
is agreeable to the Adminis Administration,
tration, Administration, there is no problem; any
channel works.)
It might be supposed that a per person
son person who carried an unwanted
proposal to the Administration
would be told to forget it, that
his request would be denied.
But thats not what happens. In a
university as in any other bureau bureaucracy
cracy bureaucracy there are always many
channels through which a
petitioner may swim. But no
matter which channel he chooses
he is always in the wrong one.

The bases on which tenure is awarded are two:
(1) competence, (2) qualities of personal character,
principle, and behavior which give promise that the
Jones 'Rebellion Speech
Vyi. . For the great mass of
humanity the only lever at their dis disposal
posal disposal for the initiation of social
change is rebellion The topic, there therefore,
fore, therefore, of my talk tonight is The role
of faculty in student rebellion.
I have talked to many student
groups about rebellion, resistance,
etc. Always some student asks: Why
cant things be done through channels ?
Why is it necessary to rebel? Why
cant you just go to the Administration
and persuade it to do differently? 9
I always encourage these students to
go ahead with their plans, if they
have any; go through channels, attempt
persuasion, but get on with it, be because
cause because the sooner they do, the sooner
they discover that it doesnt work. 9

It is the nature of an authori authoritarian
tarian authoritarian bureaucracy to mask its
domination by softening its de denials,
nials, denials, which it does by exhaust exhausting
ing exhausting people in an endless run runaround.
around. runaround. Again, my case illus illustrates
trates illustrates the point.
The College of Medicine went
through channels. Eveything was
done with meticulous attention to
bureaucratic form and timing.
And the Administration turned
the college down. Last fall when
I appealed to President O'Con O'Connell
nell O'Connell to reverse his predecessors
decision, which was a perfectly
legitimate avenue, what was I
told? That I was in the wrong
channel; I should go to the Senate
Committee on Academic Free Freedom
dom Freedom and Tenure or the Board
of Regents.
The president called a general
assembly of the faculty and com complained
plained complained that I wasn't going through
channels, that the Administration
had not had a chance to present
its side of the case; the whole
business should be thrashed out
in an open hearing before the
Senate Committee. So I went to
the Senate Committee. And what
happened? President O'Connell
caused his lawyers, Enwall and
Farley, to move that there be
no hearing at all!
Channel Maze
It is interesting to speculate
as to what might have happened
if I had gone to the regents. A
few years ago a professor at the
University of South Florida, Mrs.
Charmenz Lenhart, was fired,
she claimed, because of her out outspoken
spoken outspoken support for Barry Gold Goldwater.
water. Goldwater. She appealed to the Board
of Regents. A few weeks ago I
was at USF and read in the paper
that the regents had granted Mrs.
Lenhart a hearing two and a
half years later. And what do you
suppose the regents told her?
She was in the wrong channel.
If she wanted a formal hearing,
she should go to the Assistant
Attorney General, Mr. Buford
Rivers.
People sometimes argue that
the university system must be
democratic because it was set
up by an elected legislature.

individual will be of long-term value to the Univer University.
sity. University. The University Constitution states: Nomination
of a faculty member for tenure shall signify the Presi President
dent President is satisfied that a high degree of competence
has been demonstrated, and continuing employment of
the faculty member will serve the best interests of
the institution and the University Generally
speaking, these are the bases on which important ap appointments
pointments appointments are made in most lines of endeavor.
I intend to vote against tl)e recommendation of ten tenure
ure tenure for Dr. Marshall Jones on the second of these
bases. My primary reason for this decision is that
he has publicly urged in speech and print a principle
of action which is contrary to, and potentially des destructive
tructive destructive of, the principles on which true universities
must be organized. Dr. Jones's principle, set forth
in a Kappa Delta Pi address entitled The Role of
the Faculty in Student Rebellion," which was delivered
on this campus and published in the Educational For-'
um of January, 1966, is that the only practicable way
in which significant changes can be achieved inside or
outside a university is by rebellion, and that demo democratic
cratic democratic and other orderly processes are merely means
of ratifying and Implementing the changes thus forced.
As organizations committed to the processes and pro procedures
cedures procedures of reason, I do not believe that universities
can consistently or safely condone such preachment
of strife as a standard mode of change. I attach il illustrative
lustrative illustrative excerpts from Dr. Joness address.
There are other issues which enter into the ques question
tion question of Dr. Joness candidacy for tenure, but this
seems to roe the crucial onea crucial issue indeed
for civic life generally-and more than sufficient reason
for a decision against awarding tenure.

MARSHALL JONES
Let's suppose that the legislature
that established the state univer university
sity university system was democratic, per perfectly
fectly perfectly so. It doesnt follow that
everything it did was also demo democratic.
cratic. democratic. The process by which a
thing is done in no way guarantees
the character of the thing itself.
A democratic country may
impose its will over an empire,
as England and France did, as
we are doing. It may enforce
white supremacy, it may coerce
labor. The nature of an insti
tution and the process by which
it was established are two
separate questions.
To argue that our state uni universities
versities universities must be democratic be because
cause because they were enacted into
being by elected politicians is to
commit the genetic fallacy. It is
bad logic; and worse, it is an
apology for servility.
Our university system is auth authoritarian,
oritarian, authoritarian, and the channel work
it provides for us to swim through
is an invitation to collaborate
in our own domination.
What then is to be done? If
we abondon channel-swim ming mingand
and mingand nothing less is compatible
with intellectual integrity the
only alternative is to address
ourselves to the university com community
munity community and the people directly,
to exercise those fundamental
rights of direct appeal which are
guaranteed to us in the Con Consititution.
sititution. Consititution.
But if we do that, we violate
the covenant that binds us to an
authority over which we have
no control. We will be pronounced
in a state of rebellion.
Very well, so be it. Let us
form unions, hire lawyers, pro protest
test protest publicly, and build among us
the political sinews that alone
make change possible. Let us
rebel.



p. M """"xwhwwitww
AROUND
TOWN

Schooner Room

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
The Schooner Room at 1222
W. University Ave. is one of
Gvilles top three'beer bars. It
has that certain indescribible
something" which creates an
atmosphere that just won't stop,
any perceptive person can feel
it upon entering.
Proprietor Russell Gardner
has been at the helm of the
Schooner for about eight months
now, and owing partly to his truly
liberal attitude the bar is busy
each night.
I would give service to any anyone
one anyone as long as they obey the
rules, he said. I don't like the
word hippie/ but there are some
unusual people who come in alot.
Colored people come in all the
time also. I'll serve anybody as
long as they conduct themselves
in a humane manner.
The two bars at the Schooner
serve light and dark draft beer
by the glass, at 30 cents, and
by the pitcher, at $1.50, as well
as popular canned beer at local
prices. If you like a good sand sandwich
wich sandwich with your brew then you
cant go wrong with the wide
assortment that Gardner offers.
He has bologna, salami,
pastrami, tuna and so on through
the alphabet.
I honestly feel that we have
the best sandwiches in town, and
they are in line with the other
Gainesville merchants,'* he said.
Believe it, because it's true.
Some nights, depending on whats
available, Gardner will have a
delicious supply of boiled shrimp,
which are just natural with a cold
beer.
Although dancing to the juke jukebox
box jukebox is prohibited now, Gardner
is working very hard to trying to
obtain a dancing license as well
as a wine license. He said that
he is confident" that he will
get both before too long. The
Schooner has a color TV at the

ALL YOU I
CAN
rr I
/ MONDAY NIGHT IN THE DINING ROOM FROM 5 til 9P M.
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI DINNER
Jerry's Old-Country ITALIAN MEAT SAUCE is carefully
onod and generouky ladlad over a tender mound of
Spagharti served with piping hot breed. crkp tossed salad.
and your favorite drawing. Enjoy all tht romance and
atmoaphara of the Old Country, complete with candlelight
and tablecloths for only 99 cants.
MS TWO GAINESVILLE LOCATIONS
2310 S.W. 13th STREET I
1505 N.W. 13th STREET f

big bar and a juke box with cur current
rent current pop sounds that is actuary
loud enough to hear, unlike some
other bars in town.
Gardner is currently making
plans for an outside patio that
will be protected from bad
weather and will offer even more
atmosphere than inside the bar.
He said it will be ready between
now and June.
Girls under 21 are usually al allowed
lowed allowed inside with dates, but Gard Gardner
ner Gardner said this admission of female
minors is a very selective pro process
cess process and a privilege he does not
give to all.
If I know I can trust the
girls not to drink then I say OK,
but you just cant trust
everyone, he said. Every one
of us bar owners is at our
wit's end in trying to decide how
to do this thing right. So far Ive
had no trouble with beverage
agents.
The Schooner Room is a rec recommended
ommended recommended night spot in Gay Gayness-ville
ness-ville Gayness-ville if you want to drink
some beer, eat some good food,
watch university professors get
smashed and promise you As,
listen to tunes, watch color TV
or just sit and watch the few
long-haired colorfully arrayed
customers, since most of the
people who drink there are fairly
straight.
Its unusual, different, in interesting
teresting interesting and is one of a few
truly good bars in town. You
won't be disappointed.
MAUIDINS
AIITO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FREE ESTIMATES
<2l N.W. *
Root Sid# ACL Pop*

First Official UF Opera
Scheduled For April 4

The first official opera in UF
history is coming on April 4th.
"The Devil and Daniel Web Webster
ster Webster will be presented on April 4
at 8:15 in the University Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium under the directorship
of Mrs. Evelyn Taylor, UF asst,
professor of music.
The opera is part of a Spring
Music Festival planned for the
spring quarter and is being pro produced
duced produced in cooperation with the UF
music department.
I think the University needs
this," commented Mrs. Taylor.
Opera today is tremendously
versatile and very exciting. We
have a lot of talent here, but
are terribly hampered by the
pressure of the quarter system.
We need people with the time and

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desire to make this thing suc succeed!"
ceed!" succeed!"
Adapted from a short story of
the same name, by Steven Vin Vincent
cent Vincent Benet. The Devil and Dan Daniel
iel Daniel Webster was written for
opera by American playwrite,
Douglas Moore.

Got A Sick Corvair?
We specialize in Corvair service thats
backed up by 30 yrs. experience with Gen General
eral General Motors Corp.
Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
Were the student's friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
1031 So. Main Phone 376-7771

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Anyone who would like to aud audition
ition audition for a part in the opera
should see Mrs. Taylor at the
music department or call her
at 376-2901. Ticket prices, ac according
cording according to Mrs. Taylor, are not
expected to exceed 5 dollars a
couple.

Page 13



:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Page 14

ROTC Cadet Col. Ja:nei Cox briefs one
of his staff in his new capacity as Brigade
Commander of UF Army ROTC. Cox, from
Lakeland, received the swagger stick from
John Le Moyne who graduated last quarter.
Named the top cadet in his company at sum summer
mer summer camp, Cox is a senior majoring in Eng English
lish English and a member of Alpha Tau Omega,
fraternity.
WHATS r ~
HAPPENING

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer i
IN WATCHING HISTORY RE REPEAT
PEAT REPEAT ITSELF: Floyd Christian,
who has a name that has been
associated with famous mutinies
in the past (of the sea-faring
kind), speaks in Norman Hall
Auditorium at 7:30 tonight.
Christian is state school sup superintendent
erintendent superintendent for Florida.
IN RAISE NOSE, PLACE
THUMB: Inside North Viet Vietnam/
nam/ Vietnam/ the film banned by ir irate
ate irate citizens in Claudahassee,
will be shown tonight in Graham
Area. Admission is 7,000 pias piasters
ters piasters (25£). Time is 8 oclock.
IN UFS ALMOST DR. DO DOLITTLES:
LITTLES: DOLITTLES: The Pre-Vetinary
Club meets tonight at 7 in room
347 of the Reitz Union.
IN PROUD TRADITIONSCI TRADITIONSCICERO
CERO TRADITIONSCICERO AND CATILINE VARIETY:
The Student Senate carries on
the governmental tradition star started
ted started by those well-known but ill illfated
fated illfated gentlemen tonight in room
357 of the union at 7 p.m.
IN POLITICS AND HIGH TEN TENSION
SION TENSION WIRESTHE SHOCKING
SIMILARITIES: One of them is
that they both have Power
Transmission Lines. William
Crichton will speak on the elec electrical
trical electrical kind in room 310 of the
Electrical Engineering Building
South at 7:30 tonight.
IN AND HERE WE HAVE
A SWINGING LITTLE NUMBER
THAT WERE SURE IS GOING

Why wait £or a book
sale? We have sale prices
every day.
Don't miss these values*.
Color Photography Was S2O . $9.95
Embattled Confederates . Was $lO . $4.95
Big Game Hunting Was $lO . $4.95
American Racing Car Was sls . $4.95
The Old Masters. ...... Was sls . $7.95
Poetica Erotica Was $7.50. $3.95
The Coming of Christ Was 14.95. $7.95
Ballad Book of
John Jacob Niles $3.95
Browse today at
MIKES BOOK STORE
||6 SE Ist Books-Tobacco-Papers-Magazines

TO ROCKET STRAIGHT TO THE
TOP!: The Gator Amateur Radio
Club introduces its candidate for
the Engineers Fair Queen at their
meeting in room 525 of the En Engineering
gineering Engineering Building at 8 o'clock
tonight.
IN UFS SONS OF THE SIL SILVER
VER SILVER SCREEN: The Florida Cin Cinema
ema Cinema Society meets in the union
auditorium tonight at 7 p.m.
IN MENSAS MONDAY MEET MEETINGS:
INGS: MEETINGS: They will have one of
those in the West Wing of the
Main Cafeteria today at noon.
IN THAT OTHER MENS HON HONORARY:
ORARY: HONORARY: University Circle, a col colony
ony colony of ODK, fellowships together
in room 150 C of the union today
at 11 a.m.
IN COUNTING YOUR BLESS BLESSINGS
INGS BLESSINGS FROM THE DEATH OF
MARAT-SADE: Florida Players,
who have closed down production
(temporarily) after a well-re well-received
ceived well-received production of that play
about a professional bath-tub bath-tubring
ring bath-tubring maker, will have a busi business
ness business meeting in Constans Thea Theater
ter Theater tonight at 6 p.m. to see just
how well-received that play was.
IN THOSE WHO WERE LEERY
OF LEARY: The Union Board
comes together in room 1508
of the union today at 3:30 p.m.
IN THE COMPUTER PEOPLE:
The IBM Business School will
hold classes in all of the unions
meeting rooms today at:3oa.m.
IN GREEK-LETTER GOINGS
ON, PT. XXVII: Alpha Pi Mu
meets in the Engineering Buil Building
ding Building tonight at 7:30.

REFLECTIONS
Athletes: 'Whipping 5
BoysOf UF Campus

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF is a jock school. But,
so is Ohio State, Southern Cal.,
Missouri, Michigan State, Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech, Pennsylvania, etc.
So, why the big concern about
the athletes discount? Free
passes to the flicks? Havent we
forgotten the other side of the
coin? Why hold the department
of intercollegiate athletics res responsible
ponsible responsible for the actions of the
local merchants? Free enter enterprise,
prise, enterprise, isnt it?
Does it really matter? With
due respect to Bill Dunn who
investigated the favors given
by the local business owners,
I think it is quite safe to say
that if the NCAA rules this action
illegal, Ray Graves wont take the
chance of having UF sports placed
on suspension.
The NCAA is aware of the
favored practices. During
football season, players are given
tickets to do with as they please.
This is periodically checked and
sanctioned by the NCAA.
Lets not forget WE PAY to
see the team win, lose, or draw.
The department of Intercollegiate
athletics takes this money (from
football games, etc.) and uses it
to provide scholarships, medical
aid, housing, board, and books
for its charges. The department
doesnt beg, borrow, or take from
the University funds. So, why
make athletes whipping boys?
So, lets nit-pick some more.
Gville is quite a distance from
any major city.

Meet The Gators
Here are some of the students who make your
Alligator the Souths finest college daily.
1*46

iW v
& HKjh: v
Larry works with the Alligator Ad Department under the auspices of
the College of Journalism. For three hours credit, he works ten
hours per week applying his education in Advertising. - i
n : u)'
if- ' >- ?H
Mike Mazzina
WtSESK* ytlH 1
< '" r" 4 "i' 9 - ; *
Mike receives credit in the College of Journalism for his work in
advertising at the Alligator. This course is the practical application
of two years of study for Mike.

There are a lot more problems
students face than to worry about
those few who get sc many
favors from local merchants. So,
quit nit-picking. It aint going
to do much good!

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CAMPUS
LIVING



SET SEVEN RECORDS
Tankers Take SEC Title

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Writer
Florida's swimming Gators
made thirteen a lucky number
Saturday, as they outpaced all
competition to take their 13th
straight Southeastern Conference
Championship. The Gators,
heavily favored to take the title
again,, took seven new SEC re records
cords records in the process.
The three day meet opened
Thursday at Tennessees en enclosed
closed enclosed Student Aquatics Center
pool. In the first days compe competition,
tition, competition, Florida set three new re records,
cords, records, and took the early lead
in competition. In the 500 yd.
freestyle, Bruce Williams shaved
35 seconds off the old records
with a time of 4:25.5.
Mark McKee, swimming in the
200 Individual medley, broke the
record held by teammate Andy
McPherson with a time of 2:02.8.
The Gators also toctic the 800 yd.
freestyle relay new SEC
time.
Friday saw three more SEC
records fall to Florida. Gators
set records in the 400 yd. in individual
dividual individual medley, 200 yd. free freestyle,
style, freestyle, and 400 yd. medley.
Saturday was unimportant to
Floridas final victory. The
Gators had built up a lead which
no other team could hope to
pass. Still, the team of Andy
McPherson, Jim Perkins, Steve
Macri, and Bruce Williams com combined
bined combined to set a new record of
3:37.3 in the 400 yd. Medley
relay. That brought the total
of new records set by Florida
to seven.
Seven events were scheduled
for Saturday, and UF took four
of them, including the new SEC
mark. Other first places by Flo Florida
rida Florida included Andy McPhersons
100 yd. freestyle, with a time
of 47.4; Steve Maoris 52.2 fin finish
ish finish in the 100 butterfly, and a
total of 421 points by Mike Chal Chalbeck
beck Chalbeck to take first place in the
three meter diving competition.
In total points, Florida stood
far out in front with a team total
Gator Golfers
Top FSU 15-12
UF rallied on the back nine
to defeat Florida State Univer University
sity University Saturday 15-12 in a golf
match at Tallahassee.
Gator Eddie Hoard led the team
with the medalist score of 70.
The Gators and the Seminoles
were even at the halfway point.
Coach Buster Bishop said,
Hoard has worked hard on his
game. He didnt get to play at
Houston (R.L. Coleman Invita Invitational
tional Invitational Tournament) because he
was sick. He did a fine job against
FSU.
University of Alabama sche scheduled
duled scheduled to play also, did not show
up.
Steve Melnyk, UFs No. 1 play player,
er, player, tied his match with FSU's
Herbie Greeny 4 they both shot
72.
UF players John Darr and
Richard Spears won their match matches,
es, matches, 3-0. Darr shot a 72 and Spears
shot a 74.
Gator Kemp Gholson tied his
match shooting a 75. The only
Gator loss was Wendell Coffey,
0-3. Coffey shot a 79.
The Gators will take a break
until after final exams. UF next
plays on March 19 in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville against Georgia Tech Uni University.
versity. University. The UF golf team is
undefeated in regular season
competition.

of 578 1/2 points. Tennessee was
the surprise of the meet, fin finishing
ishing finishing second with 383 1/2. Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee fielded a swimming team
for the first time in 13 years,
and of its 18 swimmers, 15 are
freshmen. Alabama finished third
with 352 points, Georgia fourth
grdfagr J>* v 7/ idlli.
JIMMY PERKINS

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with 278, and Vanderbilt fifth
with 130 points.
Florida, however, was not
alone in breaking SEC titles.
Alabamas Leo French broke the
old 1650 yd. freestyle record
on Saturday with a new time of
17:38.6. Dirk Van Hbesen, of
Vanderbilt, a freshman, broke the
standing record in the 200 yd.
breaststroke with his time of
2:15.1. The old record, set in
1965, was heldby Floridas Char Charlie
lie Charlie King.
Floridas victory was aided by
the January NCAA ruling permit permitting
ting permitting freshmen to compete in
swimming varsity competition.
This allowed Floridas freshmen
talent, including Mark McKee,
and Mike Chalbeck, who both
posted first place marks for the
Gators, to compete in the SEC
championship.
Florida now hopes to have a
large part of its team invited to
the NCAA Championships. These
will be held March 28, 29, and
30th at Dartmouth College. Last
year, the Gators finished eighth
in that competition.

SPORTS

Monday, March 4, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

UF Second In SEC Track

MONTGOMERY, Ala.Flor Ala.Floridas
idas Ala.Floridas track team finished second
behind Tennessee at the confer conference
ence conference meet here this weekend with
28 points. UT had 75.
Only 10 of the 15 events were
available at press time and the
results found only one Gator win winner.
ner. winner. Bob Lane won the 1,000

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run with a 2:10.5 time. Lane broke
the old SEC mark of 2:12.5.
Other UF results: Jerry Fan Fannin,
nin, Fannin, third in 440; Steve Tannen,
third in high hurdles; Don Hale,
second, Steve Keller, third in
880; John Morton third in shot;
Dan Flynn, fourth in 1000; third
place in mile relay.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 4, 1968

Georgia Stumps UF
AsYear Ends,97-83
By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Combine one part accurate Bulldog shooting, one part inaccur inaccurate
ate inaccurate Gator shooting, and one part foul trouble, mix thoroughly before
a partisan Georgia basketball crowd and a regional TV audience,
and you come up with the story of UFs 97-83 defeat Saturday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon.
For Gator coach Tommy Bartlett, it was his seventh Southeastern
Conference loss of the season against 11 victories. UF finished in
a tie for fourth in the SEC with Georgia.
Opening the contest with bulls-eye accuracy from the field, Georgia
broke into an early lead. UF battled back behind the shooting of
Andy Owens and Neal Walk to finally take the lead with 13 minutes
left in the half.
The score remained. close throughout the rest of the half, and
Georgia took a 45-40 lead into intermission.
It was all Bulldog in the second half as Georgia began shooting
with amazing accuracy from the outside. In all, the Bulldogs hit
on 55 per cent of their shots from the field, compared to 46 per
cent for the Gators.
At the free throw line the Gators suffered a worse fate, connecting
on only 13 of 21. Georgia hit on 19 of 29, with most of the misses
coming with the second-string playing.
UF was hampered most of the second half by foul problems. Walk,
the Gators leading rebounder and scorer, carried four fouls for
over nine minutes before committing his fifth.
For Georgia, the victory was their first over a Gator team in
nine straight tries.
Walk led the Gator scoring attack with 19 points and his 18 rebounds
marked an SEC record of 493. Owens added 18, Mike Rollyson 17,
Dave Miller 8, McElroy 6, Mike Leatherwood 5, Kurt Feazel 4,
Mike McGinnis 4 and Boyd Welsch 2.
UF Netters Top FSU

The Florida tennis team won
their 19th straight team match
Saturday, as Coach Bill Potters
netters coasted past FSU, 7-2.
Gator netters won five singles
events and two doubles matches
in winning their second match of
the young season. Floridas top
five singles players were victor victorious,
ious, victorious, as only Will Sherwood, the
No. 6 man was defeated.
All UF singles winners downed
their opponents in straight sets,
as Armi Neely, Jamie Pressly,
Steve Beeland, Greg Hllley, and
Paul Lunetta all won with ease.
RESULTS
Pressly (UF; del. Rapp, 6-3,
6-3.
Neely (UF) def. Danielson, 6-4,
6-3.
Beeland (UF) def. Procopio,
6-3, 6-4.
Hilley (UF) def. Marcher, 8-6,
6-2.
Lunetta (UF) def. DeZeeuw,
6-2, 6-3.
Bristol (FSU) def. Sherwood,
3-6, 6-4, 7-5.
Neely and Beeland (UF) def.
Danielson and Procopio, 6-3,6-4.
DeZeeuw and Marcher (FSU)
def. Lunetta and Hilley, 6-1,
2-6, 6-4.

Terms End
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Pressly and Cox (UF) def.
Rapp and Bristol, 4-6, 6-2,10-8.
Miami Bats
Gators Twice
Floridas baseball team tra travelled
velled travelled to Miami over the week weekend
end weekend and came back with two wind windblown
blown windblown losses.
The Hurricanes won two one onerun
run onerun victories over Dave Fullers
UF club, 1-0 Saturday and 2-1
Friday. The double win marked
the first time Miami has won
a two-game series from the Ga Gators.
tors. Gators.
UMs Ed Garvey blasted a home
run Saturday as the Canepitcher
Fred Kampf limited UF to one
hit, a fourth inning single by
Nick Nicosia.
Friday, the Hurricanes won
on a wind-blown triple and mis misjudged
judged misjudged fly ball. Floridas Jim
Courier, 5-1 last year with a
1.58 ERA, took the loss in relief.
David Kahn was the losing pitcher
Saturday.
Florida, 1-2, opens its home
season this Wednesday afternoon
on Perry Field against Florida
Southern.

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