Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Vol. 60, No. 92

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Students Stage Massive March

By STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
Nearly 1,000 UF students and faculty members
Monday staged a 30-minute protest march in sym sympathy
pathy sympathy with teachers of the Florida Education Asso Association
ciation Association (FEA).

Turlington:
Stop Fight
By JIM ALMAND
Alligator Staff Writer
House Speaker Ralph Turlington called on all
Floridians to end bickering, fussing and complain complaining
ing complaining and to work together to end the states edu educational
cational educational problems at Mondays AAUP-sponsored
faculty action day in Hillel Foundation.
Turlington joined State Sen. J. Emory Red
Cross, State Rep. William Andrews, Dr. Manning
Dauer, political science department chairman; Dr.
r.L. Johns, professor of educational administration;
former Alachua County school superintendent Howard
Bishop; Richard Morgan, FEA assistant executive
secretary, and Dr. Delton L. Scudder, religion de department
partment department chairman, in a Dialogue on the School
Crisis.
Speaking on the recent legislative session and the
monies provided by it for education, Turlington
said: The money has been raised, and applied
to education.. .There is in excess of 30 per cent
more than the schools had to operate with this
year.
Whether its quality education or not cannot be
said. But it is the largest increase ever made at
one time in Floridas history. It is a tremendous
increase.
The AAUP adopted at the meeting a resolution
(SEE TURLINGTON/ PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator

UF Students, Professors And FEA Members Rally In Downtown Gainesville

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

The crowd marched four abreast down Univer University
sity University Avenue. One UF faculty member said the
march was the largest such in Gainesvilles his history.
tory. history.
The march began on campus at the Plaza of
the Americas at 10:30 a.m. with a scant following.
However, as the procession continued, interested
students and faculty, many of whom skipped classes,
joined the entourage until over 1,000 were marching
when the group reached their destination the
State Theater.
At the theater, striking Alachua county teachers
joined the march and moved to a parking lot where
prominent UF professors and students addressed
the throng.
UF Student Body President Clyde Taylor told
the crowd that the march shows there are many
individual thinking persons who realize there is
a crisis in the states education system.
Resigning UF political science professor Harry
Kantor blasted Gov. Claude Kirk as an incom incompetent
petent incompetent flunkie who should be impeached by the
people of Florida.
Continuing his attack on Kirk and the state
legislature, Kantor told the audience that what
this state needs is a legislature not interested
in vested interests.
Also voicing support for the FEA walkout, pol political
itical political science professor Ernest Bartley said the
students who gathered to support the teachers
represent the real struggle for quality education
in the state of Florida.
Dr. William Perkey, foundations of education
professor, brought cheers from the crowd of tea teachers
chers teachers and students when he exclaimed the teachers
who have resigned are telling their pupils they
(the students) are more important than phosphate.
The states phosphate industry has been granted
a tax exempt status by the state legislature.
The orderly march, escorted by police, included
students from fraternities, sororities and various
campus organizations.
No disturbances interrupted the parades one-mile
route.

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(Photo by Nick Arroyo)
Student Marcher Displays Sign

Inside
Brukner, Fristoe
Charges Dropped
See Page 2

Tuesday February 27 1968

(Photo by Nick Arroyo)



Page 2

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

=OFFICIALS DROP CHARGES =
Brukner, Fristoe
Wont Face SCC

By KATffIE KEIM
JUtlgfftDr Wfitef
Charges of disobeying a uni-
Terslty official giving an order
to clear a hallway were dropped
Monday against Ira Brukner and
Tom Fristoe, who were to have
appeared before the Student Con Conduct
duct Conduct Committee on the charges.
Brukner and Fristoe were
charged for their alleged parti participation
cipation participation in a protest of Dow
Chemical recruitment on the UF
campus on Feb. 8. They were
not arrested, although several
other students were arrested and
later released on bond.
The pair was charged with ob obstructing
structing obstructing the doorway to the Uni University
versity University Placement Office and
failing to leave the hallway after
being asked to do so by William
Rton, director of the Reitz Union.
Brukner and Fristoe both in insisted
sisted insisted that they were not par participating
ticipating participating in any large part in
the demonstration, but that they
were for the roost part obser observers.
vers. observers.
Brukner took a sign and
marched for a short time and
then moved away from the demon demonstrators
strators demonstrators blocking the entrance to
the placement office.

Perry: r Kirks Action
Will Affect History
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirks action on the Legis Legislatures
latures Legislatures big education package could affect the course of United
States history, according to Kirks key education adviser.
Whether the people of Florida like It or not, Florida and Its
governor are in the national limelight and what he does will have
an effect on what other cities and states do in solving their edu education
cation education problems.
That was the appraisal Monday from Charles Perry, the man
who hap advised Kirk on Floridas education problems since last
August, and who is intimately involved in behind the scenes work
in solving the states present teacher crisis.
| SPECIAL NOTICE a
To all students and university personnel j|j
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riiaiiaiiuiiiiiiiiaraiiaiiii
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July end August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and durli* student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone a t all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

I was sitting along the wall ,**
Brukner said. 1 moved there
so I wouldnt be obstructing.
The two students appeared be before
fore before Dean of Men Frank T. Adams
on Friday and Monday, after
which Adams released a state statement
ment statement stating that there was no
basis for their appearing before
the committee.
"We bad a more thorough eval evaluation
uation evaluation of the situation in which
they found themselves, Adams
said, and in light of the con conference
ference conference we had with them this
morning we have determined
there is no cause to bring them
before the conduct committee.
Adams refused to say specifi specifically
cally specifically that Fristoe and Brukner
were not obstructing or failed to
heed an order given by an of official
ficial official of the university, but would
say only that there was not
a strong enough basis to refer
this to a committee.
In the meeting Friday, Adams
told the pair that in all fairness
to the ones arrested, you should
be included.
You were in the hallway when
requests were made to clear the
hall and move on, Adams said.
You did not leave. In all fair fairness
ness fairness they thought you should be
Included too.

UF Attorneys Request
Jones Case Dismissal

Attorneys for the UF have
filed a motion before the Fac Faculty
ulty Faculty Senate committee Investi Investigating
gating Investigating the tenure case of Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Jones which would squash
the psychology professors at attempts
tempts attempts to g*tn tenure here.
The action followed the taking
of a deposition from Jones last
Saturday.
It is true that on Saturday
Jones deposition was taken. At Attorneys
torneys Attorneys for the university in inquired
quired inquired into his (Jones) political
beliefs, whether he believed In
the Vietnam war, whether he was
a member of the American Civil
Liberties Union and that sort of
thing, a source close to Jones
attorneys told the Alligator Mon Monday.
day. Monday.
Naturally, the source said,
Jones was advised he was not
obligated to answer these ques questions.
tions. questions. Objections were raised on
principle to their subjecting him
to this interrogation. They are
trying to dismiss the case now
because be would not answer
these questions.
The Alligator source charged
that attempts to learn more about
Jones political beliefs constitute
a further violation of his
(Jones! academic freedom.
The Supreme Court has held
that the state doesnt have any
right to inquire into a persons
political beliefs if that person
wishes to bold a state job,
the Alligator source stated.
I think, he continued, they
Senate Meet
Newly elected members of the
Student Senate called the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council under the old
Constitution will be sworn in
tonight as the Senate meets at
7:30 in room 150 C and D of
the Reitz Union.
PR k
jAn
TO STUDY IN
EUROPE WITH
' \
. AMERICAN
INTERNATIONAL
ACADEMY
CALL
378-6142
or 372-1071
after 5 p.m.

have in effect proven what Jones
said all along that this was a
politically motivated discharge.
Following the taking of Jones
deposition Saturday In a Little

Turlington
FROM PAM oiTf
accepting a petition being circulated among stu students
dents students and faculty which calls on the governor and
legislative leaders to call a special session of the
legislature to resolve the school crisis.
Also adopted was a resolution calling for the UF
chapter of the AAUP executive committee, in con conjunction
junction conjunction with other AAUP chapters throughout the
state, to decide on the possibility of a state-wide
faculty-student march on Tallahassee.
Another resolution called for a special com committee
mittee committee to meet with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell to discuss the AAUP's stand on the school
crisis and attempt to elicit his support.
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Hall seminar room, another de deposition
position deposition was taken Monday from
UF Vice-President Frederick
Conner in the administrators
Tigert Hall office.



, w w .-. w w ... w IN UNION BARBER SHOP
Lady Mans Shears

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MISS EMERSON

Library Sets
'Free Day
ForOverdues
Hundreds of overdue books are
floating around campus and the
UF library administration is
giving the wayward borrower a
chance to redeem himself.
In an effort to get overdue
books back into circulation, all
university libraries will observe
a free day Thursday.
The purpose of this day, ac according
cording according to acting Library Di Director
rector Director Margaret K. Goggin, is to
encourage students to return
books which, through careless carelessness
ness carelessness or loss, have become over overdue.
due. overdue. There will be no fines or
other charges placed on these
books turned in Thursday.
Each of the campus libraries
will have a specially marked book
drop in its building.

UNIVERSITY
CHEVROLET
"The Students Friend"
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ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(EXCEPT BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
Just Show Your ID Card To Our Service Manager
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Come in and hear 14 different
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378 7277 604 NW. 13th St,

By LYNNE TIESLAU
Alligator Correspondent
The empty space behind a barber chair
at the Reitz Union Barber Shop has been
replaced -by a barberess.
Miss Sandy Emerson, of Ocala, became
the shops first lady barber two weeks
ago.
Ever since I was a little girl I wanted
to be a barber, said Miss Emerson, who
graduated from the Florida Barber College
in December.
Four other women Wvjre in her graduating
class. In Florida, there are about 100
lady barbers.
I love it, she said, I dont have any
trouble talking with the customers here. I
usually talk to them about what theyre
going to be -- the future.
As for shaving, Miss Emerson con continued,
tinued, continued, I have done it, but I dont par particularly
ticularly particularly like to.
She just has that feminine touch, said
Wayne Barker, shop manager.
Barker said some people come in out
of curiosity when they hear about the new
lady barber. He said there has been an
increase of customers in the past two
weeks.
Some customers come in every two
days just to get a haircut by her, Barker
said. Plus, she gives bubble gum to her
favorite customers. %
The customers thoroughly enjoy a lady
barber, said Eddie Tompkins, a fellow
barber. I wouldnt mind having two twoone
one twoone on either side! he said.

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

UF Anthropologist
James Ford Dies

Noted anthropologist Dr. James A. Ford, 57, died Sunday morning
at Alachua General Hospital following a lengthy illness.
Ford was curator of anthropology at the Florida State Museum
and a UF professor of anthropology. He served as president of the
Society for American Anthropology in 1963-64 and was a Fel'ow
in the American Anthropological Association.
His method for seriation of archeological sites is widely used
and he was the author of major works and monographs in cultural,
analytical and theoretical fields of anthropology.
Ford came to the University of Florida in 1964 from the American
Museum of Natural History in New York where he was curator in
charge of North American archeology. He was an expert in South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern United States area and had served as a consultant in the
areas of the artic and the tropics. His field research included
the Southeastern United States, Alaska, Colombia, Peru and Mex Mexico.
ico. Mexico.
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Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

'Wilde Night
With Shaw
Set Tonight
By SALLY EVANS
Alligator Correspondent
A Wilde evening with Shaw,
a warmly human story of two
men who wrote about life as they
saw it, wil 1 be presented at
8:15 tonight in the University,
Auditorium.
Directed by Sir Cedric Hard Hardwicke,
wicke, Hardwicke, the show mixes drama
and humor. It reveals divergent
thoughts of two brilliant nine nineteenth-century
teenth-century nineteenth-century authors, Oscar
Wilde and George Bernard Shaw.
THE STARS
Dramatized for the stage by
Mayo Loiseau and Richard Gray,
the three-act program consists
of anecdotes, essays, speeches,
and comments from letters and
newspaper clippings. The show
uses some of the best known
and least known literary and
dramatic works to portray the
high-spirited irreverence of the
two writers, as they clash on
every subject.
Tickets are available at the
Reitz Union Box Office. Student
tickets are sl. Faculty and staff
tickets are $1.50. General public
tickets are $2.50.

T.V. LOG -^*l

2 4 9 12 5
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET
Second
7-00 M Squad McHale's Navy IQQ Years MOVIE What's New
__ I Dream Garrison's
*3O ofJesnnle Oorill Daktari ;
Baa f Garrison's Westerner"
:00 Gorillas Great Declslons
8:30 Red Skelton It Takes Legacy
MOVIE A Thief
0.00 Red Skelton MOVIE Cineposium
W "The Mating
_ Game Good Morning __ v _ _.
9i30 World N.Y.P.D. Firing Line
"McGuire,
10*00 Project Four Go Home!
High Chaparral
ia a Walter Cronkite
in Vietnam
11:00 News News News News
11:30 Johnny Carson MOVIE Joey Bishop Johnny Carson
Rlno MnrHor ... ... --
at St. Trinians
Fearless Forecast
"The Mating Game" (1958). Pop Larkin, played by Paul Douglas,
has never payed his income taxes. Watch what follows in this
hilarious comedy. Also stars Debbie Reynolds, Tony Randall,
Oliver Kelsey, and Una Merkel.

TUMBLEWEEDS
I WUlwlSir
mi TrtbwwfrWinii
/sota\
l MATCH? )

Choir Plans Tour
The UF Choir begins its annual spring tour March 16 with 17
performances scheduled throughout Florida.
The 57-voice choir, directed by Dr. Elwood Keister, will present
concerts for church and school groups in 12 Florida cities during
the nine-day tour.
The singers will criss-cross the state, making appearances in
cities on both coasts and as far south as Miami The last concert
will be in St. Augustine March 24.
First day visits of. .the choir will be Lowell and Ocala. From
there, the choir will move on to St. Petersburg, Fort Myers, Miami
for a two-day stop March 18-19, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach,
Vero Beach, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Haines City and St. Augustine
for a two-day wrapup March 23-24.
Last year the choir toured five states and represented the United
States at the official opening of Expo 67 in Montreal, Quebec,
Canada.
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THE VIOLINIST
Joseph Fuchs will appear as a soloist with
the UF Symphony Orchestra in concert Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night at 8:15 in University Auditorium,
Tickets are 50 cents for students and $1,50
for faculty and staff.

A MATCH?/.. A MATCH WPEBP!
WHAT KINPA INPIAN ARE YOO,
BOY? HAVE YOU NEVER HEARP OF
RUBBING- STICKS T'GETHER, ORTHE
COMMON FUNTSIONE? FOR SHAME!
NO! I PD NOT HAVE A MATCH!
Jf¥

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[ IN MY OTHER )
V BLANKET J



By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Faculty, legislators, and stu students
dents students alike hailed Mondays sym sympathy
pathy sympathy march and Faculty Action
Day as a step in the right di direction
rection direction toward solving Floridas
education crisis.
Such support will eventually
influence the legislature, said
State Senator J. Emory Red
Cross, a Gainesville Democrat.
Faculty turnout was signifi significant,
cant, significant, said Dr. Delton L. Scud Scudder,
der, Scudder, chairman of the Department

Mautz Claims
Turnout Light

Spokesmen from the 16 UF colleges and schools and a report
by Vice-president of Academic Affairs Robert Mautz indicated
normal class attendance by faculty and students Monday despite
the American Association of University Professors (AAUP)
Action Day and a student march supporting the teacher walkout.
Mautz said in a statement issued Monday afternoon, A check
with every college showed no more than 250 students who did not
show up for class and no more than 30 faculty. Every college is
reporting business as normal.
But Action Day leaders called the AAUP and student movements
quite successful.

Mibb
L jn 1
j. v M £3k BA a s jMMf
Student Marchers Take Over University Avenue

Leaders Praise Marchs Success

of Religion.
The march showed the stu students
dents students really care, added Student
Body President Clyde Taylor.
The day was tremendously
important and informative, said
Mrs. Frances Lunsford, district
director of the Florida Education
Association.
Cross said Mondays assembly
and others like it can collect collectively
ively collectively influence the legislature,
but not the governor.
His public relations firm has
plotted his course, he said, and
he wont deviate from it.

The Sign Tells Story Os Largest Demonstration In Gainesville's History

He placed most importance on
demonstrations by such groups as
parents and taxpayers, that is,
the general voting public.
Until thats done, he admit admitted,
ted, admitted, the chances of changing the
legislature are slim.
Scudder said the meeting was
valuable because it gave faculty,
FEA officials, and Gainesvilles
legislative delegation a chance
to sit down together and talk the
whole thing out.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, who es estimated
timated estimated faculty attendance at 800,
said Cross and Speaker of the
House Ralph Turlington differ in
their ideas of what should be
done.
Turlington thought the bill
should be accepted as is by the
teachers, he said. He wants
Improvements to be added after
a tax study in time for the 69
session.
Cross, however, Dauer con continued,
tinued, continued, wants a self-starter
session, though he thinks the
present bill is better than no nothing.
thing. nothing.
Not everyone is backing the
FEA, though. Interfraternity
Council President Jim DeVaney
estimated that as many frater fraternity
nity fraternity members did substitute
teaching as took part in the march
Monday.

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Leaders Speak Out

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TAYLOR
. individual choice

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TURLINGTON
. . accept bill
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MRS. LUNSFORD
. . addresses crowd

Photos By Nick Arroyo

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

'Rritut
. Ail
Ahimm.

Mr. President,
Take A Stand

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell is a master of
words. His fine sonorous
tones have been echoing
through this state since
October when he took the
helm of _this university.
And, people have been lis listening.
tening. listening.
Our president, exhibiting
the highest motivations,
has told crowds through throughout
out throughout the state that this uni university
versity university is on the brink
of greatness that it will
soon spearhead Floridas
growth and advancement.
President OConnell has,
however, failed to truly
help us fulfill the promise
of greatness which was left
to us by his predecessor
J. Wayne Reitz. The pres president
ident president has not moved effec effectively
tively effectively to push us over the
brink of greatness.
At the present time this
university is in the throes
of crisis. We are suffering
in the recruitment of new
faculty because of the state
education crisis and our
problems are highlighted
by the fa.ct that the chairs
of 10 deans will soon be
vacant.
Nevertheless, when an anguished
guished anguished voices are raised,
calling upon all of us to
exert ourselves in an effort
to help this university and
this state fight the battle
for better education, the
president warns us that our
image will be tarnished in
the eyes of the state by
mass action.

We Stand United

Apathy at the UF died
Monday when hundreds of
students and instructors
walked out of classrooms
and spent a day studying and
protesting the plight of edu education
cation education in Florida.
For the first time in
memory this campus came
to life in the debate of a
current issue. Moreover,
there was more than de debate,
bate, debate, there was action,
Students, teachers and
other interested citizens
marched down University
Avenue, eager to show the

The
Florida Alligator
A Student Newspaper
Let The People Know
Steve Hull
Editor

Harvey Alper
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
News Editor

Ite FiofMi AMga*or*a pff|i|y ob Imm y opnaMd
oaty ta the totmm Mow. Otter material la tMa laaaa may
raflaet tte apMoa as tte writer or oartooelat aad not aaoaaaarlly
ttet of tte PlerMa AlUgatar aalaaa apadfloaily Indicated.

Harold Kennedy
Executive Editor
Bob Padecky
Sports Editor

The president has told
us that to be great we
must be quiet. We must go
to class, avoid protest and
keep Floridas citizens
happy with our conduct if
we are to have our edu educational
cational educational bread.
Well, Mr. President, we
dont like that policy.
We would hope to see
you at the vangard of our
protests over the horrid
state of education in todays
Florida, We would hope that
the prestige of your office
could be lent to marches,
such as the one yesterday,
which seek nothing more
radica! than better schools
for a better Florida,
Our image will not be
what we imagine it to be,
but rather what we make
it. And, in the eyes of other
universities and other
states* educators, the value
of this university will rise
in proportion to its invol involvement
vement involvement in the problems
facing our society.
Therefore Mr. President
we would wish that you
would come forward and
march with us. You have
been accused of being a
company man too often.
Now is the time to declare
yourself for education and
for Florida.
President OConnell, you
know what is wrong with
this state and its system
of education as well as we
do. The time for platitudes
is long past. We need you
to lead us.

world that the UF is up upset
set upset with Floridas Legis Legislature
lature Legislature and governor. La Later,
ter, Later, marshalled at the tiny
Hillel Foundation, these
same concerned people
signed petitions, listened
to more discussion on the
education crisis and ex expressed
pressed expressed their opinions.
With this apathy died.
There can be no doubt
now about > how the UF
stands. We stand tall and
united, behind the Florida
Education Association and
those teachers who have
resigned.

HEY, ERIKA LOOKIT THE
FUNNY DISNEYLAND ANIMALS"

CAMPUS COMMENTARY
As They See 1t...

THE DA/fV CALIFORNIAN
Negroes At Berkeley

The issue of minority representation of
students, faculty and employees again con confronts
fronts confronts the University this time as a result
of charges made by the president of the
Berkeley Chapter of the National Associ Association
ation Association for the Advancem entof Colored People
(NAACP).
The charges have special relevance since
they follow on the heels of charges of
discrimination in the athletic department
and the controversy over a proposed Afro-
American literature course.
All these issues involving black students
here leave no question that there is a racial
crisis at this University which is manifest manifesting
ing manifesting itself in many areas of campus life.
In this most recent incident brought to
light, charges were made that the University
is not making enough effort in recruiting
faculty and students of minority groups.
In the first case involving faculty
recruiting the charge appears legitimate.
Less than one per cent of the faculty here
are black, and it is inconceivable that this
figure is representative of the national ratio
of qualified black educators to white edu educators.
cators. educators.
It is questionable whether the fact that
the University employs less than ten black
faculty members constitutes evidence of
discrimination. But in terms of sheer
numbers, it is obvious that recruitment of
black faculty has been neglected.
The charge Involving students is less
valid. There are two specific examples
of conscious effort on the part of the Univer University
sity University to recruit minority group students. One
is the Special Opportunity Scholarship
(5.0.5.) program adopted by the Academic
Senate in 1964 which assists minority high
school students who show academic

promise. S.O.S. is complemented by the
Economic Opportunity Program (EOP), co coordinated
ordinated coordinated through the Chancellor's office
by Bill Sommerville, assistant to the Chan Chancellor.
cellor. Chancellor.
As a result of the University's efforts,
minority enrollment has increased twofold
over the last year. Active recruiting is
also being sponsored by the Student Cam Campaign
paign Campaign Committee which works in conjunction
with the Centennial Committee.
In spite of the recruitments programs,
however, the ratio of minority students
to whites at the University is sorely un unbalanced.
balanced. unbalanced. This is a white, middle class
institution, or, in the words of black high
students, It is a place "for rich
white kids only."
The current charges against the Univer University
sity University have been Investigated by re representatives
presentatives representatives of the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, and a joint dele delegation
gation delegation of the Atomic Energy Commission
and the Department of Labor. Reports are
expected this month, and Sommerville says
there will be no need for further investi investigations.
gations. investigations.
These reports, together with the ex expected
pected expected report on discrimination in the
athletic department investigated by a cban cbancellorlal
cellorlal cbancellorlal committee, will hopefully form a
foundation for the next step in relieving
racial tensions here.
Everyone must realize the magnitude of
the problem. Although the University does
not adequately reflect minority group in interests,
terests, interests, racial problems are clearly re reflected
flected reflected by the University. Radical steps
roust be taken to alleviate the crisis,
lest the ghetto burn and we all be con consumed
sumed consumed by the flames.



STEPPING OUT ===s==
DAYS OF BEER
AND DANDELIONS
===== BY JAMES COOK
I dont know how things went to drugs so fast.
It was only four years ago that everyone was .
Everyone was .
Well, a little bit rowdy, loud, a little bit sacrilegious, a little
bit drunk on the weekends, and it seemed like .
A little bit happy.
Maybe drugs came with the war.
Or maybe they were bound to come anyway.
Who knows?
I remember Spring, sitting by a fire on the beach. A hundred
people, more or less. Budweiser and Winston. Marlboro and Schlitz.
The inevitable guitar. Salty dog. Hot nuts. Laughter.
Maybe its just a distortion caused by the passage of time.
The tire tracks on the front lawn seemed real enough the next
morning.

Landing in jail seemed real
enough until your parents got
you out.
I remember the cops coming
over the sand dunes.
Dont try to run, youre sur surrounded!
rounded! surrounded!
Just like turkeys in a trap.
someone chuckled.
People scattered in all direct directions.
ions. directions. Climbed the jettes. Swam
the inlet, fifth bulging in the
jacket pocket.
They got cases of beer, fifths,
pints, half pints. They got thirty
people out of over a hundred
that had been there.
They took pictures for the
newspaper. My bottle was in the
front row.
Pop a beer and drink it,
she giggled, and I might give
you a little kiss.
He walked over to where the
confiscated beer lay, in the back
of a truck. He took a Busch and
drank it down almost at once.
The police dog didnt even
growl.
He got his kiss. They showed
him the inside of a jail cell
but let him go with the others
when their parents came.
The parents came.
Prominent fathers.
Social mothers.
Disgraced.
No charges.
There were heroes in tee shirts
and cut-off blue jeans.
Heroines in bikinis.
Fast cars. Slow cars. Banged
up beach cars.
Everything had a name.
Not any more.
I went home for the weekend
recently.
They had a real old-fashioned
beer party here last night.
Really? Surprised.
Yeah, the cops raided it.
Arrest anyone?
No, didnt even take the beer.
They were just looking for mari marijuana.
juana. marijuana.
Funny, isnt it.
How things change.
PANTY RAIDS
COME N GO
MR. EDITOR:
In reply to Assistant Housing
Director F. E. Kings comment
on panty-raiders:
Take last years panty raid
it comes and goes. But, of course,
you will always have some in individuals
dividuals individuals who get over excited
and start throwing rocks or tear tearing
ing tearing down things.
I am sure that most people
would agree that the best panty pantyraider
raider pantyraider is one who just comes and
goes.
With apologies to the freshman
English instructors,
DAN GOODMAN

OPEN FORUM:
Adjoin ml Vi/Awt
There is no hope for the complacent man

Prof. Edson A Man of Merit

MR. EDITOR:
I do not intend this letter to
be a eulogy of one man, but that
from the example I have chosen
other students like myself may
have similar parallels in the
way of instructors. It is to you,
the students, I am addressing my myself,
self, myself, that you stand up and be behind
hind behind those men of merit, show showing

INVITE BISHOP TANNER
AMERICAS OTTAVIANI?

MR. EDITOR:
The News of Religion sec section
tion section of the St. Petersburg Times
(Feb. 24, 1968) informs us that
There was rejoicing among
liberal American Catholics this
week over the announcement from
the Vatican that Pope Paul VI
had appointed Most Rev. Paul F.
Tanner Bishop of the Catholic
Diocese of St. Augustine.
After a reference to the Bish Bishops
ops Bishops conflicts with Catholic pro progressives,
gressives, progressives, the news item goes on
WRITE SOLDIER
IN CHINA SEA
MR. EDITOR:
I am presently in the service
serving a tour of duty in Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam and the China Seas.
I was wondering if it is pos possible
sible possible for you to put my name
and address in your school paper.
I do not receive any letters
to speak of and would appre appreciate
ciate appreciate the chance to correspond
with anyone who would like to
write to me.
I do not know your policy on
such things, but anything you can
do will be appreciated.
Thank you for your time and
consideration.
JOHN E. WEST TM2
UjSJS, John W. Thomason DD76O
Fox Division
F.P.O. San Francisco, Calif.
96601

READER ADVISES
GET
MR. EDITOR:
Less teachers resigned than
was anticipated. There are less
SHEEP among the teaching pro profession
fession profession than I thought. The ones
that remained on their jobs are
leaders and should be admired.
They should withdraw their FEA
membership to further prove
their leadership ability.
I was told in 1959, by an FEA
official, that if a Republican
governor is elected that the FEA
would lead the sheep to strike.
This has been a well planned
political plot, not one with the
children in mind.
School boards should accept
the resignations and not rehire

ing showing in some small way your ap appreciation
preciation appreciation to their dedication.
For the past eight weeks I
have had the opportunity to really
learn, not just the humdrum of
facts and figures, but something
profitable and practical that can
be applied to everyday problems
in the field Im pursuing. It was
not the information as such but
the manner in which it was passed

to say that:; In some quarters,
he was referred to privately as
Americas Ottaviani.
I know nothing of Bishop Tanner
or of the accuracy of this news
item. But Cardinal Ottaviani was
a man of extreme right-wing
opinion. He was an admirer of
Francos regime, at least before
the recent liberties granted
to non-Catholics in Spain. In 1939
he was sent to Paris to see
Charles Maurras of Action Fran Francaise
caise Francaise during the reconciliation
between the Vatican and this
quasi- Facist organization.
In a notorious speech on March
2, 1953, Ottaviani defended the
Catholic demand for confessional
states in Catholic countries and
for toleration and liberty in coun countries
tries countries where Catholics are in a
minority one must have two
standards, one for truth and one
for error.
Although Pius XII did not ex explicitly
plicitly explicitly contradict this opinion of
the Cardinal, he restated the
thesis-hypothesis distinction in a
very prudent form on December
6, 1953. Presumably, the recent
entrance of Ottaviani into
ecclesiastical limbo is an in indication
dication indication that his views are not
so acceptable in the Vatican now
as they were a short time ago.
I would guess that the reference
to Tanner as Americas Ot Ottaviani
taviani Ottaviani simply refers to his op opposition
position opposition to certain aspects of the
aggiornamento. Perhaps an in invitation
vitation invitation to the Bishop to speak
on campus would provide an op opportunity
portunity opportunity for clarification of the
meaning of the dubious accolade
bestowed upon him by some
quarters.
H. W. PAUL
DEPT. OF HISTORY

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

RID OF FEA

these sheep. It would be hard on
the school system for awhile but
in the long run the children will
be better off without these dead
weights.
Let the strikers move to


Tribute To The FEA

A TRIBUTE TO THE GALLANT
35,000 RECENTLY SELF-AP SELF-APPOINTED
POINTED SELF-APPOINTED DECISION MAKERS
FOR 6,000,000 FLORIDIANS

that has ignited once again my
desire to learn. Never in my three
years at this university have I
found an instructor so dedicated
to the students as a whole. Never
have I witnessed the ardent desire
of one man to put his all into a
course, making it interesting and
challenging to the student to
learn.
He has presented the difficult
with clarity and the impossible
with exactness and ease. With
the use of his personally pre prepared
pared prepared illustrations to carry his
points across, he has held a one
hundred percent attention of his
students.
This man is an asset to the
college of agriculture and to the
university. We need more men
like Mr. S. N. Edson of the
Soils Department who puts learn learning
ing learning first and grades last.
NAME WITHHELD
\': ...
NO HONEY
IN VIETNAM
MR. EDITOR:
I am referring to Mr. J. N.
White's letter, entitled "A Taste
of Honey Vietnam" (Feb. 21).
Mr. White evidently missed
the main point, which is not
whether it is convenient to serve
there in Vietnam or not; the
question is, what are the Am Americans
ericans Americans doing in Vietnam in the
first place? Free movies every
night and a grape fizzle at one's
elbow have never been good ex excuses
cuses excuses for fighting a war.
Besides, Mr. White's letter
does not stand to reason. Quote:
"Whoever said War is Hell' ob obviously
viously obviously didn't have this war in
mind."; another quote: "I haven't
had a chance to fly a combat
mission yet." You Just wait, bud buddy,
dy, buddy, and after having flown some
fifty combat missions be sure
and write to us about that honey
again.
Meanwhile, why don't you ask
the Marines at Khe Sanh about
their opinion concerning the taste
of honey in Vietnam?
A. R. EPHRATH, 3EG

another state. All good citizens
should help them pack.
Let's do away with Florida's
third political party, "the FEA."
A CITIZEN OF FLORIDA

A day of celebration and song
throughout the land,
Tallahassee humbled, knelt at
education's hand.
Those wicked legislators, our
people represent,
But who are they to question
them whose word is heaven
sent?
Rejoice, Rejoice, O Citizens for
FEA's decreed
That barring future Instances
where chastizements the need
You'll have your education and
forgiveness for your loss
At thinking that the people not
the teachers were the boss.
Rejoicing from the parents but
louder sing the youth,
Blessings on the teachers they
have given us a truth.
Forward then O quality educated
youth, our teachers* paths to
follow,
Reason's wrong and might is
right. Democracy is hollow.
RONNIE SURRENCY, lUC
Write To Your
Representatives
MR. EDITOR:
Felix Greenes excellent talk
Tuesday night, when combined
with the great wealth of other
information on Vietnam constant constantly
ly constantly put before us, should have
done much to help people make
up their minds about their stand
on the Vietnam issue. The ques question
tion question that should now be answered
is what can we, the "little
people," do to influence our
countrys policy?
Midnight bull-sessions with
friends that already share our
views and demonstrations or sit sitins
ins sitins such as greeted the gentle gentlemen
men gentlemen from Dow may be personal personally
ly personally rewarding and lots of fun,
but in my opinion are not very
influential.
A carefully reasoned argument
trying to convince someone who
does not share your views is more
worthwhile than a 100 sterile
harangues with friends who al already
ready already agree. A thoughtful, in intelligent
telligent intelligent letter to your elected
representatives is better than a
dozen local sit-ins.
Each of us has two senators
and a representative in Washlng Washlng-1
-1 Washlng-1 ton. These are the people whose
opinions count. These are the
"big people." Write them, give
them your arguments and opin opinions
ions opinions and request a reply stating
their views. Ask you parents and
friends to do the same. This is,
after all, what representative,
democratic government is all
about.
In Florida our senators are Mr.
George Smathers and Mr. Spes Spessard
sard Spessard Holland. If your hometown
is Gainesville, your represen representative
tative representative is Mr. Don Fuqua. Their
address is simply Washington,
D.C.
KEN SCHULTZ, 7EG
MARY LOU SCHULTZ

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
ROBERTS 770 four-track stereo
tape recorder. Cross-Field head,
three speeds, hysteresis motor.
Like new. $270.00. Call 376-
4160 after 5 or on weekends.
(A-92-st-p)
*6l CHEV. power, heater, radio,
excellent condition, mechanically
perfect bought new car, must
sell. Call 372-3572 or 376-3261,
Ext. 2896 or see at Landmark
Apt. 12. (A-92-st-p)
MAMIYA interchangeable twin
lens reflex camera. Both the
80mm and the 180 mm photo photolenses.
lenses. photolenses. Call: 378-7762. (A-92-
lt-p)
FOR SALE: 125 cc Ducati 1963.
$125, also T-cub 200cc engine.
Best offer. Don Miller, 417 East.
376-9372. (A-92-3t-p)
CLASSICAL GUITAR beautiful
workmanship and sound. Only 3
months old. Complete with case cases7s.oo.
s7s.oo. cases7s.oo. Call 376-0748. (A-92-
3t-p)
FURS, 1930 clothing, collectors
items, glass, antique furniture,
Hall tree marble top buffet, oak
dining set with 2 buffets, desks.
Opposite art center, Micanopy.
Sat. p.m. and Sunday. (A-92-
st-p)
EFFICIENCY apartmentfor rent.
Quiet, excellent for the studious.
Available for 3rd quarter or?
$95.00 per month. Call 372-1693.
(B-92-lt-p)
2 bedroom A/C apartment avail available
able available March 15, $95/mo. Water
& sewage included. Call 376-8442
or see at Apt. 2, 117 SW 12th
St. (B-92-lt-p)
APARTMENT for rent. Modern
efficiency for two. No summer
obligation. Across the street
from campus. Ph: 372-0840. (B (B---91-st-p)
--91-st-p) (B---91-st-p)
FRENCH QUARTER #B7. Spend
your days and nights in luxury
pick up lease starting spring term
at reduced rate -for 3 or 4.
378-3514 or 378-7805. (B-87-
RTITiSVBTRVII Lat*
Iplpif"l show
Every
lill Night
N.W. 13H ST. 372 -9523j^g| gg
I Open at 6:30
I Feature at 1^
7:07 & 10:50
I ii Doris Day I
I.** Or JOSIE
y- technicolors
f Cofeature at 900 1
GEORGE DEAN 1
[peppard martin]
ROUGH NIGHT I
IN JERICHO I
fH TECHNICOLOR' A Univt*roal Pittuif JM

y|j3iggg|!j^£
entertainment I
1 Showtime 7:07 PLUS
| .* nm & at 9:03
Adm. SI.QO TECHNICOLOR- 11:05 "T ffU __ I
I "THE£MKMOVER... At ** I
dnie rem ig. I
i 1 J

y^v/AwXvJWV.VHvXWW'V-v.v.v. ;*

FOR SALE
*6B PONTIAC Firebird Olive with
white interior, $500.00 below
cost. 6B Magnovox stereo Com Components.
ponents. Components. FM, AM, Large floor
speakers. $250.00 or best offer.
376-3261 Ext. 3178 or 376-2708.
(A-92-st-p)
KALIGAR zoom lens. 100 mm to
200mm, f/5.6. Screw-type mount.
With leather case and sun shield.
$65.00. Call 376-4160 after 5 or
on weekends. (A-92-3t-p)
HOUSE TRAILER, 10 x 51*. 2
bedroom on nice shady lot in
Micanopy. Water furnished. Call
466-3173. $70.00 month. (A-90-
3t-p)
64 SUZUKI 50. Good condition,
SIIO.OO. Buco helmet with shield
included. Call Dave 378-3231 or
if no answer call 378-3609. (A (A---90-3t-p)
--90-3t-p) (A---90-3t-p)
GERMAN SHEPHERDS puppies.
8 weeks old. AKC registered.
Excellent pedigree. Call 378-
4600. (A-89-st-p)
MOBILE HOME for sale 10
x 56, carpeting and kitchen ap appliances
pliances appliances otherwise unfurnished.
Central Air Conditioning and
heating. Excellent condition. Call
378-2747. (A-88-st-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Black Yamaha
Twin 100. Book rack, good con condition,
dition, condition, $225. 372-3090 or 4318
NW 12th Terrace. (A-89-st-p)
FOR SALE: KLH Model fifteen
stereo unit (cost new $235) and
Koss Pro-4 headphones (cost new
SSO) Moving must sell both
at $120.00 very good condition
- payment and delivery immed immediately
iately immediately after spring vacation. Call
372-9435 and ask for Frank
Whitehurst. (A-91-st-p)
Wi:iliT:m 6:17
| mw. tUmriHf Am. | 8:51
iSHI JULIE
Mk CHRISTIE
TERENCE
|gprj| STAMP
PETER
BATES
I jgjisy Chair Twh l
Krajong ends
THURS.
See it from the beginning
1:353:325:297:269:23
AUDREY
HEPBURN
arkjn||^^M
RICHARD Rp|
CRENNASJ^M
[WAIT UNTO. PARK

Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

FOR SALE
MOBILE HOME 10 x 50 Lib Liberty,
erty, Liberty, Air Conditioning, Central
Heating, Television, Completely
Furnished. Your Best Trailer
Buy for $2,588. 372-3767 after
5 p.m. (A-83-10t-p)
FOR SALE: Heinkle 173 cc Ger German
man German Motor scooter. Passenger
seat, spare tire, luggage rack.
SIOO. Call Winn 372-4907 be between
tween between 5-7 p.m. (A-91-st-p)
1966 HONDA S-90, scrambler
bars, luggage rack, mirror, hel helmet
met helmet and shield. 6,500 miles. $275
or best offer. 372-9405, ask for
Ric Dorrie. (A-91-3t-p)
February 28th ONE DAY ONLY.
SALE: Power mower, ladies wet
suit 10/12, weighted belts, hair
dryer, games, some furnishings,
5£ to SI.OO miscellaneous books/
records/household goods. 208
NW 21st Terrace. (A-91-3t-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 50. Great
mechanical condition. Please call
372-7275. #47 French Quarter.
Ask for Mike, anytime. (A-91-
3t-p)
1963 VESPA 125 cc. Excellent
mechanical condition, leaving for
Spain. Must sell. Helmet included
$135. 378-6963. (A-90-3t-p)
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: 1533-1535 NW sth
Avenue. One bedroom furnished
apartment, air conditioned.
5 blocks from University. $95.00
per month. Call 376-8475 or 376-
1065. (B-88- st-p)

.i-NS>.-' a 1
1 B O m B
T^HsBBBHBf
' > v
77ze international team of Richard Gray & Mary Loiseau
brings to the Univ. And. fftezr highly acclaimed drami dramitization
tization dramitization of the lives & wit of OSCAR WILDE & GEORGE
BERNARD SHAW, the two most brilliant products of the
19th century. TonighVs presentation includes selections
from their best & least known works including Caesar &
Cleopatra and Man and Superman.
_ UNION \>^
n BOARD JP^
8:15 PM Tonight Students $1
Univ. Aud. Faculty & Staff $1.50
Gen. Public $2.50

WANTED
ROOMMATE wanted for next
Quarter. University Gardens, 716
SW 16 Ave., Apt 107. $41.25
per month, and one fourth of
utilities. (C-88-12t-p)
MUST SUBLEASE: University
Gardens Apt. 1 bedroom or find
one female roommate for spring
and summer quarters. Call 378-
5841. (C-88- st-p)
WANTED: Male Roommate, Vil Village
lage Village 34, Apt. 42 Telephone 378-
8704. (C-88-st-p)
WANTED!! Attractive coed scuba
diver for diving buddy. Must have
diving gear. Possible trip to
Silver Springs; weekend of March
1. Call 376-9361, Room 311.
(C-88-st-p) ' <
CLEAN, cozy apt. $105.00 per
month. Start of Spring Quarter.
Away from hum-drum. Call
George or Bob at 376-3261 Ext.
2832 before 6 p.m. and 378-
6519 after 6. (C-91-ts-p)
*
WANTED: Female roommate.
S3O per mo. 2 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Phone 378-7140. (C-91-3t-p)
MALE roommate for 3rd and/or
4th quarter for Village Park Apt.
#llO, upper overlooking pool.
$40.75 per month. Call 378-8221
between 5 and 7. (C-91-3t-p)
FEMALE roommate needed
starting in March. Present room roommate
mate roommate graduating. $43.75/mo.
Contact Susan: 378-5229. (C-92-
st-p)
FEMALE roommate needed for
immediate occupancy. Olympia
Apt. 2 blocks from campus. Se Security
curity Security deposit and last months
rent already paid. Call 376-0066.
(C-87-st-p)

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

WANTED
RIDERS WANTED. Chartered bus
to U. Georgia game. Leave March
1, return March 3. For Infor Information
mation Information call 376-9103 or 376-
9348. (C-89-st-p)
FEMALE roommate wanted for
3rd quarter: 2 bedroom duplex
2 blocks behind Norman Hail.
Central heat and air condition conditioning.
ing. conditioning. $32.50 a month plus util utilities.
ities. utilities. Call 378-7227. (C-89-st-p)
FEMALE roommate wanted so
Landmark Apt. for third quarter.
Call 378-3851. (C-90-3t-p)
MALE roommate for immediate
occupancy, Frederick Gardens
apts., #6B, 1-bedroom, AC, pool,
furnished, security deposit al already
ready already paid, only S6O/mo., call
372-7964, ask for Marvin. (C (C---91-3t-p)
--91-3t-p) (C---91-3t-p)
HELP WANTED
X ;;
MEN, need money? Earn over
SI,OOO this summer. NATURE OF
JOB: Own and operate car-wax car-waxing
ing car-waxing business in your own city,
be your own boss, set your own
hours. Be assured of SI,OOO in
3 months. REQUIREMENTS: Live
in city of 25,000 or more, be
capable of moderate physical
labor. National director of Dura-
Lustre Enterprises will conduct
interviews at Placement Office,
G-22, Reitz, on Thursday, Feb.
29. Sign up for interview now.
(E-90-3t-p)
WANTED Immediately. Beauty
Operators for new salon one
master operator pleasant work working
ing working conditions. Old location of
Blanch's Beauty Salon. 311 NW
Univ. Ave. Phone 376-6021. (E (E---91-st-c)
--91-st-c) (E---91-st-c)



CLASSIFIEDS

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

/............X*X-X*X-X-X-X-X.X.Vv.
HELP WANTED |
'XvAwvXOwJXvV-^v.vMvXWvXvV-i
FULL TIME TYPIST position
now open with Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications. Student Publications is
willing to train (on the job) a
person with typing skill to learn
sophisticated typesetting equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Applicant must be able tu
type 50 WPM with 80 percent
accuracy. This is a clerk-typist
II position. Report to University
Central Employment, 2nd floor
of the Hub for details. (E-91-
tf-nc)
ADVERTISING salesman for the
Florida Alligator. Must have car
and be available for summer
term. Good pay, good working
conditions, great experience. Ad
majors preferred. Apply in room
330 Reitz Union. (E-92-tf-nc)
REGISTERED NURSE for ped pediatrics
iatrics pediatrics office. Write stating per permanence,
manence, permanence, experience, and refer references.
ences. references. P.O. Box 2427 Univ.
Station. (E-92-ts-c)
AUTOS
WANT something that purrs? Try
this 1959 Impala V-8, radio,
heater, Air Don't work, so no
harsh noises. Tires aren't bad.
Take a chance! Call Stick" at
378-6749. (G-90-st-p)
MUST SELL: 1962 Buick Skylark
Convertible, V-8, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, radio, heater, stereo
tape. Power steering and brakes.
Good condition throughout, no
reasonable offer refused. John,
378-1921. (G-89-st-p)
LEAVING for boot camp next
week. Must sell XK-E Jaguar
roadster, blue, new michelin
tires, needs hood work, $1,625.
Archer Rd. Village Trailer Park,
Alpha 8. (G-84-3t-p)
MUST SACRIFICE: 1966 VW Se Sedan.
dan. Sedan. Excellent condition, factory
air, heater, radio. Red with white
interior. Many other extras. Call
Univ. Ext. 2951 or 376-1258 be between
tween between 8:30-5:00. (G-88-st-c)
PORSCHE '57. Black. 1600 S. Re Rebuilt
built Rebuilt transmission. New Alumi Aluminum
num Aluminum Magnesium Pistons. New
Pirelli Tires. Body refinished.
Phone 378-1121 after 5 and week weekends
ends weekends on Univ. Ext. 2877. (G (G---88-st-p)
--88-st-p) (G---88-st-p)
808
JjYLAjT
with
* BAEZ
DONT LOOK BACK

AUTOS
1963 VW convertible, Sunflower
yellow, new top, tires, battery,
carpeting, etc. *65 engine and
transmission. $795. Call 378-
6917. See at 1508 NW Ist Lane,
Apt. 3. (G-89-st-p)
1959 MG, New Top, Tonneau,
Motor in excellent condition,
$400.00. Call 378-6263 after 5:00
p.m. 376-3261, Ext. 2455 before
5:00. (G-88-st-p)
'62 VW, hadlo, heater, sun-roof,
$600.00. Call 376-0103. (G-90-
st-p)
SERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. fM-78-tt-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS .. $4-
up. SPECIAL reates for Univ.
students, faculty and employees.
At Rebel Discount, 1227 W. Univ.
Ave. 376-7430, 378-6127, across
from Wolfies. (M-91-10t-p)
PORTRAIT Special -for all
occasions wallet, passport,
identification pictures. SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 378-
1170, 1013 1/2 W. Univ. Ave.
(M-91-3t-c)
PERSONAL
COED FROM OJC with fair com complexion,
plexion, complexion, reddish-blond, hair. If
you met a zoology major at
student depository, former
classmate in Border's psy psychology
chology psychology 201, please call Jim
378-7845. Urgent. (J-91-3t-p)
L.A.H. Happy Birthday. Best al always.
ways. always. W. (J-92-lt-p)
SILVER CERTIFICATES Check
your ones, fives, and ten dollar
bills for silver certificates. Win
pay .25 on the dollar. Contact
Nina at 372-9255. (J-90-st-p)
LOIS: Happy Belated Birthday!
Saturday, February 24, Love,
your little sister. (J-92-lt-p)
XvX; v
f LOST & FOUND |
WALLET TAKEN from apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Keep money please return
papers and sorority pin to Diane
Kelly, Kappa Alpha Theta House.
No questions asked. (L-90-st-p)
LOST: male, full grown,Siamese
cat. Lost in the SE 7th St. area.
Reward! Call 372-6682. (L-92-
3t-p)
$lO REWARD for yellow and white
gold wedding band lost between
Little Hall and Graduate Library.
Daniel Shain: 376-5613. (L-92-
3t-p)

Page 9

Profile:
Revolution
In Exile
- By JOHN PARKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Robert Fierstein, the ex-UF
ROTC protestor, is starting a
revolution in exile."
* I got the idea from an Alli Alligator
gator Alligator reporter," said Fierstein.
He asked me if I was starting
a 'revolution in exile.' I told
him that I hadn't any plans along
that line. Then I started think thinking
ing thinking about it and decided that it
wasnt a bad idea at all."
His revolution is in the form
of a chapter of Southern Stu Students
dents Students Organizing Committee
(SSOC) at Santa Fe Junior
College.
Fierstein, who was one of the
eleven arrested at the Dow pro protest
test protest on Feb. 8, is presently a
student at Santa Fe and not at
UF as was reported in the Thurs Thursday
day Thursday Alligator.
Fierstein said that his planned
organization is no underground
activity.
I am going through the bur bureaucracy.
eaucracy. bureaucracy. I approached the stu student
dent student government at Santa Fe and
was of course referred to a com committee.
mittee. committee. The committee was then
non-existent more or less. But
I think we are making progress
now."
Fierstein said that the student
body on the whole at Santa Fe
was more receptive and less
apathetic toward the ideas of
SSOC than the UF student body.
On a percentile basis, Santa
Fe has more actives than UF.
There are a lot of long-hairs
and people in the know there."
Fierstein has 16 potential
members for his new organi organization
zation organization but doesn't know exactly
what issues they will deal with
once they become organized.
As far as I know there are
no violations of academic free freedom
dom freedom at Santa Fe and Dow doesnt
recruit there of course, so I
dont know exactly what we will
do at first."
Fierstein, contrary to general
opinion on campus, was not
thrown out" of UF.
I was dropped from ROTC
for refusing to cut my hair. That
left me with less than the min minimum
imum minimum number of hours. For that
reason I was suspended. But that
happens to a lot of people. All
you do is petition to be rein reinstated.
stated. reinstated. I did that and the peti petition
tion petition was granted. On my lawyers
advice I did not return to UF
the next quarter. a He said I would
just be suspended again, so I
left in good standing, tech technically."
nically." technically." j?
Fiersteirf said that his lawyer
is still working on the ROTC
case on the grounds that it is
unconstitutional for a person to
be removed from a state univer university
sity university simply because of long hair.
He said that he would probably
have enough hours to re-enter
UF without being required to take
ROTC before the case is decided
in the courts. Transfer students
with 26 hours are not required
to take ROTC.
I plan to get back in UF as
soon as I safely can," he said.

AROUND
TOWN
Bent Card
By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer

The Bent Card at 1826 W. University Ave. tries hard. It really
does. And general manager Bob Souvorin (7ED) is the force behind
the partially successful attempt.
Souvorin has been at the Card on and off for about three years*
ever since its initial beginning, and tends to think of Gvilles
only coffee house as a community type of thing.
the customer's place really, he said. It's the place for
people to go when they want to get out and do something different.
As fAr as entertainment goes the Card is absolutely liberal in
accepting acts and performers. The shows feature some fairly >
respectable folk singers from around town, musicians who can
wail half-way decently, aspiring young poets who >wish to recite
some of their works and, on rare occasions, an informal group
discussion or two.
Anyone can come in here a few days before the show and talk
to me about what they want to do, and usually I'll let that person
perform, Souvorin said. I'm open to virtually anything, but I
do have one exception, and that's rock. The reason is because
thats whats everywhere.
Our performers aren't paid but they really dont mind, since
the audience is so receptive, he said. Its a real receptive type
atmosphere and you get the idea that everybody is rooting for you.
The Card is sponsored by the Lutheran Student Center and opens
at 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights, with the shows beginning
at about 9:30 or 9:45.
There is a variety of drinks offered at the Bent Card, none of_
which, unfortunately, are alcoholic. The management offers soft
drinks, cider, tea, fruit juices, expresso and several exotic sound sounding
ing sounding concoctions cooked up by somebody with rather rich taste.
Coffee is free, pretzels are on the house and the beverages that
cost range in price from 15 cents to 50 cents. Admission is 50
cents.
One of our new drinks that we have is a combination of hot
chocolate, ice cream, whipped cream and a marashino cherry,
Souvorin said. With this drink, which is called New Drink,the
customer gets a free kazoo. In the course of the evening we have
an audience kazooalong.
One thing that the Card has that is truly unique is atmosphere.
The room is in a darkened state, there are messages painted on
the walls, the tables are beat-up worthless wooden telephone cable
spools, candles in wine bottles grace the room, the long-haired
hippie audience is a total cultural happening and there exists an air
of true animosity and casual friendliness.
So if youre looking for an unusual place to take your date, one
which offers a variety of oddities to be found no where else in
G'ville, one which is light on the wallet or purse, then the Bent
Card is ideal. If youre fairly talented and wish an outlet for your
creativity then its a nice place to perform in, also. Any way it is
viewed it is a place unlike any other around town.

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- r :



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Miss UF Contest Topped Week-End

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These Were The 10 Lovely Semi-Finalists

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First Runner-Up Patty Bohannon ...

Humecoming Entertainment At Its Best

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Miss UF Karin Ostland...

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Poker Player Study
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GUS MUSTELIER

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I Walk Is Good, But THAT Good?

Im a Gator fan, really I am. But dirty pool
is dirty pool, and I smell an eight-ball in the side
pocket.
Im also a Neal Walk fan. I admire a man who
is the second leading scorer and leading rebounder
in the SEC and who is also in the top 10 in the na nation
tion nation in both categories.
But most of all, I admire Neal because he has
proved that he can carry the burden of being the
man on the Gator cage team even on nights when
he was not given much help.
Wednesday night Neal was given help, and I
think somebody cheated to give it to him. Im re referring
ferring referring to the 26 rebounds that were credited to
him in the Gator win over FSU in Florida gym.
In the first half of that game, big Neal was out outplayed
played outplayed under the boards by FSUs fine center Dave
Cowens. Walk managed only four rebounds. By
simple subtraction one finds that Neal was cred credited
ited credited with 22 rebounds in the second half of play.

Robinson
Applaudes
Boycott
NEW YORK (UPI) Jackie
Robinson, a member of base baseballs
balls baseballs Hall of Fame, Sunday ap applauded
plauded applauded Negro athletes who have
threatened to boycott the summer
Olympics and said the United
States would lose without them.
Robinson, who broke the color
line in Major League baseball
as a second baseman for the old
Brooklyn Dodgers, made his po position
sition position on the Olympics clear.
I feel very strongly that its
right to boycott the Olympic
games . .I'm proud that these
youngsters are willing to sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice in this manner, and I cer certainly
tainly certainly do support them
Speaking on a television inter interview
view interview WNBC-TVs Direct Line,
Robinson said the same leverage
could be applied in baseball but
added, unfortunately not enough
in baseball are concerned with
the masses of Negro people to
involve themselves in protests.*
Lacrosse
Starts At UF
The newly formed lacrosse
club is the first at UF and for
at least four of the 27 members
it is their first experience with
lacrosse.
Lacrosse is a very popular
game in both the North and West,
but has just never spread to the
South, said Lane Watkins,
president of the four-week-old
club.
First played by the Iroquois
Indians, lacrosse is Americas
oldest organized sport.
The game is played on a field
very similar to a hockey field.
There are 10 players on each
team and the object of the game
is to send the ball through the
opponents goal posts as many
times as possible.
To move the ball the players
use a curved 3 1/2 to 6 foot
stick with an oval triangle of
leather netting at the end. The
game is divided into four 15
minute periods.
Lane, a former member of $
high school lacrosse team spon sponsored
sored sponsored by West Point military
Academy, said most Florida stu students
dents students have never played the game.
Six of the members are gra graduate
duate graduate students who have played
at other colleges. Most of the
other members have played in
high school or in the physical
education program at UF although
a few are novices.
The club would like to play
other groups in the state, but do
not know whether any exist, ac according
cording according to Watkins.
The club meets Saturday af afternoons
ternoons afternoons on the soccer field be behind
hind behind the stadium.

State Prep Tournaments Begin Finally

(UPI) Sixty-three district
basketbal 1 tournaments around
Florida, postponed last week due
to the teacher walkout, will be
held this week, the State High
School Activities Association an announced
nounced announced Monday.
The district basketball and
wrestling tournaments will be
held during the week of Feb.
25 through March 2 in accord accordance

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TELEPHONE 578-2304

p &jgjg||g^|
happening!
i
** stevHullivon.9-12 Bud Blackwood, 12-3 Rick Morton,3-5 __ Ra / R/n,s-6:15

By Paul Kaplan
asst, sports editor
Well, Im sorry Gator fans, but this guy just
doesnt believe it. Nobody hauls down 22 rebounds
in one half.
Wilt Chamberlain doesnt do it. God couldnt
do it.
What Im leading to is this if Neal Walk is
going to lead the nation in rebounding, or if
Neal Walk is going to be selected as an All-Am All-American,
erican, All-American, let him do it with his skills, not with the
help of a near-sighted (or perhaps inaccurate)
statistics compiler.
Right now Walk is the second leading rebounder

ance accordance with schedules previously
determined at district planning
meetings, said executive sec secretary
retary secretary Floyd E. Lay.
All member schools pre previously
viously previously entered in these tourneys
are eligible to compete.*
Lay added that he did not ex expect
pect expect any trouble in holding the
tournaments due to the teacher
walkout at least we hope there
is none.

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Regional tournaments will be
played March 8-9 at sites to be
announced later.
The state high school bas basketball
ketball basketball tournament will be held

lt||||-' -r*
. JBj;-
I This week, Sandy is wearing A
Jg|,l a red, white, and blue striped
m baby doll by Ardee of Cali for- AjjjSk
WAKm nia o Many different color com- fif
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-W kle free dream are available J|P[
from. .
1 I
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1220 WEST UNIVERSITY V

in America. His 19.1 average gives him a com comfortable
fortable comfortable lead in the SEC and puts him right be behind
hind behind Western Kentuckys Garfield Smith who leads
the nation with a 20.4 average.
The funny thing is, Neal Walk doesnt need any
help. Hes one of the top performers in the country
and everyone knows it. If he comes in first, or
second, or fifteenth in the nation, any pro team
that has seen him play will try to get him on their
club. Here lies the saddest point of all whoever
is prevaricating (thats a word for lie) about these
statistics, is not doing it for Neal, but for the
university; they love the publicity also.
The man with the pen is asking me (and you)
to believe that one man pulled down more rebounds
in one half of a game than the nations leader gets
in a full game. You may believe it, but I dont.
I think Neal Walk is getting help, and more
important, I dont think he wants it or even knows
about it.

at the UF on March 15 and 16, <
Lay said. The state wrestling
tournament will be held at
Miamis Killian High School
March 8-9.

Page 11



Page 12

!. foe Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 27, 1968

^WBBBav.v/.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.V//////.V/.VA\VAV.V//.MBMBaBr
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By Bob Padeck.y^jpy
* SPORTS EDITOR
Florida didnt play Saturday afternoon against Mississippi
State. TPey acted. In front of television. It was a sad performance
though.
The game got critical reviews.
But thats all right, the Gators were probably worrying more
about what free movie they were going to see that night.
Course, the TVfans got quite a show. In futility.
UFs Gary McElroy once deftly dribbled the ball twice and then
neatly kicked it over MSUs bench.
Three points in football but no points in basketball.
But you really couldnt blame Gary though. He had that face
mask on for his broken nose. With the heavy padding around the
outside, McElroy had hardly any peripheral vision.
Its easy then to see why he had trouble dribbling to his side.
But the rest of the Gators played like they had those face masks
on.
A couple of times State broke their famed fast break on the
Gators. It was the same fast break that led the Bulldogs to a
3-11 conference season.
With about three minutes left in the game, a Florida player
broke into a sweat, it was just before a State play attempted a
free throw.
The anticipation was too much for him.
Miss Karin Ostlund, Miss UF, and her court were at the game.
After the game, I was tempted to have one of my writers cover
her post-game comments instead of Bartletts.
You could figure what kind of comments Bartlett would make.
Something like, You cant win if you dont shoot right and other
immortal words To Live By.
Os course, the man is right.
After the game, it was easy to see why Mississippi State was
the conferences last place team. But it was hard to fathom why
the Gators were the SECs No. 4.
But, despite this game and movie passes, this years club holds
at least 10 school records. And they still have a game left.
Its against Georgia, next Saturday.
And its on TV
Here s hoping its not a rerun. BAD movies make me cry.
Archery Club Inactive
For First Time In 20 Years
M

For the first time in 20 years
the UF Archery Club will not be
active.
Miss Jane Miller, club spon sponsor,
sor, sponsor, couldn't explain the lack of
interest but suggested it was the
quarter system or just a change
in student mood.
Asst. Dean of Physical Edu Education
cation Education Henry Cherry, who is also

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chairman of intramural athletics,
said there were 22 active clubs
on campus this term, more than
ever before. He cited fencing,
modern dance and weight lifting
as becoming among the more
popular this year.
UF sponsored the state archery
meet last year.

Tannen Maliska Go Track

UFs Athletic Department is getting a lot of
mileage out of two football players.
Sophomores Steve Tannen and Paul Maliska have
turned in their football uniforms for the time being
and are now competing for coach Jim my Carnes track
team. This weekend both will see action in the
Chattanooga Invitational being held in Chattanooga,
Tenn.
Tannen, a star for the 1967 Gator football team
has shown great promise in the high hurdles. Last
year the all-SEC defensive halfback had one of the
fastest times in the nation in the 120-yard high
hurdles. This winter Tannen has been clocked in
7.3 in the 60-yard high hurdles, only three tenths

I 1 r > : P I I
i I! -.^ II
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of a second off the best in the nation.
Maliska, who saw action as a defensive safety
and split-end is also a hurdler. He did not compete
in track last year due to an injury but was one of
the outstanding prep hurdlers in the country when
competing for Winter Park Hleh School.
Both Steve and Paul have great potential in the
hurdles, says Carnes. They are hard workers,
have good speed and have the competitive spirit
to be champions.*
Floridas high jumpers Frank Saier and Ronnie
Jourdan will also compete in the meet. Saier has
jumped 6-8 and Jourdan 6-9 1/2 this winter.