Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
WEATHER
Mostly Sunny
High In The 60s
Low Irf The 30s

Vol. 60, No. 91

AAUP Calls Profs From Classes

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MISS UF
Karin Ostlund was
crowned Miss Univer University
sity University of Florida Friday
nightc
Adams Calls
Two More
Dissenters
By JIM ALMAND
Alligator Staff Writer
Detailed charges for violation
of the student conduct code are
expected to be brought against
Ira Brukner and Tom Fristoe
today for their alleged partic participation
ipation participation against Dow Chemical
Co., recruiters on campus Feb.
8.
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams
told both students Friday they
would have to appear before the
Student Conduct Committee
March 6 for refusing to obey
a university official. Five other
students were charged with the
same violation last week after
being arrested during the Dow
demonstrations for trespassing
after warning.
Calling the charge the most
ridiculous thing Ive heard of
in my life, Fristoe told the
Alligator Sunday that he was
participating on a peripheral
basis. I was in support of the
demonstration, Fristoe said,
but I was not carrying a sign
or blocking the door.
Ira Brukner said that he feels
they are being unjustly accused
because we werent interfering
with operation of the placement
center. Apparently the police
were aware of this, Brukner
said, because we werent ar arrested.
rested. arrested.
According to Fristoe, Union
Director Bill Rion told the crowd
assembled for the Feb. 8 demon demonstration
stration demonstration they could protest if
they wanted to but they could
not block the entrance to the
placement center. Friday in Dean
Adams office Fristoe said he was
told that Rion had told everyone
to clear the area.
(SEE PROTESTORS/ PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator
' 1 0
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

r Action Day Backs
State FEA Stand
Bv STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
American Association of University Pro Professors
fessors Professors (AAUP) action to support Floridas
resigned teachers will take the form of a
Faculty Action Day to be held today, begin beginning
ning beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Hillel Foundation,
16 NW 18th St.

A much-discussed professor
walk-out will not take place, per
se, but any professor who wishes
to take part in the entire Fac Faculty
ulty Faculty Action Day program must
be away from his office and
classes for most of the day.
However, Dr. Gladys Kam mer merer,
er, merer, president of the UF chapter
of the AAUP, pointed out that
no one participating need miss
classes. She carefully avoided
calling the action a walkout.
Students who wish may at attend
tend attend the AAUP meeting, said
Dr. Kammerer. Petitions will
be available for the students to
sign, but the meeting is being
held all day so students and
faculty members can attend with without
out without missing classes.
Vice-president of Academic
Affairs Robert B. Mautz said
faculty members are free to
express their support o r non nonsupport
support nonsupport of methods adopted by the
FEA in an attempt to improve
the educational system.
He added, however, Such ex expressions
pressions expressions should not deprive
students of the University of
Florida of the opportunity to at attend
tend attend regularly scheduled classes
or force a student to reschedule
his activities to accommodate the
desires of an individual faculty
member.
Mautz concluded, In any dem demonstration
onstration demonstration of sympathy or sup support
port support of either teachers who re resign
sign resign or those who continue to
meet their classes, I would an anticipate
ticipate anticipate that university faculty
(SEE WALKOUT, PAGE 2)

1,000 Students March
To Kirkless Capitol

More than 1,000 students and
professors from Florida State
University and Florida A & M
marched on the Florida Capitol
Friday in support of the mass
school teacher walkout, urging
Governor Claude Kirk to call
the Legislature into session to
deal with the crisis.
UF student body president
Clyde Taylor, who Thursday ex expressed
pressed expressed his intent to join the
march, was not in Tallahassee
Friday afternoon. There were
few, if any, UF students par participating
ticipating participating in the Friday march,
although the recently-formed UF
Students For Quality Education
plans to walk to the Capitol
Monday.
The march was reportedly or orderly
derly orderly and well-organized, al although
though although marchers shouted and
booed the news that Kirk was
out of town while the protest

University of Florida, Gainesville

-A A'
March Set
To Back
Teachers
BULLETIN
Fraternities on campus wish wishing
ing wishing to show support for the FEA
and the UF faculty walkout are
urged to join a march beginning
at 10:15 a. m. today at the Tau
Epsilon Phi house on fraternity
row, IFC President Jim DeVaney
said late Sunday night.
DeVaney made the announce announcement
ment announcement at a meeting of student
leaders at the Hillel Foundation
called to mobilize support for
the Florida Education Associa Association.
tion. Association.
Approximately 100 leaders, in including
cluding including nearly every major stu student
dent student organization on campus, at attended
tended attended and agreed to return to
their organizations and to inform
them about the details of the
march. ,i.
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Some 200 student leaders were
to have met Sunday night to plan
a student march scheduled for
10:30 this morning, to express
agreement with the Florida Edu Education
cation Education Association (FEA), the
Alligator learned Sunday.
(SEE MARCH/ PAGE 2)

was in progress. Kirk was in
Port St. Joe dedicating a new
courthouse.
A special session petition con containing
taining containing 349 names was presented
to Kirks educational adviser,
Charles Perry, following the
demonstration. Perry and Wade
Hopping, the Governors legis legislative
lative legislative assistant, were on the
steps of the Capitol to talk or
answer questions on the problem,
but they were not recognized by
most of the marchers.
Although the march was in
support of the Florida Education
Association teacher walkout,
most of the signs carried by
marchers indicated otherwise.
Typical of the placards carried
were Damn Kirk, Kirk For
Vice-President of Disneyland,
and I Would Rather Be A Teach Teacher
er Teacher Than Gov. Kirk.

AN EDITORIALt
| |
:j HUPP* 4 |
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/ IM
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4. jkV 11 V
1
*. V
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$ The Teachers Are Concerned About Me, £
;: The Legislatures Concerned About Me, The |
ij: Governors Concerned About Me. Gee, I £
£ Cant Stand Much M ? ore Os This Concern £
Walk Out
x Hey you, you on your way to class. Where do you think youre :
£ going? £
£ Today has been christened Faculty Action Day -- the day £
when your truly dedicated and concerned instructors, those who £
£ care about the future of education in Florida, arent going to be £
£ in class anyway. £
£ So, where do you think youre going? £
£ We think you should join the students march at the Plaza of £
$ the Americas at 10:30 this morning. The march was called £
£ Sunday by student leaders to support the FEA. £
£ As a show of support for our concerned faculty members who £
£ will be attending a meeting at the Hillel Foundation today, and £
£ as a show of support for the thousands of Florida teachers who £
£ have resigned in protest over the miserable state of Florida edu- £
£ cation, we urge UF students to boycott classes today. £
£ Were calling for the walkout we originally asked for last October £
£ and which we postponed indefinitely. £
£ The Florida Alligator and the children of Florida are calling j:j
$ on you, the UF student, to stop this universitys business today £
:j: by vacating every building, every classroom, every corridor, £
£ every quadrangle. £
£ We must shut this place down. There are reasons: £
£ i Floridas primary and secondary schools are physically £
£ inferior. £
£ Floridas primary and secondary schools have inferior and £
v outdated Instructional materials. £
£ Floridas primary and secondary school teachers are under- £
£ paid. £
£ The Legislature and the governor have failed to do anything £
£ to permanently end Floridas school crisis. £
£ Teachers who have resigned need encouragement and support £
| in the face of political pressure being applied against their edu- £
£ cational struggle. £
£ We at the UF are directly affected by all this: £
g inferior primary and secondary schools breed inferior stu- £
£ dents on the university level. £
£ If we dont have quality public schools we will lose quality £
£ faculty. Seventy-five per cent of the faculty have children in public £
£: schools and they are concerned about the quality of the education £
£ their children receive. £
£ t Legislative and gubernatorial neglect are being felt here in £
£ the forms of low professor salaries, fire-trap buildings, inadequate £
£ money to purchase library books and insufficient equipment for£
£ laboratory courses. £
Accreditation of higher education in Florida is being threatened £
£ by political meddling. £
| Were tired of pie in the sky promises. We want better schools, £
§ at all levels, now. Weve had enough talk. Lets walk out, for one £
S''wx xwwwwvx'w x jx jx y5555w: : : : x*x w.w. , .v. , .v.v. .v. .v:v.'rv

Monday, February 26, 1968

INSIDE
Cagers Lose
To Miss. St.
See Page II



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

Student March Planned Today

PAGE ONE
The Alligator's news dead deadline
line deadline made it impossible to cover
the meeting Sunday night.
The group, which will include
an estimated 200 UF professors,
will march to the State Theatre
where the local FEA will be
meeting. Phil Constans, execu executive
tive executive secretary of the FEA, and
other FEA leaders are expected
to speak to the marchers.
They will then march back
to campus to disperse so they may
attend the AAUP Action Day
meeting at the Hillel Foundation,
16 N. W. 18th St.
However, we learned that three
resolutions were to have been
drawn up by the students at the
meeting. The first statement
would spell out student support
for the march, which is to move
from the Plaza of the Americas
to the State Theatre today.
The second resolution is to
give support to the FEAs stand
and the local American Associa Association
tion Association of University Professors
(AAUP) Action Day (today) in
Pool Champ
To Perform
At Theatre
Willie Mosconi, acknowledged
the world's best billiard player,
will give two exhibitions at Con Constans
stans Constans Theatre Monday, one at
4 p. ro. and one at 7:30 p. m.
Mosconi holds the worlds
record for High Run with 526
balls and the Worlds Best Game
of 125 in a single inning. Mos Mosconi
coni Mosconi also claims the High Run
record in tournament play with
141 points in one inning.
Mosconi is also the worlds
best in Challenge Match Play,
with a run of 127 balls.
Professoi
FROM PAGE ONE
members would honor their
moral and legal obligations to
their students.
Dr. Kam merer said the AAUP,
which has collected $2,700 to be
used as financial aid for the
teachers, will be accepting dona donations
tions donations at the meeting. She said
the AAUP expects to collect at
least SIO,OOO from UF profes professors.
sors. professors.
UF faculty members have been
asked by the AAUP to contribute

I ROBBIES I
FotTViw Best In Steaks
R
COLOR T.V. & BILLIARDS
1718 W. University Ave.
at norlda'
ud la pfeUfemd flva Uom raU; except dam* June, July and August whan tt la pfeUshed
semi-weekly, mad daring student holiday* and exam periods. Editorial* repreeent only tha
official opinion* o t thatr meteors. Addraaa correspondence to tha Florida Alllcator, Reitz
JDatoe Betiding, Uni varsity aa aaoond daas matter at tha Unltad States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
fldbacrtpttan rata la 914.00 par pear or $4.00 par quarter.
11m Florida Alligator reserves tha right to regulate tha typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
Urn Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments at payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical error* or erroneous Insertion unless notice la given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one fey after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not .he responsible for more than on* Incorrect Insertion at an advertisement scheduled
tt, n HUM. Ufa to. -rrtM t >" "*

which an undetermined number
of faculty members are boycot boycotting
ting boycotting classes to attend meetings.
The third resolution is to urge
all students to attend and support
the above two functions, though it
would cause them to miss Monday
classes.
We arent urging students to
cut their classes per se, said
Meg Sowell, 7AS, an organizer of
the meeting. We're simply
asking them to participate in the
march and the meeting at the State
Theatre to show support for the
FEA.
Leaflets urging students and
faculty members to stay out of
their classes were distributed
to on-campus and off-campus
living areas Sunday night and
posted on the campus.
Miss Sowell said petitions
identical to those being signed
by faculty members at AAUPs
Action Day meeting will be made
available for students to sign.
The petitions call for Gov.
Claude R. Kirk, Jr. and state
legislators to call a special ses session
sion session of the Legislature to find
a solution to the present school
crisis.
Last nights meeting was co cosponsored
sponsored cosponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha,
political science honorary, and
the newly-organized UF Students
for Quality Education. That com committee
mittee committee was organized Thursday
with Charles Shepherd as chair chairman.
man. chairman.
Graduate students of Dr.
Ernest R. Bartley, political
science professor, are the core
organizers of the meeting and
march. They include Richard
Clarke, Hendrik Browne, and
Miss Sowell, all 7ASs, and Pi
Sigma Alpha president Frank
Zambido.
All fraternities, sororities,
student government, and other
organizations were invited to the
meeting, said Miss Sowell.
Bartley and Dr. Richard
Walkout
one days salary to the Florida
Education Association.
Speaker of the House Ralph
Turlington, Senator J. Emory
Red Cross, and FEA leaders
are expected to speak at the
meeting.
Dr. Kam merer said the meet meeting
ing meeting will end about 5 p.m. so the
Hillel Foundation, a student ac activities
tivities activities center, can open for use
by students.
She said the AAUP is in no
way connected with student dem demonstrations
onstrations demonstrations which are being plan planned
ned planned to be held at the same time.

Sterba, professor of economics,
were to be the main speakers.
After their talks, the meeting
was to be thrown open to the
floor, and Student Body Presi President
dent President Clyde Thylor was to have
spoken to the crowd.
Taylor told the Alligator Sun Sunday
day Sunday he Intended to go to the
meeting mainly to get educated
on the situation.
I am in sympathy with the
professors and students idea of
a meeting, he said. However,
it should be left up to each in individual
dividual individual student to see whether
he can afford the time away from
class.
Greeks Help
MS Fund
Residents of sin city will
have a chance Monday to help
crippled children as well as en enjoy
joy enjoy some pizza.
A local firm, Ginos Pizzas,
has agreed to let members of
Tau Epsilon Phi (TEP) frater fraternity
nity fraternity and Alpha Omicron Pi (AOPi)
sorority roan its two delivery
trucks from 7-10 p. m. to sell
pizzas. Profits will go to the
March of Dimes program.

HI i
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Protestors Charged

JF~ ROM PAGE ONE jj
*m3
Brukner and Fristoe said they
had been singled out of the crowd
at the demonstration because
Rlon and Placement Director
Maurice Mayberry knew them.
Brukner, who taped his talk
with Adams, said Adams told
him that In all fairness to the
ones arrested you two should

j| Roman Sole B
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be Included."
"If we are guilty," Brukner
said, "all the people in the
hall are guilty."
Brukner said they will appar apparently
ently apparently be tried along with theother
students; however, he feels that
his and Fristoes is an entirely
different case because they
weren't arrested. March l a
pre-hearing will be held for
Brukner and Fris toe.



1 wanted to work for a 1
small company. It may g J^K^^KHKKKK J^K^^KHKKKKsound
sound J^K^^KHKKKKsound crazy, but thats 4
why I went with IBM! |^^H^^H|||||^^BaaM||^
When I was in school, I dreaded the thought
ot working lor some huge company where I'd g jl - he just anothei number." says IBMs Jim Haim!
: Inn who has aB S m I:. led i ical Fngmeei mg 9 ... '.
is a S\stems Engineering Manager in Marketing. ) 9 !.^-/,->** .-£' V ? ** S*
At tlie same time, I knew there were definite ad IJK.
\an (ages in working lor a large firm. So as [ intei \ icwed : '*'*||P|g; r >*, i-'v^g^vV*
each company, l checked into the degree of indivlclualit\ W |JpHBHBfe
I could expect there.
"One of the main reasons I picked IBM was their decentral- |-
i/ation. Theyve got over 300 locations throughout thecountrv. B9HHH'" dnk;'
Which to me means a big company with a small-company
atmosphere.
IBMs small team concept I
"Actually, theres plenty of decentralization even within each !VAU'S-J^fev^*-t' -?"%-
location. For instance, in science and engineering, they use a
small team concept 11 means, no matter how large the project,
you work individually or as part of a small teamabout four '^^-r
or five people.
"In marketing, I was pretty much my own boss even
before I became a manager. As a systems engineer, its
up to you to find the solution to a customers problem, 1
and then see its carried out in the optimum wav. You
work w ith the customer every step of the way." gM ./y, y
Theres a lot more to the IBM story than Jim has
mentioned. For more ml ormat ion., \ isit com campus m .- \.
placement olliec or send an outline ot your inter M '* w-p,
ests and educational background to C. 1 Cam M K [
oppoi't un it \ employer, f ] t J J v'rb//.. h Jk ;k- *. $; ." S !V J J i ;m' o^.gfyy
i ' V'., f''-air yMv/w.-rrt'* l -- S.-SJ,- T's t- f i *k?'.' l i*f,4C(^
i

Monday, February 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

CAMPUS
EVENTS
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN BEGGING TO DIFFER WITH
GOVERNOR KIRK: Dick Morgan,
assistant secretary of the Florida
Education Association, walks into
the Norman Hall auditorium to tonight
night tonight for a question and answer
session on the current school
crisis (or non-crisis, depending
on your political affiliations).
The meeting begins at 7:30
and is sponsored by the Student
FEA. The public is invited.
IN WHERE HAVE WE HEARD
THAT BEFORE?": Profession Professionalism
alism Professionalism versus Unionism (in the
field of Engineering, that is)
will be the subject of a debate
tonight in room 211 of the Mech Mechanical
anical Mechanical Engineering Building at
7:30.
IN MAN, DO I GET GOOD
VIBES FROM THAT GROOVY
TAJ MAHAL, MAHARAJA
BABY": Social Change in Mod Modern
ern Modern India" will be the topic of
discussion at todays meeting of
the India Club in room 123 of the
Reitz Union at 3:30 p.m.
IN NOT SO INSTANT RE REPLAYS:
PLAYS: REPLAYS: The Florida Cinema So Societys
cietys Societys screening of The Ex Experimental
perimental Experimental Film" will be re repeated
peated repeated in the Union Auditorium
tonight at 7 and 9:15.
IN THE A 2 I 3 ME 2 : Thats what
youd have if you combined the
American Institute of Metallur Metallurgical
gical Metallurgical Engineers (AIME) and the
American Institute of Industrial
Engineers (AHE). But since they
arent combined, they will be
meeting separately in the union
tonight: the AIME in room 355
at 7:30; the AHE in room 346
at the same time.
IN SPEAKING OF ENGINEERS:
There will be an Engineers Fair
social tonight at 8 oclock in
rooms 121, 122 and 123 of the
union.
IN PROVING KNIGHTHOOD
(OF SORTS) IS STILL IN
FLOWER: University Circle has
a luncheon today (at a round
table, no doubt) in the union,
followed by a meeting tonight at
7:30 in room 150 B of the union.

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TUMBLEWEEDS

Bf^
BEEN ROBBEPi.' \

Taylor Names 7 Students
To Positions In Cabinet

Seven Cabinet positions in Stu Student
dent Student Government, including the
important positions of secretary
of finance and the secretaries
of mens and womens affairs,
were appointed by Student body
President Clyde Taylor Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
Robert Griffin was appointed
as secretary of finance, Roger
Brown will take over the posi position
tion position of secretary of mens affairs,
and Jeanne Long was named as
the new secretary of womens
affairs.
Also appointed were Mike Da Davidson,
vidson, Davidson, as secretary of student
activities; Nancy Pierson, secre secretary
tary secretary of university relations; Rob Robert
ert Robert Buck, secretary of organiza organizations
tions organizations and Bob Mandell, secretary
of Student Health and insurance.
All appointments are subject

I l l -s-amj-ji. J
Hear
Alligator
Summary \
Daily at 3:55 on WDVH, 980 KC

to the approval of the Student
Senate (formerly the Legislative
Council) before they may form formally
ally formally take over their offices.
Taylor said that there is a
possibility that the remainder of
the main SG positions will come
next week, because we are most
interested in getting underway
with the many projects we en envision.
vision. envision.
Some positions will take
longer until the best qualified
person is found for the job.
This does not mean there will
be any work stoppage or lag.*
TICKETS for WILDE
evening with SHAW
on Sale TODAY
at Little HalL

| Gun Fired At Officer I
A bullet struck within a few feet of a campus policeman Satur Saturday
day Saturday morning as he was making his rounds near the football stadium.
Officer D. G. Guthrie of the University Police said he was walk walking,
ing, walking, with his flashlight on, near the gate at the southeast corner
of the stadium at 12:45 a.m. A bullet fired from the north end
of the stadium struck a seat near him in the south end of the stands.
Campus police had the stadium lights turned on and searched
the area with the aid of Gainesville city police with police dogs.
No one was found.
Police said the bullet was apparently fired from a .22-caliber
pistol.
The last reported incident of a campus policeman being shot at
was about six years ago, when bullets were fired through a window
of the campus police station from a passing car.
europe"
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By TOM RYAN



Censure Os Vietnam War
Highlights Model U.N.

Resolutions censuring the Uni United
ted United States for its position in
Viet Nam and Red China for
invading Hong Kong highlight highlighted
ed highlighted a three-day Deep South Model
United Nations session held here
Feb. 22-24.
Over 150 representatives from
the UF and 15 other colleges
in six states gathered at the

(Photo by Gus Mustelier)
Secretary General Lynn Bachmann

HEW Funds
To Finance
Music Bldg.
The UF Wednesday was
awarded $458,976 by the U.S.
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare to support construct construction
ion construction of a $1,639,200 music build building.
ing. building.
The major portion of the con construction
struction construction cost 51,119,724
will come from the sale of state
bonds to be financed by revenue
from utilities taxes.
iT
The music building is one of
two high priority projects sched scheduled
uled scheduled for construction this year.
The other is the international and
graduate studies building. Pro Progress
gress Progress on both are awaiting funds
from the sale of bonds.
Long overdue, the music build building
ing building would replace a temporary
wooden structure originally con constructed
structed constructed as a basketball gym gymnasium
nasium gymnasium and now located east of
Florida Field.

Does Your Car Need Gas Today?
Then Get A FREE CAR WASH
Then why not fill up with Texaco at the
_____ H & Y Car Wash. : V:
When you get gas at H & Y Car Wash you
g* t:
1. tokens good toward a free car wash
2 a discount on a car wash valued on the
*
amount of tokens you accumulate
3 a FULL SERVICE car wash
Tuesday Is Students Day
17 gallons of gas or the equivalent in
tokens gets you a free car wash.
H&Y Car Wash Comer of 3rd St. & 13th Ave. N.W.

Reitz Union for the first annual
meeting of the Deep South Model
UN, a student organization pat patterned
terned patterned after the United Nations.
Designed to make students
aware of the structural organ organization
ization organization and some of the problems
faced by the UN, the Model or organization
ganization organization debated current world
affairs as well as a hypothetical

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/ Jfl TWO GAINESVILLE LOCATIONS
/ MnlffHW 2310 S.W. 13th STREET I
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Red Chinese invasion to Hong
Kong.
The delegations researched the
voting patterns of the nations
they represented and voted along
the lines followed by these coun countries
tries countries in the UN.
The Model UN meetings were
jointly sponsored by the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council and the UF
chapter of the United Nations
Council for International Rela Relations.
tions. Relations.
UF students coordinating the
event were* Don Slesnick, who
acted as President of the Gen General
eral General Assembly, Lynn Bachmann,
Secretary General, and Assistant
Secretary General Joyce Miller.
UF organizations representing
various countries were the Latin
American Club, Indian Club, Pi
Kappa Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta
Tau Delta, Zeta Tau Alpha, Kappa
Delta, Phi Kappa Tau, Kappa Sig Sigma,
ma, Sigma, and Pi Kappa Phi. Numer Numerous
ous Numerous UF law students also par participated
ticipated participated on various delegations.
Riviera Beach High School re representing
presenting representing Syria and the United
Arab Republic, was the only high
school participating in the ses session.
sion. session.

Monday, February 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

w 9 |
I A/per Wins Hearst Prize I
Alligator Managing Editor Harvey M. Alper has won second place
in the national William Randolph Hearst Foundation journalism
awards program.
Alper, 4JM, will be awarded SSOO for a series of in-depth articles
on the Marshall Jones tenure denial controversy published in the
Alligator during the Fall term.
Alper* s placing in the January contest gives the UF a third place
stand in the nation. Two more months of contests are open.
The UF won first place three years ago, third last year, and has
consistently finished higher than any other journalism school in the
nation.
UF '$ REPRESENTATIVES I
f Mel ward Jim Bartlett
s*Dan Sapp David Wilson
I Tom Stewart Bill Worsham
George Corl A rile Watkinson
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave. f
1 .NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 1
I DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS J
Formal V\fear
RENTAL SERVICE
SINGLE AND GROUP ARRANGEMENTS
$10.50 Complete
L (ftp Vnittrrjgttij &l?op A
S|Vl 1620 w UNIVERSITY AVE. [f(j&
Ido>
two yearsexperience.
I have one year twice

Some people get experience
in a job.
Other people get older.
Theres a big difference. And
it all depends on where you
work, and with whom you
work. You can start some
place that has all the proper
systems engineering creden creden>
> creden> tials significant contracts,
modern physical plant, and
the usual fringe benefits -
and find yourself a couple of
years later, just a couple of
years behind.
Or, you can come to a place
like MITRE and get experi experience.
ence. experience. And grow. We have the
credentials, of course. (We
happen to think theyre the
best.) But we have something
more. An attitude. We want
you to get the best systems
experience in the business.
We want to share what we
know with you, want you to
absorb it as fast as you can.
The quicker you grasp things,
the quicker things get done.

INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED
ON CAMPUS, FEB. 27, 1968'.
SIGN UP NOW AT THE PLACEMENT OFFICE.
Or write for more information: Mr. L.J. Glinos, College
Relations Coordinator, The MITRE Corporation, Box 208
CCO, Bedford, Massachusetts. CP-9.
|D MITRE
An Equal Opportunity Employer (Male A Female)
Formed in 1958 . pioneer in the design and development of command and
control systems . MITRE serves as technical advisor and systems engineer
lor the Electronic Systems Division of the Air Force Systems Command and
provides technical assistance to the Federal Aviation Administration, the De Department
partment Department of Defense, the Department of Transportation and the National Aero Aeronautics
nautics Aeronautics and Space Administration.

The more experience you get,
the faster you grow.
And thats to our mutual
benefit.
Heres the kind of experience
you get
MITRE is pioneering in the
design and engineering of
complex information, sensor,
command, control and com communications
munications communications systems for the
United States Government.
Our assignments include
prominent military electronic
systems, as well as civilian
systems for future national
air traffic control and high
speed ground transportation.
Wed like you to know more
about MITRE
About what we do, how we
think, and what it might be
like to work with us. If youd
like to know more about us,
and have a degree (preferably
advanced) in electronics,
mathematics or physics, wed
like to talk with you.

Page 5



Page 6

>, Hie Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

__. The
Florida Alligator
Sap To Let The People Know
' Steve Bull
m **
J(U Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
Ammie

Close The Schools

(Reprint From Gainesville Sun)
When tiny Cindy skipped home from Little Littlewood
wood Littlewood Elementary School the other day, her
mother asked about Cindys new substitute
teacher.
Hes nice, said Cindy, who then giggled,
He used *damr_* twice and hell once.
No big thing. The substitute no doubt is
untrained in handling tots and is harried in his
unfamiliar task. He was thrown into the breech
when 480 of Alachua Countys schoolteachers
resigned.
But is it education?
This whole thing came about Monday when
over half of the states schoolteachers walked
out. They were in a huff and we think ap
propriately -- because the legislature and Gov.
Claude Kirk had shortchanged Florida edu education.
cation. education.
The issue must be resolved on the state
level.
In the meanwhile, the Alachua County School
Board has engaged in a desperate effort to
keep some of the schools open. To fill the
gaps, it has beckoned to all comers. They
are qualified with no certification and no
teachers certificate provided they once at attended
tended attended college, n
The school board has two reasons for keep keeping
ing keeping some classes open. One reason is to keep
the faith with the 400 or so schoolteachers
who remained on the job and this is laud laudable.
able. laudable. The other is to break the back of the
Florida Education Associations 480 non-work non-working
ing non-working teachers and this is not laudable.
And it is costly.
Floridas school children are entitled to 180
days of instruction each year. Each day schools
remain open, another day ticks off. Yet, only
about 8,000 of Alachua Countys 22,350 pupils
are in class. Even in the classes which re remained
mained remained staffed by regular teachers absen absenteeism
teeism absenteeism ran as high as 30 per cent.
The remaining 14,000 students are losing
out because the lost time must be made up
before June 30. After that it cant be tacked
on.
Its time for the school board to reassess.
Some questions:
(1) Are our 8,000 children attending school
being exposed to normal, healthy adults in a
meaningful educational sense? Are they learn learning
ing learning anything, and is it good?
(2) Are the 14,000 students left out in the
cold being fairly treated, since the remaining
180 days are dribbling away while they are out
on the streets? Are they being robbed of school schooling
ing schooling which might be possible at a later date?
(3) Is there merit in splitting the community
in twain, pitting the non-working teacher
against the working teacher, engendering
hatred and distrust?
Florida has problems, brought on by a gover governor
nor governor with the idealogy of a wagon wheel
and a legislature with the imagination of a
turtle. But the problems will be resolved be because
cause because the parents of Florida will not have it
otherwise.
Until then, Alachua County must preserve
its sweat and goodwill and dollars. To expand
them in the current chaos is to puff mightly
into a hurricane. And a cooling off period
will do good to all parties concerned.
To the school board: Reef the sails and
heave to until the storm is over.
Close the schools.

AAUP SPONSORED v I
FACULTY
ACTION DAY
TODAY STARTING 10 A.M.
HILLS. FOUNDATION 16 NW 18th ST. I
PROGRAM
MORNING SESSION 10 AM. To Noon I
A DIALOGUE ON THE SCHOOL CRISIS 1 I
Presiding: 10 11 a.m. Prof. Manning J. Dauer |
11-12 noon Prof. Allen M. Sievers
RALPH TURLINGTON House Speaker 1
RED*' CROSS State Senator
BILL ANDREWS State Representative I
JACK MATHEWS Senate President Elect |
R. L. JOHNS Professor of Educational Administration, I
Author of the MFP I
DELTON L. SC UDDER Chairman, Dept, of Religion I
RICHARD MORGAN FEA j
HOWARD BISHOP Gainesville Businessman and Former j.
School Superintendent
LUNCH BREAK 1200 To 1:30 pm. I
AFTERNOON SESSION Staitin 9 1:30 P.M. I
IMPACT ON FLORIDA < I
Presiding: 1:30 2:15 Prof. Ernest M. Jones
2:15 3:00 Prof. David M. Chalmers
3:00 Prof. Frederick O. Goddard j
ON THE RECRUITMENT OF FACULTY ARTHUR W. COMBS, f
Chairman, Educ. Foundations 1
ON THE RECRUITMENT OF TEACHERS HARVEY ZORBAUGH,
National Educ. Assoc.
ON SCHOOL ACCREDITATION LEE EGGERT,
Professor of Education I
THE SOCIAL IMPACT OF THE CRISIS HAL G. LEWIS, 1
Professor of Education I
ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE CRISIS WALTER HILL, Assistant Prof. j
Department of Management j
RESOLUTION SESSION I
4 B
Presiding: Prof. Gladys Kammerer AAUP President, U of F I
Resolutions based on Day's Events J
Petitions Desk Open All Day I
* l 9
Contributions to FEA (for local teachers),-' I
Accepted All Day I
(Paid Advertisement) 1

Mautz Lauds Alligator
On Special Edition

MR. EDITOR:
I want to thank you and those who labored
with you in preparing the special legis legislative
lative legislative issue of the Alligator. I thought the
contents were such that those who read
it would have to be impressed with the
need of higher education for additional
funds.
Although the contents were not a new
source of information to me, the fact that

the issue was conceived and printed was
a source of enormous satisfaction. The issue
stands as an enormous tribute to die per perception,
ception, perception, wisdom, maturity, and selfless
concern of those who guide the destiny
of our student newspaper. I am proud to
be part of a university which can boast
of such students.
ROBERT B. MAUTZ
VICE-PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC
AFFAIRS



By WAYNE SffIRBROUN
Dept, of Philosophy
In discussions concerning
issues at the UF which are un unpopular
popular unpopular with the people of
Florida, one is likely to find the
word democracy' and the phrase
American way of life* used in
such a manner as to be almost
exclusively identified with gov government
ernment government by majority rule.' This
use overlooks an aspect of demo democratic
cratic democratic government that is just as*
important as majority rule the
protection of minority rights by a
constitution.
By de-emphasizing this pro provision
vision provision of a democracy, we tend
to lose awareness of an impor important
tant important fact which such a provision
takes into account: namely, truth
is not determined simply by a
majority vote. In turn, we also
lose sight of the fact that al although
though although decisions are made by ma majorities,
jorities, majorities, we are still supposed to
have the right to question these
decisions and to carry on sig significant
nificant significant dialogue about alterna alternatives.
tives. alternatives.
What role should the university
play in such a democratic
society? The university is that
institution which formalizes,"
which takes upon itself, the role

SOCIALLY, ACADEMICALLY INADEQUATE
A 'Starved University

MR. EDITOR:
Are you aware of the number
of students that will not be re returning
turning returning to this University next
quarter or next year, not be because
cause because of a deficiency in grades,
but as a direct result of the
academic and social environment
on this campus?

'Dropout U
MR. EDITOR:
I am getting very bitter over this quarter system. I am see seeing
ing seeing too many other students and friends dropping out of school,
losing money and time and their senses of direction; I am see seeing
ing seeing too many people being broken from the inside outwards by
the unreasonable and inhuman pressure being thrown on us.
I would like to tell the legislators who decided (for us) that
this systenf'would be better than the trimester (for them) to
come to hell, where we all are.
I would like to throw back at them the fact that about 95%
of the human beings here are incapable of actually learning
anything under this timeless system. Or, should I rather ask:
does a university still intend to teach one anything? That is,
anything except quick memorization whose content leaves the
mind as the pencil pours it on to the professor's test?
It is a sad and biting, bitter feeling to hear your friends dazedly
wondering why they can't make it here, not understanding that
this year it is much less often their fault; to see racks for sign signout
out signout cards becoming more and more empty; to walk by a friend's
window day after day and see the blind down and know the door
to be locked on the other sidefor the rest of the quarter.
When I was a freshman I thought: A trimestermy gosh,
I can never do it!" But I did it for two years and a half, learning
something, and grade point going up. This year, after two and
a half years, I can no longer learn, I have taken my courses
just to say that I had them, my grade point has gone down. The
human mind is capable of a great deal, as my freshman mind
soon found outbut not this much.
I wish that our legislators and whoever else is responsible
for the change to quarters could know the pain and disappoint disappointment
ment disappointment of dropping or flunking out, the sad sense of loss at seeing
your friends go, and the tears.
OUIDA G. CROZIER
3AS
/s He Serious?
\
MR. EDITOR:
Jason Straights entertaining article bordered on the absurd, in
my opinion, when he stated: "Stokley Carmichael and H. Brown
have one saving gracethey make the young negro proud to be
black and that is a necessity."
Is he SERIOUS?
PAT MAXWELL
2UC
I*l*''*' v.

UF Facing Disaster, Not Fame

of the minority. That is, it is a
social critic; it is the devil's
advocate."
Lip Service
This conception is not very
strange when examined. Most
people are willing to give at
least lip-service to the idea that
a university is to search for
truth wherever it is to be found
and to search for the good life."
What is this to mean if not that
the university is to examine any
and ali beliefs to see if they are
. true and to examine our values
to see if they might be improved?
But if we accept this concept of
the university, it is inevitabl that
the university will at times come
into conflict with the society of
which it is a part.

OPEN FORUM:
JK&tiui (mi ViA&wt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

Academically, the environment
consists of classes and home homework;
work; homework; any individual incentive for
understanding of concepts, as op opposed
posed opposed to memorization, is stifled
by the overwhel ming course con content
tent content and the pressure to com complete
plete complete this course load.
Socially, it has become im immoral
moral immoral to expect a relationship

SPEAKING OUT

Public Image
It is clear, though regrettable,
that non-university institutions
do not perform this function. They
are concerned with their public
images. After all, they are trying
to sell a product, or to convey
a particular belief, to as many
people as possible. So, the uni university
versity university has to be the place where
criticism can flourish. It has to
be the sanctuary" where un unpopular
popular unpopular beliefs can be considered
and popular beliefs re-examined.
And that's the rub. For if what
I have said is true, we at the
University of Florida are asking
Floridians to support us so that
we may criticize them. We must
consider, however strange the
request may seem on the face of
it to be, that the way. in which

any more than drinking, dancing,
and Splaying games." Although
these pastimes aren't in them themselves
selves themselves bad, taken as a steady
diet one tends to become starved
for something with meaning.
Also, if you do happen to
stumble across something cul culturally
turally culturally stimulating (ie: Edward
Albee) you are hard pressed to
find time to attend.
Therefore, many of us find It
necessary to seek an institution
where the school wont interfere
with our education.
Suggestion: why not take a poll
on the amount of dissatisfaction
resulting from the above?
Kristen B. Leet, 2UC; Marlene
Schneider, lUC; Mary McCann,
lUC; Regina Rainey, 3 AS;
Gayle Donnelly, lUC; E.
Schutt, 2UC; Janelle Heck,
2UC; Barbara Wilson, 2UC;
Bonnie Llngenfelter, lUC;
Linda Aust, lUC; Barbara Lip Lipsky,
sky, Lipsky, 2UC; Eileen McMahon,
lUC; Pamela Edwards, 3JM.
-i -
Contribute
MR. EDITOR:
Being a student wife (as well
as a student myself) I am vi vividly
vidly vividly aware of financial hardships
faced by married students. This
hardship was drastically in increased
creased increased in many families when
student wives left their jobs in
support of better schools. They
placed better schools for the
children of Florida before their
personal welfare.
If the faculty and students of
Florida want to show their sup support
port support of the mass resignation,
do so by aiding local partici participants.
pants. participants. Either earmark your con contribution
tribution contribution to the FEA for families
of U of F students or let's
establish a local fund from which
these student wives who resigned
may draw.
SUSAN HARRIS
7ED

Monday, February 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

that request is answered deter determines
mines determines the extent to which that
society is democratic.
For what we are really re requesting
questing requesting is that they recognize
that a society which is not wil willing
ling willing to re-examine its beliefs
and values is one which is not
willing to recognize minority
rights and which is not, there therefore,
fore, therefore, democratic.
It is true that the health of a
democracy is directly propor proportional
tional proportional to the degree to which its
universities are granted freedom
of inquiry for the degree to
which a university is required to
reflect public opinion is also the
extent to which the recognition
of minority rights is diminished.

NEW EDITOR?
MR. EDITOR:
I do hereby salute the Alligator
for presenting a review which
showed evidence of creative abil ability,
ity, ability, journalistic style, and a
degree of accuracy.
I am of course, referring to the
excellent review by GRA GRADUATE"
DUATE" GRADUATE" review contestant, Scott
DeGarmo.
The Alligator is supposed to be
a STUDENT newspaper. This
contest. has proven a vital point,
and that is that the student is
more capable of telling it like
it is" than the members of the
superficial staff of jouranlistlc
rejects which waste good desks
in the Student Publications com complex.
plex. complex.
STAN TAYLOR

SHE DEFENDS
LEARY POSITION

MR. EDITOR:
You are pushing your sarcasm
a hit too far, and not giving the
students an accurate picture of
the situation.
I take the stand that the mem members
bers members of the Forums committee
are not chickens/ as your car cartoon
toon cartoon Indicated (February 16), nor
are we inconsistent. During a
telephone conversation between
myself and Mr. Hull, I tried to
explain what I observed to occur
at an Executive Meeting of the
Florida Union Board, which I
attended in the place of the
Forums chairman who had a class
at the time.
Looking at the whole picture,
the Forums committee has not
demonstrated cowardly action in
sponsoring such persons as
Robert Sheldon, Andy Warhol, and
a local discussion on marijuana.
We were informed of Dr. Timo Timothy
thy Timothy Learys availability at the
end of last quarter. Unfortun Unfortunately,
ately, Unfortunately, little was done by the per person
son person whose responsibility it was
to seek the required approval.
Incidently, the decision of who
will speak is not in the power
of the Forums committee. We
invite the people and make their
arrangements.

Nitty Gritty
Now, let us get down to the
nitty-gritty/* The adminis administrators
trators administrators of the U. of F., with
few visible exceptions, and the
Board of Regents, with no visible
exceptions, have little under understanding
standing understanding of the role of a Univer University
sity University in a democratic society. (It
is unfair, in away to single
these people out for criticism
as they are only reflecting pub public
lic public opinion. But if anyone should
know the function of a univer university,
sity, university, they should so Ill con continue.)
tinue.) continue.)
First, they make policies on
the basis of how those policies
will affect the image the Univer University
sity University will have in the eyes of the
majority. Witness recent at attempts
tempts attempts to discourage the dis discussion
cussion discussion on drugs. Second, they
actively discourage allowing
speakers on campus who do not
hold a popular view. Adam Clay Clayton
ton Clayton Powell and Timothy Leary
are cases in point. Third, they
deny tenure to a teacher who
espouses views contrary to those
held by the majority.
Not University
The case of Marshall Jones is
the most recent example but we
have had other recent examples:
Farhang zabeeh of the Depart Department
ment Department of Philosophy and Ed Richer
of the Department of Humanities.
Fourth, they hold the threat of
academic penalties over the
heads of students who hold un unpopular
popular unpopular views. Students opposed
to allowing Dow Chemical Cor Corporation
poration Corporation on campus are the most
recent cases. The list could be
extended but enough cases have
been cited to make my point
clear.
The U. of F. is not perform performing
ing performing the role of a university in a
democratic society. It is not on
the brink of greatness but, in
light of recent trends, it is on the
precipice of disaster and that
says something as well for the
society of which it is a part.

Several weeks ago I was asked
to attend a Union Board meeting
as the Forums chairman was
busy. At that time, I was told
to suggest Dr. Learys name as
a potential speaker. I was then
instructed that it was supposed
to be presented to the Executive
Board first.
By that time, Mr. Ferguson
had announced his ** crack-down
on drug use.
Mr. Koren then called Presi President
dent President OConnell for his opinion,
and permitted us to listen to the
converstion. President OConnell
was most receptive to our plans.
However, the timing was very
poor. He was not afraid of Mr.
Ferguson, but there is a certain
diplomacy and respect Involved in
the operations of a large univer university.
sity. university.
The Forms committee is not
afraid, moreover our purpose
is not to incite problems, but
rather to bring to the students
forums of interest and, hopefully,
benefit to those who attend. It
is our endeavor to bring people
from a variety of areas. We are
always open to suggestion and try
our best to serve our students
and the University of Florida.
LINDA TARLER
MEMBER OF FORUMS COMM.
j 1 5 % a \ j i % 't

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1963 VESPA 125 cc. Excellent
mechanical condition, leaving lor
Spain. Must sell. Helmet included
$135. 378-6963. (A-90-3t-p)
t'
HONDA Scrambler 90 cc, 1967,
only 9 months old. $300.00. Costs
$450.00 new. Call Don or Larry
376-3453. See to believe. (A (A---90-2t-p)
--90-2t-p) (A---90-2t-p)
HOUSE TRAILER, 10 x 51. 2
bedroom on nice shady lot in
Micanopy. Water furnished. Call
466-3173. $70.00 month. (A-90-
3t-p)
*64 SUZUKI 50. Good condition,
SIIO.OO. Buco helmet with shield
included. Call Dave 378-3231 or
if no answer call 378-3609. (A (A-903tp)
903tp) (A-903tp)
GERMAN SHEPHERD'S puppies.
8 weeks old. AKC registered.
Excellent pedigree. Call 378-
4600. (A-89-st-p)
MOBILE HOME for sale 10'
x 56', carpeting and kitchen ap appliances
pliances appliances otherwise unfurnished.
Central Air Conditioning and
beating. Excellent condition. Call
8-2747. (A-88- st-p)
VERY GOOD INVESTMENT
Detroiter Mobile Home, 8 x 35
Cabana 8' x 20', Utility room,
8' x 12' and set up for washer
and dryer. Completely furnished.
Television and air conditioner.
$1,500. Call Tom at 378-3339
after 7:00. (A-88-st-p)
MOBILE HOME 10 x 50' Lib Liberty,
erty, Liberty, Air Conditioning, Central
Heating, Television, Completely
Furnished. Your Best Trailer
Buy for $2,588. 372-3767 after
5 p.m. (A-83-10t-p)
TOR SALE: 1966 Black Yamaha
Twin 100. Book rack, good con condition,
dition, condition, $225. 372-3090 or 4318
NW 12th Terrace. (A-89-st-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 305 Scrambler
and helmet with bubble shield.
Call 376-6920. Ask for Dean
after 7. (A-89-3t-p)
BASENJI PUPPIES. Female for.
pets. Wormed and all shots, AKC,
no bark or odor, short haired,
small appetites. Price secon secondary,
dary, secondary, good home primary. Phone:
376-4103. (A-85-10t-p)
FOR SALE: Heinkle 173 cc Ger German
man German Motor scooter. Passenger
seat, spare tire, luggage rack.
SIOO. Call Winn 372-4907 be between
tween between 5-7 p.m. (A-91-st-p)
FOR SALE: KLH Model fifteen
stereo unit (cost new $235) and
Koss Pro-4 headphones (cost new
SSO) Moving must sell both
at $120.00 very good condition
- payment and delivery immed immediately
iately immediately after spring vacation. Call
372-9435 and ask for Frank
Whitehurst. (A-91-st-p)
* *
'65 ALLSTATE SCOOTER. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Am leaving
school must sell. slsl. Also
Buco helmet. Call Karen, 378-
7491. (A-91-It-p)
1966 HONDA S-90, scramhW
bars, luggage rack, mirror, he.-
met and shield. 6,500 miles. $275
or best offer. 372-9405, ask for
Ric Dorrie. (A-91-3t-p)
February 28th ONE DAY ONLY.
SALE: Power mower, ladles wet
suit 10/12, weighted belts, hair
dryer, games, some furnishings,
5£ to SI.OO miscellaneous books/
records/household goods. 208
NW 21st Terrace. (A-91-3t-p)

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Honda 50. Great
mechanical condition. Please call
372-7275. #47 French Quarter.
Ask for Mike, anytime. (A-91-
3t-p)
FOR RENT
MALE room mate for next quarter
- furnished apt. with private
bedroom, living room bath, and
kitchen, AC. SSO per month. Call
372-8230. (B-89-3t-p)
FOR RENT: 1533-1535 NW sth
Avenue. One bedroom furnished
apartment, air conditioned.
5 blocks from University. $95.00
per month. Call 376-8475 or 376-
1065. (B-88-st-p)
WANTED V |
RIDERS WANTED. Chartered bus
to U. Georgia game. Leave March
1, return March 3. For infor information
mation information call 376-9103 or 376-
9348. (C-89-st-p)
FEMALE roommate wanted for
3rd quarter: 2 bedroom duplex
2 blocks behind Norman Hall.
Central heat and air condition conditioning.
ing. conditioning. $32.50 a month plus util utilities.
ities. utilities. Call 378-7227. (C-89-st-p)
FEMALE roommate needed for
immediate occupancy. Olympia
Apt. 2 blocks from campus. Se Security
curity Security deposit and last months
rent already paid. Call 376-0066.
(C-87-st-p)
ROOMMATE wanted for next
Quarter. University Gardens, 716
SW 16 Ave., Apt 107. $41.25
per month, and one fourth of
utilities. (C-88-12t-p)
MALE roommate for spring and
summer quarters with 3graduate
engineering students in French
Quarter (#113) pays
all. call 378-5349. (C-89-3t-p)
MUST SUBLEASE: University
Gardens Apt. 1 bedroom or find
one female roommate for spring
and summer quarters. Call 378-
5841. (C-88-st-p)
FEMALE roomn ate wanted for
Landmark Apt. for third quarter.
Call 378-3851. (C-90-3t-p)
WANTED: Male Roommate, Vil Village
lage Village 34, Apt. 42 Telephone 378-
8704. (C-88-st-p)
WANTED!! Attractive coed scuba
diver for diving buddy. Must have
diving gear. Possible trip to
Silver Springs; weekend of March
1. Call 376-9361, Room 311.
(C-88-st-p)
CLEAN, cozy apt. $105.00 per
month. Start of Spring Quarter.
Away from hum-drum. Call
George or Bob at 376-3261 Ext.
2832 before 6 p.m. and 378-
6519 after 6. (C-91-ts-p)
WANTED: Female roommate.
S3O per mo. 2 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Phone 378-7140. (C-91-3t-p)
MALE roommate for 3rd and/or
4th quarter for Village Park Apt.
#llO, upper overlooking pool.
$40.75 per month. Call 378-8221
between 5 and 7. (C-91-3t-p)
HELP WANTED |
HELP WANTED: part-time or full
time jewelery repairman. Con Contact
tact Contact Robertson's Jewelers, 8 So.
Main Street. Gainesville, Fla. (E (E---89-st-cl
--89-st-cl (E---89-st-cl

Page 8

l, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

t
HELP WANTED |
WAITRESSES! Must be 21, Part
time and full time shift avail available,
able, available, evening only. Apply Gino's
Italian Restaurant Experience
helpful but not necessary. 376-
1322, 2204 SW 13th St. (E-88-
tf;Cl
FULL TIME TYPIST position
now open with Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications. Student Publications is
willing to train (on the job) a
person with typing skill to learn
sophisticated typesetting equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Applicant must be able tu
type 50 WPM with 80 percent
accuracy. This is a clerk-typjst
II position. Report to University
Central Employment, 2nd floor
of the Hub for details. (E-91-
tf-nc)
WANTED Immediately. Beauty
Operators for new salon one
master operator pleasant work working
ing working conditions. Old location of
Blanchs Beauty Salon. 311 NW
Univ. Ave. Phone 376-6021. (E (E---91-st-c)
--91-st-c) (E---91-st-c)
MEN, need money? Earn over
SI,OOO this summer. NATURE OF
JOB: Own and operate car-wax car-waxing
ing car-waxing business in your own city,
be your own boss, set your own
hours. Be assured of SI,OOO in
3 months. REQUIREMENTS: Live
in city of 25,000 or more, be
capable of moderate physical
labor. National director of Dura-
Lustre Enterprises will conduct
interviews at Placement Office,
G-22, Reitz, on Thursday, Feb.
29. Sign up for interview now.
(E-90-3t-p)
CluLUul
3.43
QEQUIIH 6:17
L I 8:51
JULIE
CHRISTIE
HgV TERENCE
9MI FINCH
BATES
JG&ullfiaSiS&lQr
I *ewf cMr Twto
jj \ LJni ends
THURS.
See it from the beginning
1:353:325:297:269:23
WAIT UHTII. PARK

AUTOS
WANT something that purrs? Try
this 1959 Impala V-8, radio,
heater, Air Dont work, so no
harsh noises. Tires aren't bad.
Take a chance! Call Stick" at
378-6749. (G-90-st-p)
MUST SELL: 1962 Buick Skylark
Convertible, V-8, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, radio, heater, stereo
tape. Power steering and brakes.
Good condition throughout, no
reasonable offer refused. John,
318-1921. (G-89-st-p)
LEAVING for boot camp next
week. Must sell XK-E Jaguar
roadster, blue, new michelin
tires, needs hood work, $1,625.
Archer Rd. Village Trailer Park,
Alpha 8. (G-84-3t-p)_
MUST SACRIFICE: 1966 VW Se Sedan.
dan. Sedan. Excellent condition, factory
air, heater, radio. Red with white
interior. Many other extras. Call
Univ. Ext. 2951 or 376-1258 be between
tween between 8:30-5:00. (G-88-st-c)
PORSCHE '57. Black. 1600 S. Re Rebuilt
built Rebuilt transmission. New Alumi Aluminum
num Aluminum Magnesium Pistons. New
Pirelli Tires. Body refinished.
Phone 378-1121 after 5 and week weekends
ends weekends on Univ. Ext. 2877. (G (G---88-st-p)
--88-st-p) (G---88-st-p)
'62 VW, hadio, heater, sun-roof,
$600.00. Call 376-0103. (G-90-
st-p)

i^j^g|sa|j||gjy
1
I Showtime 7:07 PLUS
1 7pm & at 9:03
lAdm- *I.OO TECHNICOLOR 1 11:05 "TfX
VlhE GAMEIS OVER. At 3S|
I ilHlie PETER P, ** I
IfiMM WcEIIBHV 1
K aranfMY AWflD_fMi
ations Toligl
raswaai
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN r
o: :< hCH
THE GRADUATE..
TECHNICOLOR' PANAVISION' CD
IN HOFFMAN KATHARINE ROSS
15-3:20-5:25-7:30-9:30 .
M at
jM Wl
* SaK
JliSNwr m b^.
JHr |
,', *- 1 A^.,r *^' ?\fr, £'* > i' T ,^*" t '" " f
\ -< '' ;
dipr Ve
Youve turned me down for everything
from Homecoming to Frolics! Please come
to A WILDE evening with SHA W. Tomorrow
night at 8:15 in the Univ. And. It only
cost $1 for students like us, $1.50 for faculty
& staff, $2.50 for gen. public. And by the
way, its put on by the J. Wayne Reitz
Union Board.

Use our handy
mall In order
form.

AUTOS
1963 VW convertible, Sunflower
yellow, new top, tires, battery,
carpeting, etc. *65 engine and
transmission. $795. Call 378-
6917. See at 1508 NW Ist Lane,
Apt. 3. (G-89-st-p)
1959 MG, New Top, Tonneau,
Motor in excellent condition,
$400.00. Call 378-6263 after 5:00
p.m. 376-3261, Ext. 2455 before
5:00. (G-88-st-p)
|f3Bi3§T|sTsWlLat*
ll VJ PIV jMI i] ral Show
mmmMAMHI Every
P Night
In.W. 13rti ST 372^523|g,
I Open at 6:30 I
I Feature at
L 7:07 & 10:50 |
I $ Doris Da? I
I TheB 4ila o I
Ir.y '# F JoS IE' I
y WW*'' TECHNICOLORS [
Cofeature at 900 J
GEORGE DEANI
[peppard Martin]
I Rough night I
1 IN JERICHO I
iSffi TECHNICOLOR' A Picture jp|



CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, February 26, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

fSERVICES
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. (M-78-ts-c)
SPANISH Tutoring, 378-4600.
(M-85-st-p)
PORTRAIT Special -for all
occasions wallet, passport,
identification pictures. SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 378-
1170, 1013 1/2 W. Univ. Ave.
(M-91-3t-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS .. $4-
up. SPECIAL reates for Univ.
students, faculty and employees.
At Rebel Discount, 1227 W. Univ.
Ave. 376-7430, 378-6127, across
from Wolfies. (M-91-10t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up anddeliveryon and
near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489. (M (M---59
--59 (M---59 18tp)

PERSONAL
TED: Happy Anniversary! Thanks
for the most wonderful 2 years
of my life! Love forever, Pat.
(J-91-lt-p)
ANYONE finding a set of keys
please call University Ext. 3218
or return to McCarty Hall Rm.
217. (L-91-lt-p)
HAPPY 20th Freddy, I Love You
- Poochie, So does Burr Head.
(J-91-lt-p)

*DO-lt-Yourself
WCLASSIFIEDS ***jb|
wP* DAYS TO RUN
To order classifieds, use the
IZ form below. Mail it with remit- (consecutive) S 3
tance to: Alligator Classifieds, C 3 1 day
Room 330 Reitz Union, Gaines- D 2 days
ville, Florida 32601. 2 days (*lO% discount)
4 days (' 10% discount)
Orders must be RECEIVED Q 5 days and over P?
3 days prior to publication. (*20% discount)
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE |f
count the words, omitting a, an &
LLAboINLA ll(JN the< Addresses and phone numbers
r-i count as one word. Minimum charge
n fnl rn! is SI.OO for 20 words. For each ||
Q wanted additional word add 3 In helD wanted the total by nUmber f the a< ? S
u neip wanted ljg tQ run> Su btract the discount 4$
n Dersonai 0* applicable) and enclose a check g*
nfoo*fnnH for the remainder. For example, M
n services a 32-word ad to run 4 days costs H
U services $4.90 ($5.44 less 54?).
WORDING fli
§j NAME DATE 1!
jg STUDENT PHONE |j
g ADDRESS i I
CITY STATE -ZIP |j
uEfflg>money cannot be refunded if ad is cancel I eds*Kj

CITY

PERSONAL
COED FROM OJC with lair com complexion,
plexion, complexion, reddish-blond, hair. If
you met a zoology major at
student depository, former
classmate in Borders psy psychology
chology psychology 201, please call Jim
378-7845. Urgent. (J-91-3t-p)
HAPPY 20th, Barb. No more
teen-aged girl. Much love, K.S.
(J-91-lt-p)
CLAIRE, Happy Birthday to the
Kiri I love. Take care of my
little girl while Im gone. Mark.
( J-9 il lt -P)
To my CHI PHI Tiger Happy
21st Birthday Love, Kitten.
(J-91-lt-p)
My Little Chickadee: Ah, drink!
The sweetest thing in life next
you You! Solomon: You are ex exstatically
statically exstatically happening. Love,
Fields. (J-91-lt-p)
SILVER CERTIFICATES Check
your ones, fives, and ten dollar
bills for silver certificates. Will
pay .25 on the dollar. Contact
Nina at 372-9255. (J-90-st-p)
LOST & FOUND 1
WALLET TAKEN from apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Keep money please return
papers and sorority pin to Diane
Kelly, Kappa Alpha Theta House.
No questions asked. (L-90-st-p)

Page 9

Tuesday Evening Is A
'Wilde Eve With Shaw

Tuesday night will be A Wilde
Evening With Shaw for UF stu students
dents students as the international team
of Gray and Loiseau bring the
two 19th century masters to life
in University Auditorium.
The tour-de-force begins at
8:15 and will include selections
from the best and least known
works of George Bernard Shaw
and Oscar Wilde.
Wilde Evening is the third
dramatic special to be spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Fine Arts Committee
of the Reitz Union Board this
year. Admission is $1 for stu students,
dents, students, $1.50 for faculty and staff
and $2.50 for the general pub public.
lic. public.
The dramatic duo of Mayo Loi Loiseau
seau Loiseau and Richard Gray lace to together
gether together Wildes and Shaw's best
known worksdramatic and lit literarywith
erarywith literarywith anecdotes, ideas and
comments from letters, news newspapers,
papers, newspapers, essays and speeches in
addition to comments by the act actors
ors actors themselves.
Mr. Gray and Miss Loiseau
spent the fall of 66 at Duke
University conducting a i theatre
workshop while polishing their
work at Duke and surrounding
colleges.
Mayo Loiseau, born in New
York, began her professional
career in Hollywood while still
in high school at the age of 15,
making frequent appearances in
Father Knows Best, The
Burns and Allen and Ozzie
and Harriet shows, and many
other top flight TV dramas.
Richard Gray, who was born
in London, made his professional
debut in Barrie's Little Mini Minister
ster Minister at the age of 15.
In the last three years Mr.
Gray has played Higgins in two
productions of My Fair Lady,
Von Trapp three times in The
Sound of Music, and Arthur in
Camelot.
A Wilde Evening With Shaw
has been called a moving, laugh laughprovoking,
provoking, laughprovoking, warmly human story
of two fascinating menthe most
brilliant controversial products
of the 19th centurywhose minds
meet and clash on every major
subject.
lTw
Cafeteria
Monday Night
Fried, Deep-Sea
Perch
39<
Roast Beef
On Dressing
58t
Take advantage of our
low prices every day.
Serving
MB 4:30-8 p.m.
BySSrorEBiA i
W.Univ.Ave.

* H & |gg| C ?yg* *'* § '
- Hr
Gray And Loiseau In 'Wilde Evening'
M Arms And The Man
Opens Thursday At GLT
Thursday night begins a series of wild evenings with Shaw
as the Gainesville Little Theatre (GLT) opens its production of
Arms and the Man/ one of George Bernard Shaw's later comedies.
Directed by Esther Lane, Arms and the Man" stars Joan Shif Shiftman,
tman, Shiftman, Eugene Ruyle, William Perley, Mickie Newbill, Bill Stens Stensgaard,
gaard, Stensgaard, Silva Stafford, Joe Torchia, and Wade Lynn.
Reservations can be made by calling the GLT Playhouse at 376-4949.
Arms and the Man will play Thursday thru Saturday and March
7*9. Admission is $1 for students and $1.50 for the general public.
The GLT is located at 4039 NW 16th Blvd.
Personal Barber Service
L W Relax in comfort and convenience at the best in the proses proses/
/ proses/ sional barber field in Gainesville. Specialists in razor cuts,
emmings, washings and conventional cuts. See Kenny or Mac
SIMS BARBER SHOP
817 West University
jHHHMHHHHpHHH^
Gainesvilles Newest Night Club
Dancing Nightly Till 2 A. M.
This is not a teen club . You must be 21, and you must prove
it. Our live entertainment features some of the swingingest
groups available on Tues., Thur., Fri., and Sat. nights. Admis Admission
sion Admission is SI.OO on Tues. and Thur. and $1.50 on Fri. and Sat.
For reservations, call 376-4792 or 378-7586. We specialize
in barbeque and catering to private parties, clubs, etc.
\
N.W. 39th Ave.-2 mi. West Os of 1-75
I BRAKE d JOB I
I 29 I
W'WVtk Other American bRL
W f Sighltly Higher
'V A IS HERE'S WHAT WE DO
M \ 1. New Broke Lining |H|
B 2. Rebuild Wheel Cyle. j^BB
/1 3. Turn All 4 Drums WBB&,
|~ y £/ B'' / 4. Repack Front Wheel
V ,'js /. Lbs Bearings
L y/' ,/\ //'M 5. Add Brake Fluid
/ bvv 6. Check Crease Seals |H|
imm V y/ It 7. Precision Grind
ly f '' \ Lininqs
Warn N / 8. 25.000 Mile Cuarante* llillll
jBML s'* No Payment 'TillMar. 11
Ai
B / 372-5030 _^B



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

Page 10

Orangeami
ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR -w- TT T* |""ir| 1 TT^T
ssssssr 0 BLUE BULLETIN

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Monday, February 26
University Circle: luncheon,
Union 150 C, 11 a.m.
Mensa Members: daily lunch luncheons,
eons, luncheons, West Wing of Main Cafe Cafeteria,
teria, Cafeteria, noon
Program Office: dancing lessons,
243 Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Cinema Society: The Ex Experimental
perimental Experimental Film" Union Aud.,
7 & 9:15 p.m.
A.1.M.E.: meeting, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Paint for Fun: art lessons, 118
Union 7:30 p.m.
Program Office: meeting, 349
Union, 8 p.m. Informational
meeting about Union sponsored
trips to Europe.
Tuesday, February 27
L.D.S. Institute: The General
Epistles and the Apocalypse,
L.D.S. Student Center, 7 a.m.
Physics Lecture: Dr. Henry Bar Barschall,
schall, Barschall, The Interaction of
Neutrons with Alpha Par Particles,
ticles, Particles, 225 NSB, 11:15 a.m.
L.D.S. Institute: American Re Religions
ligions Religions and the Rise of Mor Mormonism,
monism, Mormonism, L.D.S Student Cen Center,
ter, Center, 12:20 p.m.
Physics Lecture: Dr. Henry Bar Barschall,
schall, Barschall, Experiments with Po Polarized
larized Polarized Neutrons, 227 NSB,
4 p.m.
Program Office: bridge
lessons, 400 Union, 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: pledges, 355
Union, 7 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
dinner, Univ. Inn, 7:15 p.m.
All those single and over 21
invited.
Fine Arts: A Wilde Evening With
Shaw, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, February 28
French Dept: Dr. Thomas Hanna,
recital of French Folk Songs,
346 Union, 3:30 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 355 Union, 7 p.m.
L.DJS. Institute: Building a Per Personal
sonal Personal Philosophy of Live,
L.D.S Student Center, 7:30
p.m.
Institute of Judaic Studies: be beginning
ginning beginning and intermediate He Hebrew,
brew, Hebrew, Jewish history, Intro Introduction
duction Introduction to Jewish thought, Hil Hillel
lel Hillel Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Paint for Fun: art lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: Univ. Symphony Or Orchestra
chestra Orchestra with Joseph Fuchs,
violin, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
A Wilde Evening With Shaw,
and the U of F Symphony Or Orchestra
chestra Orchestra with Joseph Fuchs,
violin soloist.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNlONaaHffev^Av*

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIPS:
All applications for the Florida
Bankers Association Scholar Scholarships
ships Scholarships must be received in tne
department of Finance and In Insurance
surance Insurance not later than Thursday,
Feb. 29, 1968.
SPRING REGISTRATION FEES
may be paid now. Pick up fee
payment materials at the inside
counter in the Student Accounts
section of the Hub.
GENERAL NOTICES
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR
ENGLISH IN ACTION to meet
each week with a person from
other lands for English conver conversation
sation conversation practice one or two hours
on Mondays and Wednesdays from
4-8 p.m. at the Baptist Student
Center, 1604 W. University Ave.
Contact Mrs. Bernice D. Harvey,
372-4711 during the above hours
for information.
SOUTHERN ANTHROPOLO ANTHROPOLOGICAL
GICAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY MEETING will
be held Feb. 29-Mar. 2 at the
University Inn. Problems and dy dynamics
namics dynamics of urbanization in the
U.S., Latin America and Africa
will be the topic for Mar. 1;
Anthropology Curriculum Study
Project will be featured at 8
p.m., Feb. 29, and a symposium
on physical anthropology will be
offered at 9 a.m., Mar. 2. The
public is invited.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. All companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Mar. June and Aug.
graduates unless indicated other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.
FEB. 26, 27:
SHELL COMPANIES. Chem.,
Physics, Eng., ME, Eng.Mech.,
Eng. Sci., ChE, CE, EE f Met.
Eng, Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts. Must be
UJS. citizen.
ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO. All
majors.
LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LA LABORATORY.
BORATORY. LABORATORY. ChE, EE, ME, Met.
Eng., NE, Chem., Physics. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NAVAL ORDNANCE SYSTEMS
SUPPORT OFFICE.
FEB. 27:
UNION 'CARBIDE CORP. ChE,
ME, EE, IE. Must be citizen.
INSURANCE COMPANY OF
NORTH AMERICA. Bus., Lib.
Arts.
WEST VIRGINIA STATE ROAD
COMMISSION. CE. Must be U.S.
citizen.

SUMMEROUR AND ASSOCI ASSOCIATES,
ATES, ASSOCIATES, INC. IE, IM, BA, Econ.,
Ind. Relations.
THE MITRE CORP. EE, Math,
Physics, Com. Sci., Ops. Res.
Oper.Research. Must be U.S.
citizen.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF ATLANTA.
DEPARTMENT OF AIR FORCE
GEEIA.

Meet The Gators
Here are some of the students who make your
Alligator the Souths finest college daily.
I
Lois is the Alligator Art Director. She supplies most of the art work
for the Editorial and Advertising Departments, with the special duty of
preparing the double-page advertising promotion each Wednesday.
Lois hopes to take her experience here into the agency field.
&
H
-
.
Dave Huskey
*
Dave holds down the position of Sales Manager in the Ad Department
plus serving a fourth of the Alligators local accounts. He has been
top salesman for the past two terms and has recently taken on the
Mall accounts.
, *
Paul comes to the Alligator as Assistant Sports Editor. Previously,
he was sports editor of the Miami-Dade Falcon Times.

BARNETT FIRST NATIONAL
BANK.
FEB. 28:
THE GENERAL TIRE & RUBBER
CO. Chem., Bus., Mgt., ChE,
ME, IE. Must be U.S. citizen.
UJS. PATENT OFFICE. Eng.,
Chem., Physics. Must be U.S.
citizen.

ALLIED MILLS. Bus. Ad., LA,
Eng., Acct., Chem.
LINK-BELT DIVISION OF FMC.
ME, IE, BA, CE, Eng. Sci. Must
be U.S. citizen.
STOUFFER FOODS CORP. Bus.,
Home Eco. Must be U.S. citizen.
PEOTECTIVE LIFE INSURANCE
CO. Edu., Lib. Arts, Bus.



Bulldogs Bounce Gators
Third Straight Time, 71-67

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor
For Mike Rollyson,it was a
great way to say good-bye.
Playing his last basketball
game for the UF at Floridas
gym, Rollyson almost single singlehandedly
handedly singlehandedly swept Florida past
Mississippi State Saturday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon.
The Gators were down 66-57
with just more than two min minutes
utes minutes left. But in the next min minute-and-half,
ute-and-half, minute-and-half, the senior blond
from Plant City pumped in eight
points.
State scored only two. But a
pair of UF fouls left the Gators
cold as the air outside.
The final score was 71-67
r Wm WC/w ::: W@'w
yfi|§L
MIKE ROLLYSON

UF Netters Take Opener, 9-0

The UF tennis team coasted
to its first win of the season
Saturday, as they easily downed
South Florida 9-0 in Tampa.
The win marked the 18th con consecutive
secutive consecutive victory for the netters.
All six singles won their mat matches,
ches, matches, as Armi Neely, Jamie
Pressly, Steve Beeland, Greg
Hilley, Paul Lunetta and Will
Sherwood all came out on top.
Surprisingly enough, the Gat Gators
ors Gators No. 1 player, Armi Neely
had what turned out to be the
toughest match of the afternoon.
South Floridas No. 1 man,
Clouser, took the first set by
a 6-4 mark before Neely was
able to regroup and hold on for
a 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 victory.
The easiest times were had
by Jamie Pressly and freshman
Paul Lunetta, both Os whom wonj
their matches by identical 6-1,
6-2 scores.
In doubles competition, things
were no different. Neely and Bee Beeland
land Beeland bombed their opponents with
Up
y|Sl jgMNK'%
::: B '-fr
I mm
y
PAUL LUNETTA

DESPITE COMEBACK ATTEMPT

before 6,304 fans and a region regional
al regional television audience. It ended
a two-season 16-game home
Gator streak.
If the rest of the three Florida
seniors gave as convincing going goingaway
away goingaway presents as Rollyson, the
scores would have been easily
reversed.
But Gary McElroy, Dave Mil Miller,
ler, Miller, and Harry Winkler didnt.
And the rest of the Gators fol followed.
lowed. followed.
Florida shot only 34 per cent
of its field goals, compared to
States 41.
: Florida shot only 30 per cent
of its floor shots in the first
half as the Bulldogs led most
of the way. UF ran off the last
10 first half points to take a
two-point lead at halftime. 27-25.
The Gators started the second
half as if they were going to
send State into the cold outside
by taking an eight point lead
halfway through the period.
But again, the Gator scoring
touch went sour, and State, the
Southeastern Conferences last lastplace
place lastplace team, took advantage.
Part of the UF problem was
the foul situation. Neal Walk
played half of the second per period
iod period with four before fouling out
with a minute left. McElroy,
shackled with the face mask he
used so well against Florida
State, made a similar exit a
minute earlier.
Florida made four more field
goals than State but thanks to

consecutive 6-1 scores, as did
Lunetta and Sherwood. Pressly
and Cox also won their first
game by a 6-1 score, but had
to fight back for an 8-6 win
in the finale.
The next Gator match will be
the teams home opener, as FSU
travels to Gainesville for a
1:30 p.m. encounter next Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. J
Neely (F) def. Clouser, 4-6,
6-1, 6-4.
Pressly (F) def. Barrett, 6-1.
6-2.

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NEAL WALK
Floridas foul troubles, connect connected
ed connected on 25 of 31 charity tosses.
UF hit on a better percentage
but took only half as many shots,
13 of 16.
McElroy, the key to the de defeat
feat defeat of NCAA bound Florida
State, had a another fine game
on the boards, grabbing eight
rebounds. But he scored only six
points.
His coach, Tommy Bartlett,
stated before the game that
McElroys broken nose will not
be operated on till after the
season. Bartlett had announced
an operation for his star senior
last Friday morning.
Walk, again in All-American
form, scored 29 and snared 21
rebounds.

Beeland (F) def. Perkins, 6-4,
6-0.
Hilley (F) def. Martin, 6-0,
5- 6-1.
Lunetta (F) def. Rinehart, 6-1,
6
Sherwood (F) def. Saine, 6-2,
6-0.
Neely and Beeland (F) def.
Clouser and Rinehart, 6-1, 6-1.
Pressly and Cox (F) def. Yoh Yohner
ner Yohner and Barrett, 6-1, 8-6.
Lunetta and Sherwood (F) def.
Saine and Perkins, 6-1, 6-1.

SPORTS

Monday, February 26, 1968, Hie Florida Alligator,

UF Tankers Top FSU
Florida swimmers Saturday won 11 of the 13 meet events and
set three Gator pool records and one meet record enroute to an
easy 75-38 thrashing of FSU.
The win nudged the UF team record to a 9-1 for the season, and
emphasized the advantage of swimming at home, as the Gators
met State in Tallahassee earlier in the season, and were only able
to manage a slim 59-54 win over the Seminoles.
Floridas sensational freshman, Mark McKee, set two records,
as his 1:46.1 time in the 200-yard freestyle eclipsed the old pool
mark, and his 4:56.0 in the 500-yard freestyle was also a pool
record. Steve Maori set the meet record in the 400-yard freestyle.
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Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 26, 1968

Effort There, Play
Wasnt Bartlett

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
It wasnt a lack of effort/
insisted Gator basketball coach
Tommy Bartlett after watching
his team suffer a 71-67 setback
at the hands of Mississippi State
Saturday afternoon in Florida
Gym.
The desire was there, ex explained
plained explained Bartlett, but we just
didnt play well.
The UF mentor cited numerous
turnovers and a poor 34 percent
field goal percentage as major
factors leading to defeat.
Sometimes you can shoot
poorly at home and still win,
stated Bartlett, but Mississippi
State was not going to have any
of that this afternoon.
I think all our boys, especial especially
ly especially Mike Rollyson, played well in
UF Golfers
Take Third
HOUSTON, Tex.The UF golf
team took third place in the R. L.
Coleman Invitational Golf Tour Tournament
nament Tournament this weekend.
The 'Gators finished third with
a 1530, strokes behind No. 1
Houston, 1493, and Texas, 1516.
The Cougars were the nations
champs last year.
Floridas Richard Spears was
the tourneys No. 2 scorer with
a 296 for the 72 holes. Houstons
John Mahaffey was tops with 295.
Other UF scores were Wendell
Coffee, and Steve Melnyk, 304;
John Darr, 309; Kemp Gholson,
317; and Mike Toale, 319.
r Gators Third
JACKSONVILLE-The Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Gators ended up third in
this weekends Region One AAU
tourney here but qualified for
next weekends state tournament.
The Gators lost to Delta Drugs
Saturday morning, 105-78. Delta
Drugs eventually won the tour tourney.
ney. tourney.
In the consolation game Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night, the Gators defeated
Cavalier Cleaners, 68-54, for a
state tourney berth.
In the morning loss, Mont
Highley and Ted Carson led the
losers with 18 points each. Stan
Wheeler chipped in with 15.

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getting us back into the game in
the closing minutes. However, we
just couldnt get the baskets when
we needed them.
I feel badly that we (jlidnt
win our last home game, con concluded
cluded concluded Bartlett. I would have
liked to have won it for our four
seniors Mike Rollyson, Harry
Winkler, Dave Miller and Gary
McElroy. Were going to miss
them next year.
A smiling, personable Joe Dan
Gold, head coach for the basket basketball
ball basketball Bulldogs, could not explain
his teams apparent hex over the
Gators this year.
If I knew what it was, I
sure wouldnt tell anybody, said
Gold. But I cant figure it out.
Gold said he thought neither
team played well in the first half.
If either team had shot a de decent
cent decent percentage and cut down on
their errors, they would have
probably broken the game wide
open then and there.
I was pleased with the de defensive
fensive defensive effort Dave Williams did
against Neal Walk, stated Gold.
He did about as good a job as
you can against Walk in a man manto-man
to-man manto-man defense.
Gold credited a changed Miss.
State offense in the second half
with the possible difference in the
score.
We went from a 2-3 to a 1-4
offensive set in the second half,
said Gold. I think that this en enabled
abled enabled us to move the ball in inside
side inside better.
Regan Signs
(UPI) Pitcher Phil Regan
ended a brief holdout and was
the last Dodger to agree to terms
Saturday night.
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