Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Cloudy
High 75-79
Low 46-54

Volume 60, No. 73

... .:s|ii|||pli
jtsjgiSl t v
hS'
I^MBnifPPWptf^^lSHl^^^P r <%s ~
' : 4 JHBftk
aBBBgBMBB%3^.jjpWMIK!yHML! aK^^a||Httgifcj||JSg3R
> \ / .'..tfjw. v >\ j,.#2M .*&s&
-'-''-
(Photo by Mike Huddleston'
TRAFFIC? WHERE?
This picture was taken Tuesday of the mid midafternoon
afternoon midafternoon traffic between the womens, dorms
and the Architecture and Fine Arts building.

SENT BY WSA
Letter To Legislators
Cites Financial Strain

By ELAINE FULLER
Alligator Correspondent
A letter expressing concern
over the current economic crisis
at the UF has been sent to each
of the 167 state legislators by
the Council of the Women Stu Students
dents Students Association (WSA).
The letters, mailed to senators
and representatives Monday,
strongly urge consideration and
support of all, state institutions.
f Approved unanimously at the
WSA meeting Jan. 25, the letter
is one of the first student-init student-initiated
iated student-initiated expressions to the legis legislature
lature legislature from a campus organi organization.
zation. organization. WSA represents over
5,000 undergraduate women stu students
dents students currently enrolled at the
University.
The letter was written be because
cause because we felt a definite need
for someone to take a stand on
what we think is an appalling
condition here, said Carol
Freedman, acting president of
WSA.
Stating visible results of the
financial strain upon administra administrators,
tors, administrators, the letter cites fewer
courses being offered, larger
classes, of professors to
higher-paying institutions, and an
undergraduate library which can cannot
not cannot be staffed to provide services.
It states that students on schol scholarships
arships scholarships or seeking them notice
there will be no more funds for
increasing scholarships to cover
the 10 per cent yearly increase
Os students.

The
Florida Alligator

Internships in Education, a
field where female enrollment is
high, is also used to show the
budget cuts effect on the delay
of some students graduation. The
letter also states, many other
students will be kept from gra graduating
duating graduating at the end of the summer
quarter if the course offerings
for this term are curtailed.
In summary, the letter states,
We are well aware of the fact
that if additional funds are not

Whatll I Do With It?
For the second time in 14 years, lost
money has been turned in to the Univer University
sity University Police Dept., Chief A.I. Shuler report reported
ed reported Monday.
Dunn E. Hamilton, 413 Thomas Hall, said
he found the money on Stadium Road, ac across
ross across the street from the Student Deposi Deposi\
\ Deposi\ tory.
Wp J The undisclosed amount of money was
F/k turned over to the police Monday after after\
\ after\ r-jjA noon.
Police said no one has as yet reported
] losing the amount of money which was
I found.
This is only the second case I can re remember
member remember in 14 years of lost cash being
given to us, said Shuler.
This is so rare, if no one claims the
money, he said, we dont know what to
- do with it.
With the number of thefts reported to
us, said Shuler, something like this makes
'Here! You Take It.' you feel good.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

FOLLOWING CLOSED HEARINGS
Election Decision
May Come Friday

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator News Editor
An Honor Court decision on
whether there will be another
presidential election may be an announced
nounced announced by Friday, Honor Court
Chancellor Bob Hughes told the
Alligator Tuesday.
The decision will follow three
days of closed hearings on al alleged
leged alleged violations of election laws.
The first of the hearings was held
Tuesday night.
The hearings grew out of last
weeks hotl y- contested victory by
Forward partys Bill Mcride
over United-First partys Clyde
Taylor for student body presi president.
dent. president. Mcride was declared the
unofficial winner by eight votes.
Hughes said that if the petition petitioner,
er, petitioner, United-First party, proves its
allegations of election law viola violations,
tions, violations, the cases will be turned
over to the Student Election
Board, which has disciplinary
jurisdiction over violations.
Hughes refused to reveal any
details of the charges, claiming

provided immediately, the next
year promises to be even worse.
We can expect to feel the pinch
in all areas.
We could have used a sta statistical
tistical statistical approach in the letter
and had the facts and figures to
support it, said Miss Freed Freedmant
mant Freedmant But we thought this would
be a more effective means of
appeal, since the legislature is
probably being bombarded with
facts and figures from other
areas of the University.

publicity might "prejudice the
hearings and a new election, in
the event tfiere is one.
He also ruled the hearings
closed to the public when an Al Alligator
ligator Alligator reporter attempted to ob observe
serve observe the pre-trial conference
with attorneys Tuesday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. He noted that publication
of unproven charges made during
the hearings could injure an in innocent
nocent innocent person.
He did, however, disclose the
nature of the charges included
such violations as "electioneer "electioneering
ing "electioneering within the prescribed 100 feet
of the polls, improper perfor performance
mance performance of duties by election of officials
ficials officials and illegal voting pro procedures
cedures procedures by the electorate.
Forward and United-First
party officials also refused to
comment on the specifics of the
hearings, claiming that advance
information might prejudice the
case.
Hughes said he alone will de decide
cide decide whether there will be another
election, but the other justices
will serve in investigative and ad advisory
visory advisory positions in the hearings.
He claimed that his decision
to decide the case unilaterally
has "basis in precedent. He
did not elaborate.
He also refused to speculate
on the possibility that he may
overturn the election and call for
a new one.
In the event there is another
election, he said, only the presi presidential
dential presidential and vice-presidential
posts will be on the ballot be because
cause because they are the only contest contested
ed contested positions.
The Student Election Board,
' according to the Student Body
Constitution, is composed of the <
chancellor of the Honor Court
and one representative from each
party which qualifies more than
40 per cent of a complete slate.
The board's purpose is to "in "investigate
vestigate "investigate any charges of viola violations
tions violations of the election laws.
The Honor Court is assuming

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

primary jurisdiction in the case,
however, because the courtis re required
quired required to canvass and validate
all elections.
The Legislative Council also
must canvass and validate the
election, according to the con constitution.
stitution. constitution. If the Honor Court
allows the election to stand,
therefore, the council may then
call for a new election.
Kirk Plan
Labeled
Temporary
BY BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
The seemingly small $10.9
million proposed for the entire
state university system by Gov.
Claude Kirk Monday has been
explained by the governors press
secretary as "only short-term.
Jim Wolf, press adviser to the
governor, told the Alligator Mon Monday
day Monday that the measures recom recommended
mended recommended by Kirk "predicated
future appropriations required by
the university. They are only
short-term.
Wolf said that theslo.9million
singled out for universities of
the proposed S4OO million ad additional
ditional additional funds urged by Kirk were
"of course, Subject to needs that
can be demonstrated to the future
Florida Education Com mission.
"Looking at the overall pro proposals,
posals, proposals, I would say that those,
if approved, going to kinder kindergartens
gartens kindergartens through twelfth grades
were relatively equal to those
asked for the universities.
Wolf said that the $10.9 million
was a "practical figure.
The UF alone has been oper operating
ating operating at sl4 million below its
request for the year.
A source close to the governor
told the Alligator that the legis legislators
lators legislators "must consider that most
of their constituents stress
quality education for kindergar kindergartens
tens kindergartens through high schools more
than they do for higher education.
Its just a question of priorities.
A SSOO million construction
bond, was also proposed the
governor that would, if passeaby
three-fourths of the voters,
allocate a large chunk,
million, to junior colleges and
universities.
The gubernatorial press se secretary
cretary secretary also cited a "cushion
of $69 million, some of which
would "probably be fed into the
universities.
"You have to remember that
the figures which the governor
called for were not only his fig figures.
ures. figures. They are those re recommended
commended recommended by an awful lot of
educators in the state.
Speaking of the referendi
that would raise $116.6 million
(SEE KIRK PAGE 2)

Inside
\
Coed Murderer
Files Appeal
See Page Two



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Bulletin News
State., National, International News
VC Attack Saigon
SAIGON (UPI) Viet Cong terror squads struck in downtown
Saigon with mortars and rockets early Wednesday and fought onto the
grounds of the UJS. Embassy in street fighting that climaxed a series
of fullscale Communist assaults in South Vietnam.
Damage mounted into the millions of dollars, with UJS. warplanes
parked at bases especially hard hit. Casualties for the Viet Cong
and North Vietnamese were high.
The invaders hit the American Embassy compound with a mortar
and ground assault and struck close to a dozen other targets including
the Vietnamese White House and four American military hotels.
It was the biggest communist assualt ever to take place within the
confines of the city. ?
Forces Strengthened
SEOUL (UPI) The American general commanding United Nations
forces in South Korea said Tuesday intensified actions have been
taken to block any new massive invasion attempt by Communist
North Korea.
Gen. Charles H. Bonesteel in spoke with newsmen following a
reported warning by South Korea to President Johnson that it will
go it alone unless the United States moves more firmly to stop Com Communist
munist Communist infiltrations.
Subs Assumed Lost
TOULON, France (UPI) The French Navy Tuesday gave up
hope of finding alive the 52 men aboard the missing submarine
Minerve. At the other end of the Mediterranean, chances of find finding
ing finding the 69 crewmen aboard the Israeli sub Dakar were equally dim.
Underwater explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau went 400 feet to
the sea floor in a diving bell Tuesday, looking for the Minerve, and
probed the area where search ships had detected a sonar ping.
Cousteau found only an old, unidentified hulk of metal.
Arabs, Israelis Clash
CAIRO (UPI) Egypt and Israel fought a two-hour artille.
battle across the Suez Canal Tuesday after Egypt attempted to free
a trapped American ship over Israeli objections.
An Egyptian military spokesman said Israeli soldiers opened
fire on four unarmed survey launches, equipped with electronic
and sonar equipment, as they headed for the northern end of the
canal to chart a safe exit route for an American ship that had ap appealed
pealed appealed to be freed.
A Suez Canal official said Tuesday night that, because of the Is Israeli
raeli Israeli attace, the Egyptian government was postponing indefinitely
its operation to free ships that were blocked in the international
waterway.
~FEA May Walkout
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) The head of the Florida Education
Association indicated Tuesday that teachers will strike if the legis legislature
lature legislature ties financing to a public vote on massive structural changes
in the educational system.
Dexter Hagman stopped short of a flat ultimatum but labeled
unacceptable 1 Gov. Claude Kirks demand that financing and structural
changes be irrevocably tied together.
Sources close to the FEA said the walkout probably will come before
the March 1 deadline set by teachers a month ago.
ROBBIES
The Best In
Meal Q J^andwichee
'color t.v. & billiards" 1
1718 W. University Ave.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official student newspaper of the Unlveraity of Florida
and is published five tiroes weekly except during June, July and August when it Is published
semi- weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Florida
Union BuUdliy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32001. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate is 'OO per year or 34.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator i. serves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertise advertisements
ments advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It coaside res objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment Ar any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising
Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be
responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several Umes. Notices tor correction roust be given before next Insertion.

Kirk Plan Labeled Temporary

to junior colleges and univers universities,
ities, universities, Wolf said, Again thats
a matter of priorities.
UFs administration generally
agreed that Gov. Kirks budget
proposals for state universities
Monday were inadequate.
Vice President of Academic
t Affairs Robert Mautz said he felt
the amount ($10.9 million) urged
by the governor was in inadequate
adequate inadequate and that this univer university
sity university will still be pressed if
additional funds are not allocated.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter, Assis Assistant
tant Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs,
called the proposals less than
we had hoped for.
Kirk called for $10.9 million
for the entire state university
system Monday before a joint
emergency session of the Legis Legislature
lature Legislature meeting in Tallahassee to
reconstruct the state education
system. Figures calculated
earlier showed that the UF was
operating at sl4 million below
their request for the year.
Motion Filed
For Retrial
Os Rivers
Attorneys for Willie Samuel
Rivers, convicted slayer of a UF
coed, filed a motion for retrial
Friday before Circuit Court
Judge J.C. Adkins,
s The hearing was set for Feb.
13, at 1:30.
I The new trial motion contained
some 16 items, the bulk of which
! contained certain procedural
questions in the Rivers trial Jan.
12, in which the defendant was
convicted by an all-white jury
for the first-degree murder slay slaying
ing slaying of Mrs. Carol Persons, a UF
graduate student.
Adkins will hear the motion.
If the motion is denied, Rivers
attorneys are expected to appeal
the case ot the state Supreme
Court.
Ij" 11 n
Bssji
warn
Fremacs classic button-down
shirtsmanship at its finest. Every
traditional feature. Newest
colors, distinctive stripings, and
all in Permanent Press.
£ Short Sleeves $5-6.00
Long Sleeves $6.00 J/PX
i f v TV TV-1
-1 TV-1 HOME OF THE J
[ CRAZY LITTLE TAILORS VT
i
, Ifremacsj
D 'A
Gainesville Mall

Regarding the SSOO million
school construction referendum,
of which sll6 million would go
to junior colleges and univer universities,
sities, universities, Lassiter expressed op optimism
timism optimism that the people, will
respond if our needs are pre presented
sented presented to them and if they be believe
lieve believe them to be desirable.
Mautz commended Monday's
Special Legislative Edition of the

I UF f s REPRESENTATIVES I
Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
=. Dan Sapp David Wilson
Pi ,\\gfc Tom stewart 8111 w orsham
George Corl A rile Watkinson I
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
I ,NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
I DEFERRED premium payments |
Ml
Join the Swing To
I all dry r LEAN,NG I
M- 'h PRICE I
CONTINUES THRU FEB. 2 K
Yes, get all your dry cleaning done for Vi price . We are staging
jH" this special event in appreciation of the reception you have given
9 Arnold Palmer Cleaning Centers in Gainesville.
For Example: 9
I Men's Suits slacks"' Dresses I
M SWEATERS (ms. 1,25)
m mm.* SKIRTS (Plain) if
I 62 25 c 62 c I
] I st*dcf I
H Country Club Quality at neighborhood prices jR
8 (Across From Jerrys North) '
m 1228 NE sth AVENUE
8 (Next To Thriftway) jS|
|| FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES!!
1

Alligator that was taken to legis legislators
lators legislators in Tallahassee before the
special session mpf.
It was extremely helpful and a
forthright endeavor by the stu students
dents students for the welfare of the
university.
Lassiter said I always knew
that the students were concerned.
Now the people in Tallahassee
know it too.



Bell Sees
Intellectual
Future
By MARGIE GROSS
Alligator Staff Writer
Put a computer in every home,
add bigger cities, more leisure
time, and free electricity and
you have the year 2,000, just 32
years from now.
Looking at the year 2,000 in
a symbolic way, Daniel Bell
noted sociologist cited the four
major forces of change in the
next 32 years as technology,
structural changes, social de demands
mands demands and the international sys system.
tem. system.
As chairman of the American
Society of Arts and Sciences'
Commission on the Year 2,000,
Bell spoke in the Reitz Union
Auditorium Monday night and said
the main purpose of the Com Commission
mission Commission is to aquaint people with
what may be ahead and to
help understand possible pro problems.
blems. problems.
In looking ahead to the future,
Bell said that the technological
changes will not be mechanical,
but intellectual. He noted that
computers, bio-medical en engineering
gineering engineering including organ trans transplants
plants transplants and geriatric processes
genetic and weather modi modifications
fications modifications will be among the new
technological advances.
Concerning structural changes
in the next 32 years Bell said
that the majority of the popu population
lation population will deal in services of
a highly skilled type. He basically
emphasized the changed nature of
the organization of knowledge.
In this future post-industrial
society the university will play
a radical role as a major in institution
stitution institution in creating advances.
Bell added that in the area
of social demands, the central
crucial point will be 100 million
more Americans. This will mean
a vast change in the needs of
public resources, and education,
and in the problem of air pollu pollution.
tion. pollution.
Bell said that the nature of
the problem of the year 2,000
can be best seen by the ironic
possibility that the scarcest
natural resource in 32 years will
be air. At the same time, elec electricity
tricity electricity will be free.
Queen Entries
Due Friday
Friday is the deadline for en entries
tries entries in the annual Engineers
Fair Queen Contest.
Applications are available at
the Student Activities desk on
the 3rd floor of the J. Wayne
Reitz Union and must be return returned
ed returned to room 303 of the union.
This years queen may
be crowned at the Engineers
Ball in the Reitz Union Ball Ballroom
room Ballroom March 29, the week pro proceeding
ceeding proceeding the Fair.
Our Mistake
The date of the upcoming Gra Graham
ham Graham Area Playboy Party was
mistakenly printed in yesterdays
Alligator as Nov. 10. The cor correct
rect correct date is Feb. 10.
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FtiK IST I MAT IS
23 N.W. jMfc *
Host Side ACL Dopot

- Jamm I' .IF
JHPOSMiJir x m
r* ** i*wT**t IT Jr. SmmS. w
*... Ip AM*
X ..Jy Ty Tyy*
y* Tyy* llMMffii%- *** ,| **^^v-1
GATOR GIRL
Todays Gator Girl is Cathy Cross, lUC
from Miami. Cathy accumulated a 3.8 average
last quarter. (Photo by Nick Arroyo)

gO gO gATOR aDS


Got A Sick Corvair?
We specialize in Corvair service thats
backed up by 30 yrs. experience with Gen General
eral General Motors Corp.
Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
Were the student's friend, so stop in
and save money,
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
1031 So. Moin Phone 376-7771
I HUE JIBI
Ij^1 29 I
iW Other American ll
W A, Sighltly Higher
W/. 'V \ MvTS'7 HERE'S WHAT WE DO S
y~*S- 1. New Broke Lining
1 2. Rebuild Wheel Cvla.
F\_ x- 3. Turn All 4 Drums
f- /V <-. / 4. Repack Front Wheel
ft -X /7> 4 I, U/ Bearings
L. ,/\ /. .O 5. Add Brake Fluid
>T wv L" vl> Cheek Crease Seals Ilf;
f Bar
./ ) 8. 25.000 Mile Guarantee
?- No F'ovment 'Till Mar. 4 BRBH
fe3QQQIQOOEI
^ y
a I T 72-5030 honored.
818

DRY CLEANING
counter open
9 a.m. -1 a.m.
Gator Groomer
Next To I'niv. Post office

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Researcher To Speak
Dr. John I. Lacey, a distinguished researcher in the area of the
involuntary nervous system and its relationship to complex human
behavior patterns produced by changes in the environment, delivers
a public lecture at the UF at 8 p.m. Thursday.
Dr. Lacey, chairman of the Department of Psychophysiology and
at the Fels Research Institute, Yellow Springs,
Ohio, will address the colloquium of the Center for Neurobiological
Sciences in Auditorium H-611 at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
litipiiimMx
RexaUDRUG STORES \
1605 S.W. 13th St. 12 W. Univ. Ave,
Phone 3776-2568 Ph. 372-2558
1522 N.W. 13th St.
(13th Pharmacy) Phone 376-2668
I Alka Seltzer |
8 reg 69< wy 8
I Gleem Super Action |
| Toothpaste |
? reg 95t O/ V 8
| Schick Auto Band |
| Razor Cartridge |
j reg <1.59 sl.l S j
I Max Factor Hair Spray
j 75j j
| Kleenex
a reg 35< 29<
jVitalis Hair Tonic j
J reg $1.19 8 5
Xerox Copies
Registered Pharmacist
Greeting Cards
School Supplies
1605 S.W. 1 3th Street
1

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Spectrum
Shows Films
On Courses
By JOANN LANGWORTHY
Alligator Staff Writer
University College students
are able to watch a biology lec lecture
ture lecture come to life, see Madame
Bovary spring into action or
view what really happened to
Hamlet-
Films on these and other sub subjects
jects subjects related to comprehensive
courses are being shown in the
four mens dorm areas every
quarter.
The films are sponsored by
Spectrum, a program started by
Mens Interhall Council to sup supplement
plement supplement reading assignments in
the basic C-courses.
According to Thomas Infantino,
public relations chairman of
Spectrum, an attempt is made
to coordinate films and class
discussions.
This weeks film DNA Mol Molecule
ecule Molecule of Heredity is currently
the subject of Biology 262 lec lectures.
tures. lectures.
Infantino said, however, that
it is not always possible to show
films the same week their sub subjects
jects subjects are discussed in class.
He cited Hamlet as an example.
Although Hamlet has already
been discussed in most classes,
he said, it will be shown in
time to be a good review for
next weeks prog.
Infantino said the films are
basically an effort to help stud students
ents students better prepare for progs.
Spectrum was started during
the summer 1966 by Robert Im Imholte,
holte, Imholte, president of Mens Inter Interhall
hall Interhall at that time.
According to Imholte the dorms
had been planning academic for forums
ums forums on an individual basis rat rather
her rather than as coordinating units.
This just didnt work out,
Imholte said. We brought tea teachers
chers teachers to speak and even though
students should have been inter inter,
, inter, ested, they werent.
We decided to improve the
l situation by working together and
bring films which would interest
students.

r -1 T.V. LOG

2 4 9 12 5
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET
7-00 Wells Fargo Honeymoonars MOVIE Compass 12 Whats New
7:30
- Lost in Space Regional Report
g.QQ Hall of Fame Ironside" Hall of Fame
8:30 Beverly Hillbillies Creative Person
9:00 Kraft Music Hall Green Acres MOVIE Kraft Music Hall MOVIE
9:30 Kraft Music Hall He & She Kraft Music Hall Tonights the
Os Mice and Night"
iaaa Run For Men Run For Your Life
10:00 Your Life Jonathan
Run For Winters
10*30 Run For Your Life
Your l ,ifp
11:00 News" News News News
1 v
11:30 Johnny Carson MOVIE Joey Bishop Johnny Carson
Love Me or
Leave Me
FEARLESS FORECAST
Os Mice and Men" A TV adaptation of John Steinbecks
novel, first published in 1937. It was adapted for Broadway in
1937 and for Hollywood in 1939. .now watch a great TV version
of a powerful, moving, touching novel.

TUMBLEWEEDS
\
T" 77 |/ww*\
/ A MEDICINE MAN \ / no\
l HERO WHEN YOU I ( kid /
\WAS A EOY? J "J/l
l N
TUI AYf man WW
I -

KENNEDY, McCARTHY CONTACTED
Accent Speakers Sought By SG

By JOANN LANG WORTHY
Alligator Staff Writer
A group of Student Govern Government
ment Government officials went to New York
and Washington last week seek seeking
ing seeking speakers and support for the
upcoming Accent symposium.
Accent Chairman Frank Gram Gramling,
ling, Gramling, Assistant Chairman Richard
Langford and Student Body Presi President
dent President Charles Shepherd left Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday to recruit possible speak speakers
ers speakers and news coverage for the
symposium scheduled here for
April 1-6.
We had to go now, Shepherd
said, because people are start starting
ing starting to set up their schedules
for state primaries.

mflKn tHflKf
u3l a inut
FEATURING-QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
DINING ROOM
COUNTER
CARRYOUT
Open Til 1 AM
l6loS.W:l3rt)St.

<
/ YA SEE, WHEN I WAS YOUNG; \
/ THE PRACTICE OF MEPICINE \
/ WAS IN A VERY PRIMITIVE \
STATE OF DEVELOPMENT... /
l WE DIDN'T HAVE ALL THE /
\ TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES /
\\oo ENJOY TODAY'.

Shepherd who was last years
Accent chairman said that it was
also better to discuss the pro program
gram program in person so that a clear
concept of the program was given
and any questions could be an answered.
swered. answered.
We also wanted to lay to rest
the incident of Adam Clayton
Powell, Shepherd said. Every Everyone
one Everyone in Washington knew he was
invited to speak here and people

DRY CLEANING
counter open
9 a.m. -1 a.m.
Gator Groomer
Next To Univ. Post Office

wanted to know why he wasnt
coming.
Possible speakers the team
talked to included Sen. Robert
Kennedy, D-Mass., Sen. Edward
Brooke, R-Mass., who is cur currently
rently currently the only Negro senator,
and Sen. Eugene McCarthy, D-
Minn.
According to Shepherd, Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy is very likely to accept,
as is Brooke.

The Sound Shop
Music for Everyone
You don't have to be an expert to
appreciate music. The Sound Shop offer
quality sound at the lowest prices in
town Come in and listen.
AH Transistor, 90 watt FM Stereo Rec
The Fisher soo-T,
... v II
$339.58
378-7277 604 NW 13th St.

m
/*%/->[ | N. Cen. Florida's
CL/Udl #l ZENITH Dealer
Be On Time To Class
Use A ZENITH
CLOCK RADIO
''
COUCHS 608 N. MAIN ST
9fj m 376 7171
Only at Couch's Do You Get AH 5
Price-selection -service -terms-qualify

By TOM RYAN
NO SIR! WHEN WE GOl HUNG-UP [
ON ILLNESS BACK THEN, WE l
PIPN'T HAVE NO POWPERCP BONES
OR RABBITS FEET TO HELP OS'...
AN' ANTI-PIABOLICS WAS
A PREAMI

Gramling added that the pro program
gram program is still flexible and look looking
ing looking for ideas. Among new things
being considered is another panel
discussion with younger men on
it.
It is also possible the program
will have more speakers and
that the featured speaker would
appear in smaller groups so that
* students would have a better op opportunity
portunity opportunity to talk to him.



CAMPUS
LIVING

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Studious Coed Frosh
Eligible For ALD

Alpha Lambda Delta, national
freshman womens honor society,
is currently determining eligible
members. Women' students
classified as lUC with a 3.5
average or better may be eli eligible.
gible. eligible. This average may be ob obtained
tained obtained in any quarter or accum- t
ulated over two quarters.
Transfer students may be con considered
sidered considered for membership if she
attended a college that had an

WHATS
HAPPENING

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN LOST CAUSES: lnquiry
into Change will be the topic
spoken on by Dr. Ira Gordon,
professor of Education and past
chairman of the Department of
Education Foundation, at the Stu Student
dent Student FEA meeting tonight at 7:30
in the Norman Hall Auditorium.
IN THE BLACKBOARD
JUNGLE RE-VISITED: Chal Challenge
lenge Challenge in the Classroom, a movie
sponsored by Pi Mu Epsilon, will
be shown in room 346 of the
Reitz Union tonight at 8 oclock.
Everyone is welcome to come.
IN A, E, I, OOY, AND VAAY:
The Institute of Judaic Studies
gives lessons in beginning and
intermediate Hebrew tonight at
7:30 at the Hill el Foundation.
IN THE MACHINES THAT-'
RULE OUR LIVES: The Con Construction
struction Construction and Computing Confer Conference
ence Conference will be held in room 349
of the union all day today.
IN REVERSING THE EVOLU EVOLUTIONARY
TIONARY EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS: The Florida
Speleological Society returns to
I L&W
1 Cafeteria
1 Wednesday Night
1 Mouth Watering
| Veal Parmagiana
49<
I Chicken Chop
49 <
I Home Style Cooking
s erv n 9
CAFETERIA |
GATOR ADS SELL
> ' 0.
CALL EX. 2832

ALD chapter and certification
is received from that college.
A new coed may also be eli eligible
gible eligible if the average on her trans transfer
fer transfer credit and her UF average
for the first quarter meet the
ALD requirements.
Any students with questions
concerning eligibility should con contact
tact contact Joyce Katz, assistant Dean
of Women, 123 Tigert, Ext. 2478.

the caves tonight at 7 p.m. in
rooms 355 and 356 of the union.
IN COLLEGIAN KIWANIANS:
The Circle K Club, an organ organization
ization organization sponsored by the Kiwanis
International, meets tonight in
room 150 C of the union at 7.
IN HOWS THE WEATHER,
JOSE?: The International Club
offers conversational Spanish
to those interested in conversa conversational
tional conversational Spaniards. Come to room
347 of the union tonight at 7:30
and see for yourself.
IN FLICKS FROM GAMMA NU:
Gamma Nu Chapter will show a
film tonight in the union audi auditorium
torium auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
TWO BITS, FOUR BITS AND
ALL THAT: Dont forget the two
week cheerleading clinic begin beginning
ning beginning Monday, 3:30 p.m. on Florida
Field. All students not on pro probation
bation probation and having a 2.0 overall
are eligible.

* /
Decree Candidates in: |
die, ME, IE, EE, Acctg,
CheM, CkE, Mktg
4
Meet the Man
from Monsanto
February 7-9
Sign tip for an interview at your placement office.
This year Monsanto will have many openings for
graduates at all degree levels. Fine positions are
open all over the country with Americas 3rd largest
chemical company. And were still growing. Sales
have quadrupled in the last 10 years ... in every everything
thing everything from plasticizers to farm chemicals; from
nuclear sources and chemical libers to electronic
instruments. Meet the Man from Monsanto he
has the facts about a fine future.
Monsanto
i
. -s 1
An Kqual Opportunity Kmployer

Coeds Take Advantage
Os 'Work Abroad Plan

By BETH BRANDON
Alligator Staff Writer
Summertime 6B is going to be
a blend of excitement and hard
work for UF student, Patricia
Ann Gilliland.
Pat will be one of the 1,500
students participating this sum summer
mer summer in the Jobs Abroad Pro Program.
gram. Program. A program sponsored by
the International Student Infor Information
mation Information Service which guarantees
salaried jobs in Europe to in-
terested students.
f j.
These students will have the
unique chance to live with the
people and learn their customs
and language while they are earn earning
ing earning money. The students have
their choice of working in Eng England,
land, England, France, Belgium, Spain,
Germany, Switzerland, Turkey or
even Japan.
The type of jobs range from
factory, hospital, construction,
restaurant, hotel and farm work
to camp counselors and mothers
helpers. The salaries range from
S3O to $275 a month depending
on the type of work at which the
student is employed.
Miss Gilliland, a junior major majoring
ing majoring in Anthropology, has chosen
Spain as her summer home.
Spain, she commented, was a
natural choice because she, along
with her family, visited the
country three years ago. Pat also
stated that she picked Spain so
she could improve her Spanish.
Scientific Talk
Held Tomorrow
Dr. Ernest C. Pollard of Penn Pennsylvania
sylvania Pennsylvania State University will
speak Thursday on A Journey
from Physics to Biology.
Pollards talk, scheduled for
4 p.m. in room 227 of the Nu Nuclear
clear Nuclear Science Building, is part
of the Nuclear Sciences Seminar
Series.
All interested persons are in invited.
vited. invited.

Page 5

As of yet this energetic coed
does not know the type of employ employment
ment employment she will receive. Accord According
ing According to her, the type of job she
works at will determine whether
or not she will be able to travel
extensively.
She commented that although
she knows the work will be hard,
she is looking forward to the sum summer.
mer. summer.
Another UF student, Sandy
Johnson, can verify the fact that
a summer job in Europe is hard
work.
Sandy, a senior majoring in
foreign languages, spent one
month last summer working in
Hindelang, Germany. During that
time, she worked alternately as
a waitress and governess from 7
in the morning til 8:30 at night
each and every day.

LUNCH SPECIALS FROM 690
v, O CHUCK WAGON MEALS
*k AW 990
jfcYSljf OPEN 11 AM-9PM
TpEROSA
JUL i iWKHOWD
In Gainesville at the Westgate Shopping Ctr.
3321 W. University Ave. at 34th St.
ALSO IN ORLANDO AND TITUSVILLE

Final Week
4
Jllen Xafctesi
____ L ' '- : ii l ' '-T rJ
1/4 1/3 1/2 3/4
OFF 1
Pniiiersit^
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
CAROLYN PLAZA
' I. ~

After her month's work in ffln fflndelang,
delang, fflndelang, Sandy spent the next three
months traveling through Ger Germany,
many, Germany, Sweden and Denmark.
The AChiO sister then com commented
mented commented that although the work
was hard, it was a wonderful
experience that she wouldnt have
missed for the world.
* *
There are moves afoot to
switch the name double
breasted suits" to cross over
suits." Another move, of con concern
cern concern to men: the trend-setters
want to drop toiletries for
men's cosmetics.
* *
Paris couturier-designer Guy
Laoche believes clothes for
men should be imaginative
without being fanciful. Im
completely against romantic
throwbacks, he said. The
man of today doesnt want
them.



>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Page 6

. The
Florida Alligator
HaH To Let The People Know*
** r
M Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
MiMfiflg Editor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
1h Florida AUlsalor*s official posltloa oa las wo Is expressed
oaly la as ooloans bslow. other material la this Issue star
reflect the opinloa of the writer or cartoonist aad not necessarily
that of the Florida Alllsator unless spedfleally Indicated.

Revise Grading System

With the advent of the
quarter system there is
an immediate need for a
change in the grading sys system.
tem. system.
If a 3tudent fails a five
credit course and repeats
the course a second time
and earns a passing grade
of C the student has now
earned ten credits worth of
D.
At some universities, the
grading system is based on
the fact that if a student
earns a failing grade, be before
fore before taking another coarse
( example: repeating 101
before taking 102), he must
successfully pass and the
failing grade is deleted --
it does not count as credits
attempted for a second
time.
A second solution to the
problem of grades, which
takes some consideration,
is to eliminate them and
give number grades. If a
student is earning aB-plus
(a number grade of 88),
why not give the 88? Av Averages
erages Averages might improve, and
they might not. The com computer
puter computer cannot figure a grade
of plus or minus.
One university has re recently
cently recently applied the system
of pass, fail, and pass with
honors. Os course, this
school is Ivy League and
the purpose is to stop stu student
dent student panic for grades.
While this particular
school isnt on the quar quarter
ter quarter system, the adminis administration

Lets Make Waves

Gov. Claude Kirk just
doesnt seem to understand
that the UF, and Floridas
other universities, are in
deep and lasting financial
trouble.
The state university
system needs a big shot
of money NOW if it is to
emerge from the doldrums
of educational poverty.
Monday, the governor
called on the legislature
for a minimal amount of
help for the universities.
His request is worse than
disappointing.
Now there is only one
avenue of hope through

tration administration has seen the need
to reduce the pressure of
grades.
The UF has found itself
in a predicament with the
quarter system. Thfe grad grading
ing grading system must be chang changed,
ed, changed, preferably where the
failing grade is deleted and
the new grade entered.
Numerous averages (and
students) would be saved.
Election
Awards
BEST USE OF POST POSTERS
ERS POSTERS This kudo goes to
Rich Houk Contrived Party
candidate, who utilized a
picture of himself standing
in a empty sewer vat with
his arm around the per personification
sonification personification of mother.
THE CASSIUS CLAY
HUMILITY AWARD goes to
Bill Mcride for the speech
he gave after finding out
he had been elected pres president
ident president We are the great greatest,
est, greatest, Mcride exclaimed.
I MADE A FOOL OF
YOU AWARD is bestowed
to Ira Brukner, Individual
party candidate, for his
announcement that he plan planned
ned planned to transfer school in
September, even if he had
won as president.
WRITERS CRAMP A AWARD
WARD AWARD Manny James,
member of Forward Party
gets this award for the
astuteness he showed in
writing poop sheets.

the legislature.
Therefore, we call upon
every individual at this uni university,
versity, university, and friends of the
university too, to write,
wire and call their legis legislators
lators legislators and encourage the
lawmakers to get some something
thing something done in a big
way-- for education.
Floridas future may
well depend on what is done
in Tallahassee during the
next nine days the legis legislature
lature legislature meets.
It is our responsibility
to seV that the legislature,
and the governor, know our
wishes.

IWr
*; v ' '" r 't ;
Just Want To Reassure You Folks That There
Are A Thousand Ways To Locate These Bombs
EDITORS NOTEBOOK
Kirks Surprise ipBI
BY STEVE HULL

TALLAHASSEE Gov. Claude Kirk's
speech to the emergency session of the
legislature Monday came as a surprise to
many people.
Kirk, in his 50 minute 70 page talk
staged a dramatic reversal by abandoning
his previous no new tax promise and said
he favored a two cent sales tax hike
and another five cents added to cigarette
prices to alleviate the states financial
doldrums.
Floridas go-go governor even went so far
as to say if the legislature adopts his
proposal he would campaign on every
street corner in the state for passage of
a referendum raising taxes.
Kirks words sound good, but when you
look at past history Kirks remarks are
not so surprising.
Urging a referendum for the state popu population
lation population accomplished two things:
Makes Kirk seem as if he is interested
in state education (thus the legislators
like him)
And secondly by saying let the people
decide, he gains favor in the eyes of the
people.
Consequently Kirks speech was planned
to be politically oriented enough so as not
to alienate anyone. The speech just left
many legislators guessing what the real
motives of the Kirk speech really were.
Numerous Democratic lawmen in Tal Tallahassee
lahassee Tallahassee labeled Kirks education message
as blackmail and dictatorial tactics to
film flam the people.
The battle lines are clearly drawn. The
democrats dont want any structural changes
that would require constitutional require requirements
ments requirements and the Republicans will insist on the
changes as a point of difference.
Watch for a fight during the session.

It is however, refreshing to note that
Kirk has finally realized there is an edu educational
cational educational crisis in the state, but the big
question is whether Kirks proposal can be
implemented by a generally hostile legis legislature.
lature. legislature.
Itll take three-fourths vote of the legis legislature
lature legislature to get the tax changes on the ballot
May 7 as proposed by Kirk.
After listening to the republican govern governors
ors governors speech, I had the distinct feeling Kirk
was attempting to pull the wool over the
eyes of many people.
Kirks speech was eloquent but what he
said dealt mainly with generalities.
We must rebuild the states educational
system to improve; . management is
important; by 1975 the crisis may be re resolved,
solved, resolved, the Governor stated.
Kirk also implied he desired a stonger
hand in the state educational system by
appointing his own educational superboard.
Jim Wolf, Kirks press secretary, sum summed
med summed it up very well when he said, Kirks
speech is only a temporary remedy to a
problem that is of long run significance.
* *
CAPITAL NOTES: UF Graduate (1967)
and special governors aide, Ken Rast, said
he plans to run for the Legislature this
year.
Kitty Kirk, the Governors attractive
daughter attended her fathers speech.
The special Legislative edition of the
Florida Alligator distributed Monday in Tal Tallahassee
lahassee Tallahassee was read with interest by many
of the states lawmakers. Gov. Kirk also
said he would read the issue when he
had time.



PHOENIX WATCHES

To Kill A Computer

Progress tests are upon the
unfortunate of this multiversity
once again. The problem of de delineating
lineating delineating a correct Lernersque
answer and marking in the cor corresponding
responding corresponding slot plague those
seeking a higher education this
year as before. Are these mul multiple
tiple multiple guess creations true indices
of ones progres?
Many years ago when I was a
freshman, as the political slogan
goes, remember being in
a departmental honors course.
We fortunate students werent
required to take progs, but as
a type of absurd experiment I
submitted myself to the seven
oclock ordeal.
Receiving my exam and filling
in all the vital information, I
proceeded to take the test. My
first objective was to find every
all of the above question and
use them as the answers; next
I disregarded every none of the
above answers, and every
answer with a qualifying term of
absoluteness, viz. in every in instance,
stance, instance, always, etc.; next I pro proceeded
ceeded proceeded to look for the most am ambiguous
biguous ambiguous and universal termino terminology,
logy, terminology, viz., the constantly chang changing
ing changing patterns of existence or the
fluctuating trends of human be behavior
havior behavior relative to social relation relationships;
ships; relationships; next I looked for any whose
content in some way pertained,
repeated, or dealt with the sub subject
ject subject of the question. Although this
was the most trying part my
choices had been considerably
narrowed by the above proced procedures.
ures. procedures. Finally I picked from past

Letters to the editor should be limited
to 300 words All letters must be signed ;
however, upon request, the writers name
can be withheld Correspondence will be
subject to standard editing procedures so
that it complies with space limitations

Torch/a Cant Please All
MR. EDITOR:
I feel that it is time that somebody spoke up for the articles by
Joe Torchia. Contrary to some of the letters that have been published
in the Alligator recently, I would like to voice my opinion.
Perhaps the articles were distasteful to some, that cannot be helped.
To many, Im sure that both article were extremely amusing and
some of the better satire to shine forth from the Alligator.
However, like so many things published by the paper, it cannot please
everyone and doubtful that it ever will. We need more good articles
like Torchias to make the Alligator enjoyable reading. You can
please some of the people some of the time, but you cant please all
of the people all of the time*.
RICHARD J. FOSTER, 3AS

you dont realize ho w
HUCH I HATE your B&iNg-
CALLED "wHtTE DIAMONd'AND
, MY BE(AJ6 LABELED AS
BLACK COAL.
... AMD IF you don't HUMY
UP I'LL BUfli fIOT.AND
tooruwnL'iWnwMM.v

BY IRA BRUKNER
experience a lot of twos and
threes.
Ridiculous? Utterly. However,
I made a low B on the test,
and if I was constantly success successful,
ful, successful, I could conceivably pass the
course, learning nothing more
than how to give a Comprehen Comprehensive
sive Comprehensive Course Department and an
upper division counselor the im impression
pression impression that I had satisfactorily
passed the course.

My point is a simple one. Al Although
though Although my example is strange,
many students laboring under
computerized education feel they
are being cheated. Some are
bored, others are frightened of
their inability to express the in intricate
tricate intricate and delicate meaning of a
poem on an IBMfill-in-the-blank
sheet, and still others feel that
their real progress isnt being
satisfactorily measured.
Although many may contend
that the mind goes through the
same processes in answering a
multiple guess creation as it
does in writing an essay then
how comprehensive are the tests?
How reflective are they of ones
creativity, degree of inquiry, and
depth of achievement?
In many Comprehensive
Courses this type of testing
counts as much as 66 per cent
of the final grade; in some 100
per cent. My question is when will
these games we play stop? When
will we liberate ourselves from
our ignorance? Dean Doty, how
much longer will the computer
try to stifle and kill us?

WE'RE 80TH OF THE SAME
substance, it's Your duty
TO MAKE YOUR "CARBON BROKER
YourSomplete equal:; >
T,
n 1
hold ou-m&cMreHaPWJ,
m i owr hand it to you wie
GOT TO MAKE OP Ym MIWP T o
IrtPRWE YOURSELF... LIKE I DID...
AMD THEN SUCK TO THE JOB.
* -STaEHDfr'-

OPEN FORUM:
jAdMiaml tyiMtMt
"There is no hope for the complacent man."

Dont Vote Dont Complain

MR. EDITOR:
I have a question. Maybe it
will be of no importance to the
majority of your readers, but it
is of importance to this country
and to me.
Our University is comprised
of approximately 19,000 students.
Thursday only about 7,000 stu students
dents students voted. My question is, Why?
Why is there apathy among
seemingly educated individuals?
Why is it that in a university
this size, only 7,000 students
took fifteen minutes out of their
busy schedules to vote?
What are these 12,000 people
going to do when they have to
vote in national and state elec elections?
tions? elections?
Send Cong Here
MR. EDITOR:
The Vietnamese war is killing
American soldiers, wasting Am American
erican American money and frazzling Am American
erican American nerves. If the United
States* concern for the welfare
of the South Vietnamese is etched
on so great a scale, why doesnt
President Johnson simply trans transport
port transport them to the United States
where they can receive the bene benefits
fits benefits of the welfare state in more
pleasant surroundings.
In the event that President
Johnson felt it necessary to pro protect
tect protect the South Vietnamese from
our own adherents of commun communism,
ism, communism, he could secure the
refugees safety by sending all
communist advocates and sub subversive
versive subversive planners of violence to
South Vietnam.
If the latter found exile to be a
denial of their constitutional
rights, President Johnson could
continue to pursue his present
course in domestic affairs and
sow the strategic swamps of South
Viet Nam with salt, and every everyone
one everyone would live happily ever after.
GEORGE SPELVIN

The Real Reason ROTC r Stinks

MR. EDITOR:
Last week I was approached
by an Air Force ROTC cadet
officer and was asked, How can
I motivate the disgruntled cadet
in this required ROTC pro program?
gram? program? At that time I did not
have an equitable answer, but
now I feel I do and since I
find I am not at all alone in
my feelings I would like others
to be aware of the situation.
First, a little background ma material
terial material is necessary. I walked out
to the ROTC drill field Jan. 18,
and was somewhat startled to
notice that men who had been
sergeants last quarter were basic
cadets now; that basic cadets
commanded entire flights and
rank was issued lit accordance
with assigned position, regard regardless
less regardless of past experience and/or
knowledge. While true that this
system gives everyone a chance
for a leadership position, what
about motivation? What happens
to the guy who goes through
a drill team or Voice Command

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Are they then, also going to be
apathetic towards voting?
If this is the intrest they take
in their governing bodies now,
how is it going to be later?
I cant imagine anyone not car caring
ing caring enough to exercise their pri privilege
vilege privilege to vote. A privilege so
many have died for and are dying
for today.

DOLLARS -FOR-SCHOLARS
MR. EDITOR:
Last Thursdays Alligator contained an article concerning
the complete revamping of the Dollars For Scholars (DFS)
program. Because of certain unfounded assertions In that
article, I feel obligated to reply. The main thrust of the article
was supplied by Charles Shepherd who maintained that a near
deficit in the program in 1966 led to the reorganization of
the drive.
This alleged deficit occurred because, it was asserted,
last years chairman forgot to subtract expenses of the pro program
gram program before he promised the amount the program would give
to the UF.
My reply is to state, categorically, that neither I, not any
member of my staff, did at any time before, during, or after
the program, promise explicitly or implicitly to anyone, any
specific or general amount to be given to the UF by the student
drive. An examination of the Alligators published during the
time of the campaign for funds would reveal that our stated
goal was to collect slightly less than $19,000. If my memory
serves me correctly (SG did not, or would not, give me a copy
of the final financial report), we collected somewhat over
$32,000.
If the report is ever produced by SG it will demonstrate
clearly that expenses were accounted for in proper fashion.
Secondly, it should be pointed out that, contrary to Shepherds
statements, DFS in 1966 was entirely self-sufficient and did
not rely on SG for expenses. To the best of my knowledge,
this policy was continued subsequent to my graduation and
departure from the UF in December 1966. Incidentally, this
was the first year that such a practice was followed. Thirdly,
In order that the record be set straight, the 1966 program was
run on a year-round basis with several thousand dollars
being collected before the final push during DFS Week.
Finally, I take issue with the statement by Dwight Rogers,
the current DFS chairman that we wont just .ask for hand handouts
outs handouts like last year. We'll try and give them something in
return for their money.
For Mr. Rogers* information, last year the DFS drive
did such things for the students as sell them campus pacs,
spirit hats, shakers, and through the Arnold Air Society,
bring Bob Hope to the campus. If this is not giving the students
something in return for their money, I certainly dont know
what is. H
TIM JOHNSON JR.
CHAIRMAN, DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS. 1966

School and spends a year in the
ranks and finds all his effort
wasted? Why should he care any
more?
Can you now understand why
the attitude of "ROTC stinks'
or ROTC is a waste" comes
about? Can you now understand
why all but the most Gung Ho"
or 1 credit grade conscious (if
effort really does make a dif difference)
ference) difference) bother with the little
extra effort to be "sharp"? Do
you think the regular military
would survive if rewards were
not given for effort?
many seem to share my senti sentiments.
ments. sentiments. ROTC is over for me and
it doesnt really matter, but if
ROTC could actually contribute
something (learning to salute and
do flanking movements seems
useless), even if only the com competition
petition competition of prestige in attaining
rank, there might not be quite
the turmoil about compulsory
ROTC.
ANDREW L. KLEIN, 3AS

How can we ever point to the
communist countries because
their people cant vote, when we
can and dont!
To you 12,000 people I say,
dont ever call politics dirty and
dont complain about your
government, if you dont vote,
you dont have the right!
TANYA FERRO, 3AS

TV
*'Rh<4 T
GATOR,
COMING!

Page 7



The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968.

Page 8

Mr. Mitchells (1)
In case you dont recognize
them this is Chip Hopkins
and Lany Taylor. Theyre
in love with their new Bass
Weejuns from Mr. Mit Mitchells.
chells. Mitchells. There was a time
when Lany thought Chip was
a heel, but now hes got
soul, real soul, thaiks to
Bass Weejuns. See Mr.
Mitchell if you want to stay
on your toes, at either the
University Avenue store or
the new Gainesville Mall
location.
.
Silvermans (2)
She walks in beauty like
the night ... Sandy
Howard, K A T, adorns this
after five satin acetate
dress in chartreuse. The
bodice has an empire
waistline with a large satin
belt with a rhinestone
buckle. And Silvermans
has the dress. Youre never
hung up with nothing to
wear as long as theres
Silvermans.
University City Bank (3)
- .... .- ~ ' _ tr-,
Rona Goldstein, A E Phi
is opening her checking ac account
count account at UCB. Shes get getting
ting getting a first hand demon demonstration
stration demonstration of the courteous
service, from a helpful em employee,
ployee, employee, and you can N bet
your bottom dollar shes
going to be a satisfied cus customer.
tomer. customer. Theres only one
way to bank in Gainesville,
and thats the University
City Bank Way,

J mk

Donigans (4)
' V
Kay Simpson sits amidst
the beauty of nature in a
beautiful ribbon lace and
organza empire dress by
Lanz of California. All the
elegance, charm and ex exquisite
quisite exquisite design of a poem by
Wordsworth couldnt sur surpass
pass surpass the simplicity and
gance of this design. Visit
Donigans and see more of
the same.
Alans Cubana (5)
Here sits Janice Koeher,
D Phi E, shes cramming
a sandwich from Alans
down while she crams for
her exam. Alans is the
quickie way to have lunch,
when other pressing mat matters
ters matters dont allow enough
time for a restaurant meal.
a*
Alans take-out service
may be the answer to your
shortage of time.
Morrisons Cafeteria (6)
Edward Ross, known fond ,y
to his friends as number
10 is one good reason for
eating at Morrisons. Here,
he Assists Vivi Bergh, in
setting up this fine array
of delicious food. Mor Morrisons
risons Morrisons is the expensive
looking cafeteria, with rea reasonable
sonable reasonable prices that every
student can afford. Just
say number 10 please.

',y,- ~ - yf; ; v':;-i- i \~--|mgg jiSBKlj 2t 4 | if '"'* "
- M |M| .*V
jF-fm, ~1
V IH ;; Kp^
Hi & l sis
HSW; Im 1 %
1 Wlmm nr jMm : :. ,j|
Rme &
.. s*>...-; \ | |^Ai^'(i|ii|wH^W|^^Hljj^^W|Bj[^K3^^Wi^B^^^^B|B
(6) "~ i>

P 9
B
- i
i
,



'
By# <*.
Smhhl With Peter Paul § Mary
. o
-; Jit''4>4ktiMk*''V .'*>" . . -' ''- j
*sj tWT#i> jj' ~ v #1? 1
, \M w't ,# w^MMMBam
s' mm. XM 'isWM&^mmmssM
r 4 rffc- S*? *,:> Wy- Ss
: .|| |
SX gap
I' -i ~
>-, .' vX>s£& $ >-* H I g- | £&sr SIMl^
£.. - I ; :' I
. m, 4 ? ;< alB:. M .SlralWM
H 4ks m
I ;***"*ggf I
HW ^V, > '^^^^y^^^^^w^^fflMHm|jj|||i|H|W^^^
jm
g||iig| B Jp
.f f jr :j :
:' iz&mH '/qwk #> m ~ / &.#'. M
v A :'%&#/ -~" > K,m/ w^^^K^^^wESS£Km
> 7# .hjlli
Atel Wi' 7 mi
VH| HBpiBHIBHPpr pjf ; | 114 m
P's ;f *, v
l, pj JT W^^m^f 9
- K v 1 v
£* k w 1 J.IJBr jr
ah
HHE IH W
WfTT ~*' midHiii^i llllllllllll,ll g J T.; ~
M Sr, f


Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for tale |
1966 SUZUKI 50 cc. $115.00.
376-9554, ask for Rick. (A-6 9-
6t-p)
BASENJI PUPPIES, trained,
shots, wormed, ready to go out
looking for a home, AKC, cham champion
pion champion background, reasonable
rates. Ph: 376-4103. (A-67-10t-
P)
ORGAN Farfisa Minicompact,
lass than a year old. Why pay
$170.p0 more for a new one?
Perfect for a group. $325.00
cash. 376-8194. (A-69-st-p)
MAG WHEELS nearly 1/2 cost
at SIOO.OO. Fits chevys, GTOs,
Firebirds. HONDA 150, mechani mechanically
cally mechanically excellent. Only 3,500 miles.
$270.00. 378-5823. (A-72-st-p)
NEW C.B.RADIO Must sell.
Pearce Simpson Escort HI, Ch
9-14. Origianlly $248.00. Will
sell at $150.00. Antenna, Coax
and Pre-amp. included. 376-0706
any time after 6:00. (A-72-3t-p)
POST VERSATRIG Slide rule with
guarantee and manual. A $15.95
value for $9.95. Like new. Call
372-5654, Andy after 7. (A-72-
2t-p)

gpr Do-It-Yourself
1 Classifieds I
To order classifieds, use the form below. Mail it with
H remittance to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330 Reitz ||
gj? Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. ££
.fit DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE ||
M CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN g
§ for sale (consecutive) S§
for rent 1 toy
Es wanted 2 toys
help wanted 3 toys (*lO% discount)
autos 4 days (*lO% Discount) g
||| personal 5 Days and Over P
8| lost-found (*20% discount) g
H services DEADLINES w g
si WORDING Orttora amt tm RECEIVED S
1 day prior to ptoaiicrtton.
S DETERMINE COST |
Count tfaa word*, omlttlnf a, an tfaa. Addraaaaa and pfaona nurobara count K
OK u ooa word. Minimum cfaarfa la SI.OO tor SO words. For each additional £
ij word add Multiply tfaa total by nurobar at days tfaa ad la to ran. Sub- ft
tract tfaa dlaoount Qt applicable) and andoaa a chock tor tfaa remainder. k
For asampla, a SS-word ad to ran 4 days costs $4.90 ($8.44 laaa 64?). &
Student # Phone |
AddreSS'aMHaMMMMMWMmaw-"|
§ city State ___ Zi P |
Money cawiot be refunded If ad Is cancelled.

j for sole J
BASENJI PUPS. AKC reg. Ideal
apt. pet. No odor, no shedding,
no barking. Wormed and shots.
SIOO. Call 472-2408 after 5. (A (A---69-st-p)
--69-st-p) (A---69-st-p)
FLY! Hawks Inc. has
shares available in a Cessna
Skyhawk. Dual radios dual omni.
Full panel. 372-1290 or 372-
6045 after 6:00. (A-67-7t-p)
HONDA 50. Good condition.
Automatic start. SIOO.OO. Call
Mark after 10:30 p.m. Room
462. 372-9435. (A-73-3t-p)
SACRAFICE: 65 Westinghouse
TV, $75.00, Heavy Duty Royal
Typewriter, $45.00. Artcarve
Diamond Engagement Ring,
$170.00 was $205.00. Takingbest
offers. Call George, 378-7889.
(A-73-2t-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 Ducati 125 cc.
Street or woods. Superior con condition.
dition. condition. $225.00 with extras. Call
Terry, 372-6588. (A-73-3t-p)
1960 TRIUMPH TR3. Baby Blue.
Good condition, engine rebuilt
within past year. $500.00. Call
376-9564. (G-73-3t-p)

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Page 10

| | for talc |
1960 METROPOLITAN Conver Convertible.
tible. Convertible. New Paint, tires, top. Per Perfect
fect Perfect running condition. Got new
car for graduation. $350.00 or
best offer. 378-8935. (G-73-6t-
P)
TRADE: 1965 Volkswagen Sedan,
clean, 25,000 miles, Radio, for a
clean 1964 or newer Karmen
Ghia. No Junkers. Call 378-5837.
(G-2t-73-p)
j for rent
QUIET, newly decorated, fur furnished
nished furnished upstairs bedroom, Down Downtown
town Downtown vicinity. 378-7845 after 5:00
p.m. (B-71-3t-p)
LARGE 2-bedroom apartment lor
rent. Ideal for 3 students. SIIO.OO
a month, all utilities included.
Phone 376-8314 after 5:00. (B (B---68-st-p)
--68-st-p) (B---68-st-p)
NO LEASE!! Female Roommate
for private house. 5 min. walk
to Med. Center. One bedroom,
share utilities, $31.35 per month.
372-3940. (C-73-lt-p)
NOT SETTLED YET? Rooms
walking distance from campus.
t CH and AC. Phone 378-8122 after
I 5:30 p.m. (B-68-9t-p)
MALE roommate to share 2-bed 2-beds
s 2-beds room Village Park Apartment.
3 40-70 per month. Plus utilities,
3 372-5283 or See Apt. 99. (C (C---j)
--j) (C---j) 73-3 t-p)
5 SUBLEASE 2 bedroom apt. at
5 Landmark. Call 372-2909 or 372-
3 6535. (B-69-st-c)
u NEED third man for 3 bedroom
house. Comfortable, convenient,
| private, 5 blocks from campus.
? Immediate or beginning Term
H ID. Call 378-6339 1613 NW
H sth Ave. (C-73-st-p)

1 SWtf PLUS '3 Stooges^B
< I dont like it, Arme Padula
& Simply grand! Margaret Padula
[SIDNEY PQLTXBR T£CMN "^l
I show me rpm TY) fffft I
I " WITg LOVe4
PfcgEigfi
itcHRRLTMHemyii
i ImHKimiunn schell I

wanted ~1.
WANTED: A groovy type chick
who wants to make the Daytona
Grand Prix Races February 3
and 4 with an action guy. Call
Watt after 5:30 at 378-7069. (C (C---
--- (C---
TWO SENIOR LAW school Stu Students
dents Students want an attractive coed to
plan and prepare meals four
nights a week. Call 372-6950. (C (C---
--- (C---
WANTED: 2 tickets for Peter,
Paul and Mary concert. Call
Carmen at 378-5104. (C-73-kt-
JBH
WANTED 2 good quality stereo
speakers with enclosures. Suit Suitable
able Suitable for 70 watt amplifier. Please
call 372-8855.
WANTED: 1 female roommate
to share 1 bedroom apartment
at Univ. Gardens for February
or Third Quarter. Call 372-7247.
(C-72-st-p)
WANTED: Talent for Graham
Areas playboy club. Pianist,
ventriluquist, vocalist, guitarist,
comedian, any unusual talent for
floor show. Contact Stan Taylor,
376-9136. (E-71-3t-p)
help wanted
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY
to establish your own business
_as Protective Life's U of F
College Specialist. Home office
training program with guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed salary pi us com mission bon bonus.
us. bonus. Unlimited income and ad advancement
vancement advancement potential. Send re resume
sume resume to G. C. Warner, P. O.
Box 2026, Orlando. We will ar arrange
range arrange your interview and apti aptitude
tude aptitude test in Gainesville. (E-71-
st-p)

| help wanted
TOe University of Florlda tias
challenging positions available
for inexperienced and exper experienced
ienced experienced Clerk-Typists and Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringe bene benefits
fits benefits include the opportunity to
attend one (1) college course
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the^*Hub > .
(E-61-ts-c)
>
lost-found
FOUND: Pair black frame
glasses, out-side Architecture
and Fine Arts Building. Call
376-0841. (L-73-3t-nc)
personal
??did Sam what Guess! My! My!
yuffT. (J-73-lt-p)
=pi
vanDJfcel
fFifeSyl
| cofeature at 9:00 |
Ijwwumwd
fNMjMMgrg.
MATTHEIM
TNI
t HMV. fcfcJrrfty
Ends Thurs. *
TO THS MAN *
* or mi ooiocN mho *,
IOVI is A MAUTIfUt WAV! I
* THIHAKM KM
WMCTION...
IMHMCM I
M HU....11 (
I f MKMNM
* 1 - *m m nud i
I
1 i



Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

CAMPUS CALENDAR

Wednesday, January ZX/'
Institute of Judaic Studies: begin beginning
ning beginning and intermediate Hebrew,
Jewish history, introduction to
Jewish thought, Hlllel Foun Foundation,
dation, Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Nu Chapter film: Mar Martin
tin Martin Luther/ Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Student Fla. Education Assn.: Dr.
Ira Gordon, Inquiry Into
Change, Norman Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Pi Mu Epsilon: Challenge in
the Classroom, 346 Union,
8 p.m. Everyone invited.
Thursday, February 1
Business Administration Sem Seminar:
inar: Seminar: Dr. John K. King, The Theoretical
oretical Theoretical Foundations of Strate Strategic
gic Strategic Intelligence, 18 Mat., 3:30
p.m.
Baptist Student Center: fellow fellowship
ship fellowship supper, 1604 W. Univ.
Ave., 5:30 p.m. Everyone wel welcome.
come. welcome.
Gator waning Ciuo: meeting and
film, 355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi: executive
meeting, Union 150 G
Mrs. University of Florida: de desert
sert desert orientation, 122 Union, 8
p.m.
Friday, February 2
Reitz Union Board: interviews for
Films Chairman, 310 Union,
3 p.m.
Union Movie: Shenandoah,
Union Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing, 214
Fla. Gym, 8 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
. ~ *- >
Tickets are now on sale for Russ
Burgess, Edward Albee, Juan
Serrano, and the Graham Area
Playboy Party.
ADMINISTRATIVE
J
NOTICES
PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are ex expected
pected expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to us his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
CLC 141: Wednesday, Feb. 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or
119.
CLC 142: Wednesday, Feb. 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4,7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D) to Little 121 or 125;
(E) to Little 113; (F) to Little
227, 233, or 235; (G) to Pea-

#| Visit Us At Our New Home
Low Interest Rates On Loans TttlH t3w Wsb
Auto Loans Our Specialty V@SSlilltflHUilaHVc
"Serving U F Employees Since 1935" *' s
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT 1 INION-AlWlwwa^.

body 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H)
to Peabody 201, 202, 203, 208 or
209; (I-J) to Flint 110 or 112;
(K) to Walker 301, 303, 307
or 308; (L) to Little 201, 203,
205 or 207; (M) to Little 213,
215, 217, 219, 221, 223 or 225;
(N) to Little 237; (O) to Little
239; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102;
(R) to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium.
CBS 261; Tuesday, Feb. 6,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,
113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or
119.
CBS 262: Tuesday, Feb. 6,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Walker
Auditorium; (M-R) to Leigh 207;
(S-Z) to Little 101, 109 or 113.
CMS 171: Thursday, Feb. 1,
7 p.m. All CMS 171 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
MS 301: Thursday, Feb. 1,7
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,113,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.
STUDENT JOBS AVAILABLE:
Students who are eligible for the
Work-Study program should
apply at the Student Employment
Office, 182 Building E. Part-time
work available for typists, file
clerks, laboratory assistants and
art work. ~
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EX EXAMINATION:
AMINATION: EXAMINATION: All foreign lan language
guage language functional examinations
will be given Saturday, Feb. 10,
18 Anderson Hall, 10 a.m. 12
noon.
DEADLINE FOR REMOVAL
OF I GRADES: Feb. 9 is the
deadline date for removal of I
grades (excluding 699 or 799)
for all graduate students who wish
to receive their degrees on March
19.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS: Examinations
in French, German, Russian and
Spanish will be given at 9:45
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 3, in Leigh
Hall.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION MAJORS
AH teacher education majors, re regardless
gardless regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence or enroll enrolling
ing enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and the
elementary block (EDE 300, 301,

BLUE BULLETIN

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES

and 302). English and speech
majors do not take the test, as
, SCH 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are being now made in Room 124,
Norman Hall.
GENERAL NOTICES
PAINTING FOR FUN CLASSES
will be held Feb. 7-28 from
7- 9:30 p.m. Monday and Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, in Room 118 of the Reitz
Union. Mrs. Esther Bristol will
teach the class. The cost is SB.
To register call Ext. 2741, Pro Program
gram Program Office, Room 310, Reitz
Union.
CHEERLEADING TRYOUTS: A
cheerleading clinic will be held
Feb. 5-16 from 3:30 5 p.m.
every day on Florida Field. Try Tryouts
outs Tryouts will he held Feb. 16. At Attendance
tendance Attendance is mandatory starting
Feb. 5.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of

The Typewriter Is Mightier Than...
,c \ I
- '' I I Hr
#**-
rtmiTiriiMirn ~ u i i W -': -^v;^S^J-^'.^'iV'';
A Newspaper Is Many Things To Many Different People.
One Little Old Lady From Memphis Won A Contest By Listing 417 Different Ways
To Use Old Newspapers. You Know.. .Things Like Swatting Flies, Lining Gar Garbage
bage Garbage Pails, Wrapping Fish, Making Paper Dolls; Etc.
But Newspapers Are So Much More.. .Or Should Be. They Should Defend, Ex Extol,
tol, Extol, Criticize And Just Plain Tell A Story. One Major Service That The Florida
Alligator Brings You, Along With These Others, Is Through Advertising. Not
Only Do Our Advertisers Feel That YOU Are Worth Speaking To, But Their Pro Products
ducts Products And Services Are Offered With You And Your Particular Needs In Mind.
The Florida Alligator

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

the interview date at the
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. All companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Mar. June and Aug.
graduates unless indicated other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.
FEB. 1: INTERNATIONAL TEL TELEPHONE
EPHONE TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CORP.
Physics, Chem., EE, ME, IE,
Eng., Bus. Management.
FEB. 1: WEST VA. PULP &
PAPER CO. Ch.E., ME, MSIE,
MBA, CE, EE, Chem.
FEB. 1: UJS. GEOLOGICAL SUR SURVEY
VEY SURVEY Eng. and Hydrology.
FEB. 1: ANHEUSER-BUSCHINC.
ME, EE, ChE., IE.
FEB. 1: GEORGIA POWER CO.
EE, IE, ME, Sales Eng., De Design
sign Design Eng.
FEB. 1: DEPT. OF HOUSING &
URBAN DEVELOPMENT. Fi Finance
nance Finance Analyst, CE. Juniors for
summer employment.
FEB. 1: GENERAL FOODS
CORP. Fin., Acct., Ind. Rela.,
EE, ME, ChE, IE.
FEB. 1: JOSEPH E. SEAGRAM
& SONS, INC. Chem., EE, ME,
Acct., Chem., Bact.
FEB. 1: HOWARD, NEEDLES,
TAMMEN & BERGENDOFF. CE.
FEB. 1: THE BABCOCK & WIL WILCOX
COX WILCOX CO. ME, ChE. MET.E.,
CE, Physics, NE, IE, Acct.
FEB. 1: WORTHINGTON CORP.
ME, ChE, EE, IE, Sales Eng.,
Research & Devel., Mfg. Eng.

PLACEMENT NOTICES

FEB. 1: SWIFT & CO.
FEB. 1: ORTHO PHARMACEU PHARMACEUTICAL
TICAL PHARMACEUTICAL CORP.
FEB. 1,2: RING, MAHONEY
& ARNER. Acct.
FEB. 1,2: HUGHES AIRCRAFT
CO. EE, ME, Math, Physics.
FEB. 1,2: MCGRAW-EDISON
POWER SYSTEMS DIVISION.
Physics, EE, ME.
FEB. I, 2: PROCTER & GAMBLE
CO. Lib. Arts, Bus. Adm,
FEB. 2: AGENCY FOR INTER INTERNATIONAL
NATIONAL INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT.AU
majors.
FEB. 2: UNITED AIRCRAFT RE RESEARCH
SEARCH RESEARCH LABORATORIES. Re Research
search Research Aero. Eng., ChE, EE, ME,
Met./Mat. Eng., Physics, Chem.,
Math.
FEB. 2: CROWN ZELLERBACH
CORP. IE, ChE, ME, EE.
FEB. 2: FLORIDA STATE ROAD
DEPT. CE, Services
FEB. 2: LEGISLATIVE AUDI AUDITORS
TORS AUDITORS OFFICE. Acctg.
FEB. 2: CHARLESTON NAVAL
SHIPYARD. Eng.
FEB. 2: SMITH, BRALEY &
JOHNSON. Acct.
FEB. 2: CALGON CORP. Chem.,
ChE, Biol.
FEB. 2: WASHINGTON NAT NATIONAL
IONAL NATIONAL INSURANCE CO. Lib.
Arts, Bus. Adm.
FEB. 2: AVCO CORP.
FEB. 2: FEDERAL COMMUNI COMMUNICATIONS
CATIONS COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Page 11



Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday. January 31. 1968

BV-IINE:
JOE TORCH IA
V Jmi

I MUST HAVE BEEN OH AROUND
TWELVE I GUESS WHEN SHE
WENT AND BECAME A ] NUN
i asked her why
And she said god is calling me
And I asked her how do you
know
And she said I just know god
works in strange ways
And I said why is god strange
And she said because he has
so much to do he has to work
in strange ways
And I said but my catechism
says were supposed to know
love and serve god in this world
and be happy with him in the
next arent we so how can we
if hes strange huh
And she said something about
how were supposed to love god
and not doubt god so we can go
to heaven
And I said does god love us
And she said yes of course
he does look at all hes given
us look how fortunate you are
And I said well how come
billy up the street got a new
bike and I have to use yours
a girls bike and all the guys
laugh and so that must mean
god loves billy more
And she said no she said god
must have thought a new bike
wouldnt be good for me she said
maybe I could get killed on it
or something
And I said couldnt I get killed
on your bike too
And she said yes but maybe
And I said besides if I get
killed I would go to heaven and
be happy with god in the next
And she said maybe you wont
go to heaven maybe
And I said but god loves me
doesnt he arent'l his children
And she said yes you are a
child of god
And I said well god wouldnt
send me to hell if I got killed
Jordanian
Named
BIA Head
Walid Abu-Gharbieh, 7AG has
been chosen the new chairman
of the UF Board of International
Affairs, according to George J.
Vinas, director of International
Affairs.
Abu-Gharbieh, a native of Jor Jordan,
dan, Jordan, is past president of the Arab
Club and coordinator of the Inter International
national International Beauty Queen Contest
for the 1967 International Week.
He will be installed after the
International Week which will be
held February 5 thru 12.
_Bl
JUato*\
1 1 ads l
jM SELL \

Feature Editor

on a girls bike would he espec especially
ially especially since it ain't new and if
he loved me he wouldnt send me
there would he especially since
I go to confession every week
and tell father how*l sinned by
envying billy for having a new
boys bike
And she said maybe you havent
been so good
And I said yes I have
And she said you never know
And I said I love Jesus so
Ill go to heaven I have to
And she said you never know
And I said why
And she said god works in
strange ways
I MUST HAVE BEEN OH
AROUND TWELVE I GUESS
WHEN SHE WENTANDBECAME
A NONE

Camp Positions for Faculty, Older Students
Exciting work with youngsters at boys camp,
June 23 to August 23. Mature staff of men
from all parts of the country (foreign stu students).
dents). students). High degree of staff fellowship. Open Openings
ings Openings include nature, astronomy, electronics,
ham radio, musicals, folk music, archery,
drama, overnight camping., golf, baseball,
basketball coaches, tennis, waterfront (in (including
cluding (including sailing, skiing, canoeing), fine arts.
Fine salaries, higher for experienced men.
40th year. Interviews on campus. Send full
experience, references. Camp Mah-Kee-Nac,
137 Thacher Lane, South Orange, N.J. 07079.

CAREER IN
ROCKET AND Ifglgf
MISSILE
PROPULSION \VSKm
EXPLORE the potential for proses- laris, Poseidon, and Sidewinder propul- Science Other
sional achievement at the Naval Ord- sion systems as well as virtually every Chemistry Accounting
nance Station, Indian Head, Maryland. missile system in use by the Fleet today. Physics Mathematics
Few technical fields offer you as many Located 25 miles south of Washing- \
opportunities for an exciting and re- ton, D.C., Indian Head is close to the Liberal career Civil Service benefits
warding career as the rapidly growing cultural, social, and scientific advan- include graduate study at nearby univer univerfield
field univerfield of chemical propulsion. Indian Head tages 6f the Nations Capital offering sities with tuition expenses reimbursed
is a recognized leader in research, de- opportunities for pleasant suburban or Career pos j tions are a)so avaj | as | e for
velopment, production, and evaluation country life within a few miles of moun- BUSINESS and LIBERAL ARTS graduates
of propellants and rocket propulsion tain and shore resorts. in finance, procurement, personnel ad adsystems
systems adsystems and has advanced the state-of- Professional positions available in: ministration, computer programming j
the-art of chemical propulsion through Engineering 1 rjf
participation with the Department of Aerospace Electronics Naval Ordnance Station fjft
Defense and NASA. Indian Head has Chemical Industrial Indian Head, Maryland 20640 jjx
made important contributions to the Po- Electrical Mechanical An Equal Opportunity Employer
Representative on Campus FEBRUARY 14 1968
For interview, contact your placement office 9

From The Zilch Pit

"We got the wood for this
set from the zilch pit!
This was the comment of set
designer Don C reason at the
production meeting for the Flo Florida
rida Florida Players production of
Marat / Sade.
C reason decided to use only
wood in the set because **l like
the feel and texture of wood.
He and Albert Wehlburg, techni technical
cal technical director for all Players pro productions,
ductions, productions, decided to use old wood
instead of "ageing new lumber.
The problem was where they
would find a supply of weather weatherbeaten
beaten weatherbeaten boards?
The answer was the "zilch
pit. This was Creasons sar sardonic
donic sardonic term for a large pile of
old wood taken from homes that
had been torn down.
Florida Players made ar arrangements
rangements arrangements to obtain this wood.

PLAYERS IN REHERSAL

They then transported it to the
Constans theatre only three
weeks ago.
Today, this "zilch pit is rap rapidly
idly rapidly being transformed into the
bath house of an 18th Century
insane asylum. "Marat / Sade
is set in the asylum of .Charen .Charenton,
ton, .Charenton, France. It is the scene of

Value Rated Used Cars
AIJ FBS Station Wagon. V 8 factory air
1964 OlllS* cond. standard shift, radio heater
White. $1295
gg% f* Station Wagon. Nice condition
OA vOKlfif 6 cylinder auto trans.
Economical.. $695
t%A D|| Rill lor Station Wagon Three seats V 8
Us MIIMIICI fac } ory air C ond power steering
& brakes. . $1195
63 Chevrolet
61 Plymooth m
Special 2 plus 2 convertible Yellow
LL Pontinf Black bucket seats. Chrome motor
factory air mag wheels. $2595
LA pnUT|Ar r x carbs 4 speed stick
wWI lAv Burgandy hardtop coupe. $1695
BRASINGTON
CADILLAC-0 LDSMOBILE INC.
2001 NW 13 ST. 378r5301

a play directed by the Marquis
de Sade.
The controversial play will
begin its seven-performance run
on February 12. All evening per performances
formances performances will begin at 8; the
Saturday matinee will have a cur curtain
tain curtain time of 2:30. Tickets will
be on sale at the Florida Union
box office.



Labor One /Means Os Survival

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: PART TWO
OF A.SERIES)
Victor Riesel, nationally syn syndicated
dicated syndicated columnist of Inside La Labor,
bor, Labor, has been reporting labor
news since the 19305. He has
always been an ardent fighter
of the rackets. In April, 1956,
he was blinded by an acid-throw acid-throwing

Society In Year 2000
'Radically Different

By ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff Writer
Structure of American society
in the year 2000 will be radi radically
cally radically different from todays
society but will be shaped by it.
American Society in the Year
2000 was the subject of a speech
Monday night by Dr. Daniel Bell.
Dr. Bell headed a Commission
on the Year 2000 of the American
Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Begun in 1962 by 28 leading
scholars, the com mission studied
four sources of change that will
take place in the next 32 years:
technology, structural change,
social demands and the inter international
national international system.
Technology will undergo the
most radical change, Bell told a
capacity audience in the Reitz
Union auditorium.
Emphasis will change from
mechanical technology to intel intellectual
lectual intellectual technology. This will re require
quire require a new way of thinking
about things.
Bell listed bio-medical engin engineering,
eering, engineering, the computer revolution
and weather modification as ex examples
amples examples of this new technology
and noted that they will have a
greater impact on society than
the transportation revolution had
on the last century.
The advent of this new tech technology
nology technology will not be without pro problems
blems problems Bell warned.
Man will increase his under understanding
standing understanding of the basis of life in
order to increase his life span,
but ideas on such subjects as
retirement will have to change.
A man retiring at 65 will still
have possibly another 20 years
us useful life left.
The technological revolution
will also bring about an infor information
mation information revolution with the crea crea'lguana'
'lguana' crea'lguana' Is
Rescheduled
For Friday
Because of popular demand,
the Gainesville Little Theatre
will present another performance
of Tennessee Williams Night
of the Iguana Friday at 8:30 p.m.
at the GLT Playhouse, 4039 NW
16th Blvd.
Thi s performance has run the
past two weekends, and because
of the turn-away crowds the GLT
decided to hold one more per performance,
formance, performance, Friday evening only.
Students may attend any GLT
production at the special rate
of $1 the regular price is
$1.50
Reservations may be made by
calling the GLT at 376-4949.
Tickets must be picked up 15 min minutes
utes minutes before curtain.

ing acid-throwing attack of a small-time
Brooklyn hood.
At the Fairleigh Dickinson
University convention, Riesel
talked about the role of econom economics
ics economics and labor in the U.S., and
the power of unions in the world.
Riesel stated, One means of
survival the labor movement.
When not talking about the U.S.,
he referred to the economic, pol political,
itical, political, and social struggles of
China. Mao attacked the indus industrial

tion of a vast computer utility
system.
Thousands of people can be
connected by consoles to a com computer
puter computer center, Bell said,These
consoles could eventually be as
common as telephones in the av average
erage average home and will become the
largest single industry of the
future. c
How it will be organized,
public or private, will be one of
the great social and political
questions.
Changes in weather conditions
will be a reality of the future.
Since the direction of ocean
currents now direct weather and
they in turn are directed by
the polar ice caps, it would be
possible to cover or melt parts
of these caps in order to change
the worlds weather, according
to Dr. Bell.
A second major change in
society will be in its structure.
Bell called the society of the
future post industrial, character characterized
ized characterized by the predominance of a
service sector in the society.
The United States is already
changing to this form of society,
Bell said, and by 1975 over 60
per cent of the American work
force will be in the service sec sector.
tor. sector. Two big groups will emerge,
the semi-skilled and profession professionals.?
als.? professionals.?
Social demands brought forth
some of the most interesting
ideas in Dr. Bells speech.
By 2000 there will be 100
million more Americans. They

k class ring
I \ Now Available off-campus
1 A college degree is an earned asset
worthy of pride. Wear your achieve-
I ment proudly with the University of
/ Florida class ring from Gainesville's
I / leading jeweler.
I /GAINESVILLE'S (QUALITY JEWELER
Pujtkjsnla'uln.
* 103 W. Univ? Ave
Phone 376-2655 New Gainesville Mall

VICTOR RIESEL SAYS

trial industrial movement, said Riesel,
Which lead to internal conflict.
Shan-Chi, labor leader of Com Communist
munist Communist China, was able to mob mobilize
ilize mobilize thousands of people and
command a tremendous amount
of power.
However, negotiation is the
key word of labor movements.
Without it, the cause fails. But,
in the United States, such nego negotiations
tiations negotiations have proven quite suc successful,
cessful, successful, which makes OUR labor

will make more social demands
in the areas of health, educa education
tion education and pollution control.
Pollution will be one of the
major problems. Pure air is
a sacred resource. By 2000 elec electric
tric electric power will be free and pure
air expensive.
Under questioning by the aud audience
ience audience Dr. Bell noted that space
exploration is more a natter of
relative priorities. Many scien scientists
tists scientists wish money would be spent
more for earth research than
on space.
On Vietnam type wars of the
future he expressed optimism
stressing that there is an in increasing
creasing increasing effort on the part of
the UJS. government to disen disengage
gage disengage from this type of conflict.
Citing current civil wars in
Africa, Bell noted that five or
10 years ago this would have
brought UJS. intervention.
The role of the individual in
this new society was concluded
by Bell to be both freer and
more bold.
Man will be more of an in individual
dividual individual than ever in his his history
tory history but will be constrained by
mass society.

I DRY CLEANING
J Ol! ]'] 1 0 opo 1 j
* -* a.Il;
Gator Groomer
Next To l'riix. Post Office

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

movement so prosperous.
The power/prosperity was
shown in the 1965 Transport
Workers Union strike that crip crippled
pled crippled New York City. Michael
Quill, who headed the union, prov proved
ed proved that a strike could stop all
activity in the heartbeat of the
world.
The question is, why was this
successful? Quill represented an
era of civil disobedience the
American Labor Union. The most
influential case was the merger
of the AFL-CIO and a sit-in
headed by Walter Reuther when he
attacked General Motors in 1937.
Riesel stated that the power
given to such men as James
Hoffa could cripple the U.S. This
was stated before Hoffa was im imprisoned.
prisoned. imprisoned. The end result is that
Hoffa is in jail and the US is
still economically powerful. The
power Hoffa held is the same
kind held by key political fig figures
ures figures when it comes to winning
elections. New Yorks Governor
Rockefeller wins the support of
street cleaners and hospital
workers.
The columnist also spoke of
the radical changes that are now
occuring in the wage scales and
the number of working hours
which will result in automations
take-over and the adjustment civ-

CAROLYN PLAZA SHOP
8 Barbers Afehampoos
> S t Free Parking
Ml Razor Cuts
We Specialize In Scissor Work
ip
yr V
Ik A
THAT y*RANKUN GIRL
If youre lucky enough to have tickets to hear
Peter, Paul and Mary, you should also be
lucky enough to have an outfit like this to
wear for the occasion Os natural colored
puckered cotton, a modest twenty-four dollars
. ... in our junior comer.
franklins
* Bourn t Briley Sboy
Open Monday Through Saturday 9 f Q 5:30
~2401 SW 13 th St.- Village Square

illzatlon will have to face.
Riesels concluding statement
once again referred to this
power that labor has in in influencing
fluencing influencing governmental prac practices.
tices. practices. There is no need for a
strike as labor can supply funds
to' saturate all communications
media.
The student reactions to Ri Riesel's
esel's Riesel's discussion were: ..
The problem with labor in the
20th century as compared to
the 19th is that there is no
fight against the classes. RleSel
said that the Communist theory
of classes is archaic there
is no class struggle.
. The student is already
involved in the labor movement
of today.
. . One must belong to
an organized group.
. . Being classified as a
working man, cannot be called a
disgusting term.
... The 20th century refers
back to the 19th century indiv individualism.
idualism. individualism.
The labor movement is one
that college students cannot over overlook.
look. overlook. The very existence of our
society, economic growth, and
quasi-governmental stability is
based on labor. Like it or not,
after we graduate, we join the
labor moviant.

Page 13



Page 14

:, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

~,/\;'V'''; ,'; : ..; : -:.:-
llilE&lPi

these people
are the
Seminole Seminolea
a Seminolea
they are the
people who have
made your years
: [
at the University
of Florida
the most exciting
and challenging
'* *
of your life,
you can
remember these
days with the
Seminole,
your record
0
of your
college career,
order your copy
today.
send $5 with
your name
address and
student number
to Seminole
330 Reitz Union.



.SAYS COACH LYNN
Tiger Errors Lost Game

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writer
Those three turnovers, those
three costly turnovers, mut muttered
tered muttered Auburn head basketball
coach Bill Lynn with a notice noticeable
able noticeable grimace on his face after
watching his team go down to
a 65-60 defeat at the hands of
the Gators.
Turning the ball over three
times in a row to Florida on
bad passes in the second half
was the turning point of this
ball game," explained Lynn. Af After
ter After that we just couldnt make
the big play when we needed to
have it. 11
Lynn also said he felt his play players
ers players lost their poise after the
three turnovers.
We started to force our plays
too much," said Lynn. You

Ron Yary Goes First In Draft;
Dolphins Get Oranges Csonka

(UPl) Ron Yary of Southern
California and five other behe behemoths
moths behemoths were quickly snapped up in
the second combined National and
American Football League draft
today in what was rapidly be becoming
coming becoming the year of the line lineman."
man." lineman."
Yary, a two-time All-America
offensive tackle who paved the

Lombardi May Quit

(UPI) Green Bay Packers
coach Vince Lombardi said Mon Monday
day Monday there would be a press dinner
and news conference Thursday
at 6 p.m. at the Oneida Golf
and Riding Club in Green Bay.
The nature of the news con conference
ference conference was not disclosed. How However,
ever, However, reports have persisted for
months that Lombardi will re resign
sign resign as head coach of the world
champions but remain as general
manager.
He has held both positions since
coming here in 1959. In that
time, his teams have won six
National Football League Wes Western
tern Western Division titles, five league
championships and the only two
Super Bowl games played.
The reports reached a fever
pitch when the Packers were in
Miami earlier this month prac-
Two Tampa
Aides Leave
(UPI) Two of the three as assistant
sistant assistant football coaches at the
University of Tampa submitted
their resignations Monday.
They were offensive backfleld
coach Vic Prinzi and line coach
Larry Beckish.
Prinzi had been as assistant
coach since 1964. Beckish had
been with the Spartans for two
years.

DRY CLEANING
counter open
i Ii 1 ci (§ I1 i #
Gator Groomer
Next Ji r..n. I s-t tflct-

cant do that against Floridas
zone defense and expect to win."
Lynn descrobed Auburns de defense
fense defense as a sagging man-to-man.
"We wanted to drop our guards
back into the middle to help our'
big men against Neal Walk. Over Overall,
all, Overall, I think they did a good job."
Lynn praised Auburn forward
Ron Jackson for his outside
shooting.
I had to bench Ron in the
Kentucky game because he wasn't
shooting enough. Now he's finally
starting to open up and shoot
more."
"I thought the game got very
rough at times," stated Lynn.
Sometimes too rough for bas basketball."
ketball." basketball."
All of our games this season
have been very close," concluded
Lynn. Nobody has blown us out
of the gym. But were not getting
the right break at the right time."

way for sensational runner O. J.
Simpson, was the bonus" se selection
lection selection of the Minnesota Vikings
and the Cincinnati Bengals,
Atlanta Falcons, San Diego Char Chargers,
gers, Chargers, Boston Patriots and New
Orleans Saints quickly followed
suit by tabbing linemen.
I
1
The only non-lineman selected
among the first seven was line linebacker

ticing for the Super Bowl game
against Oakland. Lombardi said
then that he had not decided on
his plans, and that he would
vacation in Florida after the
game and take a long, hard
look at Vince Lombardi.
Other reports have said Lom Lombardi
bardi Lombardi might return to his native
New York and take over the
reins of the AFL Jets. But Lom Lombardi
bardi Lombardi said in Miami that he de definitely
finitely definitely would stay in Green Bay
in some capacity.

/ THEMGB: \
/ IT WILL TEACH YOU ALL THERE \
/I* TO KNOW SPORTS CAW
*
The MGB is what sports cars are all about. Dual-carb
\ 1798 cc engine, fade-free disc brakes, firm racing X
\ suspension, precise steering. Other pleasures to X
\ taste English leather bucket seats, wind-up X
X windows, hinged side vents, lockable X
\ trunk, snug removable top,*room in X
X the back for extra gear or hang- X
X ers on. The MGBAmericas X
best selling sports car.
W
Crane x
Imports
,506 East University 372-4373

BILL LYNN

backer linebacker Fred Carr of the Univer University
sity University of Texas at El Paso, se selected
lected selected by the linebacker-rich
Green Bay Packers. Larry
Csonka of Syracuse, a fullback,
was chosen by the Miami Dol Dolphins,
phins, Dolphins, who picked eighth.
Cincinnati, given the first
choice in the regular round, pick picked
ed picked All-America center Bob John Johnson
son Johnson of Tennessee; Atlanta grab grabbed
bed grabbed defensive tackle Claude
Humphrey of Tennessee A & I;
San Diego picked offensive tackle
Russ Washington of Missouri;
Boston tabbed defensive tackle
Dennis Byrd of North Carolina
State, and New Orleans went for
defensive end tackle Kevin
Hardy of Notre Dame.
Minnesota had been expected
to use its preferential pick, which
it obtained from the New York
Giants, to draft a quarterback.
But the Vikings swung a deal Mon Monday
day Monday for quarterback Gary Cuozzo
of the New Orleans Saints, clear clearing
ing clearing the way to go instead for ,a
lineman.

SPORTS

Wednesday, January 31, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Cougars Lead UPI;
Bruins Stay Second

By SANDY PRISANT
United Press International
The University of Houston con continued
tinued continued to turn the impossible
dream into reality Monday as the
surprising Cougars again outdis outdistanced
tanced outdistanced UCLA and remained the
top team in college basketball
after the ninth week of the 1967-
68 season.
Flirting ever more seriously
with the national title in what
was supposed to be the Year
of the Bruins/' Houston, 18-0,
garnered 28 first place votes
from United Press Internation Internationals
als Internationals 35-member Board of
Coaches for the second week in
a row and piled up the same 343
points to top UCLA by 22 points.
The Bruins, 15-1, who fell from
the top spot that they had held
through 23 straight ratings after
their heralded 71-69 loss to the
Cougars two weeks ago, started
all over again after having their
winning streak snapped at 47.
Coach Johnny Woodens club
bombed Holy Cross 90-67 and
edged Boston College 84-77 last
week in its only two outings.
But Houston, now possessor of
the longest winning streak in
major college basketball, hardly
worked up a sweat in talcing its
19th straight, a 112-79 decision
over Lamar Tech Saturday.
In the balloting based on games
played through Jan. 27, the first
seven schools remained where
they were in last weeks rat ratings
ings ratings and the only new addition
to the top 10 was Duke, which
replaced Utah in the select circle.
Following UCLA were North
Carolina, New Mexico, St. Bona Bonaventure,
venture, Bonaventure, Tennessee, Columbia,
Vanderbilt, Kentucky and Duke.
Rounding out the top 20 were:
Utah, Cincinnati, Wyoming,
Drake an£ Marquette tied for
16th, Davidson, and Northwestern
and Princeton tied for 19th.

At John Hancock i
theres more to
Life Insurance than
selling Life Insurance,
*
and well prove it to you
On Feb. 7 & 8
Our John Hancock man will be interviewing
candidates for careers in:
Sales & Sales Management
Administrative Management take o ne
Electronic Data Processing
Managerial Accounting
Management Training Program 1
Actuarial Development >,
Check your placement office
I 111 111 s I
for interview details. ||
An Equal Opportunity Employer

North Carolina, 12-1, amassed
261 points to remain far behind
the two leaders although the Tar
Heels knocked off Georgia Tech
with ease in their only game
last week.
New Mexico, 16-0, was idle
but notched 227 points and now
trails North Carolina by only 34
points. St. Bonaventure, the third
unbeaten major college quintet,
won it 14th and 15th outings of
the campaign and the Board of
Coaches cast votes totaling 184
points for the Bonnies, who re received
ceived received 145 a week ago.
1. Houston 28 18-0 343
2. UCLA 7 15-1 321
3. North Carolina 12-1 261
4. New Mexico 16-0 227
5. St. Bonaventure 15-0 184
6. Tennessee 12-2 171
7. Columbia 11-3 79
8. Vanderbilt 13-3 77
9. Kentucky 11-4 50
10. Duke 10-2 40
Second 10: 11, Utah 22; 12.
tie Boston College and New
Mexico State 21; 14. Cincinnati
17; 15. Wyoming 14; 16. tie
Drake and Marquette 9; 18.
Davidson 8; 19. tie Northwestern
and Princeton 7.
Others receiving five or more
points in order of their totals:
Louisville, Kansas State, Ohio
State and UTEP.
STROBE LIGHTS FOR
PARTIES FEATS & BANDS
Solid State Circuitry
Photo Flash Strobe Tube
Variable Frequency 1 4 *25
flashes per sec.
50 Watt Sec. 2000
1 YEAR GUARANTEE
Send Money Order for s79**os
50% Deposit C.O.D.s fff
Electronic Strobe Light Co.
Box 413 A
Laguna Beach, Calif. 92652
Dealer Discounts Available
Campus Salesmen Wanted
-

Page 15



Page 16

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 31, 1968

BPf JOIN THE THOUSANDS §
ifai \who Are Saving Money
fM mmgmm SAVE Money, Time 9 West University Ave.
and Parking Space i t2 ,TS.X
36Tablets I J Use the lip balm Recommended
5.89 value Jeraen s I | by the U.S. Olympic Teams
mm m m m jm
/|7> 514ozJar CHAP STICK
Reg. .39
NO DOZ Hr 43$ 27c ( M :
oQtely T 'Chap Stick'protects lips against chapping
ALKA- Ultra Brite Toothpaste IIKTDF
seltzer 3 KINGSIZE UJ
25 brand I e ee mm I j /^T pm* £ll £
Sizi et Great for relief Regular .89 value CO!* few)
of headache- J X V SHAMPOO
.69 upset stomach! ( JIIHI livv
4 99$
E w Personna persowwa
J | # UAID CPPAY "zngummm.
, 12 hqurs nMI lx jilxM I
CONTAC Regular or Suoer KSS
blad es J
Super Stainless
10 For7Q£ lo7value A/d 16.2 -oz can Stee| OOa
$1.49 value $1.45 value 10 For
' ih/AW# I
|H |gpj Re!iuiar Men h< I Shoulders^
/Si 99$ 59$
§\w*ii\ Head & Shoulders
Surer If XEROX i Shampoo i
Size | AAny Ei
EU-, : : £ 11 @ c mi I | Medium Size Jar mm
jfc ij IS c Coupon Good Thru February 7, | lT
g 1968 Reductions Or Enlargements |
P| Not Included In Coupon Offer. | SI.OO value M W
SMMjmmjmimj
QUIK-SAVE gg!
_ HEALTH BEAUTY AIDS COSMETICS GREETING CARDS I I 1 I
Every Pay photo finishi ng xerox copyings paperbacks magazines