Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The ycmng lady on the left demon demonstrates
strates demonstrates what store for UF
students the fifth annual
playboy party in Graham Area Nov.
the
the
box office. Cost is $5.50 per couple.

Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 70s
Low In The 50s

Vol. 60, No. 72

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INTERHALL SOCIAL
This was the cozy scene Sunday night when
Buckman Hall and Tower B residents so socialized
cialized socialized in a Reitz Union lounge to the sounds
of the Saturn Five,
- - --rJ .-' '
Voters Approve
. e ~
New Constitution
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The proposed student body constitution was passed in last Thursdays
election by a comfortable margin, but a proposal calling for open
Honor Court trials failed.
One proposal, which was the wording contained in the body of the
constitution, called for closed trials and publication of the names of
the guilty, which is the procedure now in use.
Article IV of the Constitution, which contained this wording, received
the two-thirds needed for passage, while no other provision for Honor
Court hearings could pull as many votes.
According to Jim Crabtree, a member of the Honor Court, a student
can request either an open or closed trial under the provision, but
must ask for the open hearing to get it.
Crabtree said the open/closed hearing provision was in effect
under the old constitution and that a student could ask for a public
hearing on his case.
**lt has always been the rule, he said.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

UF DEFICIT IGNORED?

By STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
and
By BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
TALLAHASSEE- Gov. Claude
Kirk asked a joint emergency
session of the legislature Mon Monday
day Monday for an additional $10.9 mill million
ion million to bolster the financial status
of the entire state university sys system.
tem. system.
The UF currently needs sl4
million more than it was appro appropriated.
priated. appropriated.
The university bidget approved
by the Board of Regents for all
units of the UF for the year
1967-1968 was $75,853,595. The
amount approved by the legisla legislature
ture legislature was $61,961,085.
Kirk also recom mended an in increased
creased increased five per cent sales tax
and an additional five-cent tax
on cigarettes.
The people of Florida are
willing to pay the cost of quality
education, Kirk said, but they
want to know that every tax dol dollar
lar dollar is spent buying a full mea measure
sure measure of education.
Os the proposed $10.9 mil million
lion million increase to the state uni universities,
versities, universities, Kirk said $6.1 million
would be needed to cover the
deficit created when the Regents
1 Council Meets j
| Legislative Council meets J
>| tonight at 7:00 in rooms 346 ;|
|; and 347 of the Reitz Union. |§
§1 Party caucuses will be held %
| at 6:30.
On the agenda are the third §g
| reading of the Student Pub- ||
|| lications Autonomy Bill and ||
i first reading of the Teacher ||
i Evaluation Charter.
The Council may not canvass ||
gg election results tonight as the gg
§| Honor Court has not yet cer- §
i tified the results.

Kirk Recommends
University Budget

did not adopt the full tuition in increase
crease increase previously recommend recommended.
ed. recommended.
If passed, the remaining rev revenue
enue revenue allocations would be distri distributed
buted distributed in the following manner:
f $1 million singled out to
FSU for science development.
$2.3 million to be used for
additional academic and non-ac non-academic
ademic non-academic personnel.
$1.5 million for a regents
loan and scholarship program.
Kirk also stressed the impor importance
tance importance of student opinion in his
address.
We should never allow our ourselves
selves ourselves to forget for a moment
that the student, for whose ul-

PETITION CIRCULATING
Students Seek
Another Election
By JANIE GOULD
- Alligator Staff Writer
Several students are circulating petitons for a new presidential
election, the Alligator learned Monday.
By tomorrow, we expect to have more than 1,000 names, said
Legislative Council member Don Goodman. He said about 10 students
are carrying petitions from door to door.
He said students who signed were required to write their student
number and classification. Hardly anybody refused to sign," he
continued. We dont ask them what party they favored."
All the petitions ask for a new election on the basis of alleged
irregularities. Signers are required to be full-time students at the
UF.
The bulk of the signers are independents, according to Helme
Walter, 4AS, who circulated petitions in Colonial Manor.
The signers either had been apaethic before, and now felt guilty;
or they were angry, and glad they could do something," she said.
Seventy-five per cent of students contacted in Landmark Apartments
signed petitions, said Carolyn Cooper, 3NR.
She said she obtained 70 signatures, all independents except for
two fraternity men, in an hour and a half.
Most of the people were enthusiastic about signing," she said.
They were upset about rumors about election violations."
She said Mcride supporters wouldn't sign, preferring to leave
well enough alone."
Mcride, when contacted by the Alligator Mbnday, said he had heard
nothing about the petitions.
(SEE PETITION," PAGE 2\

Tuesday January 30, 1968

timate benefit the entire edu educational
cational educational enterprise operates, is
the customer."
A special edition of the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator showing the financial cri crisis
sis crisis at the UF was distributed to
members of both houses of the
legislature, Secretary of State
Tom Adams, the governor's off office,
ice, office, and the Board of Regents
prior to Monday's emergency
session.
Kirk's surprisingly low bud budget
get budget recommendations for state
universities were met with mixed
feelings among legislators.
Speaker of the House Ralph
(SEE KIRK," PAGE 2)

Inside
Kirk Calls For
5% Sales Tax
See Page 14



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Bulletin News
State, Nationallnternational News
UN Deadlocked On Crisis
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) Faced with a U.S. Soviet deadlock
the Security Council Monday found itself powerless to solve the Pueblo
crisis and postponed debate indefinitely.
die Council voted to debate the crisis Friday and held a second
jting Saturday. Debate had been scheduled to resume at 3 p.m.
liiST Monday, but that meeting was cancelled early in the afternoon.
Platon D. Morozov, the Russian ambassador, told newsmen he
met with U.S. Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg Sunday, but the So Soviet
viet Soviet diplomat reported no give on either side.
Goldberg, in debate Friday and Saturday, argued that the Pueblo
was clearly in international waters when the North Koreans seized
it a week ago.
Morozov, acting as a friend in court for the unrepresented
North Koreans at the United Nations, echoed their claims that the
Pueblo had violated North Korean waters and was on an espionage
mission when it was captured.
t
Viets Stage Major Offensive
SAIGON (UPI) The United States and its allies said Monday
invading North Vietnamese troops were waging a major offensive
in northern areas of South Vietnam. The allies scrapped a lunar
new year truce in the embattled zone and pressed air raids into
the southern reaches of North Vietnam.
The U.S. Command said the North Vietnamese have massed four
and possibly five divisions perhaps 40,000 men in and around
South Vietnams two northernmost provinces.
This is no longer infiltration, a U.S, spokesman said. It is
invasion.
Lost Sub Believed Found
4 I
TOULON, France (UPI) French naval officials said Monday
night searchers using sonar equipment have detected a metallic
object beneath the waters of the western Mediterranean which they
believe is the submarine Minerve, missing since Saturday with
52 men aboard.
The United States has been requested to lend special undersea
rescue equipment, authorities said.
The French asked for the help of the UjS. submarine rescue ship
Petrel, which was reported enroute from Gibraltar to help in the
search for the missing Israeli submarine Dakar.
Strike Closes Schools
CINCINNATI (UPI) A strike by the 700-member Cincinnati
Teachers Union Monday forced 19 public schools to close, affecting
26,000 of the 88,000 pupils in the local school system.
All but one of the citys eight high schools were closed. However,
84 public schools remained open, staffed by teachers in the 2,500-
member Cincinnati Teachers Association.
rmmc n SHmcfl
I I3OL a VUua£ I
IfEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE I
' DINING ROOM §
COUNTER
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U tbs official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and Is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and durine student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
nffirui opinions at their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Florida
Union BuUdlng, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate tee typographical tone of all advertise advertisements
ments advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It conslderes objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment ter any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising
Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be
responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

Kirk Urges Tax Hike

Turlington (D.-Alachua) expres expressed
sed expressed concern that Kirks recom recommendation
mendation recommendation would not be adequate
enough to help the UF out of
its present financial doldrums.

Election Vote Protest
Delays Inauguration

Protests and questions over
the validity of last Thursdays
election have caused the post postponement
ponement postponement of the inauguration of
the student body president for at
least one week.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd ordered the
postponement of the ceremonies,
originally scheduled this Thurs
day in a statement issued Sunday.
This decision, Shepherd
said, will not in any way affect
Petition
At least one dorm, Broward
Hall, has been covered by a
petition. According to Vicky
Fagan, 2UC, 150 names were
collected by Monday afternoon.
Students circulating petitions
will turn them in to Legislative
Council members this after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, before the council meet meeting
ing meeting tonight. Majority Leader
Greg Johnson hinted that petitions
could have an effect on the
council.
Leg Council is supposed to
respond to student opinion, he
said. Petitions would indicate
that lots of people think there
should be a new election.
However, Honor Court Defense
Attorney Jim Crabtree said the
petitions would have no bearing
on court proceedings, unless the
petitions indicate fraud.
Its fine and dandy that stu students
dents students want a new election, he
said, but that wont influence
the court unless petitions relate
particularly to the protest.

k '
(
LET'S TALK ABOUT YOUR FUTURE
INDUSTRIES
<
PPG representatives will interview at
University of Florida on February 8 & 9, 1968
'
Through careful selection, placement, and a well planned program of
individual development, PPG employs college graduates to help meet
today's challenges and provide managerial leadership for the future.
Because of PPG's diversity of products, locations, and caner openings,
we feel it is well worth 30 minutes of your time to explore these oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities with our representative; he is interested in you ar d your future.
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Senator L.K. Edwards (D-Ala (D-Alachua)
chua) (D-Alachua) agreed with Turlington.
Kirks proposal is merely
away to solve a current prob problem
lem problem and is not sufficient enough
to cover an extended period of
time, Edwards said.

the taking of office by any of the
candidates if and when the Honor
Court certifies and then the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council canvasses the
election.
All guests invited to the inaug inauguration
uration inauguration were notified by phone of
the postponement.
An exact date and time will
be announced as quickly as pos possible,
sible, possible, as soon as the inauguration
is rescheduled, Shepherd said.

Finest Selection Os
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Open Fridays TUI 9 PM

Edwards compared Kirks rec recommendation
ommendation recommendation to a patch on a
root. Its only temporary,
he said.
Edwards, who recently emceed
a homecoming event at the UF,
said the state university system
is in trouble.
Turning to the possibility of
tuition being raised, Edwards
speculated the doors are wide
open for consideration of pro providing
viding providing more money for the state
university system.
Turlington could not be pin pinned
ned pinned down concerning the tuition
hike. But he did say tuition was
not fully raised last summer be because
cause because a loan program for uni university
versity university students was vetoed by
Kirk.
. * *
Kirks opening speech to the
legislature also touched on the
need to present a tax referen referendum
dum referendum before the people of this
state.



Suicide-Prone People
Want To Be Stopped

By RITA BARLOW
Alligator Staff Writer
. ff ... : : ~ *.
Most people contemplating suicide want to be
stopped, psychologists agree.
At least two-thirds have recently seen a doc doctor.
tor. doctor. Virtually all have given warning before ta taking
king taking their lives.
Then why were they not stopped? Their fam families
ilies families and suicidologists supported by the Na National
tional National Institute of Mental Health would like to
find out.
With diminishing moral condemnation of sui suicide,
cide, suicide, which Christianity has called a sin, scien scientists
tists scientists are making headway toward understanding
suicide, the last soundless scream of a human
who finds himself alone in a world that seems
deaf to use the words of Robert J. Levin.
Dr. Ben Barger, director of the UF mental
health unit at the infirmary, concedes, The
breeding places, carriers, and causes of mental
and emotional disturbance are only partially
understood.
But already it is clear, says Dr. Richard
McGee, UF associate professor of clinical
psychology, that almost always there are signs

New Phone
System Due
By March 29
After 40 years of being housed
in the basement of the Univer University
sity University Auditorium, the UFs tele telephone
phone telephone exchange is getting a new
building.
The new building is scheduled
to be completed March 29 at a
cost of $146,000 with the new
exchange completed next year.
The university has been wait waiting
ing waiting so long for this building,
said Robert W. Gay, general
contractor.
According to Calvin C. Green,
director of UFs physical plant
division, the new building will
house a completely automatic
Internal telephone system.
The University, said Green,
is in the process of updating
and enlarging its old telephone
system with the introductiQn of
Centrex, the name given the new
receiving and sending system.
The system itself is
primarily an Internal one, said
Green. It is a campus tele telephone
phone telephone system.
L&W
CAFETERIA
Tuesday Night
Baked Meat Loaf
Brown Rice & Gravy
49<
Turkey Pan Pie
49<
Home Style Cooking
Servi ng
gpjvjpppjj 11:15-2 p.m.
AFCTERIA I

sCXffIPUS SUICIDES PART THREE:

Depends on the giant. Actually, some giants are just regular
kinds of guys. Except bigger.
And that can be an advantage.
How? Well, for one thing, youve got more going for
you. Take Ford Motor Company. A giant in an exciting
and vital business. Thinking giant thoughts. About market'
ing Mustang. Cougar. A city car for the future.
Come to work for this giant and youll begin to think
like one.
Because youre dealing with bigger problems, the
consequences, of course, will be greater. Your responsibilities
heavier. That means your experience must be better more
complete. And so, youll get the kind of opportunities only a
giant can give.
Giants just naturally seem to attract top professionals.
Men that youll be working with, and for. Marketing and
sales pros working hard to accelerate your advancement.
Because theres more to do, you'll learn more. In more

Whats it like
to sell
fora^ant?
... ; '
. ' ./ \ .. '-! .
4 ' .-V
* v
V
v
_>
Actually Im quite lug cm It.
; 7 ; . r t ; K

to betray a rising level of self-destructive
tendency.
But all too often the signs are veiled or so
tentative as to be inaudible. Or they may be
disguised as withdrawal or belligerence.
Weve got to increase the acumen of pos possible
sible possible rescuers for something the suicide suicideprone
prone suicideprone say or the way they behave, says Dr.
Edwin S. Schneidman, a leading American au authority
thority authority on suicide.
An individual can drive toward suicide and
make active plans for killing himself, and at
the same time have a strong yearning for res rescue,
cue, rescue, says Schneidman, who hopes to see sui suicide
cide suicide prevention centers as common as fire
stations.
The suicidal person needs a sharp-eared
Samaritan to heed his cry for help.
It helps if you can convey that you think
him competent to deal with his troubles, says
Barger. Offer to go with him, if necessary,
to find help.
We do not yet have facilities for a round roundthe-clock
the-clock roundthe-clock hot line to help. Maybe we need one.
But meantime our people in the early warning
network and in the infirmary want to help.
Will the next silent cry for help be, as the
suicidologists predict, far better heard?

Faculty Concert Set Tonight

The UF Department of Music
will present a faculty concert
at 8:15 tonight in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
Chamber Music for Winds
will feature the Florida Wood Woodwind
wind Woodwind Sextet and the Faculty Brass
Trio, assisted by pianist Russell
Danburg, playing works by
Lefebvre, Hindemith and Pierre
Gabaye.
Members of the sextet are RJS.
Bolles, flute; JjS. Kitts, bassoon;
E.C. Groth, oboe; Reid Poole,
French horn; TJS. Small, clar-

areas. You may handle as many as three different assignments
in your first two years.
Youll develop a talent for making hardmosed, imagina'
tive decisions. And youll know how these decisions affect
the guts of the operation. At the grass roots. Because you 11
have been there.
If youd like to be a giant yourself, and you've got
better ideas in marketing and sales, see the man from Ford
.when he visits your campus. Or send your resume to Ford
Motor Company, College Recruiting Department.
You and Ford can grow bigger together.
THE AMERICAN EOAD, DEARBORN, MICHIOAN
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Tuesday, January 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Reitz Union Box Office
Will Be Closed
For Audit
Tuesday, Jan. 30
Re-open Wednesday, Jan. 31

inet, and R.E. Foster, trumpet.
The trio of flute, trombone
and trumpet music will be played
by Poole, chairman of the De Department
partment Department of Music; Richard
Bowles, director of university
bands, and Foster, assistant di director
rector director of bands.
All the above are faculty mem members
bers members in the music department
with the exception of Bolles, who
is dean of the College of Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts.
The public is invited to attend
the free concert.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Edward Albee
To folk Here
Edward Albee, Americas
best-known playwright and au author
thor author of Whos Afraid of Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Woolf? will lecture on the
UF campus Feb. 7.
Albee, who recently won the
Pulitzer Prize for his latest play,
Delicate Balance, will speak
at 8 p.m. in the Reitz Union Ball Ballroom.
room. Ballroom. Student Government and
the Forums Committee, co-spon co-sponsors
sors co-sponsors of the event, will host a
reception for the author after his
lecture.
Known internationally as Am Americas
ericas Americas Angry Young Play Playwright,
wright, Playwright, Albee rocketed to fame
in 1959 with his one-act play,
Zoo Story. The play opened
in Berlin after a number of New
York producers turned it down.
He went on to win critical ac acclaim
claim acclaim for The American
Dream, a satire on the Am American
erican American way-of-life, and The
Sandbox, described as an ab absurdist
surdist absurdist farce.
His widest fame, however,
came with the film version of
Whos Afraid of Virginia
Woolf? with Elizabeth Taylor
and Richard Burton.
Albees plays are described as
iconoclastic, not only in ideas
but in presentation. He has used
subjects and Anglo-Saxonisms
never before heard on the Broad Broadway
way Broadway stage; he has made his char characters
acters characters describe or perform acts
of perversion and violence which
strike at the very heart of our
violent way of life; he once re refused
fused refused to permit an intermission
in a three-act play.
He presently is working on
a play about mans evolution.
Tickets for the lecture are on
sale at the Reitz Union box of office.
fice. office. Prices are $1 for students
and $1.50 for others.
Contest Deadline
The deadline for the Miss Sem Seminole
inole Seminole contest is Friday. Appli Applications
cations Applications may be picked up at the
Seminole office in room 337 of
the Reitz Union.

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NBC CBS ABC NBC NET
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Garrisons
I Dream of Jeannie Daktari The Bachelor Stitch with Style
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8:00 Jerry Lewis Daktari ... Power of the Dollar
Gorillas
8:30 Red Skelton Legacy
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9:00 MOVIE NBA All-Star MOVIE Cineposium
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__ __ of the Opera
10:00 cbs News
Special
10:30
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11*30 Johnny Carson Mo ,yte, Joey Bishop John* Carson
When Willie ~
Comes Marching ~
Home
Fearless Forecast
Be sure not to miss the CBS News Special A Night at Fords
Theatre. Its the reopening of Fords Theater in Washington,
D.C. 103 years ago its doors were closed with the death of Abraham
l Lincoln. Since that night, the theater has been dark. Watch it
open again tonight with an all-star cast.

TUMBLEWEEDS
/*" /AM MEPtCINE
WHEN I Y MEN! WE TALENTEP
GROW UP \ TUMMY-TAPPIN 1
I WANNA BE \ TONGUE-TEASIN'
AMEPICINE MAUSMAN TINKERS!
MAN LIKE J \^j

Police Find
Stolen Cycles
Two motorcycles stolen from
the UF campus last week were
found abandoned in Ormond Beach
Sunday.
John Dennis Taylor, 307 East
Hall, and George F. GrisingerlH,
226 Weaver Hall, reported their
motorcycles stolen Sunday, A
state-wide bulletin was broadcast
to law enforcement agencies.
University police were advised
by teletype Sunday night that both
motorcycles had been found aban abandoned
doned abandoned in Ormond Beach.
Taylor and Grisinger must
contact Ormond Beach police to
recover the motorcycles.

LUNCH SPECIALS FBOM 69e
v, n CHUCK WAGON MEALS
OPEN 11 AM-9PM
iWDEROSA
JUL j TKAK HOUSE
j.
In Gainesville at the Westgate Shopping Ctr.
3321 W. University Ave. at 34th St.
ALSO IN ORLANDO AND TITUSVILLE

UF Sophomore Arrested
For Disorderly Conduct

A UF sophomore was arrested for disorderly
conduct Sunday morning after running four stop signs
and cursing police officers, University Police said
Monday.
Police said the student, whose name is being with withheld
held withheld pending an investigation, was observed running
the stop signs and was stopped on Stadium Road
by Sgt. J.A. Smith.
Police said the student, a sophomore, was in ineligible
eligible ineligible to have a car in Alachua County, according
to UF regulations.
Police said the student told them he had rec-

DRY CLEANING
counter open
9 a.m. -1 a.m.
Gator Groomer
Next To Univ. Post Office

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Provision for remote speaker.
Fine furniture styling in genuine
oil finished Walnut veneers.
FROM $29.95 TO $199.95
PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED BY COUCH'S
OWN FINE ZENITH. FM TECHNICIANS
608 N. Main St.
WUUtrl > Ph. 376-7171
If It Is FM Radios You Want-Sea

/POES
( LOTOF TOIENa ] ;c A K L by
V X WITH A FEW WELL WELL\MEPICIN
\MEPICIN WELL\MEPICIN ONESy

eived a ticket earlier for having no decal, which
he had not paid.
The student reportedly cursed Smith and the cam campus
pus campus police violently. Smith then advised the stu student
dent student he was under arrest for disorderly conduct.
When the student refused to accompany Smith
to the Gainesville police station, he was taken forcibly
to the city jail.
He was then booked for disorderly conduct and
issued a ticket for having an ineligible car in the
county and for running stop signs. His car was
impounded by campus police.

By TOM RYAN



m.
1 If your major
f_ is listed here,
IBM would like
1 Vto talk with you
| \ February sth, 6th
I or 7th.

Sign up for an interview at your placement officeeven if
you're headed for graduate school or military service.
Maybe you think you need a technical background to work
for us.
Not true. ft
r r~\ 1 : ; *; - P
Sure we need engineers and scientists. But we also need
liberal arts and business majors. We d like to talk with you even
if youre in something as far afield as Music. Not that we d
hire you to analyze Bach fugues. But we might hire you to
analyze problems as a computer programmer.
What you can do at IBM
The point is. our business isn't just selling computers.
It's solving problems. So if you have a logical mind, we need
you to help our customers solve problems in such diverse areas

as government, business, law, education, medicine, science,
the humanities.
Whatever your major, you can do a lot of good things at
IBM. Change the world (maybe). Continue your education
(certainly, through plans such as our Tuition Refund Program).
And have a wide choice of places to work (we have over 300
locations throughout the United States).
What to do next
Well be on campus to interview for careers in Marketing,
Computer Applications, Programming, Research, Design and
Development, Manufacturing, Field Engineering, and Finance
and Administration. If you cant make a campus interview, send
an outline of your interests and educational background to
Mr. C. F. Cammack, IBM Corporation, 1447
Peachtree St., N.E., Room 810, Atlanta, Ga. JTJ 0/ J jVj t
30309. We're an equal opportunity employer. CJVU



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

The
Florida Alligator
|j§|ig To Let The People Know* 9
w
Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
a ~ ManagingEditor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Boh Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
Tlm Florida Alligator's official position on Issues Is expressed
only in the columns below. Other material In this Issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist and not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically indicated.

Impossible Quarter

This is the impossible
quarter.
The pressure is building,
and building, and building.
It seems there is no end in
sight.
Nine and one-half weeks
of sheer hell are now
weighing upon our shoul shoulders.
ders. shoulders. This quarter is too
short; there have been
weekends stolen by Satur Saturday
day Saturday classes, and there is
no time to catch up.
The truth is that this
quarter it has become al almost
most almost respectable to stay a
week behind.
The cause of all these
problems is no secret.
The crime of our quar quarter
ter quarter courses, which are no
more than highly com compressed
pressed compressed semester courses,
has been compounded by the
crime of a compressed
quarter.

Time For A Change

The question of compul compulsory
sory compulsory class attendance has
been bandied around long
enough. Its time to change
the rule*.
The University is chang changing,
ing, changing, students are awaken awakening
ing awakening to their opportunities,
their potentials, their re responsibilities.
sponsibilities. responsibilities.
The attendance rule is
an anachronism. It is ri ridiculous
diculous ridiculous for the rule to re rein
in rein ain on the books.
Students will attend
classes whether or not they
are so required. It is lo lo'
' lo' gical to suppose that they
came to learn, which pre presupposes
supposes presupposes class attendance.
Furthermore, students
pay to come to the Univer University.
sity. University. If they do wish to
squander their money, they
should have the right to cut.
The Red and Black has
commented previously on
the captive audience* as aspect
pect aspect of the compulsory at attendance
tendance attendance rule ? Obviously,
this point is simply a side

This isnt really a uni university
versity university this spring; its a
race.
What can be done?
For a starter, the calen calendar
dar calendar can and must be re revamped.
vamped. revamped. Next, courses
which now carry a three threehour
hour threehour tag should, in many
cases, be worth five hours.
It would also be nice
if professors stopped to
think about just how much
reading they now require
in less than two and one onehalf
half onehalf months.
Too often the load is
worse than staggering; it
is impossible.
The UF, however, seems
to enjoy and exalt the im impossible.
possible. impossible.
Well, perhaps the im impossible
possible impossible should be more
carefully considered. Do Doing
ing Doing the impossible may be
an illusion here. More than
likely we do more than we
humanly can, but we prob probably
ably probably dont do it very well.

factor. But if a student feels
he can do just as well in
a course by merely reading
the text and avoiding the
class, who can say he is
learning less.
The administration
seems to be avoiding the
question entirely. Perhaps
an interested student group
which passes a resolution
concerning class attend attendance
ance attendance mightmeet with more
response.
Although the subject was
broached in the SGA sug suggestions
gestions suggestions for major rule
changes, the SGA proposed
that the question be left up
to the professor.
The Red and Black sug suggests
gests suggests that the rule be al altered
tered altered so that professors
are not allowed to require
class attendance, thereby
ending a possible grading
system which takes attend attendance
ance attendance into account.
The Red and Black,
University of Georgia

r mmwf\
C -^ J IWIWWIfIU
|
1

SELF-HELP ARTICLES

Self-help articles are making a wreck
out of me. I would be tempted to quit
reading them if I didn't dig culture and
that jazz. (I am purely a hog about cul culture.)
ture.) culture.)
As it is, do you mind if I have a word
with you?
Inimical.
That's the word.
I have been trying to work it into my
everyday conversation'' and, frankly, it's
not easy. Maybe your life is replete with
the golden opportunities to go around Mat Matting
ting Matting inimical! inimical
a little short here.
Wliat happened was I read one o f those
improve-your-vocabulary articles and it
stuck in my mind. My mind is pretty
gummy here of late.
The article said to be alert for strange
words.
So, I sort of sulked around being on
the alert for strange words hiding in
the shadows, looking over the top of my
newspaper in hotel lobbies, that sort of
thing.
Sure enough, pretty soon I found a strange
word. I dont mean it was that strange
you may have known it for years, and Ive
nodded to it repeatedly in passing. Usually
I dont bother with words that haven't
been properly introduced I know more
old words than I can spell. But the vo vocabulary-improvement
cabulary-improvement vocabulary-improvement article came to mind
when I read later:
This constant stress ... is designed
to make Russian viewers feel we are
deeply inimical to them."
I tried to do what I usually do with
words Im not really sure of jump

Alligator Staff
A Student Newspaper
DAVE DOUCETTE MICHAEL ABRAMS
Assistant News Editor Editorial Assistant
i l.
JANICE SIZEMORE JOE 70RCSA
Campus Living Editor Entertainment Editor
STAFF WRITERS James Almand, Beth Brandon, Arlene Caplan, David
Chafin, James Cook* Linda Daniels, Jeff Denkewalter, Duffy, Glenn Fake,
Janice Forsberg, Anne Freedman, Mary Gantt, Brenda Gevertz, Janie Gould,
Margie Gross, Sam Hansard, Steve Hulsey, Kathy Kelm, Leslie Lepene,
Roy Mays, Fred McNeese, John Parker, Lori Preece, A1 Pierleoni, Raul
Ramirez, Dave Reddick, Neal Sanders, Barbara Schaefer, Jerry Silberberg,
Jeff Scurran, Lori Steele, Dee Dee Horn, Gail Shtnbaum.
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS r Nick Arroyo, Mike Huddleston, A1 Jensen.
l' ii> 1

l-ni-mi-cal?

BY JOHN KEASLER

over them. This, actually, is not a good
system and I am always seeing words
I probably should have learned years ago.
But this article made my conscience
hurl so I went over and looked up inimical
in the dictionary, an action I hadn't per performed
formed performed in some time.
Opening the dictionary, I learned what
inimical" meant.
A press agent called up and gave me an
outline for a story which he felt would
make journalistic history and burbled,
What do you think of that idea?"
Im so inimical to that idea that my
ears are ringing."
Great, great! We'll have lunch and
chat."
This alone was enough to make me want
to go back to one of the word usage rules
told me years ago by an editor. That rule
has remained with me.
Dont use no big word that you got to
look up," he said, when a little-bitty
tee-ninesy word will do the job."
But the crowning blow came last night
when I squalled at my daughter, Turn
that TV down! Dont make me inimical."
To my astonishment, she knew what it
meant. (It can mean adverse or harmful;
or unfriendly, hostile.)
Doesnt everybody?" she said.
That's enough for me. Ill stick with
the words I have. People have only two
reactions to your new words. If they don't
know it, they think youre mispronouncing
something else. If they do, they think
youre retarded for not knowing it all your
life.
I wouldnt let another new word worry
me for a kytoon full of mortling.



OPEN FORUM:
* There is no hope for the complacent man
- >

IXED MOODS PREVAIL

Election Aftermath

MR. EDITOR:
The January 16th issue of The Florida Alligator
illustrates that the purpose of this student pub publication
lication publication is not clearly understood by those who
run it and write for it. Specifically, the articles
relating to the present campaign for student body
president indicate that the following is true.
The Florida Alligator has absolutely no right to
present editorially its views on the qualifications
and desirability of the two candidates. In any
political campaign there is always more than one
newspaper or other publication which can express
differing views on the issues and candidates.
In addition, when there are at least two publi publications
cations publications it is possible for each one to support
different candidates. The importance of this aspect
of political campaigns is clear. The ordinary
voter gains much of his knowledge of the can candidates
didates candidates by reading such publications. If only one
publication exists it is likely that the voter will be
strongly prejudiced in favor of the candidate chosen
by that publication.
Unfortunately, such a situation exists on this
campus. The Florida Alligator is the only student
publication which the students and faculty rely
on for their information of what is happening on
campus. Thus, what the Alligator prints will gen generally
erally generally be believed and since there is not another
publication which might publish differing views,
a large number of readers will have no choice
but to believe what they read. The truth or fal falsity
sity falsity of the charges against Mr. Mcride is not at
issue here.

Frats Illogical

MR. EDITOR:
You and I both know that the
political situation on this campus
is not truly representative of
the students. Everyone realizes
this, yet no one seems to know
where to begin the needed cor corrections.
rections. corrections. I have a suggestion
Let's start with the procedure in
which fraternity blocs align
themselves with political parties.
I am a member of a social
fraternity, but because I believe
in the candidates and goals of
the United First Party and be because
cause because I can't accept the pro procedures
cedures procedures by which a few "pol "politicos"
iticos" "politicos" as in many big bloc
houses committed my house
to the other party, I was forced
by my convictions to politically
split with my house .. an un unheard
heard unheard of action. I did this be because
cause because I could not justify the
manner in which my house was
committed to a candidate
BEFORE they knew his slate or
his platform. . BEFORE THEY
EVEN KNEW WHO WOULD BE
THE UNITED FIRST PRE PRESIDENTIAL
SIDENTIAL PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE!!
There are those who argue that
such an early commitment is
necessary for a fair share of the
"political pie." I may be overly
idealistic, but I believe there
is a definite obligation for fra fraternities
ternities fraternities to support the party with
the candidates they feel will best
represent the student body
and not just their special
interests since fraternity
money and block votes play a
major role in campus elections.
I talked individually with many
of my fraternity brothers and
most of them disliked the present
system of being told who to sup support
port support by a few "higher-up", and
were in favor of a chapter vote
to democratically decide which
party to back. I feel most fra-
temity.ipl? ptore this senttment.

Os course, reform is too late
for this election, but I intend to
work this next year toward the
goal of fraternities allowing their
brotherhoods to decide by
Chapter vote as to which party
to back after seeing the major
candidates and platforms. This
will be a good first step toward
truly representing you the
students in student govern government.
ment. government.
STEVE RUSHING

UFs Candidate Taylor
Cost Him The Profits

MR. EDITOR:
At the Florida vs. Tennessee
basketball game, there were bro brochures
chures brochures being passed out in the
gymnasium with the word
"understanding" on them. Many
people disregard the meaning
of this word, especially the per person
son person who is running for United-
First party president in the elec elections.
tions. elections.
At every basketball game I am
one of the two needy program
sellers, who receive two cents
per 10 cent copy. This income
goes toward our needs while we
are working our way through col college.
lege. college. Getting to the point, there
were about fifteen distributors in
front of the gymnasium handing
out five sheets of paper which
had the line-up of both teams.
These were distributed by the
Clyde Taylor campaign party with
his fraternity brothers helping.
This wasn't so bad, until the
customers started telling us that
mm * <* a> *. m m m

Significantly, The Alligator, because it is the
sole publication on campus, possesses a tremen tremendous
dous tremendous capacity to influence students in their actions.
Such great power must be wielded cautiously and
responsibly.
The editorial about Mr. Mcride was a flagrant
misuse of power and an indication of a failure
to perceive what the purpose of the Alligator should
be during a political campaign on campus. That
purpose is simple, yet vital to a fair campaign
and an informed student body.
It would be to everyones advantage if the Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, during an election campaign, carried the
pictures, platforms and qualifications of all the
candidates. In addition, the Alligators editorials
should encourage all students to choose to vote
for the candidates on the basis of their quali qualifications
fications qualifications and issues, rather than personalities.
The Alligator should warn students against being
intimidated by the unthinking members of the
university community. Above all, students should be
encouraged to reserve judgment on the candidates
until enough is known about them.
If our university is to be truly one of free
thought and intellectual freedom it is imperative
that The Florida Alligator re-define its purpose.
Failure to adopt new policies and an insistence
on continuing the old ones will be a continued
misuse of power and a flagrant manifestation of
contempt for the needs of our fellow students.

they had already received a pro program.
gram. program. The distributors were
flanked down the sidewalks hand handing
ing handing out the sheets before they
could reach us at the entrance
to the gymnasium.
I don't mind competing against
people, because I compete every everyday
day everyday on the UF track team. But,
this isn't competing; its being
down right dirty and immature,
that is being shown by this can candidate.
didate. candidate. He could have distributed
these sheets at the door inside
the gymnasium. They had nothing
to gain by hustling us out of two
cents which we earh fair and
clean. We had everything to lose
by not selling left-over pro programs.
grams. programs.
Mr. Taylor, I hope that you
are proud of yourself by dis distributing
tributing distributing your name, and I hope
that you gained a few more votes,
because you lost mine.
DON HALE, 4PE
... .......

BRUCE ALPER, lUC
Choke
| MR. EDITOR:
Regarding smoking: I would §
| like to say that in spite of §
| a well-documented study indi- §|
| eating that the life expectancy f|
|of a twenty-five year old ||
I smoker is eight years less ||
I than that of a comparable non- if:
| smoker, all smokers have my |§
| profound admiration.
After all, anyone can stop :|
| smoking; it takes a man to §f
I face cancer.
| DOCTOR XJ|

Tuesday, January 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

PHOENIX WA TCHES ss
A Factory?
IRA BRUKNER
I am reminded of a story that I recently read in this newspaper
regarding the recruitment by this University of a high school basket basketball
ball basketball star. The sports story mentioned that this up and coming giant
was being seriously courted by over 50 colleges and universities,
and he had accepted an invitation to visit UF in the spring. Naturally
this person's travel expenses are being paid for, and since the Athletic
Department didn't just casually take notice of him I'm sure we
have sent scouts to Tennessee to observe him in action. And if we
are lucky enough to land him he will of course sign a grant-in-aid,
live in an excellent dormitory, eat steaks at the training table,
have excellent tutors at his reach, receive a monthly allotment,
get his books for free, drink Gatorade and even get a cut at local
clothes stores. Stretching the point? I seriously doubt it.
Each year on a continuing schedule this university in the form of
its most well known department athletic, sends out scores of re recruiters
cruiters recruiters to replenish its decreasing amount of athletes. This is
undoubtedly a great expense although it is only a drop in the bucket
compared to the enticements UF is able to offer its prospective
Spartans. Consider if you will the sum created if you tabulate travel
expenses, tuition expenses, food expenses, room expenses, book
expenses, professional tutor expenses, monthly allotments, etc. It
is indeed a formidable figure multiplied by the number of athletes
on scholarship. This expenditure is a large amount, however if we
didn't get Steve Spurrier, Georgia might have.
And we all know the prime importance of athletics just look at
Yon and remember the inadequate language labs and Walker Hall.
I am also reminded of a friend of mine who was seriously courted
by over twenty colleges with names like Princeton, Stanford, Cal
Tech, Yale, MIT, Chicago, Harvard, Wisconsin, and Michigan. His
brilliance is phenomenal, consequently this achievement, not his
participation on an intramural volleyball team singled him out to
receive the overtures of these schools. He also was "scouted,
by a man inviting him to a performance at the Loeb Theatre in Cam Cambridge,
bridge, Cambridge, by a man showing him the 'facilities' at Palo Alto, etc. He
too was offered a sizeable scholarship as were many of his present
classmates. However, if Yale didnt get him, Harvard might have.
My point is a simple one. There are many high school students
who will receive overtures from different schools on the merits of
their academic achievement and promise. Does UF send out re recruiters
cruiters recruiters to entice these students to come here? It seems that our
present extravagant courting centers on athletic not academic giants.
Although there may be some haphazard crisscrossing, where is our
emphasis going to be? Are we seriously concerned with creating a top
rate university or an athletic factory?
Athletics have a valid role, but our scale is inverted if their god godlike
like godlike and fragile treatment supersedes that of the scholar.
A Student Paper?

MR. EDITOR:
The Alligator is a student
newspaper. That's what you say
on your masthead and in the
editorial in Monday's issue. Is it
really a student newspaper or has
it been transformed into a po political
litical political newspaper?
I am not supporting any can candidate
didate candidate and I am all for freedom
of the press, but I dont like the

Backs Gator Editorial

MR. EDITOR:
As an independent and potential
voter for Contrived Party, I read
your editorial urging third party
backing of Taylor with mixed
emotions.
I knew Rich Houk during the
Pam me Brewer controversy as a
man of resourcefulness and
strength as he worked behind the
scenes to calm radical elements
in the movement. His primary
goal then, as it is now, is to
promote equal rights and bene benefits
fits benefits for all students. Thus I

Green Boards, What For?
MR. EDITOR:
We the students of this university are paying more than SSOO
a year for green boards to attach political poster for our elections.
NOW look at them, they are emptyl Guess WHY? Immaturity!
And we are the ones who want the voting age reduced when we cannot
even restrain ourselves during a student campaign?
Lets use reason (something uncommon around here), and conduct
ourselves as ADULTS.
If you don't like a candidate, just let everybody know about it,
DON'T tear up the posters! Act your Age!
Think about it, it even pays.
MARIO MARTINEZ, SEG
'> J c */ i i i c il-j i : . *, l

idea of taking the student's money
and using it for political pur purposes.
poses. purposes. The student newspaper is
not a private paper and you have
no right to use it to support any
candidate!
It's about time that everyone
quit playing little boy and showed
some maturity. It's about time
that students demanded an un unbiased
biased unbiased student newspaper.
LEON POINDEXTER, lUC

would like to see him as our
next president.
However I think it would be
a tragic and unfortunate mistake
if because of his running as a
third party candidate, his exact
antithesis, Bill Mcride, were to
win the election.
So I concur with your editorial
and urge Rich Houk as well as
Ira Brukner, to back Taylor but,
hopefully, for them to remain
active in government in some
other capacity. *
JOHN MEDEARIS

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for soU j
BASENJI PUPS. AKC reg. Ideal
apt. pet. No odor, no shedding,
no barking. Wormed and shots.
SIOO. Call 472-2408 alter 5. (A (A---69-st-p)
--69-st-p) (A---69-st-p)
FLY! Flying Hawks Inc. has
shares available in a Cessna
Skyhawk. Dual radios dual omni.
Full panel. 372-1290 or 372-
6045 after 6:00. (A-67-7t-p)
FOR SALE: 4 keystone mags
mounted on 4 new. wide track
80,000 mi. ultra-ionics, 378-
4440. 8:00 to 5-DO, after 5:00
call 376-6174. (A-*6B-st-c)
1966 SUZUKI 50 cc. $115.00:
376-9554, ask for Rick. (A-69-
6t-p) jj
BASENJI PUPPIES, trained,
shots, wormed, ready to go out
looking for a home, AKC, cham champion
pion champion background, reasonable
rates. Ph: 376-4103. (A-67-10t-
P)
ORGAN Farfisa Mini compact,
lass v than a year old. Why pay
$170.00 more for a new one?
Perfect for a group. $325.00
cash. 376-8194. (A-69-st-p)
MAG WHEELS nearly 1/2 cost
at SIOO.OO. Fits chevys, GTOs,
Firebirds. HONDA 150, mechani mechanically
cally mechanically excellent. Only 3,500 miles.
$270.00. 378-5823. (A-72-st-p)
NEW C.B.RADIO Must sell.
Pearce Simpson Escort in, Ch
9-14. Origianlly $248.00. Will
sell at $150.00. Antenna, Coax
and Pre-amp. included. 376-0706
any time after 6:00. (A-72-3t-p)
POST VERSATRIG Slide rule with
guarantee and manual. A $15.95
value for $9.95. Like new. Call
372-5654, Andy after 7. (A-72-
2t-p)
for rent
OLYMPIA APTS. Modern 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished, carpet, sound soundproof,
proof, soundproof, central AC, and Heat.
3 blocks from campus. $150.00
monthly. Call 376-1965 after
.'OO. (B-68- st-p)
SUBLEASE 2 bedroom apt;- at
Landmark. Call 372-2909 0 r 372-
6535. (B-69-st-c)
QUIET, newly decorated, fur furnished
nished furnished upstairs bedroom, Down Downtown
town Downtown vicinity. 378-7845 after 5:00
p.m. (B-71-3t-p)
LARGE 2-bedroom apartment for
rent. Ideal for 3 students. SIIO.OO
a month, all utilities included.
Phone 376-8314 after 5:00. (B (B---68-st-p)
--68-st-p) (B---68-st-p)
"NOT SETTLED YET? RAoms
walking distance from campus-
CH and AC. Phone 378-8122 after
5;30 p.m. (B-68-9t-p)

[ 630 J
Bsr POITIBR ""l
7pm w TO SCR I
_ WITH LOVE"!
UjT s=fc/ 4gasT rl

I I wq nted j
WANTED: A groovy type chick
who wants to make the Daytona
Grand Prix Races February 3
and 4 with an action guy. Call
Watt after 5:30 at 378-7069. (C (C---72-2t-p)
--72-2t-p) (C---72-2t-p)
WANTED: 1 preferably 2 male
roommates to share 2 bedroom
apartment with fireplace, $25.00
per month plus utilities. Call
Dave, 378-1884 after 5:00. (C (C---
--- (C--- st-p)
ONE OR TWO female UF stu students
dents students wanted to share furnished
apartment one block from cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 378-5601 after 5:00 p.m.
(C-68-st-p)
SITTER, 1 Male or Female for
boy 10, girl 9. Must provide
own transportation and be re reliable.
liable. reliable. Call 376-0203. (C-72-lt-
P)
WANTED: 1 female roommate
to shire 1 bedroom apartment
at Univ. Gardens for February
or Third Quarter. Call 372-7247.
(C-72-st-p)
NEEDED: Male roommate to
share room with full bath. Just
one block from Norman Hall!
Call Wayne Howard, 376-9907.
$40.00/month. (C-70-3t-p)
WANTED: 2 tickets to P. P. and
M. Two I had were stolen. Will
pay extra. Call Bill, 376-7210.
Leave message if not there. (C (C---
--- (C--- 3t-p)
help wanted
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY
to establish your own business
as Protective Life's U of F
College Specialist. Home office
training program with guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed salary pi us com mission bon bonus.
us. bonus. Unlimited income and ad advancement
vancement advancement potential. Send re resume
sume resume to G. C. Warner, P. O.
Box 2026, Orlando. We will ar arrange
range arrange your interview and apti aptitude
tude aptitude test in Gainesville. (E-71-
st-p)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN to
work 20 hours per week at the
Alligator. Car is needed; ex experience
perience experience desirable. Good pay, in invaluable
valuable invaluable experience, good work working
ing working conditions. Apply room 330
Reitz Union. (E-71-tf-nc)
Tne university ox Florida nas
challenging positions available
for inexperienced and exper experienced
ienced experienced Clerk-Typists and Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringe bene benefits
fits benefits Include the opportunity to
attend one (1) college course,
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the "Hub.
(E-61-ts-c)

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Page 8

help wanted
WANTED: Talent for Graham
Areas playboy club. Pianist,
ventriluquist, vocalist, guitarist,
comedian, any unusual talent for
floor show. Contact Stan Taylor,
376-9136. (E-71-3t-p)
j autos
1963 PONTIAC Catalina 2 dr.
Hardtop. Radio and Heater, power
steering and power brakes. 4
new tires. Excellent condition.
Reasonably priced. Ph. 378-5133.
(G-68- st-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 Rambler Am American
erican American Station Wagon. $600.00.
See at 1750 SW Williston Rd.
(G-66-st-b)
1965 VW. Radio, heater, top con condition.
dition. condition. Maintenance record. Bar Bargain
gain Bargain at $999.00 or best offer
call 376-2916. (G-70-3t-p)
lost-found
$50.00 REWARD for information
leading to the recovery of my
Honda 450. Stolen from Murphree
Area Tuesday or Wednesday Jan January
uary January 16, or 17. Black and Silver,
Tag Number 19A569, Frame
Number 1021521, Call Jon Cie Ciener,
ner, Ciener, 372-9306. (C-66-st-p)
LOST: London Fog Trench coat.
White, with lining. 38 Reg. Lost
Thursday night at the Hunt club.
I'll trade plus a reward. Bill
Levens. 372-9303. (L-71-2t-p)
LOST vicinity McCarty Reitz
Union Tie Chain with pendant
initialed MS WBW 64. Reward.
Phone Weaver, Hume Library,
2111. (L-70- 3t-p)
personal
HAPPY AVOCADO DAY KAF KAFFREN
FREN KAFFREN Thats 12 and thats a
lot. Heres to 112 more
Avocados Remember Dont
crush the Avocados Baby! (J (J---72-lt-p)
--72-lt-p) (J---72-lt-p)
HAPPY BIRTHDAY LITTLE
AVOCADO! You are certainly
cute as a mouse named rat and
your captain loves you 112.
Sleep tight. (J-72-lt-p)
n.w. st. mmn
wasssssnm
IDick B*l
IvanDfte I
iFifewaiyi
| cofeature at 9:00
kswfiramj

For V
111 Jj
THE vV '
1 audience**
Uva/vJ VJ^P
USE
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

PHILIPPE J/JtL ;
DE BROCA If |
TECMNISCOPE
3-5-7-9 out 10:40 ApTf
SWTCjT).
Whats it like
to work
for a giant?
Depends on the giant. If the
giant happens to be Ford Motor
Company, it can be a distinct
advantage. See your placement
director and make an appoint'
ment to see the man from Ford
when he is here on:
I'd like a big job please.
1

1 I
fSW3!I ENDS TODAY" ji
JssSa Valley of the Dolls juDL
r TmIW 37>-2434 | PANAVISION W COLOR :00-3ao-5:20 T 7:3p-9:4gr.J
waits a t trigger-point!
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Ends Thurs. *,
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lOVt IS A UAUTIFUi WAV I I #
TM SIARCH FOR
RfRFKTION... 4
THI SIARCH
FOR MU....11
THI MARCH
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A nut FOR TM TOUMO 4 R
JL I A TM TOUWO 41 MART I R
* Mi *Mo if m>-
I



-' J . /
- ; \
I
. ...
Sometimes,
Madge will
surprise you.
v v
. %:; / 6
1
Surprise!
Madge has her mind set on a new set of drapes.
And it could mean "curtains for you. Its surprising
how many people are surprised like that every year..
HDont be.
Wherever, whenever you drive . drive de defensively.
fensively. defensively. Watch out for the other guy, or gal.
Watch Out for the Other Guy.
/a
> 8 -
- 1
**
- .*> ..
HN&
Published to save l.ves ,n cooperation with The Advertising Council and the National Safety Council. <>uhC> W

Tuesday, January 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

ADVISOR CLAIMS
Frats Location
Affects Grades
Does the location of a social fraternity influence members grades?
The answer is an emphatic yes, according to W. Harvey Sharron
Jr., UF assistant to the dean of men and fraternity advisor.
Sharron and Johnny L. Arnette, former assistant dean of men at
Florida, conducted an Investigation to prove their hypotheses that
on campus fraternities have higher grades than off-campus frater fraternities.
nities. fraternities.
Os the 26 Florida fraternities used in the study, 12 are located
on campus and 14 off campus.
Studies made of the 1965-66 and 1966-67 school years showed
that grade point averages of pledges and members of on-campus
fraternities were significantly higher than those of pledges and mem members
bers members of off-campus houses.
Sharron said differences in grades with the pledges was influenced
by a university rule requiring all freshmen to live in university
residence halls.
The on-campus houses are, by their location, more closely
supervised both academically and socially, he continued. In the
study, it was found that there were more cases of misconduct in the
off-campus fraternities than in the on-campus fraternities.
Realization of this by the fraternities has led many of them to
purchase lots on Fraternity Row on campus.
Studies also showed that when fraternities moved from off campus
to the campus, academic averages moved up, Sharron added.

Officials Call For
Additional Lighting

A group of UF officials found
several dark spots last week
along campus walkways and re recommended
commended recommended additional lighting.
The group consisted of Betty
Cosby, dean of women, A. I.
Shuler, campus police chief, Wil William
liam William E. Elmore, vice president
of buisness affairs and two
womens housing counselors.
Elmore said they found 11-
12 routes with spots darker than
they should be. He didnt say
where the dark areas were found.
The group met following a re recent
cent recent series of rape attempts
on UF coeds. In the three cases
reported two weeks ago, the coeds
were attacked in relatively well welllighted

EAT FREE
FOR ONE WEEK
AN.. J*
Winner jJ*
Each Week \ \\
Drop Entry At Winner
Blank In Box A j Announced
1802 W. Univ. \ / In Alligator
Location ONLY A 1 Mon. Feb., 5
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Phil Spoon
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lighted welllighted sections on campus, po police
lice police said. Screams and kicks
foiled the rape attempts. In each
case, the victim told police the
assailant was a Negro.
Elmore said recommendations
for additional lighting will be sub submitted
mitted submitted to Warren Michael of the
physical plant division for cost
estimates and types of lighting
needed.
Michael said that in general
routes taken by women students
are well lighted but there are
some dark spots.
He said a survey has been
going on for some time in an
effort to improve campus light lighting.
ing. lighting.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Agriculture Institute
Has 60 Vacancies

By SALLY DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
Farm leaders hope to get $2.9
million restored to the UF In Institute
stitute Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) budget during the
special legislative session*
UF has approximately 60 IFAS
academic staff vacancies that
leave some 60 research pro programs
grams programs inactive, said Provost
E. T. York, Jr.
Prior to the 1967 legislature,
the State Budget Commission,
made up of the state cabinet,
cut the S3O million IFAS budget
request approved by the Board
of Regents by approximately $6.5
million.
After realizing the critical ef effects
fects effects of the IFAS budget cut,
Campusules
Earn Approval
Os Parents
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Staff Writer
The majority of parents of UF
students responding to a ques questionnaire
tionnaire questionnaire sent out by the Univer University
sity University College and the Mental Heal Health
th Health Institute have expressed a high
degree of approval of present
university regulations.
The purpose of the survey
was to re-evaluate university po policies
licies policies and regulations, especially
in regard to student conduct. The
results will be taken into con consideration
sideration consideration by the various com committees
mittees committees designed to stipulate
campus regulations.
The survey was sent to 600
randomly selected parents of stu students
dents students registered during the win winter
ter winter trimester of 1967. Responses
from 291 parents were received
for tabulation by the beginning of
the fall quarter.
Parents were asked to submit
their attitudes toward delayed
fraternity and sorority pledging,
drinking on campus for students
over 21, university regulations
concerning possession of cars by
underclassmen on campus, and
the function of the honor system.
The university's policy on no
curfews for male students re received
ceived received 26 per cent disapproving
responses, especially from the
mothers.
Ten per cent of the parents
expressed doubt about the effect effectiveness
iveness effectiveness of the honor system in
regard to reporting offenses.
According to the survey, pa parents
rents parents apparently feel that the
universitys jurisdiction is
needed more on than off campus.
Strongest disapproval was ex expressed
pressed expressed on the idea of a re required
quired required prepaid eating plan, and
allowing students over 21 to drink
on campus.
Fraternity and sorority pled pledging
ging pledging should be delayed until so sophomore
phomore sophomore year, according to the
opinions voiced on the question questionnaire.
naire. questionnaire.
Twenty-one percent of the pa parents
rents parents do not agree with the hy hypothetical
pothetical hypothetical university regulation
forcing all freshman and soph sophomore
omore sophomore students to live in univer university
sity university housing.
ADS. Meets
Jim Weeks, retail advertising
manager for the Gainesville Sun,
will be the featured guest speaker
at the annual winter rush of Alpha
Delta Sigma, mens professional
advertising fraternity, tonight at
7:30 in room 362 of the Retiz
Union.

six of the seven members of the
budget commission moved to re restore
store restore most of the $6.5 million.
During the regular 1967 legis legislative
lative legislative session three attempts to
restore approximately 30 per
cent of the cut were vetoed by
Gov. Claude Kirk.
A statement prepared by the
IFAS revealed the following con consequences
sequences consequences of the budget cut:
In the past three years Florida
has slipped from a national rating
of 14th to 38th among comparable
state programs in average sal salaries
aries salaries of its agricultural scien scientists.
tists. scientists.
Average salaries for all ranks
of agricultural research workers
are considerably below the level
supported by both the adjoining
states of Alabama and Georgia.
Average salaries for personnel
in other budgetary units on the
UF campus are $1,300 greater
than those for comparable
personnel in the agricultural de departments.
partments. departments.

Engineers, Mathematicians:
you should
consider a career
withNSA

... if you are stimulated by the prospect
of undertaking truly significant
, assignments in your field, working in
its most advanced regions.
... if you are attracted by the
opportunity to contribute directly and
importantly to the security of our nation.
... if you want to share optimum
facilities and equipment, including one
of the worlds foremost computer/EDP
installations, in your quest for a
stimulating and satisfying career.
The National Security Agency is
responsible for designing and
developing secure communications
systems and EDP devices to transmit,
receive and process vital information.
The mission encompasses many
aspects of communications, computer
(hardware and software) technology,
and information recording and storage
... and provides a wealth of career
opportunities to the graduate engineer
and mathematician.
ENGINEERS will find work which is
performed nowhere else... devices
and systems are constantly being
developed which are in advance of any
outside the Agency. As an Agency
engineer, you will carry out research,
design, development, testing and
evaluation of sophisticated, large-scale
cryptocommunications and EDP
- systems. You may also participate in

* { J
-a -a ' V
where imagination is the essential qualification

UF Plans Centrex System

By September, 1968, it will be possible to
call on-campus exchanges direct, according to
William E. Neylans, assistant director of housing.
This new system, reported Neylans, is called
the Centrex System.
Centrex will involve the establishment of a
separate exchange for campus phones. This will
eliminate the process of goingthrough the Univer University
sity University operator.
A slight increase in rent for campus housing
facilities will be necessary to finance the system.
Prior to this time the handling of long distance
calls has been cited as a reason for the imprac impracticality
ticality impracticality of phones in the individual rooms. No
definite system has been devised to handle long
distance calls. Neylans said it has not yet been
decided whether the university or the telephone
company will handle them.
No additional phone system like that of Yon

DRY CLEANING
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propagation, upper atmosphere
phenomena, and solid state devices
using the latest equipment for
advanced research within NSAs fully
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MATHEMATICIANS define,
formulate and solve complex
communications-related problems.
Statistical mathematics, matrix algebra,
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few of the tools applied by Agency
mathematicians. Opportunities for
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Continuing your Education?
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Nearly all academic costs are borne by
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Salaries and Benefits
Starting salaries, depending on
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vacations, insurance and retirement are
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of Federal employment without Civil
Service certification.
Another benefit is the NSA location,
between Washington and Baltimore,

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Hall or the Twin Towers will be established,
Neylans said. There will be an operator some somewhere
where somewhere on campus but no individual operators or
switchboards in the dorms.
For those dorms in which the Centrex system
will be established, some system, as yet undecided,
will be set up to eliminate many of the coin coinoperated
operated coinoperated telephones. Neylans also mentioned that
various ideas for replacement of the old system
are being considered and cost information is still
being gathered.
I wont say that Centrex will completely elim eliminate
inate eliminate pay phones, but those left will be supple supplemental,
mental, supplemental, Neylans declared.
It has taken quite a bit of advanced planning
to make the entire system operational. Neylans
claimed it was a large job, not one that could be
done overnight.
We already have the cables installed for Cen Centrex
trex Centrex in some of the buildings, Neylans stated.

which permits your choice*of city,
suburban or country living and allows
easy access to the Chesapeake Bay,
ocean beaches, and other summer and
winter recreation areas.
Campus Interview Dates:
February 8,9
Check with the Placement Office now
to arrange an interview with NSA
representatives on campus. The
Placement Office has additional
information about NSA, or you may
write: Chief, College Relations Branch,
National Security Agency,
Ft. George G. Meade, Maryland
20755, A TTN: M 321. An equal
opportunity employer, M&F.
national
security
agency /



- 1 y 'HE^ : ;-\*
>;/. : &* &*ag
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lAm.' W iM^MWB--.i.
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(Photo by Nick Arroyo)
Mood Os Union Light Show Is Captured
Light Show Freaks Out

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
For those of us who had the
fortitude to attend the Mens In Interhall
terhall Interhall Council dance Saturday
night, let me congratulate you for
going.
Os course, the dance was the
worst Freak-Out the campus
has yet seen. If any real hippies
from San Francisco had bothered
to show up, the hippie movement
might have ended last Saturday
night.
The main problem was the
music. Aside from the fact that
City Steve and his Gingerbread
Men made vague attempts at
making music, they would have
done well to play charades.
The psychedelic lighting was
wretched. Unfortunately, not
every group can hope to imitate
the Cheetah of New York, or the
Electric Circus. The strobe

" -: ; iggp^^^^|g^v
JjB f ;.'
/ ; # '' i"'H mMEr' WzgSUmk
' X
T *. t ,*,' jH^^Hr, \
iii iiiiBHIMP
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Nancy Wright Andy Holloway I
Frame Stylist Manager |
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ii||. M^MI WWIII l IMI IfiUrl \ **

lights were mildly effective ex except
cept except that most of the freaks who
attended were more fun to watch.
Perhaps the highlight of the
evening was when the barrier
surrounding a lighting machine
collapsed and equipment fell on
would be dancers.
The most silly event of the
evening was the number of
teeney-boppers and girl scouts
who invaded the scene. Most
should have been home in bed
and the stores that sold them
body paint must have made a
fortune.

Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sapp David Wilson
Ool^p^-r-rTom Stewart Bill Worsham
W George Corl Arlie Watkinson
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS^

The clothes were horrendous.
The children were absolutely
the funniest, most hysterical
combination you could have seen.
The number of UF students was
doubtable since those who decided
to join the Freak-Out did a
pretty poor job.
And, so, in another UF first,
someone sure goofed. The next
time a campus group sponsors
a dance, it should be restricted
to UF students. The lovelite show
should have been extinguished
long before it was turned on.

Tuesday, January 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Homosexuals Wage War
By LOUIS CASSELS
United Press International
Homosexuals are waging a militant campaign for acceptance of
their way of life as a normal condition, like being left-handed.
Their hopes for changing public attitudes would be greatly enhanced
if they could get churches on their side. Recently, they seem to
have made substantial progress in that direction.
A group of 90 Episcopalian priests met in New York Nov. 28
for a symposium on the churchs approach to
majority agreed that the church should classify homosexual relations
between consenting adults as morally neutral, and said that in
some cases they may even be a good thing.
This month, thousands of congregations of the United Presbyterian
Church and the United Church of Christ are receiving booklets,
prepared by the social action departments of the two denominations.
The booklets assert that the church has a special responsibility
for helping to change societys attitude toward homosexuality, because
in the past it has been the institution most vehement in its opposition
to the homosexual.
The booklets are intended for study and discussion by local church
groups.
One contains a long article by Dr. Lewis I. Maddocks, director
of the Washington office of the Council for Christian Social Action
of the United Church of Christ.
5
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NEW YORK $32.30
Faster Thru service short route J
T railways
easiest travel on earth

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Alan Bates Is Trump,
In 'King Os Hearts

By JOE TORCHIA
Entertainment Editor
When Alan Bates played the
young man in Zorba the Greek,
everyone was convinced he would
go a long way as a dramatic
actor.
But that was before Georgie
Girl.
When Alan Bates played Jos,
Georgies almost-lover, every-'
one was convinced hed go a
long way as a comedian.
Then came Far From the
Madding Crowd and, as it
turned out, Alan Bates (as one of
Julie Christies bleech! ~
beaus) was the only good thing
about the movie.
Now comes King of Hearts
(at the State) and it proves one
thing if nothing else: Alan Bates
is the most versatile, talented,
interesting and enjoyable young
actor on the screen today.
There is a lot to be said for
Philippe De Bronca* s King of
Hearts it is one of the most
delightful, colorful, thoroughly
entertaining flicks to come from
anywhere in a long time but
Alan Bates is the best part of
this good film.
King of Hearts is basically
the story of a French town which
is taken over by the lunatics
of an asylum when it is hastily
Ballard Is
New Physics
Society Head
Dr. Stanley S. Ballard, chair chairman
man chairman for physics and astronomy
at UF, will be installed as pres president
ident president of the American Association
of Physics Teachers during the
annual meeting of that group and
the American Physical Society in
Chicago, Monday through Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
Ballard, whose installation as
president will begin a one-year
term heading an organization of
over 10,000 members from uni universities
versities universities and colleges throughout
the nation, planned the program
for this years meetings in his
role as president-elect.
Dr. R. E. Garrett and Dr. Ber Bernard
nard Bernard Chern of the physics depart department
ment department and post-doctoral student
Dr. J. K. Joen also will attend
the meeting.
The paper won the AAPT High
School Award in 1966 for ex excellence
cellence excellence in teaching physics.

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FREE Estimates on Any Repairs
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abandoned near the end of World
War I.
The fleeing Germans plant an
enormous bomb which they hope
will stop their pursuers andit
is up to Pvt. Plumpick (Bates)
to render it harmless.
m
Apt,
ALAN BATES
And thats about all there is to
it it doesnt sound like much,
but the comic possibilities (as
well as those of biting irony)
are exploited fully by director

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De Bronca and his magnificent
cast.
Bates effort to save the in insane
sane insane is delightful, as well as
somewhat touching, it would be
very easy to sloppily sentimen sentimentalize
talize sentimentalize this potentially good script,
but De Bronca doesnt. He uses
Bates perfectly: slightly roman romantic,
tic, romantic, but not overdone; very funny,
but not grotesque; somewhat
falry-taleish, but still believe believeable.
able. believeable.
De Bronca brilliantly mixes
genuine humor with slapstick,
Ifantasy with irony, and roman romanticism
ticism romanticism with realism.
His overall effect is thoroughly
enjoyable its a flick that
wont leave you when you exit
the theatre.
I could single out any one
performer of this gigantic cast
and describe a true comic por portrait
trait portrait but it would be useless.
All I can do is urge you to
go to the State and judge for your yourself.
self. yourself. I dont think youll be dis disappointed.
appointed. disappointed.
(Rating: ***)

II SSOC vs. Navy II
By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Meet The Peacemakers, Not The Warmakers read the sign in
front of the Southern Students Organizing Committee (SSOC) table
on the ground floor of the Reitz Union.
A boy with long hair and a girl in a short dress played Dodge
the Draft on a playing board on the floor.
Fly Navy read the pamphlets and signs at a table about six
feet to the right of the SSOC table. Two Navy recruiters, a Lieutenant
Commander and a Lieutenant Junior Grade were talking to a group
of UF students.
Lt. Cmdr. Jay Wilson said the SSOC representatives have probably
helped the Navy's recruiting efforts rather than hindering them.
* ~~
A lot of people talk to them a couple of minutes,' said Wilson,
then come over to us.
We have tested about 45 students so far this week, he said. This
is the most we have tested since we moved into the new union.
Wilson said he had looked through SSOCs free literature, but had
not bought the literature they were selling.
He said one member of SSOC had borrowed a Navy pamphlet about
the Navy's WAVE program. It was returned with humorous captions
written on the pictures.
Wilson said the SSOC people had been friendly enough.
They like to talk, said Wilson, but they don't want to listen. They
will ask a question, then ask another before you can answer it.
TRUNK
SHOWING
WED. d THUDS.
JAN. 31FEB.l
11-4:30
Ramada Inn
I
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it Jacksonville, Florida
SHOES TO BUY
SHOES
- TO ORDER
Local Representative
KAY SIMPSON 378-4233



By JANICE SIZEMORE
Alligator Campus Living Editor
Brace yourselves, coeds, a new honor is at stake!
This year, in connection with Glamour magazines Ten
Best Dressed College Girls Contest", the Campus Living'
Dept, of the Alligator will stage a Best Dressed Coed
Contest." The winner will be the official contestant
representing the UF in the Glamour competition.
The UF Best Dressed Coed will be selected from
representatives of dorms, sororities and off-campus
residents. .. 1
Each girls dorm (including coed dorms Graham and
Hume) will elect one representative as will each sorority.
This is not a beauty contest. Entrants should be judged
on fashion tastes and wardrobe coordination as well
as appearance.
Coeds living off-campus who wish to participate are

By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN RAH RAH RAH AND SOCK
IT TO 'EM, GATORS DEPT.:
All persons interested in becom becoming
ing becoming cheerleaders for next year
must attend the two-week-long
cheerleading clinic beginning
Monday, Feb. 5. Come to the
Florida Field at 3:30 p.m. and
by all means wear loose cloth clothing.
ing. clothing. (PS you must have a 2.0
average and cannot be on pro probation
bation probation this quarter to be eli eligible.)
gible.) eligible.)
IN PEOPLE WHO KNOW THAT
THE SHORTEST DIFFERENCE
BETWEEN TWO POINTS IS
SEVERAL STRAIGHT LINES:
Florida Blue Key meets in room
349 of the Reitz Union tonight
at 8 oclock.
IN THE ABROAD BOARD: The
Board of International Activities
meets in room 316 of the union
at 8 o'clock tonight.
WITH CAMPUS POLITICOS:
The Legislative Council gathers
tonight for a regular business
meeting in room 349 of the union
at 8:30 p.m.
IN GIRLS WHO HAVE WILL WILLINGLY
INGLY WILLINGLY SACRIFICED THEIR IN INDEPENDENCE:
DEPENDENCE: INDEPENDENCE: Panhellenic
Council congregates in room 150
C and D tonight at 7.

IN CHRISTIAN HOSPITALITY:
The Christian Science Organi Organization
zation Organization has as their guest speaker
Mrs. Lenore P. Hanks at their
meeting in the Union Auditorium
at 8 o'clock tonight.

/ J-BOY BOX for (jfa m
/ the price of a JBoy
I J-Boy, fre nth fries and cole
I slaw- regularly SI.OO
/ CAL L JERRYS
/ CARRY-OUT SERVICE
I Two GtWmtMi
/ Unrie H
/ 2310 S. W. 13th Street 376-2696 /
f 1505 N. W. 13th Street 378-2481 f

Best Dressed Coed To Be Selected

WHATS HAPPENING

IN THOSE WHO ARE REALLY
CONCERNED ABOUT EQUAL
RIGHTS FOR WOMEN: The
Womens Student Association
meets in room 355 of the union
today at 4 oclock.
IN THINKING THAT MIND
OVER MATTER IS ALL THAT
MATTERS: Mensa, an IQ club

Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
THE SHADOW THAT SCARES ME Dick Gregory
VANISHED Fletcher Knebel
HOW CHILDREN LEARN John Holt
I WONDER AS I WANDER Langston Hughes
THE LAST HERO CHARLES A. LINDBERGH
Walter S. Ross
BLAST OF WAR Harold Macmillan
THE MOST PROBABLE WORLD Stuart Chase
POINT OF DEPARTURE James Cameron
THE LANGUAGE BARRIER- BEASTS AND MEN
Elizabeth Borgese
VIET CONG Douglas Pike
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M
Campus Shop & Bookstore

CAMPUS LIVING

asked to submit a photograph (full length) and a resume
including vital statistics (height, weight, dress size,
waist measurement, hair color) and a list of all campus
activities. These girls will be judged by a panel of
coeds from Womens Interhall and Panhellenic.
The winner of Best Dressed Coed" will be entered,
through Campus Living, in Glamours national contest.
Glamours judges will select ten girls from the entries
submitted. The winners will appear in the August College
Issue of Glamour and in newspapers throughout the
country. A personal gift will be given to them from the
editors of Glamour. In addition, they will receive an all allexpense
expense allexpense paid trip to New York from June 2 to 14 via
American Airlines with reservations at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel. The June trip will include visits to
cultural centers, museums, evenings at the theater and

for the intellectuals intellectual,
has a re-organizational meeting
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in room
150 B of the union.
IN POLITICS AND PIE (NOT
THE SKY KIND): There will be a
Political Science and Pi Sigma
Alpha lecture in room 349 of the
union at 3:30 p.m. today.

Tuesday, January 30, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

dinner at famous restaurants. The winners will be en entertained
tertained entertained at luncheons and receptions and meet some
of the top leaders in the fields of fashion and beauty.
A selected number of contestants will be chosen as
Special and/or Honorable Mention Winners. These girls
will receive a gift from Glamours editors.
Each contestant in the national contest (including the
UF representative) will have the opportunity to be a
campus contact for Glamour throughout the next year.
Deadline for receiving off-campus entried is Friday,
February 9. Photograph and resume should be mailed
to: Campus Living, c/o The Alligator, Reitz Union.
Sororites and dorms must select a representative and
submit her name to the same address by Monday,
February 12.

Million-Dollar Losses
NEW YORKThe Insur Insurance
ance Insurance Information Institute re reports
ports reports that there were 15 catas catastrophes
trophes catastrophes in the United States in
1966 which caused SI million or
more each in insured property
losses. The greatest damage was
done by tornadoes and winds
which struck Kansas in June,
causing in one day SSB million
in insured losses.

BARBER SHOP
CONVENIENCE
Plus
QUALITY
Hr
Prof Barber
Ground Floor
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Student Union
Mon.-Sat. 8:00 A.M.-5:30 P.M.
;i'"''' ~ -

Jacobs-Harrison
Plan Wedding
And! Harrison and Russ Jacobs
wish to announce their engage engagement
ment engagement and their approaching wed wedding
ding wedding set for June 29. Andi is a
sophomore who plans to major in
Social Psychology and Russ is
a 4EG in the Chemical Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering class of 69. Both are from
Miami.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Identity Found
In Sex Braun
By LINDA DANIELS
Alligator Staff Writer
Sex is big because it is the most important way of finding identity in
a relationship, according to Jon Braun, acclaimed as one of the most
outstanding collegiate speakers in America today.
In a lecture delivered in University Auditorium Thursday night,
Braun discussed sex under the topic Intercourse and Marriage."
He said oneness occurs between two people during intercourse and
listed the three dimensions of oneness as: (1) physical, giving union;
(2) soulish, giving continuity; and (3) spiritual, giving perspective.
Intercourse is never a purely physical act," he said. FTee love
is never free. There's no such thing as free sex.
Intercourse always has some meaning. It is a total person act, in involving
volving involving all a person is."
Sex is a big part of the building relationship of marriage, according
to Braun's philosophy.
Based on this reasoning, he cited three problems of pre-marital
intercourse as guilt, loss of trust in another person, and loss of trust in
oneself.
Elaborating on these three points, he said one can't get rid of social
and religious restrictions; violated trusts with other people won't be
restored; and loss of self trust results in loss of self love.
He said God figured out sex and made it pleasurable. But, gross
sex is the number one symptom of a sick society."
His major point was, No matter how bad you've blown it, there's
total and complete forgiveness."
To support his statement, he said sin is shooting and missing, but
its the only thing God forgives.
He voiced an opposition to rules which don't work because morality
can't be legislated and to religion because religion is man trying to
reach up to God, when really, God reaches down to man.
Braun defined love briefly as The total acceptance of one as is,
demanding no changes in order to keep the standing.''
He added that love is creative.
In reference to marriage and its responsibilities he said children
want to know first of all that parents love each other and secondly
that parents love them.
When questioned on The New Morality," he said its a misnomer,
a justification. The.heart of its position is meaning, and meaning is
diluted in relationships advocated by the new morality."
In summary he said: unconditional forgiveness is crucial, full
potential can be restored, and a new power is evolved inside a person.

Jones Calls TV Station 'lgnorant

By JANICE FORSBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Marshall B. Jones Monday
attacked a WTVT-TV editorial
critical of his proposal to replace
the Board of Regents with a
council of university presidents.
Referring to Joness proposal,
the editorial stated that mob
rule is not democracy and
anarchy is not freedom.
Channel 13 of Tampa thinks,
it would seem, that a university
governed by its faculty would be
anarchy and mob rule. Channel
13 also seems to think that dic dictatorship
tatorship dictatorship by a Board of Regents
is democracy, said Jones.

Jones, assistant professor of
psychology at the UF, has been
denied tenure for his advocacy of
student power.
What Channel 13 does not
seem to know is that in England
places like Oxford and Cam Cambridge
bridge Cambridge in fact, everywhere in
the Western World except the
United States and Canada, univer universities
sities universities are organized along the
lines I suggested.
It is only here that it is
anarchistic for professors to run
their own institutions. Only here
is it reasonable that universities
should be governed by Boards of
Regents which consist mostly of
businessmen, said Jones.

DEMOCRATS BALKING

Tax Hike Backed
L
With Reservations

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) ln lnitial
itial lnitial reaction to Gov. Claude
Kirk's educational recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations Monday was general agree agreement
ment agreement on the five per cent sales
tax proposal but stiff resis resistence
tence resistence among Democrats to his
demand that the new money be
tied to massive structural chan changes.
ges. changes.
But House minority leader Don
Reed said he is convinced the
governor will not retrench"
from his position of requiring
constitutional amendments, in including
cluding including a Super board" of ed education
ucation education and an appointed school
superintendent ahead of increa increased
sed increased taxes.
Not all legislators liked the
governors proposal for upping
the sales tax from three to five
per cent.
Rep. James Sweeny,D-DeLand,
chairman of the powerful House
Finance and Taxation Committee,
said he believed the House would
vote to close all exemptions in the
three per cent sales tax, inclu including
ding including groceries, before it would
go to five per cent.
But that's only my opinion,"
he added.
However, Rep. Fred Schultz,
D-Jacksonville, speaker des designate
ignate designate with a strong voice in the
House, said he could see no al alternative
ternative alternative to a five per cent tax
if the Legislature is to take care
of education and also provide
property tax relief.
But saying he opposed the super
board of education and making the
state school chief an appointed
rather than an elected official,
Schultz said I don't feel the
governor would let an important
program like this stand or fall
on a completely compromising
position on structure.
I hope we can find a solution
acceptable to all."
Senate President Verle Pope,
a Democrat, accused the gover governor
nor governor of trying to blackmail the
voters" into taking the structural
changes, distasteful though they

To put it bluntly, Channel 13
is ignorant of the history and
traditions of the university and
/ J
of its organization in other
countries. The tragedy is that this
kind of ignorance presently
controls and manages our state
universities, concluded Jones.
The editorial followed a talk
Jones gave several weeks ago at
the University of South Florida.
In his speech Jones attacked the
organization of the state univer universities
sities universities as thoroughly authoritar authoritarian.
ian. authoritarian.
Jones pointed out that at

may be, in return for an ade adequately-financed
quately-financed adequately-financed school pro program.
gram. program.
The governor said he would in-

SHEPHERD SAYS
No Tuition Hike
Seen In Capital

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Staff Writer
I doubt a tuition increase for
state universities will even be
discussed during the special leg legislative
islative legislative session," Student Body
President Charles Shepherd told
the Alligator Monday.
Shepherd and Lewis Miles, ex executive
ecutive executive secretary of the Coun Council
cil Council of Student Body Presidents,
attended the opening meeting of
the special legislative session
for education Monday.
The only people talking about
tuition Increase are the pres presidential
idential presidential candidates here," Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd noted, but I wanted to find
out for myself, anyway."
The only person that would
have had any effect on reques requesting
ting requesting a tuition increase is Gov.
Claude Kirk," Shepherd said,
and he did not make such re request."
quest." request."
The Governor asked the leg legislature
islature legislature Monday to provide $10.9
million to correct deficiencies
in university financing.
Kirk emphasized the move was
necessitated by the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents refusal to accept his pro proposal
posal proposal to raise tuition to $l5O
last summer.
Shepherd said he had talked
to legislators who helped reduce
proposed tuition increased last
summer.

PRSA Committee Formed

Timothy C. Blake, 4JM, has
been named by the Public Re Relations
lations Relations Society of America
(PRSA) to its advisory com committee
mittee committee on forming a national
student public relations society.
Blake is the president of the

present all power resides in the
Board of Regents which delegates
total authority on campus to a
university president, who can do
anything he likes as long as it
does not offend the Regents.*
He then suggested his demo democratic
cratic democratic alternative to replace
the regents with a council of
university presidents. Each
president would be responsible
to the faculty of his university.
This council would deal
directly with the legislature and
serve as the budgetary agency for
the state universities, Jones
said.

sist that tax increases be re repealed
pealed repealed by June 30 if the struc structural
tural structural changes are rejected at a
statewide election May 7.

The general consensus of
opinion among them was that a
tuition Increase would be discus discussed
sed discussed at least during the spec special
ial special session,'* he said.
That doesn't mean we wont
watch whatever actions the leg legislature
islature legislature takes, Shepherd said,
adding that Gene Stearns, Student
Body President at Florida State
University is our watch dog
in Tallahassee, and the minute
a bill or resolution regarding an
increase is introduced, action
will be taken."
During their trip to the state
capital, Shepherd and Miles ar arranged
ranged arranged with Stearns a meeting of
the Student Body Presidents'
Council for February 11.
The meeting will be based on
what comes out of the special
legislative session," Shepherd
said.
Shepherd turned the chairman chairmanship
ship chairmanship council over to Stearns Mon Monday
day Monday to assure effective leader leadership
ship leadership to the council when it
meets."
Shepherd's term of office at
UF has practically expired.
Shepherd said her thought it
would be helpful to our new pre president
sident president if we ever get one and
whoever he is to attend the
February meeting so he can learn
other university student presid presidents'
ents' presidents' ideas on this important
matter.

Student Public Relations Organ Organization
ization Organization (SPRO) at the UF. He is
one of the only two students named
to the committee from the 20
student PR groups across the
nation.

;
w v VO.-' :
HK- Ml
?.%
RL
JONES



Miller Awakes Gators
Just In Time, 65- 60

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor
Captain Dave Miller woke Flo Florida
rida Florida from a deep sleep late in
the second half to send the Ga Gators
tors Gators scurrying past Auburn, 65-
60, Monday night before 6,008
Florida gym fans.
The Florida freshmen won the
prelim, topping Chipola Junior
College, 96-87. UF's Todd La Lalich

*6B UF Frosh Team
Balanced 1 Smith

The 1968 UF freshman foot football
ball football team will be one of the
best balanced ball clubs ever
signed, says coach Charles M.
(Rabbit) Smith, director of re recruiting.
cruiting. recruiting.
The 1967 team had big line linemen,
men, linemen, said Smith. But this year
the UF has concentrated on more
backs, speedy types.
For the first time, the Gators
have specifically recruited a
place kicker. He's from New New
New
Orange-Blue
Set April 27
Although the exact date of the
opening of spring football prac practice
tice practice is not set, the UF Orange-
Blue game, which concludes these
drills, will be April 27.
Gator head coach Ray Graves
announced this date today and said
his squad will probably open
spring football practice on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, March 23. This date, how however,
ever, however, is tentative with a chance
the Gators will wait until Monday,
March 25, to begin work.
Florida will return 28 letter lettermen
men lettermen next fall, losing 13 off this
past season's 6-4 team.
Florida Rifles
Shot Down
By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
They missed it by just that
much.
Nineteen points to be exact.
That was the difference between
defeat and victory for the Florida
Rifles last Saturday in a four fourteam
team fourteam match in Lakeland.
The Gator marksmen finished
third in the match, two points
behind Miami and 19 points be behind
hind behind Florida Southern. FSU came
in last.
It was a tremendous let-down
after beating a tough North
Georgia Military College team
just two weeks before, stated
Captain Tommy Smith, advisor
to the Rifles. But the team
members are still in good spirits,
and I'm sure we will bounce back
in a big way.
Currently the Gator sharp sharpshooters
shooters sharpshooters sport a 16-4 mark.
Next Saturday the Rifles
journey to Tampa to compete
in the Tampa All-Service Match.
Slated to compete for the Gator
marksmen are Toby Muir, Lee
Morse, Jim Waugh, Kerry Chat Chatham,
ham, Chatham, Larry Lunden and George
Pringle.

lich Lalich was the game's outstanding
player, pulling down 17 rebounds
and scoring 31 points.
The Baby Gators had an eas easier
ier easier time of it than its varsity,
who trailed most of the game.
With Neal Walk leaving the
game in the first half with four
fouls, Auburn led Florida most of
the/ first half and 14 minutes
into the second.
Walk, who scored just 11 points
and 11 rebounds, came into the

berry, Fla., and only weighs
145 pounds, but hes kicked a
43-yard field goal.
Most of the to-be freshmen
were recruited from Florida. In
1967 there were only five out outof-state
of-state outof-state scholarships. This is
from a total of 39 spaces open
for football scholarships.
UF has 120 spaces available
for athletic scholarships, this in includes
cludes includes all sports.
A football player on scholar scholarship
ship scholarship can play other sports, but
an athlete with a scholarship
in another sport cannot play foot football,
ball, football, says Smith. This is a con conference
ference conference rule. It makes sure that
football players aren't recruited
by giving a scholarship in another
sport.
When asked about footbal 1 play players
ers players on scholarship that cant
play for some reason, Smith said
that didnt affect the scholar scholarship
ship scholarship at ail. Some schools try to
get rid of scholarship holders
that dont play, but not the UF,
say Smith.
In 1967 the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference (SEC) and independent
teams in the SEC area recruited
110 Florida athletes. The UF
and Florida State got 70 of these.
The SEC and independent
schools, Miami, Georgia Tech.,
FSU, and Tulane recruited 527
football players in 1967. The 110
Florida athletes was the largest
group from any state. Kentucky,
with 22 had the smallest.

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game with 11 minutes left in the
game. Five minutes later the
6-10 junior hit a layup to put
UF ahead for the first time since
the games early stages, 50-
49*.
Then Miller, who has played
third-fiddle to Walk and Andy
Owens this year, scored the next
six points, two field goals and
two free throws. The Tigers
crept back to within one point
of the Gators with 51 seconds
left in the game 60-59. But Mil Miller
ler Miller tapped in a missed free throw
and seconds later scored another
free throw. That put the winners,
-3 in the SEC, 12-6 over overall,
all, overall, ahead by four with just 35
seconds left.
Miller totaled 16 points, five a above
bove above his average. Owens, back at
full strength for the first time in
two games, hit for his average,
16 points. Mike Rollyson played
another key role as the all allaround
around allaround substitute, scoring 11
points.
Mann, Downs
Top Gridders
Final gradings of Floridas
football game films from the 19-
67 season give top individual hon honors
ors honors to linebacker David Mann
and safetyman Bobby Downs of the
defensive unit.
Mann, a junior, led the team
in individual tackles with 66 while
Downs, a senior, topped the team
in defensive points (based on
game-by-game scores in 12 ca categories)
tegories) categories) with 779.
Second in both vital defensive
departments was senior tackle
Don Giordano, who made 59 ta tackles
ckles tackles and came up with 749
points in the 10 Gator games.
Top tacklers, in addition to
Mann and Giordano, were Downs
with 55, middle guard Bill Dor Dorsey
sey Dorsey with 52, defensive end Brian
Jetter with 45 and linebacker
Wayne McCall and end Britt Skri Skrivanek
vanek Skrivanek with 37 each.

Mg MfwW
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* yr.VN in' CM I -M'tt #'m*



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Florida's swimmers swam to
its fifth straight win without a
loss by routing Tulane Univer University
sity University Monday afternoon, 63-49, at
the Gator pool.
The Gators won the first seven
events from the Green Wave
and then coasted onto the easy
win. In eight of the 13 events,
new meet records were broken.
One the three-meter
diving by UFs Mike Chalbeck.
Chalbeck recorded 300.45 points
off the high board, the highest
diving score ever recorded at
Floridas pool.
The Gators now own wins over
Alabama, Florida State, South
Florida, Georgia and Tulane. The
winners next meet is Thursday
in Greenville, N.C. against East
Carolina.
Petes Best Ever
Birmingham, Ala. In leading
the Southeastern Conference and
all major colleges in scoring with
a fabulous 45-ppg average, Fete
Maravich of LSU may be on
his way to the all-time NCAA
scoring crown.
Only one basketballer in his history
tory history ever scored 40-plus points
for a full season Frank Selvy
of Furman, who averaged 41.7
for the 29 games of his 1954
season.
If Maravich, who hits the half halfway
way halfway mark of LSU's scheduled
26-game season this Wednesday
when the Tigers entertain Clem Clemson
son Clemson at Baton Rouge, averages just
40 ppg the rest of the way, rather
than the current 48, he will finish
with over 42 per game for the
season, the highest average in
history.
SEC Week
This weeks schedule:
MONDAY: Vanderbilt at Louis Louisiana
iana Louisiana State, Tennessee at Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State, Kentucky at Mis Mississippi,
sissippi, Mississippi, Auburn at Florida and
Alabama at Georgia.
TUESDAY: Valdosta State at
Florida State, Virginia Military
at Georgia Tech and Maryland at
Miami.
WEDNESDAY: Georgia at Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, Mississippi State at Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi and Davidson-Virginia
Tech at Charlotte.
THURSDAY: Samford at Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, Florida State at North Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, Clem son at Georgia Tech
and Dayton at Miami.
FRIDAY: Missouri at Tulane.
SATURDAY: Georgia at Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, Florida at Vanderbilt,
Louisiana State at Kentucky, Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi at Tennessee, East Ca Carolina
rolina Carolina at Florida State, Miami at
Tulane and Toledo at Virginia
Tech.
SEC Scoring Leaders
Name G Pts. Ave.
Maravich, LSU 14 625 44.6
Walk, Florida 17 464 27.3
Nordholz, Ala. 14 304 21.7
Hagan, Vandy 16 347 21.7
Casey, Kentucky 15 301 20.1
Lienhard, Georgia 14 276 19.7
Justis, Tenn. 14 268 19.1
Elliott, Alabama 15 254 16.9
Boerwinkle, Tenn. 14 236 16.9
Tinker,Auburn 15 249 16.6
Sec Standings:
Cons. All
Teams W L W L
Tennessee 6 1 12 2
Florida 8 3 11 6
Louisiana St. 5 2 10 4
Vanderbilt 5 3 13 3
Kentucky 5 3 H 4
Georgia 4 4 9 5
Mississippi St. 3 5 7 9
Auburn 2 5 6 9
Alabama ?i 6 8 7
Mississippi J 0 0 3 H

UF Wins No. 5, Bops Tulane, 63-49

400 Medley Relay -1. F Bruce Williams, Steve Zarzecki, Rich Richard
ard Richard Ahrens, Thadd Blanton 3:47.1 T No Entry (New record recordold
old recordold meet record: Florida 3:52.9 in 1/8/65)
lOOOFreestyle 1. Phil Sheehee F 11:10.5 2. Bob Bresnahan-
T 11:21.5 3. Mike Goldstein T 12:25.3
1 meter diving 1. Glenn Hoffman F 238.55 2. Jeff Montgomery
F 205.45 3. Doug Williams T 163.60
200 Freestyle 1. Bob Applegate F 1:54.5 2.Don Kearns- T
1:55.7 3. Frank Lombardo- T- 2:25.9
50 Freestyle 1. Paul Ackerman F :23.0 2. John Rouquette T T:23.7
:23.7 T:23.7 3. Char|es Johnson T 0:42.2
200 Individ|ual Medley 1. Jimmy Perkins F 2:09.3 (new record
-old record: Florida 2:12.1 in 1/8/65) 2. Bruce McKeever r T T-2:21.7
-2:21.7 T-2:21.7 -V -V---3
--3 -V---3 meter diving -1. Mike Chalbeck F 300.45 (highest 3-mtr.
diving score ever recorded in the Florida Pool) 2. Bob Link F F-283.45
-283.45 F-283.45 3. Doug William T 158.25

GRADUATING ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
\
BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
*
WITH
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
ECls St, Petersburg Division
-ON CAMPUS INTERVIEW JANUARY 31

This may be the chance you have
been waiting for an exceptional
professional opportunity with an
industry pace-setter on Floridas
subtropical Gulf Coast in St,
Petersburg,
For qualified graduates in
electronic engineering, ECI offers
excellent career opportunities in
such areas of advanced develop development
ment development and design as coding, mod modulation,
ulation, modulation, digital communications,
microelectronics, RF communica communications
tions communications technology and satellite sys systems,
tems, systems,
ECI is a recognized leader in
command and control system-;,
miniaturized transmitters and re rei-T*y
i-T*y rei-T*y

So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal dinner for interested electronic
engineering students and their ladies at the Holiday Inn
on 13th St. S. beginning at 6:30 Jan. 30, Please let us know J
that you are coming by calling us in advance at 376-8266
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and asking for Mrs. Jones.
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
St Petersburg, Florida
Please Mote that the buffet meeting place has been changed to Holiday Inn.
an equal opportunity employer

200 Butterfly -1. Pete Levine -T 2:13.3 (new record -old meet
record Tulane 2:22.5 in 2/1/66) 2. Peter Prinz -F 2:24.5
3. Dave Bercuson T 2:46.6
100 Freestyle -1. Don Kearns- T 0:50.6 (new record -old meet
record Florida 0:50.8 in 1/8/65) 2 Bob Bridges F 0:50.9
3. Perkins F 0:52.1 4. C. Johnson T 0:54.1
200 Backstroke -1. Bruce Williams F 2:07.1 (new record
old meet record Florida: 2:28.3 in 1/8/65) 2. McKeever T T-2:28.8
-2:28.8 T-2:28.8 3. Goldstein T 2:40,0
500 Freestyle -1. Phil Sheehee F 5:25.9 (new record -old
meet record Florida: 5:27.7 in 2/1/66) 2. Bob Bresnahan T T-5:28.5
-5:28.5 T-5:28.5 3. Pete Levine T 6:30.5
200 Breaststroke -1. John Rouquette T 2:23.8 (new record
old meet record Florida: 2:29.0 in 1/8/65)2. Donald Cooper- F
2:31.7 3. Lombardo T 2:51.7
400 Freestyle -1. T McKeever, C. Johnson, Kearns, Bercuson
4:43.0

ceivers, multiplex systems and
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