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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 60, No. 71

OVERCROWDED CLASSES
This classroom scene is typical of many
classes on the UF campus which are over overcrowded
crowded overcrowded due to a shortage of professors to
teach course sections. More money is needed
to attract professors and alleviate the crucial
problem.
Photo By Mike Huddleston
AN EDITORIAL
We Need Help
'- h
This morning the state university system of Florida stands at
the brink of disaster.
It has been forced to this critical point by ineffective and un unrealistic
realistic unrealistic state planning and politics.
The cost of education is rising for the student as, simultaneously,
the quality of course offerings, instructors, physical plants and
libraries continue to decline.
The future of this state is being destroyed by inertia.
Floridas state legislature, governor and education leaders have
failed us and themselves. They have failed to bring this state to the
forefront, in any real sense, by depriving it of a sure and certain
road to leadership education.
It is no secret in our society that a mans worth is equivalent to
his education. And, it is known that the total of all mens worth is
the sum of any states total wealth.
Florida is poorer this rooming because it has failed to produce
or support schools and colleges which could make it great.
v
The present music building is condemed and is a dreadful fire
hazard. It is an hourly invitation to the kind of disaster, and much
worse, which was recently suffered in the state prison system,
a current report from the University of Floridas College of Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts states.
Will the crime of inferior education soon be multiplied by a dread dreadful
ful dreadful disaster of fire and death?
Perhaps.
And, yet, there is a simple solution to this problem and a future
for this state. That future and that solution lie in an investment
for tomorrow made by Floridas citizens of today.
Taxes can and must be raised toaccommodatethe young people of
. lorida in the best possible university system which can be created.
Low cost, quality education must be supported by the people of this
state If Florida truly intends to lead the nation.
Lets talk business. An investment in education today will accumu accumulate
late accumulate interest each day. In the years ahead the dividends from this
Investment will be valued as Florida counts an increasing number of
substantial citizens, each proud of their state, thankful for the
education they received here and willing to pay the costs of educating
others.

The
Florida Alligator
Sp ecial Legislative Edition

University of Florida, Gainesville

UF In Deep Trouble
By BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
The quality of education at the UF is in deep trouble.
Budgetary problems are shifting the gears of the university from
low to reverse.

The teacher shortage has
robbed the university of 12.1
per cent of the faculty necessary
to educate 16,737 full-time stu students.
dents. students.
Some students planning to gra graduate
duate graduate in August will have to wait
until December because the

Crisis At A Glance
o
S University Will Suffer, Page 2
s Fewer Courses Being Offered, Page 19
S' Quality Education Report Fails, Page 19
UFs Financial Aid Critical, Page 2
S' Intern Shortage Felt Statewide, Page 19
Economic Crisis
Termed Grave

The state of Florida is en endangering
dangering endangering its future by not sup supporting
porting supporting a quality education pro program,
gram, program, Robert B. Mautz, vice
president of academic affiars
said Saturday.
Mautz said he considers the
UFs economic crisis grave
and the future frightening.
Basically, I think the state
is concerned with the future. The
kind of education it gives its
citizens is, in fact, the topic
of the special legislative ses session.
sion. session.
Knowledge is the one great
advantage of any group of people.
If we dont have funds to sup support
port support a quality program on all
levels, including the graduate
level, we are endangering our
future by not providing for a
competitive edge, Mautz said.
Mautz said the UF needs about
sll million to meet current
needs.
He explained that in the edu education
cation education and general budget the UF
requested $42 million, but only
s3l million is available.
In addition, the UF needs build buildings,
ings, buildings, funds for the health center,
the engineering industrial ex experiment
periment experiment center and the insti institute
tute institute of food and agricultural
science.
In terms of specifics, the UF
needs increases of faculty sal salaries,
aries, salaries, assistance for faculty re research,
search, research, purchase of equipment
and the support of graduate stu students.
dents. students. Mautz commented.
Libraries are also being neg neglected.
lected. neglected. Mautz termed this very
serious.
The vice president expressed
hope that fiscal needs can be met.
The UF will immediately try to

courses needed for graduation
will not be offered during the
summer quarter. Approximately
25 to 30 per cent of the faculty
will be hired for the summer
months as compared with the
normal 65 per cent.
The university budget approved

employ faculty, increase gra graduate
duate graduate assistance, buy equipment
and improve university op operations,
erations, operations, if more money is ap appropriated,
propriated, appropriated, Mautz concluded.
MAUTZ
. trouble ahead

QUOTABLE QUOTES
Unless additional staff is available the college (of Education)
will have to cut down its enrollment next year, adding to the
teacher shortage. Kimball Wiles, dean of the College of
Education
Actually, we are out of business until the next academic
year. Our big pocketbooks are empty. Douglas Turner,
director of student financial aid at UF
Instead of raising tuition we should be increasing the tax
on alcoholic beverages, cigarettes, and even a corporate income
tax. J. Emory Cross, state senator
If critical fiscal needs are not met at this session, damage
which can never be fully repaired will be done to the students.
Stephen C. OConnell. UF President

Monday, January 29, 1968

by the Board of Regents for all
units at the UF for the year 1967-
68 was $75,853,595. The amount
approved by the Legislature was
$61,961,085.
The impact can be better vis visualized
ualized visualized by examination of the
Education and General Budget,
which accounts for the bulk of
educational functions at the UF.
The Board of Regents request
amounted to $36,169,859.
The amount approved was
$28,769,404 twenty per cent
less than the needed amount.
Seventeen classes in the Col College
lege College of Education alone had to
be cancelled for the first quarter
this year because of lack of
faculty. Ironically, the state
would not appropriate funds
enough to educate many future
educators.
Many education majors are
transferring to other institutions
in order to get their internships.
Eleven per cent of the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys space is in temporary
buildings. The University re requested
quested requested from the state a total
of $26,025,000 of construction
funds for the current biennium
to keep pace with growing en enrollments,
rollments, enrollments, to house increased
numbers of faculty, to progress
towards the replacement of tem temporary
porary temporary buildings and to rehabi rehabilitate
litate rehabilitate some existing facilities.
Os this sum, only $5,053,000 was
allocated.
What is the University planning
for next year?
With an increase in the number
seeking admission to the UF,
without an increase in supporting
staff, will result in deterioration
of physical facilities and of the
inability of the UF to perform
the supporting services it re regards
gards regards as necessary.
Security and control of traf traffic
fic traffic is poor and, with the increase
in students in 1968, will become
more inadequate. The advent of
new buildings without additional
personnel for maintenance and
funds for supplies and equipment
will accelerate the deterioration.
The Legislature is meeting
in Tallahassee today to seek the
solutions that many hope will
pick the UF, as well as the entire
state education system, off the
ground and set it back on its
feet.



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

Page 2

' The UF Will Suffer ...
c 0
If our critical fiscal needs are not met at this session,
damage which can never he fully repaired will be done
to the students. Stephen C. OConnell, UF President.


OConnell: Budget Increase Needed

2 Alachua Legislators
See No Tuition Hike

Bv JEFF ALFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
The special education session
of the state legislature meets in
Tallahassee today and the
Alachua County delegation does
not expect the legislature to raise
tuition for the state universities.
Rep. Ralph Turlington and Sen.
J. Emory (Red) Cross both agreed
that there was little chance tui tuition
tion tuition would be raised.
I opposed raising tuition in
the first place and I dont think
most of the legislators like the

Recent Report Says
UF Libraries Rank
Below U.S. Average

Fiscal year 1967-68 was a
dismal turnabout for the UF
Libraries.
UF officials had hoped it would
be a catch-up year. They re requested
quested requested $900,000 in state funds
for the library acquisitions,
$400,000 to make up for the de deficiencies
ficiencies deficiencies of past years.
Instead of this major increase
in the budget, UF Libraries re received
ceived received less than the year be before.
fore. before. It was allocated $262,000
in the UF Education and General
Budget, or $129,369 less than in
1966-67.
Mrs. Margaret Goggin, acting
director, said she expects the UF
library will rank among the low lowest
est lowest in the nation when compared
to institutions of the same size,
complexity and advanced levels
of instruction.
Using as a comparison 23 other
institutions which have enroll enrollments
ments enrollments exceeding 10,000 and which
grant more than 100 Ph.D.'s a
year, a recent UF report in indicated
dicated indicated its libraries were below
average in size and rate of ac acquisitions.
quisitions. acquisitions.
In July 1966 the average num number
ber number of volumes held in these 24
state universities was 1,660,772.
The UF Libraries ranked 17th
with 1,147,771.
The report indicated Florida
had fallen from 14th among the
institutions to 17th in a six-year
period. The average rate of
growth for the libraries was
94,630 volumes, compared to
62,592 for Florida.

idea of raising it, said Cross.
Instead of raising tuition we
should be increasing the tax on
alcoholic beverages, cigarettes,
and even a corporate income
tax, he added.
Although both legislators do not
forsee a tuition hike they are
split on the outlook for education
Turlington, speaker of the
house, expressed cautious opti optimism
mism optimism last week when he said
that he expects the governor to
approve the increase in sales
tax recommended by the Com Commission
mission Commission on Quality Education.

This could be the quality cam campus
pus campus of the state of Florida," said
Mrs. Goggins, but- it cant be
if we can't provide research
material for students and faculty
in the fields in which we are
committed."
An analysis of library seating
shows that only 20 per cent of
UF undergraduates 'and 10
per cent of its graduate enroll enrollment
ment enrollment can be accommodated in the
UF libraries. Mrs. Goggin said
the standard sought for such
libraries is to be able to seat
30 per cent of the under undergraduates
graduates undergraduates and 40 per cent of the
graduates.

By MARLYN RUBIN
Alligator Staff Writer
There are 3,000 UF students on fi financial
nancial financial aid. To offset this year's $25
a quarter increase in tuition, $225,000
is needed.
If tuition were to go up again, the
situation would become even more critical.
In November UF officials took the fol following
lowing following position on a proposed hike in
tuition to $l5O a quarter. In response to
a question by the joint legislative select
committee on education, President O'-
Connell replied:
If an increase in tuition is accom accompanied
panied accompanied by an increase in scholarships and
loan funds so that the tuition increase
will not deprive any student of a chance
for an education, $l5O per quarter, al although
though although high, does not appear to be ex excessive
cessive excessive on an absolute scale or in re-

Financial Aid At UF Critical

Sen. Cross, on the other hand,
believes the governor will veto
the Increase tax proposal.
Without new taxes, Florida
wont even be 31st in the nation
in education, Cross said. Tur Turlington
lington Turlington stated that the governor
pledged to abide by the decisions
of the commission and he ex expects
pects expects Kirk will reluctantly ap approve
prove approve the sales tax proposal.
We dont need to meet all the
requests that have been made and
still operate the state school sys system,
tem, system, Turlington added.
We can live if we dont eat
steak, and we can have quality
education without granting all the
requests, he said.
If the governor vetoes the sales
tax increase it will take five*
votes in the House to override
the veto.
Cross expressed a hope that
five Republicans could be per persuaded
suaded persuaded to vote against the gover governor
nor governor and override his veto, but
Cross noted in the past they have
responded to the governors de demands.
mands. demands.
When Kirk tells them to sit
down they dont even look for a
chair, Cross said.
JM Students Help
The UF advanced journalism
reporting class, taught by Jack
Detweiler, helped to compile to todays
days todays special legislative edition.
The edition is being distributed
to members of the state legis legislature
lature legislature and political leaders
throughout the state.

lation to charges of comparable insti institutions.
tutions. institutions.
If such an increase in tuition is the
only alternative to continued starvation of
higher education, then such an increase
is warranted subject to the condition
noted,"
Last spring Gov. Kirk proposed a $4
million loan fund to accompany the tu tuition
ition tuition hike, but then vetoed the measure
when it was made a part of the general
appropriations bUJ
Loan funds at the UF are depleted,
said Douglas Turner, director of student
financial aid.
Actually, we are out of business until
the next academic year," he commented.
Our big pocketbooks are empty," Tur Turner
ner Turner said, referring to loan funds provided
by the National Defense Education Act,
a guaranteed bank loan program, the state
and the UF.
Turner said a few departments and col colleges
leges colleges have accumulated some money

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95 Hjk

For UF To Attain
National Distinction

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF will suffer irrepar irreparable*
able* irreparable* damages unless the special
Legislative session finances UF
needs, President Stephen C. O-
Connell said recently.
Damages of grave concern to
the president are, a denial of
admission of some students, a
deterioration of quality instruc instruction
tion instruction and retrogression in
progress.
The current financial crisis
will stop the UF from attaining
true educational distinction, the
president said.
OConnell likened the UF to a
man trying to cross a 25 foot
stream with a 24 foot plank. The
only way the UF can cross the
stream into a place alongside
the truly great institutions in this
country is through a budget in increase
crease increase of five to ten per cent
a year, he said.
To make the UF a truly great
institution two things are needed,
OConnell said.
First, an adequate physical
plant and necessary equipment.
Second, outstanding faculty mem members
bers members with reputations as leaders
in their field must be attracted.
The $2.4 million deficit has
forced the UF to make drastic
changes. OConnell said the UF
has reduced the purchases of
equipment and other capital items
to 40 per cent of last years
expenditures.
In spite of additional students,
faculty, and buildings, expense

money for maintaining operations
remains the same as last year.
The fiscal crisis means that no
new positions authorized will be
filled, OConnell said.
The summer quarter and next
academic year will see even
greater changes and reductions.
OConnell cited the following pos possibilities:
sibilities: possibilities:
Reduction of enrollment for
the summer quarter by 50 per
cent
No increase in student en enrollment
rollment enrollment for the 1968 fall term
Reduction of faculty and staff
when one of the criticisms is
that classes are already too large
Reduction of salaries when
we are not really competitive
with salaries in some sister
states
Reduction of the number of
courses and programs now being
offered.
OConnell has appealed to the
citizens of Florida to provide
for the reasonable needs of the
State University System.
I urge that you indicate to all
of your officials legislators, cab cabinet,
inet, cabinet, and Governor, that you share
our concern and that you wish
our problems solved at this
special session of the legisla legislature.
ture. legislature. If your critical fiscal needs
are not met at this session, dam damage
age damage which can never be fully
repaired will be done to the stu students.
dents. students.
We will suffer loss of fine
faculty members; and our for forward
ward forward progress will be affected
for years to come, the presi president
dent president told a civic club earlier this
month.

through gifts and other sources in an ef effort
fort effort to assist these big programs.
Turner explained that students who ex exhaust
haust exhaust their own funds between now and
the end of the academic year have no
assurance that the UF will have loan funds
available for them.
Many are working to augment their
resources, some are dropping out, some
are borrowing from sources outside the
university, and other just arent eating,
he said.
I had a boy in here today who lost
nine pounds last week in an effort to
conserve his meager funds. At least his
college had some loan money left I could
put him on.
Costs will go up to SI,BOO this year,
opposed to last years $1,550. This extra
$250 is due to the creeping inflation in
books, housing, food and tuition, only $75
of it is due to tuition increase.



Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 70s
Low In The 40s

TECHNICAL ISSUES CITED
U-F Party Files Election Protest

Forward
Wins Most
Positions
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Forward party, under presi presidential
dential presidential candidate Bill Mcride,
made an apparent but unofficial
near-sweep of Student Govern Government
ment Government positions in Thursdays
general election, taking 31 Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council seats, 12 Honor
Court Justiceships, all elected
Lyceum Council positions, and
all but one of the top five SG
offices.
All results remain unofficial
until they can be certified by
both the Honor Court and Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council.
The tabulation of votes by the
Honor Court gave 3348 votes to
Mcride, 3340 votes to United-
Firsts Clyde Taylor, 785 to Con Contrived
trived Contrived partys Rich Houk. Ira
Brukner of Individuals party re received
ceived received 150.
Forwards Phil Burnett, re receiving
ceiving receiving 4136 votes won the treas treasurers
urers treasurers position, over United-
Firsts Allan Casey, who polled
3076 votes.
Pete Zinober of Forward party
received 4304 votes to outdis outdistance
tance outdistance his opponent for Chancellor
of the Honor Court, Jack Horner,
who received 3245.
(SEE RESULTS PAGE 4)

Teller Raps Treaty
By JIM ALMAND
Alligator Staff Writer

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TELLER

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

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IS THIS ILLEGAL?
AUF student drops a slip of of the polls in last Thursdays
paper into a checkoff box at one election* See page five for story.
Former UF Prof Says Florida
Should Impeach Governor Kirk

Florida ought to impeach Gov.
Claude Kirk and get rid of the
incompetence in the legislature
and Board of Regents, Dr. Harry
Kantor, a recently resigned UF
professor of political science

Monday, January 29, 1968,

said Friday.
I am leaving because of my
responsibility to my two children
to see that they have an adequate
education. They cant get it in
Kantor continued.

Dr. Edward Teller, who played a major
role in the development of the atomic bomb,
is worried about the proposed U.S.-Soviet
anti-proliferation treaty because it prevents
us from including our allies into our present
defense system.
I think we should try to stop proliferation
of aggressive weapons not weapons of
defense, Dr. Teller said Sunday to a question
propsed during a press conference in the
Reitz Union.
Dr. Teller will speak on Three Revolu Revolutions
tions Revolutions in Physics today at 4 p.m. in the
Reitz Union Ballroom. His speech, being
sponsored by University Lecture series, will
deal with the Copernican, the absurd and
the applied science revolution.
Survival Today will be Dr. Tellers
topic tonight at 8 oclock in the Gainesville
High School Auditorium.
The U.S. cannot put up a civil detense
program that could save all the people but
we can establish civil defense that will save
the great majority of Americans, the nuclear
physicist said.
Civil defense can make sure a United
States will survive, Dr. Teller stated.
The Russians will not want to attack us
unless they can eliminate us completely .
Civil defense in my opinion is the best
deterrent against war, Dr. Teller said.

Page 3

He said Gainesville High
School, where his children will
attend school next, is going on
double session next school term.
Kantor opposes this.
In private conversations I
have had with my childrens
teachers they have complained
about the working conditions and
the size of classes at the school.
It is affecting my childrens ed education,
ucation, education, he stated.
Kantors children attend West Westwood
wood Westwood Jr. High School currently.
I have been here for 16
years, Kantor said, and
Florida education hasnt gotten
any better. I dont foresee any
improvement in the next five
years. My children are 12 and
13 years old and after five years
(SEE KANTOR PAGE 4)

UF Recruiting Os Negroes
Dialogue Subject Tonight

UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves will be quizzed on re recruitment
cruitment recruitment of Negro athletes as
part of tonights DIALOGUE dis discussion
cussion discussion of the university athletic
program. The meeting is at 7:30
in Room 349 of the Reitz Union.
DIALOGUE, a group discussion
program, is designed to better
the student-faculty relationships
on campus.
Graves will be the featured
speaker along with Mandell
Gllcksberg, president of
Athletic Association; and William
E. Elmore, chairman of the
Faculty-Ticket Committee.
Facets of the athletic program
which have come under fire
during the last year will be
discussed, including the contro-

Inside
Final Election
Tabulations
See Page 4

Elections
Called
'A Mess
By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Bill Mcrides unofficial eight
vote victory over Clyde Taylor
Thursday has apparently left
many students confused. United-
First party filed a protest Satur Saturday
day Saturday calling for a new election,
an Honor Court justice said the
situation was a mess" and the
general consensus seems to be
that the handling of the election
was "all mixed up."
Bob Hughes, chancellor of the
honor court, said the protest of
the presidential race was filed
Saturday by United-First party
but whether another election will
occur is still undetermined.
The Honor Court chancellor
is the only person who can re recommend
commend recommend another election.
Hughes said the issue was tech technical
nical technical and "pretty legal." "Were
following election laws and I
intend to keep it that way,"
Hughes commented Sunday.
Prejudicial irregularities
must be proved before the elec election
tion election can be invalidated.
Both United-First and Forward
must submit a brief to the Honor
Court by 5 p.m. today. Hughes
explained that the court can then
determine whether to negate the
protest or certify the election
results.
Hughes said it would be Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday afternoon "at the latest"
before formal* hearings would
be called for. The hearings, oral
arguments before the chancellor,
will give the court grounds for
calling another electionif the
specific allegations regarding ir irregularities
regularities irregularities are true, an honor
court official explained.
Neither Hughes nor either of
(SEE "ELECTIONS PAGE 4)

versial system of ticket distri distribution.
bution. distribution.
The system will be explained,
future plans for changes will be
noted, and the system will be
compared to that at other uni universities.
versities. universities.
DIALOGUE will also discuss
academic standards for athletes,
often criticized as being too low
by SEC schools Vanderbilt and
Tulane, which have higher admis admission
sion admission standards than UF and other
state universities in the SEC.
_ These schools have problems
similar to the Ivy League schools,
in that they cannot recruit many
high-calibre athletes who dont
have the grades necessary for
admission.



..... . -- - ' "
'People In Trouble Need
Someone To Hear Them

By RITA BARLOW
Alligator Staff Writer
What a person in trouble usually needs most
is just someone to listen to him/' says Dr.
Richard McGee, UF professor of clinical psy psychology
chology psychology and consultant on suicide prevention.
To meet this need, the university established
in 1957 its now nationally-recognized early warning
network of strategically-located trained and sym sympathetic
pathetic sympathetic listeners.
Since upsetting emotional problems can be
expected wherever there are people, says Dr.
Ben Barger, director of the UF mental health
project, we ought to provide help before the
problems become too burdensome.
Students The Key
Students numbering 147 or more man the net network's
work's network's first echelon about 35 campus leaders
from Student Government, the cabinet, Inter-
Fraternity Council and Pan-Hellenic Council and
about 112 trained section and dorm advisors
with their professional supervisors, the resident
counselors.
Additional professional counselors make up the
second cadre. These include seven from the Office
of Student Affairs, 25 from the Housing Office,
numerous faculty, six from the chaplains' corps,
10 from the infirmary and 24 from the Counseling
Center.
The early warning network owes its success to
another factor besides key people readily acces accessible,
sible, accessible, counseling and testing. This factor is widen widening
ing widening understanding of the nature of campus stress.
Students are brighter than they used to be, says
Bargers 1966 report to the American College
Health Association. More than 66 per cent come
from the upper fifth of high school graduates.
And they seem able to examine their problems
forthrightly, says Barger, which may be one rea reason
son reason for more willingness to use the available help.

Kantor Resigns

(FROM PAGE 3)
they will have passed the crucial
stage in their education.
Florida is trying to protect
a status quo that doesnt deserve
protecting, Kantor stressed.
The whole state legislature is
terrible. Nobody has the guts to
fight the governor.
Insurance laws are being
passed in the legislature while
education in the state is allowed
to deteriorate. Aside from that,
there are no Negroes in the

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University o' Florida
and Is published flvfe times weekly except during June, July and August when it Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Relit
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered j
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

CAMPUS SUICIDES-PART 2

legislature and 30 per cent of
the Florida population is Negro,
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, Chair Chairman
man Chairman of UF Political Science De Department,
partment, Department, s2.iu that he regrets
Kantors resigning.
I value the work of Dr. Kantor
very highly, said Dauer. He said
that Kantor was discouraged over
the trend in the public school
system and the recent refusal
of bond issue in Gainesville.
Kantor is going to Marquette
University when his resignation
takes effect June 15.

He accredits the diminishing number of sui suicidal
cidal suicidal emergencies on this campus to the UF
early warning network.
The network includes 256 or more people sta stationed
tioned stationed throughout the campus, wherever students
live, study, attend classes, govern themselves,
socialize, or practice their religion.
Although the number of people in the network
fluctuates slightly from term to term, people in
each of eight or more categories are available
for conferences if needed from a students
first day on campus until his last.
High Prediction
Although the October, 1966, Moderator predicted
1,000 UJS. student suicides in 1967, Dr. Michael
L. Peck of the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention
Center said in October, 1967, that the 1967 figure
can be revised downward to about 300 nationwide.
And, contrary to predictions of a rising rate
of student suicides, Peck finds that the 1960 rate
of 5.1 per 100,000 students is mirrored by an
identical 5.1 in 1966.
At the same time, the 1960 general population
rate of 9.0 per 100,000 rose by 1966 to 16.6
in Pecks California sampling.
These figures contradict earlier statements that
college students have a higher suicide rate than
non-college people the same age.
It appears that people on campuses may be
better able than people off-campus to accept stress stressful
ful stressful situations, says McGee. In fact, the struc structured
tured structured environment may actually help in meeting
stress.
The college environment may even protect
vulnerable natures, says kcGee, by provid providing
ing providing them with predictable goal achievement.
In spite of the brightening statistical outlook,
however, silent calls for help are still to be
heard on campus, by those who will listen.
As Norman L. Farberow of the Los Angeles
Suicide Prevention Center says, Sitting on the
ledge of a building is a tremendous attempt at
communication.

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Page 4

Election Results

The following are the unoffi unofficial
cial unofficial returns for Legislative
Council seats (one seat from
each college, except as indica indicated):
ted): indicated):
Arts & Sciences (5 seats):
Armistead Neely (F)-378, Nancy
Isenberg (UF)- 362, Bob Snyder
(F)-350, Bob White (F)-345, Bill
Levens (F)-343, Richard Border
(F)-335, Barbara Nunn (UF)-324,
Ira Hatch (UF)-301, Stewart Her Hershey
shey Hershey (UF)-296, David Coggshall
(UF)-294, Martha Troetschel (C)
-100, Jo Franklin (C)- 99, Charles
Riley (C)-90.
Journalism (2 seats):
Ronnie Bloom (F)-159, Ed Tolle
(F)-140, Larrie Sikorski (UF)-
120, Clifford Schulman(UF)-108,
Bonnie Granat (C)-35, Susie
Whalton (C)-33, Tim Blake (D (D---21.
--21. (D---21.
Law (2 seats):
Dick Brodeur (F)-149, BUI Sa Sadowski
dowski Sadowski (UF)-161, John Kuder

Election Protested

(FROM PAGE 3)
the party chairmen would specu speculate
late speculate as to the outcome of the
protest. Jack Harkness, chair chairman
man chairman of United-First party, said
there were many election viola violations
tions violations and irregularities.
The election didnt seem to
be well planned, Harkness said.
Harkness said typical election
violations were students who
voted more than once, absentee
ballots which were not counted
and an election polling booth
which opened an hour and a half
late.
The chairman of Forward par party,
ty, party, Charles Harris, said he was
not sure what his party was doing.
Harris said he was out of town
all week-end and Manny James,
a member of Forwards steering

~ The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

(UF)-131, Albert Parker (F)-
120, David Howland (C)-8.
Forestry:
Kenneth McLaughlin (F)-17.
Physical Education:
David Tullis (UF)-37, Glenn Rep Repple
ple Repple (F)-29.
Medicine:
Robert Grady Ashley (F)-15.
Nursing:
Patti Barbarowicz' (F)-34, Je
Conord (UF)-26.
Health:
Kathy Monoghan (UF)-39, Jan
Dyro (F)-30.
Architecture (2 seats):
Jim Manuel (UF)-103, Charles
Warren (UF)-97, John Jourdan
(F)-87, James Kersey (F)-87,
Thomas W. Cayce (C)-15.
(SEE ELECTION RESULTS,
PAGE 5)

committee, would be handling the
issue.
James was unavailable for
comment.
In the race for president of
Lyceum council, Mary Jo Holland
defeated United -Firsts Diana
Leach by a vote of 3393 to 3254.
Mary Stewart defeated Nancy
Register for the position of vice
frrekldent of Lycium councU by
a vote of 3318 to 3097.
The results for the four elected
positions of Lyceum Council are
as follows: Candy Moler (For (Forward)
ward) (Forward) 3546 votes; Esther Smith
(F), 3546; Carol Bussey (F), 3382;
Linda Rudd (F), 3378; Kathy
Price (U-F), 3193; Joyce Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett (U-F), 3106; Laren Lucas
(U-F), 3010.



Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Agriculture:
Howard Foster (F)-84, Sally Ben Bendroth
droth Bendroth (UF)-36, Denny Dennison
(0-11.
Pharmacy:
Tom Flowers (F)-31, Tom Jack Jackson
son Jackson (UF)-27.
Engineering (3 seats):
Mario Martinez (F)-242, Bob
Henderson (F)-192, Chris Bauer
(F)-180, Ernie Haslam (UF)-174,
Robert Harris fUF')-162. Rod
Brock (UF)-158, Donald Nelson
(C)-52.
Education (4 seats):
Becky Peirce (UF)-251, Barbara
Banks (UF)-248, Kathy Dittmar
(F)-240, Sharon Hackney (UF)-
239, Tony Laue (F)-228, Sherry
Segerman (F)-227, Clare Lipich
(UF)-223, Sharon Desvousges
(F)- 220, Diane Dolan (C)- 34, Let Letty
ty Letty Jones (C)-29, Marie Sardinha
(C)-25.
a
Business Ad. (3 seats):
Jim Morgan (F)-313, Alan Star Starling
ling Starling (F)-301, Mike Hill (F)-259,
Steve Rushing (UF)-224, Hardy
Pickard (UF)-212, Robert Buck
(UF)-194, Graham McKeel (I)-
113, Mark Misiaszek (C)-39.
Freshman (5 seats):
Scott Holloway (F)-946, Bob Mar Marshall
shall Marshall (F)-895, Jay Howell (F)-
857, Jerry Troller (F)-848, El Elvin
vin Elvin Phillips (F)-832, David Story
(UF)-659, Mike Sligh (UF)-654,
Roy E. Brewer (UF)-643, Charlie
Truett (UF)-637, Jeff Bayman
(UF)-617, Pat Callahan (C)-163,
Elo-ly Saarna (C)-128, Mary
Street (C)-128, L Tinsley (C)-
122, Lianne Brown (C)-103, Doug
Henson (l)-58.
Sophomore (7 seats):
Susan Erb (F)-781, Pat Tidwell
(F)-774, Joy Green (F)-769, Bob
Glenn (F)-765, Betty Jo Padron
(F)-753, Fred Dobbins (F)-725,
Joan Mazzawi (F)-728, Roger
B. Davis (UF)-667, Bobby Klein
(UF)-655, John Kesler (UF)-654,
Bill Barr (UF)-651, Robert
Fleischman (UF)-647, Kris Leet
(UF)-606, Sharod Tuell (UF)-
589, Tish Burchard (C)-155, Ke Kevin
vin Kevin Dowling (C)-139, Rick Rey Reynolds
nolds Reynolds (C)-133, Terry Russell (C)-
133, Pat Sterne (C)-125, RhettV.
Rednour (C)-116, William Flader
(0-115, Argelio Arch Maldonado
(I)-60.
Results for Honor Court Jus Justices:
tices: Justices:
Arts and Sciences:
Jeffrey Klink (F)-343, Jackie Je Jedel
del Jedel (UF)- 322, Sandra Fuller 00-
70.
Journalism:
Missie Hollyday (F)-149, Elaine
Fuller (UF)-117, Steven Brown
0)-29.
Law:
Richard Lazzara (F)-172, Jim
Kincaid (UF)-111.
Forestry:
Bob Dees (F)-19.
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Election Results Listed

Page 5

Physical Education:
Bill Womble (F)-35, Linda Gro Grover
ver Grover (UF)- 30.
Medicine:
Jerry French (F)-18.
Nursing:
Donna Walter (UF)-34, Susan E.
Davis (F)-25.
Health:
Marie Headley (UF)-43, Patricia
Hulsey (F)-18.
Architecture:
Manny Ponce (UF)-110, Ben Wal Walbert
bert Walbert (F)-88.
Agriculture:
No candidates qualified.
Pharmacy:
Robert Mount (UF)-36, Sandra
Fasano (F)-25.
Engineering:

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Kent Withington (F)-196, Michael
Leonard (UF)-173.
Education:
Kathy Ramers (UF)-256, Jill
Vandroff (F)-234.
Business Ad.:
Bruce Bokor (F)-320, Marc Fine
(UF)-208.
Freshman class:
Linda Satlof (F)-914, John Du-
Pont (F)-913, David Byron (UF)-
737, Susan Johnson (UF)-717.
Sophomore class:
Becky Wright (F)-803, Jim Cal Callahan
lahan Callahan (UF)-777, Jacob Stuart (F)-
768, Eileen McDargh (UF)-711.

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Checkoff
System Used
In Election
By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Forward Party was the only
party using the checkoff system
i% Thursday's election.
At each polling station, a For Forward
ward Forward Party member was in
charge of collecting cards filled
out by fraternity and sorority
Forward Party voters.
The cards contain the name and
fraternity, or sorority, of the
voter and are turned over to the
respective houses after Forward
Party computes how many from
each house voted.
t A girl at one of the collection
tables said Forward Party had
promised a beer party to the
house with the largest percentage
of votes for Forward Party. This
was confirmed by other members
of Forward Party.
Joe Hilliard, Student Govern Government
ment Government secretary of interior, said
the checkoff system was defin definitely
itely definitely being used for political
patronage.*
* The house that draws the most
voters will be rewarded with a
keg party or something. Also
when time comes to give out
cabinet positions the houses with
the best percentage of voters will
again be rewarded,* Hilliard
said.
A rule was passed by Student
Government to allow the check checkoff
off checkoff system to be used but with
restrictions, according to Hil Hilliard.
liard. Hilliard.
Collection tables could not be
set up within 100 feet of the polls.
But Election Deputy Greg John Johnson,
son, Johnson, a United-First party leader,
said about 15 violations of the
rule had been reported against
Forward Party.
If the election is close,* said
Johnson, it could be thrown out
if a reasonable case could be
made that people were influenced
by the checkoff system.
Johnson said his party was not
using the checkoff system be because
cause because the party did not consider
it proper.

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Speaking before the meeting of
the Southern Section of the Amer American
ican American Federation for Clinical Re Research
search Research in New Orleans, Dr.
Robert H. Waldman, a postdoct postdoctoral
oral postdoctoral fellow in the Department of
Microbiology, described his
recent studies in which a nasal
and throat vaccine spray was
administered to establish im immunity
munity immunity against the flu virus.
A UF College of Medicine
scientist reported last week a
new vaccine spray that may be
the first fully successful method
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Field trials are under way on
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All that remains to complete the
trials is to see how well the
volunteers withstand the current
flu epidemic.
In laboratory tests conducted
by Waldman since July, 1967, at
the UF on 20 volunteers, half
received the spray vaccine and
half the shot.
All 10 of those receiving the
spray showed significant rises
in respiratory antibody count.

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Page 6

Only two of the 10 who received
the flu shot showed an equivalent
antibody production in the respir respiratory
atory respiratory tract.
The spray, odorless and taste
less, is administered in the nose
and mouth, as the patient deeply
inhales the solution.

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, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, i 968

By TOM RYAN
gosh! HE SURE WAS AWFUL SICKI
(wait'll he gets ) l JW/Av
)/ Y /

Waldmans studies in inhal inhalation
ation inhalation immunization processes
began two years ago while he
served as a clinical associate at
the National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases, National
Institutes of Health, in Bethesda,
Md.



Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

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i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

Page 8

M
AIW/UUW.

The Election Mess
111-planned

Wow, it was some election.
Yes, the recent student
government election was
something else. It proved to
be mis-managed, ill
planned, un coordinated and
now, worst of all, uncertain.
Who do we have to thank
for all this?
Well, at the top of the list
there is Secretary of Inter Interior
ior Interior Joseph Hilliard.
Mr. Hilliard really man managed
aged managed i;o blow it this year.
First he forgot to have
green-boards erected. Then
he managed to let the Honor
Court get away with appoint appointing
ing appointing four election officials to
open 54 voting machines and
then to check the tabulations
at night.
Mr. Hilliard has said that
the small number of Honor
Court officials caused the
polls to open late and slowed
the counting. He has added
that he had no control over
the Honor Courts dearth
of officials.
This may be true, but the
fact that Mr. Hilliard failed
to bring this problem to the
attention of the public before
the election is in-excusable.
Moreover, his inept handling
of the whole election picture
is proof that he did less than
a perfect job.
Perhaps the greatest proof
of Mr. Hilliards failure was
what happened to election
tabulations immediately fol-

. . New Election?

To make bad matters
worse it appears that United-
First partys Clyde Taylor
will manage to have the elec election
tion election contested.
If the Honor Court fails
to throw out the presiden presidential
tial presidential vote, on the basis of
numerous alleged election
violations, it is expected the
Legislative Council, pre presently
sently presently dominated by the old
United and First parties,will
invalidate the election in its
canvass.
And then we will have
another horror of horrors
to live with.
Not only will the election
have to be staged again, but

The
Florida Alligator
A Student Newspaper
Steve Hull
Editor

Harvey Alper
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
News Editor

The Florida Alligators nfqH.i position on issues is expressed
only in the columns below. Other material in this issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist and not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically indicated.

Harold Kennedy
Executive Editor
Bob Padecky
Sports Editor

lowing the polls closing.
At the outset the public
was informed at an election
party in the Reitz Union
that the vote would be slow
in coming. Then, by 9 p.m.
it looked like all the votes
were in.
But, wait.
Everyone seemed to have
a different total and Mr.
Hilliard was forced to admit
there was something* wrong
with his count.
So, at 9:30 p.m. Mr. Hil Hilliard
liard Hilliard took the microphone
and declared Forward par partys
tys partys Bill Mcride the vic victor
tor victor by 14 votes -- 3,209
to Clyde Taylors 3,195.
But, Mr. Hilliard cau cautioned
tioned cautioned this was an unoffi unofficial
cial unofficial final total.
He also stopped all elec election
tion election counting and left every everyone
one everyone running for a legislative
council seat in elective
limbo.
Thank you Mr. Hilliard.
As it turned out the Honor
Court counted the votes and
counted them again. After
throwing out the absentee
ballots (thanks to the failure
of Mr. Hilliard to submit
all applications for such bal ballots
lots ballots to the court) the Honor
Court gave us a new election
total.
Now, Mr. Mcride is the
victor by eight votes 3,348
to 3,340.
Thank you Honor Court.

in addition we can expect
little improvement from
either Mr. Hilliard or Honor
Court officials.
It might not be so bad if
everyone involved in this
mess was impartial. But,
they arent.
The people who conduct
these elections all have
strong political ties -- and
this includes Honor Court
officials.
This election was a mess.
Maybe the eventual and
official presidential victor
will be able to correct this
situation on a permanent
basis.

IM SURE IT WAS ME HE WINKED AT

EDITORS NOTEBOOK

a-:.
Political Games Wm
fj&gf stijj&rfm!

Confusion.
The recent student body elections have
proven one point and only one democracy
does not exist at the UF.
Tied up in their own little world of politics
and semi-security, students attempt to play
the game of life, as if it were only a game.
Politicos who groom their candidates for
re-election show their real personalities
during the heat of the campaign. Friends
are lost, two faced individuals say one thing
and mean the other, smear sheets are thrown
and then finally nothing is accomplished.
After all the back stabbing for political
favor, nothing is resolved; the election ends
in a virtual tie.
Who wants to be president, the question
is asked.
I do, the winner says; were the
greatest.
The losing candidate yells fraud. We
won't concede, he says.
And the game continues.
Supporters and foes scurry through the
halls of the Florida Union, stand outside
the Honor Court door and then rush to
their respective candidates yelling we
won, or the other party is trying to
put something over on us.
And the game continues.
Charles Shepherd, present student body
president returns from Washington and finds
out he is still the leader.

DAVE DOUCETTE
Assistant News Editor
JANICE SIZEMORE
Campus Living Editor

STAFF WRITERS James Almand, Arlene Caplan, James Cook, Jeff
Denkewalter, Anne Friedman, Brenda Gevetz, Janie Gould, Margie Gross,
Sam Hansard, Steve Hulsey, Kathy Keim, Leslie Lepene, Roy Mays, Fred
McNeese, Raul Ramirez, Dave Reddick, Neal Sanders, Barbara Schalter,
Jeff Scurran, Lori Steele, Jerry Silberberg.
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Nick Arroyo, Mike Huddleston.

Alligator Staff

BY STEVE HULL

one politico remarks, Shepherd may be
president for life.
Cancel the inauguration, the other yells.
Then another politico says the legislative
council will take care of the whole mess.
The Council will decide, we dont trust
the honor court.
And the game continues.
Protests are filed by the losing party.
They say there were 25 election
violations. People were paid to vote, names
were switched, candidates campaigned too
near the booths, leaders from both sides
charge.
United-First announced that they would
have won the election by 1 vote if the ab absentee
sentee absentee ballots had been counted.
Somebody goofed again.
Former presidential candidate Ernie Litz
is thriving on the confusion. It's great
material for my book on the election
titled Beer for Breakfast, Litz says.
And there are other happy people, too.
Manny James, Forward party manipulator
and friend of John Ritch, has jokingly told
this editor to watch out.
Ok, Manny, I'll keep watching.
Nevertheless the election has turned
into a complete fiasco.
The only concrete item discernible from
the election is that we have three people
who think they are or may be president.
Will the real president please stand up.

MICHAEL ABRAMS
Editorial Assistant
JOE TORC9A
Entertainment Editor



Strange Bedfellows: CIA, Peace Corps

BY JAMES COOK
Alligator Staff Writer
Last week, in Reitz Union, the CIA and the Peace
Corps recruited within a few feet of each other.
It is a little known but nonetheless disgraceful fact
that at one time, the two organizations almost be became
came became one.
Shortly after the Peace Corps was established
in 1961, the CIA, under the directorship of Allen
Dulles, made a concerted effort to infiltrate the
ranks of that organization. It was only the sharp
outraged protest of Peace Corps Director, Sargant
Shriver, that kept the CIA from taking over com completely.
pletely. completely.
War Is Peace?
This twisted, Orwellian, War is Peace* concept
is typical of the CIA philosophy.
The Peace Corps story is only one example.
The well-publicized National Student Association
infiltration is another. Last year, a CIA agent,
who had the guts to both quit the CIA and give an
Interview to Ramparts magazine on his reasons
for doing so, told still another part of the ClA ClAcampus
campus ClAcampus story.
The modus operandi was to trick the student
into performing an innocent task for them and paying
him ten or twenty dollars for which he would be

OPEN FORUM:
JkAti'lfl wl 'DIA&tMt
There is no hope for the complacent man."

POP GOES THE AVERAGE

MR. EDITOR:
There was a time at the U of F,
when pop quizzes were looked
upon as unnecessary irritations
inflicted upon the students by
gung-ho** instructors.
Times have changed.
With the advent of the quarter
system it is almost impossible
for students taking a full load
to be prepared for five or six
courses every day, or any day
as far as that is concerned.
Many times a single course re requires
quires requires a full night's preparation,
and the other courses must be
postponed until a night or two
later. It is necessarily a con continuous
tinuous continuous catch-up process.
Love Letter
MR. EDITOR:
On the Peace Movement,
I write this letter, not out
of defiance, but out of love,
moral convictions, and beliefs.
I was asked by close friends
and family not to participate in
any peach demonstrations as a
result of an articlybyayCrom articlybyayCromley,
ley, articlybyayCromley, Washington Reporter, in
which he stated that the leader leadership
ship leadership of the march is composed
of men primarily with other axes
to grind.
Many people are swayed by this
and other similar articles, that
this is the case in peace demon demonstrations
strations demonstrations because they might jeo jeopardize
pardize jeopardize their false sense of se security.
curity. security.
I am not a communist advo advocator,
cator, advocator, nor can I say that I am a
true American in the sense that
most people think of one today.
Oui beliefs are a result of
civilized and logical conclusions,
due to the fact that we refused
to accept a belief or conviction
merely because of someone
elses say so.
t ,*
RICK STURM, lUC

A student should be allowed
to schedule his own study hours,
without the threat of a pop quiz
hanging over his head. It is in indeed
deed indeed an inconsiderate and un unconcerned

CHECK OFFS RELIVED

MR. EDITOR:
After having spent the last
two weeks listening to both Clyde
Taylor and Bill Mcride com complain
plain complain about the evils of petty
politics and puppet student gov governments,
ernments, governments, I began to believe that
I was finally witnessing a cam campaign
paign campaign that would result in a
student government dedicated to
honest government, and to making
political appointments based on
merit and not as a reward for
fraternity favors and financial
support. Idealistic?
Yes, and as a semi-participant
in four previous elections, I
should have known better. I was
not to be disappointed. Forward
Party has returned to the old
check-off system.
For the benefit of those stu students
dents students who are new to the political
wars, the check-off system con consists

Explain Saturday Classes

MR. EDITOR:
Well, fellow students, it has
been done to us again. This time
it is the calendar committee
who has placed the giant screw
through us. The committee
could have just as easily made
our Easter Vacation (which is
j now called Spring Vacation since
it comes three weeks before
Easter) three days shorter.
I am sure that short vacations
between terms does not bother
them since they have scheduled
only two days between the Spring
and Summer quarters. I feel

asked to sign a receipt.
By clever rearrangement of the decimal, the
amount given on the receipt was changed to ten
or twenty thousand dollars. The student was then
confronted with the skillfully altered receipt and
warned that if he did not cooperate fully, the
evidence* would be turned over to his countrys
embassy. There would naturally be questions as to,
what he did for the American government that
was worth so much money to them.*
The Hidden File
Has the CIA managed to distort its role in Am American
erican American institutions since it was first set up as the
coordinating and intelligence arm of the president?
Harry Truman, the man who set the CIA up back
in 1946, seems to think so.
In 1962, Truman wrote that he was disturbed
with the way the CIA had diverted itself from
its original purpose .
We have grown up as a nation, respected for
our free institutions and our ability to maintain
a free and open society. There is something about the
way the CIA has been operating that has cast a
shadow over our historic position.**
The shadow cast by the CIA stretches far
and wide. It stretches from the National Archives
where documents concerning Lee Harvey Ozwald
have been locked up for the next 75 years, from
the White House where the president has been made

concerned unconcerned instructor who would
face the student with this
dilemma.
GARY R. LITTLER, 4ADV-JM

sists consists of a small box located
in the immediate vicinity of the
polls, and dutifully manned by
a fraternity or sorority pledge.
After Legislative Council
passed a law prohibiting such
boxes within a certain distance
of the polls in 1965-66, coupled
with the fact that certain houses
would secretly attempt to cram
as many slips as they could into
the boxes, the system fell on
bad times. United-First is NOT
using them this year.
I urge all students to take note
of this. If Mcride wins, I feel
he owes all of us (1) an explana explanation
tion explanation for the check-off boxes, (2)
what he intends to do with the
information they will reveal, and
(3) how this fits in with his con concept
cept concept of mature and impartial
student government. Let us see
him speak for himself.
GARY SCHAFFEL, 7AR

that this is a good idea. The
calendar committee at F.S.U.
thought that this was a good idea
too because they have three extra
days at the end of their term
instead of the Saturday classes!
(FJS.U. has state teachers at attending
tending attending during the summer quar quarter
ter quarter too!!)
So let us ask Mr. Calendar
Committee, whomever you are,
to please explain to us again
why we have to go to Saturday
classes. In the meantime, can
anyone please lend me a screw screwdriver?
driver? screwdriver?
BRUCE KO NIGS BURG 3EG

Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

The Ticket Game ;
Paint The Zones
MR. EDITOR:

I am hurrying to write this letter while lam still irate, though
I think my anger will last until my traffic court date, February 13.
Is everyone at the police department drunk? Or maybe this is all
a big joke on the motorcyclists at Hume Hall. That must be it itthey
they itthey couldn't be serious.

I come home from the library
about 11:00 p.m. and parked my
cycle in the midst of the others.
Nothing unusual. At least there
was nothing strange until I found
a parking ticket stuck under my
grab-strap the next day. I was
immediately dazed.
I was plainly in the scooter
EDITORS
NEWSPAPER?
MR. EDITOR:
I am not a student of the UF,
I work here. I will be enrolled
here in the fall. I cannot vote
now or else Bill Mcride would
have one more vote.
The Florida Alligator is for
all of the students here at the
University of Florida, not only
an editor and his staff. You seem
to publish what you would like
to believe and leave out the true
and full facts.
Everyone is entitled to their
own opinion but when it comes
to supporting your individual
opinion the paper no longer re remains
mains remains an informative product
but becomes one with bias opin opinions.
ions. opinions.
I am sure you will have some something
thing something sharp and cute** to say
about my disregarding the rules
about names and classifications,
but sweety you have a lot of room
to criticize since you are such
an open minded person and are
willing to print the qualifications
of both parties ha!
ELAINE STANFORD
JAY HINGSON

Hes So Wonderful

MR. EDITOR:
I would like at this time to
publicly express my sincere ap appreciation
preciation appreciation to Don Braddock, im immediate
mediate immediate past Treasurer of the
Student Body. As Chairman of the
Budget and Finance Committee I
had the opportunity to work very
closely with him in the prepara preparation
tion preparation of the current budget.
His experience in financial
matters was invaluable. For the
first time in many years the

to lie, innocently or otherwise, to the Nation and
the World over U-2 flights, invasions, and bribes.
It stretches to the capitols of distant countries
where coups and subtrafuge are daily fare, where
even the agency's successes are embarrassments
when foreign populations begin to wonder who's
running their country their government or our
CIA.
Amorality
The morality and even necessity of such enter enterprise
prise enterprise is of vital concern to every American stu student.
dent. student. Os greater concern are the actions of those
who abuse their right of tree access to the campus.
The CIA has shown few scruples in its choice
of front organizations. It has had university re research
search research facilities, it once had the National Student
Association, and it almost had the Peace Corps.
In view of all this, it's more than a little ri ridiculous
diculous ridiculous to hear student leaders cry, "equal access
for the ClA'. If any civillian organization had shown,
to use the words of an NJS.A. spokesman, "such
blatant disregard for American education", it would
almost certainly be barred from this or any other
campus.
The CIA had its chance on the American campus
and blew it!
The Central Intelligence Agency is gone now, but
it will be back next year, wanting a place to re recruit.
cruit. recruit. Let's tell them to forget it!

zone. Someone was walking by. I
came to my senses and asked
him if it looked as though I
was outside the proper scooter
zone. He said no, and couldn't
figure out why I had gotten the
ticket.
I soon found out from another
cyclist who had just gotten a
ticket and paid, after finding out
why he had gotten ticketed. It
seems the police department had
painted the words "no parking,"
on the curb where the words
"scooter zone" had been. No
one seemed to know just when
it was changed. I must hand it
to the police for doing a sly
job of repainting.
I also found out that every everyone
one everyone else in the zone was tick ticketed.
eted. ticketed. Now, get serious, cops!
Obviously every cyclist in Hume
Hall didn't get together and say,
"Hey, let's all park in the no noparking
parking noparking zone tonight."
A little forethought, and even
without that, a little afterthought
before being so generous with
those little yellow ticketsis
this too much to expect of the
campus police?
Os course I should look at
the good side. This -*could al always
ways always be made into a game. See,
every night when everyone is
asleep, the police come with
their paint brushes and change
the words on the curb, without
being caught: "scooter zone;"
then "no parking," the next night;
then "auto zone; helicopter zone;
go to jail, do pass go,
DOUG OLANDER, lUC

SG Budget was balanced, the fi financial
nancial financial records were brought up
to date, and a feasible and prac practical
tical practical budget was passed.
In addition, under Don Brad Braddocks
docks Braddocks guidance and leadership
the Student Loan Program was
initiated, the Campus Develop Development
ment Development Fund was realized, and
feasible uses for the Camp Wau Wauberg
berg Wauberg Development Fund were in introduced.
troduced. introduced.
GEORGE DUFOUR, 4AS

Page 9



BRASINGTON
CADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE INC.
GOOD SELECTION
OF MAKES, MODELS, & PRICES
2001 NW 13 ST. 378-5301

2310 S. W. 13th Street 376-2696
1505 N. W. 13th Street 378-2481

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W
N.W. 23rd Blvd. at 13th St.
FREE Parking
Shop Tues., Wed.,Sat., 8:30-5:30
-Shop Mon., Thurs., Fri., 8:30-9:00
715 N. W. 13th Street

225 W. University Avenue
IM
: 220

THE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE CAROLYN PLAZA

&tag&rag
13 WEST UNIV. IN THE MALL

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CRANE
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601 S. W. 2nd Avenue
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s OF GATOR ADVERTISERS

1123 W. University Avenue
J k
KntMfkij frki £kfejii
Mfti (bmrtxs Mqritfy Vai.. fejE^
3 Location*: 214 NW 13th St. 376-447 UpjHKrtS
114 NW 34th St. 372-3641 Inf Ats
~ 207 NE 16th Av*. 378-295*
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COPYRIGHT 1983
of GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ms I
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COME IN: OR CALL KJhI
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a ** BaBBSBBaai !BBBaBBKa=SS==5 ~^ ==s=!==aB B= * a,B BH *****BS>*HBBBBSSSBSSaBBaS3SSS
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QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. l/N/V. AVE.
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309 N. W. 13th Street
JHHH 231 N. W. 10th Avenue
JP
1131 W. University Ave.
.: ':' \ ; n \ "
COUCHS
*>
608 N. Main Street



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I for sale |
BASENJI PUPS. AKC reg. Ideal
apt. pet. No odor, no shedding,
no barking. Wormed and shots.
SIOO. Call 472-2408 alter 5. (A (A---69-st-p)
--69-st-p) (A---69-st-p)
FLY! Flyl-g Hawks Inc. has
shares available in a Cessna
Skyhawk. Dual radios dual omni.
Full panel. 372-1290 or 372-
6045 alter 6:00. (A-67-7t-p)
FOR SALE: Brand new crash
helmet and lace shield only
$20.00, originally cost $35.00.
Call Bill Northup at 372-9363.
(A-68-3t-p)
_-
FOR SALE: 4 keystone mags
mounted on 4 new wide track
80,000 mi. ultra-sonics, 378-
4440. 8:00 to 5-00, alter 5:00
call 376-6174. (A^6B-st-c)
1966 HONDA-450, 14* handle
bars, brand new battery, King-ko
exhaust pipes. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell. Call 372-5976.
(A-67-st-p)
1966 SUZUKI 50 cc. $115.00.
376-9554, ask lor Rick. (A-69-
6t-p)
PACEMAKER Mobile Home, 10 x
50*, 2 bedroom, central air, Town
n' Country Trailer Park, Call
378-4890. (A-67- st-p)
MOSRITE GUITAR: sun burst
linish, excellent condition. $325
with case. Also, MGB Luggage
rack, $17.00 and Voit Barracuda
Slalom Ski, $20.00. Call Dusty
alter 6 p.m., 378-7686. (A-69-
3t-p)
MUST SELL! 1965 Honda 305
Dream. White, incredible con condition
dition condition must be seen. 376-
3211 Ext. 5453, Harry or leave
message with secretary. (A-67-
st-p)
BASENJI PUPPIES, trained,
shots, wormed, ready to go out
looking lor a home, AKC, cham champion
pion champion background, reasonable
rates. Ph: 376-4103. (A-67-10t-
P)
SOLID STATE STEREO SYSTEM!
Includes: 2 AR4x speakers, Sony
250 A tape deck, Knight KG-854
amplifier and KG-765A tuner,
Weathers Townsend turntable
with Empire 880 PE Cartridge.
Best oiler over SSOO. 372-7203
or 376-9420. (A-66-st-p)
ORGAN Farflsa Minicompact,
lass than a year old. Why pay
$170.00 more lor a new one?
Perlect lor a group. $325.00
cash. 376-8194. (A-69-st-p)
MUST SELL 1966 Yamaha Twin
100. Excellent condition with hel helmet,
met, helmet, $240.00. 378-8427. (A-67-
st-p)
for rent
FURNISHED ROOM. Business
lady has room in private home,
kitchen privileges, phone. Male,
alter 5:30 p.m. or weekends,
814 NE 11th Ave. (B-64-st-p)
LARGE 2-bedroom apartment lor
rent. Ideal lor 3 students. SIIO.OO
a month, all utilities included.
Phone 376-8314 alter 5:00. (B (B---68-st-p)
--68-st-p) (B---68-st-p)
NOT SETTLED YET? Rooms
walking distance from campus.
CH and AC. Phone 378-8122 alter
5;30 p.m. (B-68-9t-p)

| lor rent |
FOR SALE OR RENT: 1 br.
trailer, AC, new gas heater. Good
condition. Nice location lor stu students.
dents. students. Call 378-8288 or 376-
6217. (B-69-3t-c)
SUBLEASE 2 bedroom apt. at
Landmark. Call 372-2909 or 372-
6535. (B-69?5t-c)
THE CENTER OF ACTIVITY.
Live life a little better. Live at
University Gardens. We have
more than the others. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (B-66-st-p)
WHY LIVE in. a traffic-jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
o 1 all parking problems. Fully
furnished spacious 1 bedroom
apt., AC, gas heat, fully equip*
ped kitchen including washing
machine. Call 372-3357 or 372-
*240. (B-58-ts-c)
OLYMPIA APTS. Modern 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished, carpet, sound soundproof,
proof, soundproof, central AC, and Heat.
3 blocks from campus. $150.00
monthly. Call 376-1965 alter
3:00. (B-68- st-p)
QUIET, newly decorated, fur furnished
nished furnished upstairs bedroom, Down Downtown
town Downtown vicinity. 378-7845 alter 5:00
p.m. (B-71-3t-p)
wanted I
WANTED: 1 preferably 2 male
roommates to share 2 bedroom
apartment with fireplace, $25.00
per month plus utilities. Call
Dave, 378-1884 alter 5:00. (C (C---
--- (C--- st-p)
ONE OR TWO female UF stu students
dents students wanted to share furnished
apartment one block from cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 378-5601 alter 5:00p.m.
(C-68-st-p)
ROOMMATES WANTED. Male or
Female. Check with office of
University Gardens. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (C-66-st-c)
$50.00 REWARD lor information
leading to the recovery of my
Honda 450. Stolen from Murphree
Area Tuesday or Wednesday Jan January
uary January 16, or 17. Black and Silver,
Tag Number 19A569, Frame
Number 1021521, Call Jon Cie Ciener,
ner, Ciener, 372-9306. (C-66-st-p)
$25.00 REWARD lor information
leading to apprehension of the
person who ran into the side of
a beige Cadillac parked near
Reitz Union on McCarty Drive,
Tuesday afternoon Jan. 23, 1968.
Call 376-3261, Ext. 3334, Mrs.
Andress. (C-68-3t-c)
WANTED: 2 tickets to P. P. and
M. Two I had were stolen. Will
pay extra. Call Bill, 376-7210.
Leave message 11 not there. (C (C---
--- (C--- 3t-p)
NEEDED: Male roommate to
share room with lull bath. Just
one block from Norman Hail!
Call Wayne Howard, 376-9907.
$40.00/month. (C-70-3t-p)
FEMALE roommate to share du duplex
plex duplex behind Norman Hall. Phone
378-6258. (C-67-st-p)
I help wanted
WANTED: Talent lor Graham
Area's playboy club. Pianist,
ventriluquist, vocalist, guitarist,
comedian, any unusual talent lor
floor show. Contact Stan Taylor,
376-9136. (E-71-3t-p)

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

Page 12

| help wanted
HELP WANTED: Student needed
to work part time at Reitz Union
Information Desk. Hours: Wed Wednesdays,
nesdays, Wednesdays, 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.,
Fridays, 10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Apply Public Functions Office,
101 Reitz Union. (E-71-2t-c)
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY
to establish your own business
as Protective Life's U of F
College Specialist. Home office
training program with guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed salary plus com mission bon bonus.
us. bonus. Unlimited income and ad advancement
vancement advancement potential. Send re resume
sume resume to G. C. Warner, P. O.
Box 2026, Orlando. We will ar arrange
range arrange your interview and apti aptitude
tude aptitude test in Gainesville. (E-71-
st-p)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN to
work 20 hours per week at the
Alligator. Car is needed; ex experience
perience experience desirable. Good pay, in invaluable
valuable invaluable experience, good work working
ing working conditions. Apply room 330
Reitz Union. (E-71-tf-nc)
The University of Florida has
challenging positions available
lor inexperienced and exper experienced
ienced experienced Clerk-Typists and Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringe bene benefits
fits benefits include the opportunity to
attend one (1) college course
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the "Hub.
(E-61-ts-c)
HELP WANTED. Student wives
Interested in sales or cashier cashiering.
ing. cashiering. Apply Personnel Office, Col College
lege College Inn. 1728 W. University Ave.
fE-66-st-p)
Its Not
jjj*Wr
GATOR
ADS
SELL MORE...
Just Plain
Good Sense
ij

j autos
1964 FORD GALAXIE 500-XL.
All power, V-8, bucke* seats,
wide oval tires, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, just overhauled. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. Call 372-5976.
(G-67-st-p!
1963 PONTIAC Catalina 2 dr.
Hardtop. Radio and Heater, power
steering and power brakes. 4
new tires. Excellent condition.
Reasonably priced. Ph. 378-5133.
(G-68-st-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 Rambler Am American
erican American Station Wagon. $600.00.
See at 1750 SW Williston Rd.
(G-66-st-Dl
1965 VW. Radio, heater, top con condition.
dition. condition. Maintenance record. Bar Bargain
gain Bargain at $999.00 or best offer
call 376-2916. (G-70-3t-p)
1961 VW Dombi in excellent con condition
dition condition all around. Gasoline heat heater.
er. heater. Must sell. 1410 SW 10th
Terrace, Apt. 41. (G-68-st-p)
1967 AUSTIN-HEALEY Mark IH
3,000. Fully equipped. 17,000 mi.
(378-7520). (G-69-3t-p)
personal
NOW YOUR FAMILY may come
from Miami to Gainesville every
Saturday lor only $lO round trip
per person. Late model station
wagon. Call 372-8371. (J-67-st (J-67-st.
. (J-67-st. ...Ml.
lost-fpund
FOUND: Makeup kit Broward
Parking Lot, Must be able to
identify. Call 372-9450, lor Rro
48/. a-*9-3t-nc)
BpawT iia st. flirtsaWW
mSSffISuWPI
DicK J' I
IvanDyfce 9
iFifewfliyi
| cofeature at 9:00
laPfflKtm

illV-' ")I 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:30-9:40 pfifCn
MoffheDolls
aiming wmti.wQamfWM
HiHWJIRO color DELUXE -J
r*n!f!n^!?7^.iti-HL i u.vjmy
SmoJ
Eri TECH ~~I
*to sm I
xv/ oui f
nH LOVE!

lost-found
LOST: London Fog Trench coat.
White, with lining. 38 Reg. Lost
Thursday night at the Hunt club.
Ill trade plus a reward. Bill
Levens. 372-9303. (L-71-2t-p)
i
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up and delivery on
_ and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489. (M (M---59-18t-p)
--59-18t-p) (M---59-18t-p)
LOST vicinity McCarty Reitz
Union Tie Chain with pendant
initialed MS WBW 64. Reward.
Phone Weaver, Hume Library,
2111. (L-70-3t-p)
*
services
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. (M-54-ts-c)
[ 2 W. fctowrtty />L |
Ends Thurs. *.
.
TO THi MAN
/ Os THi GOLDIN MUD \
IOVI IS A MAUTIFUt WAV I #
THI MARCH FOR
FfRFKTtON
THf MARCH
FOR M1F....11
, -^m THI MARCH
FOR THI
Jm
f A MU TOA IM TOOMO A
1 | # THI TOUNO AT MAIT %
.NIUIM AT H. I

"^Erids
Th U |O?S N.VT nffcSF.
'if
NAMMUKTIM
osMATT HELM
THE
j HMBUSHiKS



Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Why
So
Excited?
--- V :. -'V . ' '-
- c v t>-'
*<. < *3gtc.s3Bl .;:
-. jHMTO
* T-pyjsS
*
*fe&<& mt
* &>* iS^w^^Si'^'
*
. 0 .'
WHO KNOWS
]
. i '-
j
It could be one of a thousand things. College is that kind of
life . Excitement, challenge and varied interests. f*~
Why does she. like thousands of others, read the pages of
The Florida Alligator every morning . Looking at its I
stories, its photos, its advertising? 1
I4C |||§
Because The Florida Alligator is an important part of her 1
college life. And an exciting one. I
I
1 '""' H

Page 13

FASHION FORECAST
'Bonnie Influences U.S. Scene;
Rome Boasts r No Color Look;
Hemlines Lowered In Paris

NEW YORK (UPI) Milliners
of America keep in step with
the thirties theme drummed
for spring by the nations top
designers.
Consider Scarlett OHara hats
feminine straws with nearly
shoulder-wide brims laden with
artificial flowers or fruit.
Cogitate, about the Bonnie and
Clyde influence berets and fe fedoras
doras fedoras in the moll and gangster
manner.
The big brimmed hats come
plain as frequently as they come
decorated. Worn front and center
they shade the face. Pushed back
with brim pinned up in the front
they present another look.
The gangster fedora, when seen
in collections, most often topped
miniskirted costumes over black
or navy stockings.
Plantation curls from the hair hairmakers
makers hairmakers of America are some something
thing something else that go to a womans
head for spring. They are being
manufactured in paintbox and the
usual hair colors.
*
ROME (UPI) The pale look
dominated the Italian spring sum summer
mer summer high fashion collections to today.
day. today.
The Roman ideal woman will
be wearing mostly white next
season with a dash of beige for
davs she feels daring.
Federico Forquet, who num numbers
bers numbers socialites and Queen Anne
Marie of Greece among his cli clients,
ents, clients, went all out for the pallid
look in day clothes.
Forquet kept his hemlines
inches above the knee. Curves
and intricate panels were basic
to Forquets silhouette.
Some of his handsomest spring
coats had flared panels down
the front, giving them a poncho
look. Others fastened at the side
to give the coats a surplice
look.
Designer Valentino banned both
color and evening pajamas.
Jacqueline Kennedys favorite
Roman designer also concentra concentrated
ted concentrated on white. What was not white

1968
Jowls Model C
BASIC TRANSPORTATION AT ITS BEST
Ford Cortina $1996
Includes All Standard Equipment fir Freight.
High-performance family car. Gets up to 30 miles
1 per gallon at normal cruising speeds. Four-speed
fully synchronised transmission. Front disc
brakes. Wall-to-wall carpeting and all-vinyl
interior. Turns in a circle six feet less than VW.
Available in 2-and 4-door Deluxe, 4-door
Station Wagon and as the hot GT in
2- and 4-door models.
COLONIAL LINCOLN MERCURY
2201 N.Main St. at 23rd Blvd. 372-4251

could be beige, black or navy navyadding
adding navyadding up to the dictum no
color.
The flowing evening pajamas
that were once a Valentino trade trademark
mark trademark disappeared in this col collection
lection collection to be replaced by floor
length at home dresses in
white or beige.
PARIS (UPI) The spring
rites of high fashion open today
to ordain a return to femininity
and perhaps, alas, even to longer
skirts.
>
Waists and bosoms will almost
certainly return to the fashion
scene.
Most fashion pundits are pre predicting
dicting predicting that skirts will be full
with hemlines wandering all over
the place and generally more in
the direction of mini than maxi.
But a rumor that designer
Marc Bohan of the House of
Christian Dior will drop skirts

fi Try the specialty of the house, f
B from the char-broiler, o. |f
I LONDON BROIL STEAK I
K 5 1/2 oz. all meat no bone fi
! aMf
Served with french fries
or baked potato jfi
070
(with tossed salad 51.17) 1
9 This is our everyday low price. And S
9 try our other taste-tempting S
V steaks too. i
I long hon I
I steak Room I
(Formerly Wonderhouse)
I 372-2405 14 S.W. Ist Street 372-2405

to two inches below the knee
has the haute couture world more
than a little nervous.
The House of Dior is one of
the few salons which still might
be able to introduce that sort of
change and make it stick.
Bohan himself remains mum
on the subject of hemlines al although
though although he has come out solidly
for a return to natural feminine
curves after seasons and seasons
of pure geometry.
What is likely to happen is
that Paris this year will come
up with a soft, feminine line
that will be more universally
adopted than the hemline of any
particular designer.

DRY CLEANING
counter open a.- ] a. :
Gator Groomer
Next To Univ. Post Office



Orange
and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE. FLORIDA UNION

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Monday, January 29
S
Mensa Members: daily lun luncheons,
cheons, luncheons, South wing of Main
Cafeteria, 11 a. m.
Univ. Lecture Series: Edward
Teller, Three Revolutions in
Physics; Copernican, The Ab Absurd
surd Absurd Revolution and Applied
Science, Union Ballroom, 4
p.m.
Fla. Players: business meeting,
Constans Theatre, 6 p.m.
Program Office: dancing lessons,
243 Union, 7 p.m.
A.1.M.E.: meeting, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Society of Automotive Engineers:
joint meeting with ASME, 211
MEB, 7:30 p.m.
Food Science Club: meeting, McC
Provost room, 7:30 p.m.
Basketball: Fla. vs. Auburn,Fla.
Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture:
Daniel Bell, The U.S. in the
Year 2,000, Union Aud., 8
p.m.
Tuesday, January 30
Delta Sigma Pi: meeting, 355
Union, 7 p.m.
Program Office: bridge les lessons,
sons, lessons, 400 Union, 7 p.m.
Tues. Evening Supper Club: din dinner,
ner, dinner, Univ. Inn, 7:15 p.m. All
those single and over 21 in invited.
vited. invited.
Painting for Fun: art lessons,
118 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma: rush smoker,
362 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mensa: reorganization meeting,
Union 150 B, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: Chamber Music for
Wind Instruments, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, January 31
Institute of Judaic Studies: be beginning
ginning beginning and intermediate He Hebrew,
brew, Hebrew, Jewish history, intro introduction
duction introduction to Jewish thought, Hil Hillel
lel Hillel Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Pi Mu Epsilon: Challenge in
the Classroom 346 Union,
8 p.m. Everyone invited.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for
Russ Burgess, Edward Albee
and Juan Seranno
NOTICES
ADMINISTRATIVE
PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are ex expected
pected expected to take the following tests.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to us his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
CSS 112: Tuesday, Jan. 30,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4,7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D) to Little 121 or 125; (E) to
Little 113; (F) to Little 227, 233,
or 235; (G) to Peabody 101, 102,
112, or 114; (H) to Peabody 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) to
Little 201, 203, 205 or. 207;
(M) to Little 213, 215, 217, 219,
221, 223 or 225; (N) to Little
237; (O) to Little 239; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker AuditorWtfn; (T-V)
to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
- J'
CMS 171: Thursday, Feb. 1,
7 p.m. All CMS 171 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
MS 301: Thursday, Feb. 1,7
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112,113,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EX EXAMINATION:
AMINATION: EXAMINATION: All foreign lan language
guage language functional examinations
will be given Saturday, Feb. 10,
18 Anderson Hall, 10 a.m. 12
noon.
DEADLINE FOR REMOVAL
OF I GRADES: Feb. 9 is the
deadline date for removal of I
grades (excluding 699 or 799)
for all graduate students who wish
to receive their degrees on March
19.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS: Examinations
in French, German, Russian and
Spanish will be given at 9:45
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 3, in Leigh
Hall.
j- f
GENERAL NOTICES
MINIMUM WAGE: Effective
Feb. 1, all non-faculty personnel
shall be compensated at a rate
of at least $1.15 per hour, re regardless
gardless regardless of the source of funds.
The University work week, as
defined under the Wage and Hour
Law will be 42 hours rather than
44 hours per week, effective Feb.

BLUB BULLETIN

I. Therefore the establishment of
the work week of 42 hours means
that employment for non-exempt
employees for over 42 hours in
a 7-day period obligates the Uni University
versity University to a liability of an over overtime
time overtime rate of one and one-half
times the employees normal
hourly rate. Every effort should
be made to restrict the work
of employees to within the 42-
hour week.
LEAVE REGULATIONS
CHANGES: A number of major
changes regarding leave policies
for state employees have been
placed in effect at the University.
Detailed explanations of the new
regulations are available to re representatives
presentatives representatives of colleges and de departments
partments departments from the Personnel
Division on the second floor of
the Student Service Center. The
changes were explained in a re recent
cent recent meeting conducted by the
Personnel Dvision. Any depart department
ment department not represented at the meet meeting
ing meeting should obtain a copy of the
changes.
COLLOQUIUM OF THE CEN CENTER
TER CENTER FOR NEUROBIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES: Dr. J. I. Lacey,
chairman of the Department of
Psychophysiology and Neurophy Neurophysiology
siology Neurophysiology at Fels Research Insti Institute
tute Institute will address the colloquium
of the Center for Neurobiological
Sciences at 8 p.m., Room H H-611,
-611, H-611, J. Hillis Miller Health Cen Center,
ter, Center, on Thursday, Feb. 1. His
topic will be Electrocortical
and Cardiovascular Correlates of
Attention and Conation. The
public is invited.

CHEERLEADING TRYOUTS: A
cheerleading clinic will be held
Feb. 5-16 from 3:30 5 p.m.
every day on Florida Field. Try Tryouts
outs Tryouts will he held Feb. 16. At Attendance
tendance Attendance is mandatory starting
Feb. 5.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
'Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. All companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Mar. June and Aug.
graduates unless indicated other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.

f*-'
Lucy: "Charlie Drown, if you don't
come with me to the Annual Meeting,
I don't cry on my shoulder when you
find out what a nifty souvenir I
bring home!"
Charlie Grown: "I better g 0...."

Page 14

JAN. 29, 30: HASKINS & SELLS.
JAN. 29, 30: U.S. ATOMIC EN ENERGY
ERGY ENERGY COMMISSION.
JAN. 30: NORTH CAROLINA
NATIONAL BANK. Acct,, Econ Economics,
omics, Economics, Bus. Must be citizen.
Juniors for summer employment.
JAN. 30: CELOTEX CORP. EE,
ME, ChE, Chem.
JAN. 30: ANACONDA WIRE &
CABLE CO. IE, EE, ChE, CE,
ME. Must be UjS. citizen. Mil Military
itary Military requirements must be ful fulfilled.
filled. fulfilled.
JAN. 30: ERNST & ERNST.
JAN. 30: INGERSOL-RAND.
JAN. 30: UNITED AIRCRAFT
CORP.
JAN. 30, 31: DEFENSE INTEL INTELLIGENCE
LIGENCE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY. CE, Comp.
Sci., Forestry, Eco., Math, Phys Physics,
ics, Physics, Struc.Eng., Urban Planning.
Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 30, 31: HUMBLE OIL. All
Eng. Must be UJS. citizen. Juniors
for summer employment.
JAN. 31: THE FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF TAMPA. Bus. Must
be UJS. citizen.

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The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

Meeting Time Happiness
8 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 30,1968
Medical Science 3uilcing Auditorium
Vww*
Entertainment Happiness
Professor Russell Oanburg
"Music for Fun ar.d Enjoyment"
/% *\
Miscellaneous Happiness
Pveports, Elections
Door Prizes,? Refreshments
A A
7 O
Happiness for the entire family

JAN. 31: DUN & BRADSTREET,
INC. Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts, Edu.,
Journalism.
JAN. 31: SEATTLE SCHOOL DIS DISTRICT
TRICT DISTRICT #l. All academic areas.
Must be UjS. citizen.
JAN. 31: J. B. IVEY & CO.
Any major.
JAN. 31: SAUTER LABOR LABORATORIES.
ATORIES. LABORATORIES. Sales, Mktg. Juniors
for summer employment.
JAN. 31: ELECTRONICS COM COMMUNICATIONS,
MUNICATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
JAN. 31 FEB. 1: UNION CAMP
CORP. Bus. Ad., All Eng., For Forestry.
estry. Forestry. Must be UJS. citizen.
JAN. 31 FEB. 1,2: RADIA RADIATION,
TION, RADIATION, INC. EE, ME, IE, Acct.,
Finance. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 31 FE. 1: NORTH AM AMERICAN
ERICAN AMERICAN ROCKWELL CORP
Math, Physics, Electronics, EE,
Chem., AE, ChE, CE, ME. Must
be UJS. citizen.



Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

*Drafting Os Students Is Selective

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Staff writer
Jerry Silberberg attended a ser series
ies series of intercollegiate conventions
last year. This is the first of a
four part series of interviews
with: Lt. Gen. Lewis Hershey,
Vance Packard, Victor Reisel,
James Farmer.)
JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
The most perplexing paradox
facing male college students is
their constant worry of being
drafted or their classification
with local draft boards.
This problem was presented at
an intercollegiate convention held
at New Jersey's Fairleigh Dick Dickinson
inson Dickinson University. The students in
charge, brought Lt. Gen. Lewis
Hershey to discuss the draft.
After listening to this man, many
were convinced he hid behind a
lot of official jargon to avoid
giving a straight answer.
Hershey stated that technolo technological
gical technological and scientific forces were
vital to the armed forces. The
war today is not the same as
it was for World War 11. We
do not know the demands of
tomorrow, but do know the value
of scientists and engineers.
We must start with thousands
(of men) to get hundreds (fit for
battle). (Note: Bracketed words
are the authors.)
Youth must make a better
country out of what they've got.
The following are excerpts
from a press interview with Lt.
Gen. Hershey:
Q: For what reason are Peace
Corps members exempted from
the draft?
A: I dont know.
Q: Would you com ment on draft
card burners?
A: Card burners must exhibit
individuality in some other way to
voice opinion of laws.
Q: What about reclassification
of marchers, card burners, etc?
A: I only know of one case
of reclassification.
Q: What about drafting women?
A: Not planning to do this.
Cant be planned or prepared. Re Requirements
quirements Requirements are high, but
positions are filled voluntarily.
Q: What are the manpower
needs for the next 12 months?
A: The draft call for Octo October
ber October (1967) will be fore 150,000
men. Those 19 and younger will
make up 50%. (note: depending
on levels of income and educat educational
ional educational status, draft notices will
vary.)
Q: What about colleges on the
tri-mester sytem?
A: Depends on the length of
the session. Recently inNew
Jersey, one local board reclas reclassified
sified reclassified a conscientious objector,
and he was sentenced to two years
in prison.
Q: Would you comment on the
procedure in the investigation of
an objector?
A: The decision is up to the
local board. Religious beliefs
must openly state their anti-war
clauses. Some wars are consid considered
ered considered just. (It now becomes a
question of the justice of war)
Congress has decided to let
men, who are objectors, fill
their service obligations in other
ways. In regard to the question,
Is war just? man cannot de decide
cide decide this factor.
Q: What is the position of the
college student in regard to the
draft lottery?
A: (apt a direct quote) This
method of who foe* first is not


Page 15

a set pattern of operation. In
reference to college students,
after 23 years of age, the name
is submitted to be drawn after
graduation.
Q: Who makes draft decisions?
A: This is up to the states
governor and local boards.
Q: Why arent there national
draft standards?
A: The main problem is the
number of men that would have to
be classified. This would exceed
37-million men.
The general ideas regarding

GRADUATING ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
WITH
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
ECls St. Petersburg Division
-ON CAMPUS INTERVIEW JANUARY 31

This m ay be the chance you have
been waiting for an exceptional
professional opportunity with an
industry pace-setter on Floridas
subtropical Gulf Coast in St.
Petersburg.
For qualified graduates in
electronic engineering, ECI offers
excellent career opportunities in
such areas of advanced develop development
ment development and design as coding, mod modulation,
ulation, modulation, digital communications,
microelectronics, RF communica communications
tions communications technology and satellite sys systems.
tems. systems.
ECI is a recognized leader in
command and control systems,
miniaturized transmitters and re receivers,

So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal dinner for interested electronic
engineering students and their ladies at the Holiday Inn
on 13th St. S. beginning at 6:30 Jan. 30. Please let us know
that you are coming by calling us in advance at 376-8266
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and asking for Mrs. Jones.
, >'" V
I v
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
/ St Petersburg, Florida
Please Note that the buffet meeting place has been changed to Hplhdjsy Inn.
an equa! opportunity employer

GEN. HERSHEY SAYS

the draft depends largely on ones
income bracket and educational
level. However, it might be of
value to point out that in states
where only teachers colleges
exist, a student seeking a higher
level of instruction is denied a
HOMAN
SOLE
BELTS, LEATHER WORKS,
BAGS. CLOTHING, SANDALS.

chance at higher education.
Therefore, his chances of being
drafted are increased. When the
draft was termed Selective Ser-

CAROLYN PLAZA BARBER SHOP
8 Barbers Shampoos
>st Free Parking # Shaves
rw Razor Cuts Massages
We Specialize In Scissor Work

ceivers, receivers, multiplex systems and
space instrumentation. With 2000
employees, ECI is large enough to
offer the facilities, programs and
security you are seeking, but small
enough to stress individual
achievement and to give you every
opportunity to realize your capa capabilities
bilities capabilities to the fullest.
As a member of ECls profes professional
sional professional team, you will be encouraged
to continue your education with
postgraduate study. ECI offers a
full tuition refund.
Visit the placement office today
and make an appointment to talk
with Electronic Communications,
Inc. on January 31.
%

vice/* that is just what it im implies.
plies. implies.
(Next: Victor Reisel)



IBV LINE: M
JOE TORCHIA pr J?
| #St iffe "O- 1 i. 2
;s~;*T
Features Editor mmm

Private Little came from a
white anglo saxon protestant protestantaverage
average- protestantaverage m iddle- class-American
family.
And Mother cried when he left;
and Father smiled proudly at
his son; and Sally-next-door told
him how
Ill be waiting, Charlie
Ill miss you, Charlie
I love you, Charlie.
Kiss me, Charlie.
And all his high-school high-schoolbuddies
buddies high-schoolbuddies had an excuse to have a
goingaway for him and the com community
munity community even had a band as he
got on the bus and waved
Goodbye Mom goodbye Dad
goodbye Sally goodbye everyone.
Private first class Little
didnt want to go there.
But, Mom, I have to.
Ill be back Sally.
Sure Dad.
Dear Charlie:
I miss you Charlie.
Im still waiting Charlie
I love you Charlie.
Love, Sally.
Dear Sally:
I love you too.
But I love my country more
0 think)
And I must fight this war.
Love, Charlie.
Dear Charlie:
Dont forget to wear
Your long underwear
If you go out in them swamps.
Love, Mom.
Dear Mom:
I fought for the first time
(with my long underwear).
Love, Charlie.

'On Hamlet Presented Today

Bull Session on Hamlet, a
50- minute Dlay by Dr. Didier
Graeffe, professor of humanities,
will be presented today, Tuesday
and Thursday in Walker Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Anyone may attend. There is
no admission charge.
Performances are scheduled
for 1:25 p.m. today, 12:20 p.m.
Tuesday and 9:05 and 11:15 a.m.
Thursday. >
On Hamlet is the 12th con consecutive
secutive consecutive play Dr. Graeffe has
written for special UF perfor performance.
mance. performance. Since he first began in
1956, Dr. Graeffes plays have
become a well-appreciated UF
tradition.
There will be no evening per performance
formance performance this year as there has
been in past years.

THE PIZZA HUTS OF

Dear Charlie:
Keep your chin up.
Love, Dad.
Dear Dadr~~
I kept my chin up.
I got wounded I got syphilis
I got a promotion.
Love, Charlie.
i :
Dear Charlie:
Were all very proud of you.
Love, Dad.
Dear Mom:
I killed for the first time.
Love, Charlie.
Dear Charlie:
I love for the first time. Not
you.
Yours truly, Sally.
Sergeant Little was very brave
as he led his platoon to get
mortared.
And as he saw it coming, and
as just before he died, and as
with his last spoken breath he
muttered:
I hate.
And Sergeant Littles brittle
mother was presented with a
medal for performance (his)
above and beyond the call of
anything
And then a lerch
And then Sergeant Littles re remains
mains remains went to the worms as Sally
cried
I love you now, Charlie.
And as everyone said:
I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the and to the for which it
stands one under god with liberty
and justice for
all except Charlie.

Dr. Graeffe described On
Hamlet as scenes that Shakes Shakespeare
peare Shakespeare found unwise to put in his
plays for reasons which will be become
come become obvious when you see this
play.
This play is directed by

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Film Review .. Ambushers
Is Indigestably Irrelevant

By NICK TATHO
Alligator Feature Writer
Few movies have appeared in
cinema history as irrelevant as
the Ambushers. Its pure fluff.
Dean Martin is Matt Helm,
cherubic Santa Claus to reindeer
spy-girls. This is the third in
a series of formula flicks. The
formula is F plus S x (Ha)
yields $. Fashion for the fe females
males females plus as mini thighs as the
screen will hold distilled in a
catalyst of contrived humor
yields money at the box office.
Well, to the story. You see
there is this space ship (U.s.)
that can only be flown by women.
This space ship is hijacked by
an extremist who owns a brew brewery.
ery. brewery. Deano has to get the in international
ternational international conspirators and des destroy
troy destroy the ship.
Kurk Kasznar. is the bifocaled
radical who operates from a
subterranean mansion in ol
Mehico. He acts like he had rigor
mortis before he entered the
man-hating magnetic field of the
spaceship. In a scene where he
chases Lovie Cravesit (get it?),
he is nothing more than a tod todderlng
derlng todderlng old roan.
Beverly Adams is Lovie.
Santa Verger is an enemy
agent.
And there are other cardboard
characters in this Andy Warhol
reject but serious criticism
would only give credence to their
legitimacy. Yes, it comes on the
screen in many colors; yes, you
eat pop corn while watching it;
yes, its funny; no, it isnt a
movie. Its a fraud worthy only
of the airwaves.
A sample joke stolen from
Bob Hopeless:
Enemy agent (drinking):
Skoll.
Matt Helm (also drinking): Os
course its cold, its got ice in
it.

Michael Beistle, instructor of
humanities, and stars Margaret
Beistle, Dr. Herman Levy and
Ruth Ann Hell wig, star of last
years Florida Players' pro production
duction production of ONeills Touch of
the Poet.

Page 16

Deano would have us think he
is so smashed that he cant quite
stay in his role. So everything
is just one big spontaneous James
Bond satire and he can wink at
the audience and tell jokes and
well understand cause its lov lovable
able lovable ol Deano, everybodys
greaser, and we only paid $3
to get in me and my date, so
what the heck? Right?
Wrong, cause $3 is two votes
for another in this degenerating
series of creeping corruption.
Dean Martin alias Matt Helm
stars in another exciting intrigue,
Fire Frequency
NEW YORKA fire breaks
out in an American home every
49 seconds, according to the In Insurance
surance Insurance Information Institute.
Fire strikes nearly 2,000 Amer American
ican American homes every day and claims
a life every 43 minutes.

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counter oper. : a.:. a.::
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i UF REPRESENTATIVEE. c j
~ ~~ Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sa PP David Wilson
Tom stewart Bill Worsham
V George Corl Arlie Watkinson
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i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

The Wrecking Affair,** coming
soon to your local theaters. Miss
it, too.

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Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

WALK SETS REBOUND MARK
Gators Blister Alabama

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sport' 'Jitter
UFs tower of consistency,
Neal Walk, pumped in 36 points
and grabbed 31 rebounds to direct
the Gators to a 88-75 basket basketball
ball basketball triumph over scrappy Ala Alabama
bama Alabama Saturday night.
With his father and younger
brother in the crowd of 6,209
at Florida Gym, Walk broke the
UF single-season rebound mark
of 328 held previously by Cliff
Luyk and Jim Zinn. The 6-10
junior center now has 343 re rebounds
bounds rebounds and will set a new record
with each new rebound he grabs
this season.
Even with Walks performance,
the Gator cagers had to fight off
a late scoring surge by Alabama
to nail down their eighth vic victory
tory victory in Southeasten Conference
play.
UF saw their eight-point half halftime
time halftime lead dwindle to two mid midway
way midway in the second half as Ala Alabama
bama Alabama began finding the basket
from outside. The Tides Randy
Hollingsworth hit a layup at 8:35
of the final stanza to cut the Gator
lead to an uncomfortable 64-62.
At this point, however, the
Gators reeled off 10 straight
points in four minutes to break
the game open. The victory gave
UF an 8-3 SEC record. Overall,
the Gators are 11-6.

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Page 17

Forward Mike Rollyson, sub subbing
bing subbing for the injured Andy Owens,
poured in 16 points to capture
second-place scoring honors for
the Gators. Forward Gary Mc-
Elroy and guard Mike Leather Leatherwood
wood Leatherwood netted 12 markers each.
Guard Dave Miller, in foul
trouble most of the game, ended
the evening with eight points.
Tom Jones paced the Tide
scoring with 23 points, followed
by Gary Elliott with 20. The Gator
defense held Alabama guard Mike
Nordholz to eight points, far off
his 22.7 game average. Nord Nordholz
holz Nordholz connected on only one of
eight field goal attempts.
The Gators connected on .478
percent of their field goal at attempts.
tempts. attempts. Alabama hit on .414 per percent.
cent. percent. In the rebounding depart department,
ment, department, UF garnered in 52 to the
Tides 33.
In the preliminary game Satur Saturday
day Saturday night, the Gator freshmen
lost a 96-86 decision to Lake
City Junior College.
The Baby Gators were paced by
Todd Lalich with 29 points. Jerry
Hoover netted 17 and Jeff Miller
and Vernon Chewning had 16 each.
Lake City JC hit over 50 per percent
cent percent from the field and 80 per
cent from the charity stripe. UF
connected on 45 per cent from the
field and 57 per cent from the
free-throw stripe.

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||||
NEAL WALK

6> > CJMDG
THE NEW MORALITY
t i y
speaker: Lenore ID. Hanks, C. S.B.
Discussion afterward
8-9p.m. Reitz Union Aud. Jan..3o



Viking
Magnecord
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-

SPORTS
Gator Gymnasts Triumph
First Time In Three Tries
The UF won its first gymnastics meet Thursday night after three
starts. The Florida gymnasts defeated Sam Houston State College
by a score of 132.85 to 128.20.
Robin England was high scorer for the Gators earning a total of
40.3 points and getting four seconds and a third. Andy Dainis took
first place in the side horse and high bar while getting third place
on the rings and parallel bars. Other place winners for Florida
were Mike Brennan first place in vaulting, and Charlie Salomon
first place on the parallel bars.
The UF Gymnastics Club is coached by Mr. Joe Regna. Mr. Regna
has been named to the NCAA rules committee for gymnastics. He
is one of six men in the country on this committee and will represent
the entire southeast section of the United States.
The next gymnastics meet will be with FSU Saturday, Feb. 10,
at 2:00 p.m. It will be held in the south end of the Florida gym. Ad Admission
mission Admission is free and all interested persons are urged to attend.

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Bartlett Lauds Walk;
SEC Chances Alive

By PAUL KAPLAN
Assistant Sports Editor
Tommy Bartlett looked at the
game statistics and cracked one
of his he did it again smiles.
He saw Neal Walks name with
31 rebounds, 36 points written
next to it.
Im running out of things to
say about Neal, he said. Im
just real glad hes on our side.
His rebounding is just so
impressive. His 31 tonight gives
him a single season record of
343, and hes only played 17
gameswhat a ball player.
Bartlett also noted that the
6-10 Walk took quite a physi physical
cal physical beating under the boards
against a rough Alabama team.
The tallest man for the Tide
was only 6-7, and they con consistently
sistently consistently had two or three men
jumping against Walk for re rebounds.
bounds. rebounds. There were more el elbows
bows elbows than fingers.
He added praise for Mike Rol Rollyson
lyson Rollyson who played for the injured
Andy Owens. Roily played
nearly the entire game and scored
16 points to match Owens aver average.
age. average. He stole several passes on
defense when the score got close.
We needed Owens in the game,
but we just couldnt take the
chance, Bartlett noted. Rol Rollyson
lyson Rollyson did a fine job filling in;
hes a real hustler.
Bartlett said that his club made
a few costly errors at the start
of the second half when Alabama
switched into a press defense,
but that when they slowed down
they regained their composure.
We were ready for five dif different
ferent different Alabama defenses, he
said. They went into a 1-3-1,
a 2-3, a zone and a man-to-man;
we handled them all well.
As for the Alabama team, the
second year head coach was just
as impressed as the 6,029 Gator
fans were with the outside shoot shooting
ing shooting of Gary Elliott.
That boy has got quite a shot,
Bartlett said shaking his head.
He was shooting at a .500 clip
(nine for 18) and that was from
20 to 30 feet out.
But just as important, we
stopped their big gun, MikeNord MikeNordholz.
holz. MikeNordholz. Hes another great shooter
and tonight we held him to only

McKee Called Best
Swimmer In South
UFs outstanding freshman swimmer, Mark McKee, continues to
rewrite the record books every time he sets foot in a swimming pool.
The prep All-America from Newtown Square, Pa., has only been
in two meets, but already has set three new school records and each
time was better than the existing Southeastern Conference mark.
In his first meet against Georgia, McKee set a new record in the
200-yard freestyle event with a time of 1:47.6, breaking All-American
Tom Dioguardis school and conference record.
Last Saturday it was McKee that led the Gators to a 59-54 victory
over Florida State. He set a new record in the 200-yard individual
medley with a record time of 2:01.4. Later in the 500-yard freestyle
McKee knocked 15 seconds off the record swimming the distance in
4:55.8. It was his victory in the 500 that sparked the Gators to their
fourth victory of the season.
Mark is truly the finest swimmer ever to compete in the South,
says Floridas successful swimming coach Bill Harlan. Hes a
picture perfect swimmer who can swim all strokes with equal
success. Im sure glad he will be with us for four years.
The quiet, soft spoken freshman attended Malvern Prep In Penn Pennsylvania.
sylvania. Pennsylvania. Hh was one of the most sought after swimmers in the country,
narrowing his choices to Michigan State, Yale and Florida before the
Gators won out.
The Gators also have a few other freshman stars to throw at their
opponents. Jamie Murphy, Jimmy Perkins, Bruce Williams and Mike
Chalbeck have looked very impressive in the Gator victories.
The success the freshman have enjoyed has been an inspiration
to the Gator veterans. All-Americas Steve Macri and Barry Russo
along with Andy McPherson have been looking better than ever.
Florida will host Tulane today before facing East Carolina, North
Carolina and North Carolina State all on the road February 1,2,
and 3.

TOMMY BARTLETT
eight points; they were ready for
him.
Nordholz is the SECs third
leading scorer with a 22.7 aver average,
age, average, and is behind only Pete
Maravich of LSU and Walk, who
is averaging 26.7.
Finally, Bartlett settled down
to his outlook on the SEC.
Florida, Vanderbilt and Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky have to keep on winning
if they want to stay in this race,
he said. If we lose another SEC
game, it may put us out of con contention.
tention. contention.
Auburn, our next opponent,
is always toughest in the second
half of the season. They lost a
few tough ones in the start, but
now theyre coming on strong
as they usually do.
Bartlett noted that the league
was unusually balanced this year.
There are no undefeated teams
and the less successful clubs
can beat the best on any given
night.
Our fans are great and they
love a tough race, he concluded
tiredly. But it sure is tough
on the coaches.
Bell Predicts
Future Tonight
Dr. Daniel Bell speaks tonight
at 8 p.m. in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on The U.S. in the
Year 2000.

we care
1859-1967...108 YEARS YOUNG

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. The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 29, 1968

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Monday, January 29, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

BMMft a TTMUhWimiw i i< m h 1 a 11 \mu i
if ft flB S BHjjjHHHH BHHHMMI ftftftftftftftftj
bmw&m ib si K. mmmmm
;.f| ft ft flft HlrW ft *S H ' T ft 4 9K| I t mmSsS Hftfti % >
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Anthropology Dept Shown Here Is Housed in Temporary Buildings Made During World War 11.

'Give UF Priority
Florida's legislators should single the UF out for greatness
among state universities, contends L. E. Grinter, dean of the UF
graduate shcool.
In addition to average funding according to the state-wide
formula the UF must be given an excellence fund" for re recruiting
cruiting recruiting the most brilliant young teachers and also mature scholars
and research leaders of national reputation, Grinter wrote.
The formula Grinter mentioned is the state's method of allo allocating
cating allocating funds for faculty salaries on the basis of the number and
grade level of students attending its six state universities.
Grinter contends that the quality of an institution can be
measured rather crudely by the dollar volume of its research
and the number of doctorates it awards each year.
Last year UF ranked in the top 25 schools in receiving federal
research funds.
Grinter added that to realize its goal of a truly distinguished
university'* the UF will have to be part of a clear program of
higher education a program that would clarify its role as an
institution singled out for excellence.

Kirks Education Report
Given A Failing Grade

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF professor was grading
the report of the Governors
Commission on Quality Educa Education.
tion. Education.
It lacks comprehensive comprehensiveness,
ness, comprehensiveness, he remarked.
It deals almost entirely in
generalities.
It is lacking finality and de decision.
cision. decision.
I dont quarrel with the things
it says as much as I do with
the things it didnt say.
The professor was Dr. Ralph
B. Kimbrough, head of the de department
partment department of administration and
supervision in the College of
Education. As the only member
of the UF. faculty on the gover governors
nors governors special study group, Kim Kimbrough
brough Kimbrough has been highly critical
of the haphazard manner in which
the report was made.
They called it the Governors
Commission on Quality Edu Education.
cation. Education. It was the governors, it
was a commission, and it was on
education, hut there is some
question as to the qualityaspect
of it, Kimbrough asserted.
My criticism is not a re reflection
flection reflection on the members of the
commission. You just cannot take
30 good men and women and give
them two months to define qual quality
ity quality education.
For example, Kimbrough cited
the commissions failure to get
down to detail on building great
universities. It makes no
specific recommendations for a
university system of excel excellence,
lence, excellence, he said.
Kimbrough said the commis commission
sion commission was born of political cir circumstances.
cumstances. circumstances. He warned that
Politics has seriously damaged

Page 19

Florida schools for the past 10
years, and it will continue to do
so until people with mature
enough views demand an impro improved
ved improved political system.
He blamed the short work
period for causing the com commission
mission commission to submit meaningless
generalities in the report. Kim Kimbrough
brough Kimbrough said that not as much
attention was paid by the com commission
mission commission to scientific facts as was
needed.
Some interest groups saw in
the commission a vehicle to use
to their benefit. he concluded.

Campus Building Fund
Shows s2l Million Deficit

The UF sought $26 million
in state funds for buildings dur during
ing during the 1967-68 biennium. In Instead,
stead, Instead, it got a $5,053,000 share
of a SSO million bond issue that
the state may have trouble sel selling.
ling. selling.
In November President OCon OConnell
nell OConnell told a legislative committee
some of the effects of this build building
ing building shortage at the university.
Among them are:
Eleven per cent of the uni universitys
versitys universitys space is in temporary
buildings.
The size of the entering class
of medical students cannot be
increased.
Money does not exist to con construct
struct construct a College of Dentistry.
The allotted funds are not
sufficient to keep pace with grow growing
ing growing enrollments, provide office
space for additional faculty mem members,

. o excellence fund


f 1


bers, members, replace World War II tem temporary
porary temporary buildings, and rehabili rehabilitate
tate rehabilitate some existing facilities to
meet present needs.
Cabinet officials have ex expressed
pressed expressed concern oyer the fate of
the SSO million bond issue. The
bonds can pay a maximum of
4.5 per cent in tax-exempt in interest,
terest, interest, but this figure is rather
low in the current bond market.
* ; * n
We hope the bond market will
be such that these bonds can be
sold in February, said UF Dir Director
ector Director of Planning Ellis Jones.
If the bonds arent sold, no build building
ing building projects can begin on campus
unless the legislature authorizes
new funds.
Federal funds are available for
some UF building programs,
Jones added, but these funds must
be matched with a certain amount
of state funds.

Teacher Crisis
Hurts Students
The first morning of classes last fall, hundreds of UF students
lumbered around campus with minimum loads because courses they
needed were either not being offered that quarter or not enough
sections were offered to fit their schedules.
There were no instructors available to teach the needed courses.

Statewide
Effect Felt
By MARLYN RUBIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Budgetary problems are de depriving
priving depriving Florida of the teachers
is badly needs.
UF students who could be
teaching are waiting to intern
so they can get their degree.
Florida requires 11,000 new
teachers a year. The state's
combined production is 3,500.
Florida is therefore 7,500
teachers short each year.
The situation may soon get
worse, contends Dean Kimball
Wiles of the College of Education.
The College of Education is
67 teaching positions short, not
counting its need for additional
research, counseling or adminis administrative
trative administrative personnel.
Wiles said some of these po positions
sitions positions are required to supervise
interns.
"Unless additional staff is
available the college will have
to cut down its enrollment next
year adding to the teacher short shortage,"
age," shortage," Wiles said.
Wiles hopes to see three needs
met as a result of the special
legislative session. "We need
new positions, operating money
and money for equipment and
space," he asserted.
Wiles summarized his disap disappointments
pointments disappointments in the colleges pre present
sent present budget:
The college lacks those 67
teaching positions.
It requested $195,000 for
operating expenses and equip equipment.
ment. equipment. It was granted $55,000.
A new building, Education
Research and Media Center, was
requested but denied.

UF Teacher Shortage
The UF student enrollment supports 1,386 faculty positions under
the current scale, but it only received money enough to support
1,206 positions.
Here Is how this shortage of 180 faculty members Is broken down:
EDUCATION-GENERAL Positions Earned Positions Shortage
By Enrollment Approved
Resident Instruction
Lower Level 324 300 24
Upper 467 378 89
Graduate 163 148 15
Non-Resident 37 22 15 c.
Research 206 189 17
Professional Services 20 17 3
Academic Advisement 74 64 10
Administration 95 88 7
TOTAL 1386 1206 180

The UF is presently 180 fa faculty
culty faculty members short of its mini minimum
mum minimum needs based on a formula
adopted last spring by the Florida
Legislature for allocating faculty
positions to the State Univer University
sity University System, Dean of Academic
Affiars Rae L. Lassiter, said
recently.
If all 180 faculty members
were added to the staff, the UF
would still not come up to its
own assessment of its minimum
needs.
Lassiter explained that the UF
had asked for more positions
than it was allocated under the
legislative formula.
The UF teacher shortage will
be worse this summer when only
25 to 30 per cent of the faculty
the normal 65 per cent for the
summer months.
The ultimate result of the
shortage may be a cut-back on
next falls enrollment. Such a
move would be a step backward
by the UF to eliminate the gap
between the allotted teachers and
thq demanded number of course
classes.
Floridas universities are
authorized faculty positions on
a "productivity" formula. The
formula called the Brumbaugh
Method is based on the num number
ber number of full-time credit hours
to be taught.
The system calls for one fa faculty
culty faculty position for every 400 credit
hours in lower (100-200) level
courses. If, for example, an in institution
stitution institution has an enrollment for
20,000 credit hours in lower
level courses, the university
would be alloted 50 faculty po positions.
sitions. positions.
The ratio improves as the level
of instruction goes up, since
upper and graduate level work
demand closer teacher-pupil re relationships.
lationships. relationships.



"*" 0U H T-t-d-rO
119 Members Q
frootKaJ A j).
THE SENATE L, \
Itfoifctsl ,M- WBIB7hi"92JL_J IGodtdea J t ) '"j Ltvv | Vpl IT
48 Member* O/ toiheY^/^ l n I V/ Qa>* H M,rlM |\
/bertr j Itsfcwy Dwdl V TJU I
, y / O'-r-U'-Q t VaS .A\
Ta&e a good look! Its your state! It's your education! y/ uvyj TfXJTT A]lHik K , l | oirt | \
Theyre your representatives! You and your parents L I \voiuiA rSitiiofijn I p#,k \ i!_l
voted them in office! They handle our money! We \ jr t
finance our education! Our representatives are going V-LA* *^ ll,lt^ ll| f to meet to discuss problems Write them and express | Q \ \ 8 1 J st ~ llK< *\
your views! As Floridas future leaders we, too, j r,, V \ \"j!2!!l LLjr i ~yTv Mwt< \
deserve better! Il-,,T' i \ oicoio \ SWm uu /A \
IlNHlibrt.9,l ,_ IL V == / W

SENATORS
ESCAMBIA
John R. Bronson
P. O. Box ISO
Gulf Bmu, 32561, (D)
ReuMn OD, Askew
250 Professions] Bide.
Pensacole (D)
WALTON, WASHNGTON
William Dean Barrow
P. O. Box 486
Crest view (d)
Dempsey J. Barron
P. O. Box 1628
Panama City (D)
Mallory E. Horne
P. O. Box 1140
Tallahassee (D)
TAYLOR
L. P. Ps& Gibson
P. O. Box 811
Parry (D)
ALACHUA
J. Emory "Red Cross
P. O. Box 699
Gainesville (D)
DUVAL
John E. Mathews
1630 American Herltace
Life Bulldln(
Jacksonville, 32202 (D)
Tom Slade
8486 Ramona Boulevard
Jacksonville (R)
Dr. John J. Fisher
826 Miami Road
Jacksonville (R)
William T. Stockton, Jr.
1209 Barnett Bank Bldg.
Jacksonville (K)
Vails A. Pops
Box 819
St Augustine (D)
MARION
L. K. Edwards, Jr.
Irvins (D)
SUMTER, LAKE
Ralph R. Clayton
234 Bostb Boundary
DeLand (R)
Dennis J. Patrick OGrady
So. Apopka Ave.
Invernass (R)
SEMINOLE, ORANGE
Kewath Plants
# 1217 Wakefield Dr.
Altemooto Sprlnfs (R)
Robert & Elrod
P. O. Box 106
Windermere (IQ
BUI Gunter
P. O. Box 20163
Orlando (D)
PINELLAS
C. W. "BUI Youi*
7981 4B Street
Pinellas Park 33865 (R)
Harolds. Wilson
460 Poses da Leon
Belleeir (R)
Henry Sayler
322 21 Street North
St PetenbeiE (R)
Richard J. (Dick) Daeb
8780 Seventh Ave. North
St Peteraburf (R)
wllsborough
Ray C. Knocks
818 RtvertdlU Drive
Temple Terrace (D)
Joseph A. McClain, Jr.
818 Martas Batt GMt.
Tampa (SO
T. Treat! Ott
101 EMt Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa (D)
Lsuis da la Parte, ir.
736 Bast Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa 09
~ POLK
Bea EDI Grtffla, j r
P. a Baa 380
Fie eeart 09
Lwdaa M. ChHea, Jr.
VOJMM

Write To Your State Legislators

INDIAN RIVER
Elizabeth J. (Beth) Johnson
469 S. Atlantic Are.
Cocoa Beach (R)
C. S. 'Cliff Reuter
Box 162
Sharpes (R)
HIGHLANDS
Wilbur Boyd
726 Eighth Avenue
Palmetto (D)
SARASOTA 4
Warren S. Henderson
Golden Beach Blvd.
Venice (R)
HENDRY, PALM BEACH
L. A. Skip Bafalls
'419 Marlin Road
N. Palm Beach (R)
Elmar O. Friday, Jr.
P. O. Drawer X
Fort Myers (D)
Jerry nomas
612 Auetrallian circle
Lake Park (D)
COLUER
David C. Lana
1233 N. Rio Vista
Fort Lauderdale (R)
Charles a Weber
2408 N. E. 26 Ave.
Fort Lauderdale (R)
John W. (Jack) Bell
X* 100 8. E. Sixth Bt.
Fort Lauderdale (R)
Chester W. (Chat) Stolxenburg
P. O. Box 10276
Fort Lauderdale
DADE
Edmond J. Gong
1617 duPoot Building
Miami, 33131 (D)
Robert M. Haverfleld
1117 City National * Bldg.
Miami (D)
Laa Welssenborn
6726 Orchid Drive
Miami Lakes (D)
Robert L. Sbevln
4901 8. W. 87 Court
Miami (D)
George L. itoUahan, Jr.
5409 Riviera Dr.
Coral Gables (D)
Tom Spencer
19 West Flagler Street
Miami (D)
Ralph a Poston
2102 N. W. 20 Street
Miami Dick Flacker
1740 N.E. Second Avenue
Miami (D)
Richard B. (Dtck) Stone
112803. W. 63 Avenue
Miami (D)
REPRESENTATIVES
ESCAMBIA
Gordon W. Walls
1906 North Magaolla Ave.
Penaaoola (D)
WarreaM. Briggs
2881 Palermo Road
Pensacola (D)
PhU Ashler
283 Daaa Road
Penaaoola (D)
Jim Raevaa
28 EMt Gardes Street
Pensacola (D)
SANTA ROSA, OKALOOSA,
WALTON, HOMES AND WASH WASHINGTON
INGTON WASHINGTON 1
Eternal M. "Ed Fortmm
P. O. Bex 18SS
Pace 09
l7* North Melli )
Creel view (p)
L. a "Sam Campbell
RL 8, Boa 840-D
DePmdak Springs (R)
BAY, GULP AND CALHOUN
Panama CBy CD)
Tofisr
Pert at. Jae 08

LIBERTY, JACKSON AND GADS GADSDEN
DEN GADSDEN
W. M. (BUI) Inman
423 W. Washington St.
Quincy (D)
Wayne Mixson
504 Noland Street
Marianna (D)
FRANKLIN, WAKULLA AND
LEON ;
Miley Mlers
1213 Mlccosukae Road
Taliabaaaea (D)
Donald L. Tucker
P. O. Box 2434
Tallahassee (D)
JEFFERSON, MADISON, TAY TAYLOR
LOR TAYLOR AND LAFAYETTE
Keo Smith
210 Cyprees Road
Parry (D)
SUWANNEE, DIXIE, HAMILTON,
GILCHRIST AND LEVEY
Leon N. McDonald, Sr.
409 Helvenston St
Live Oak (D)
* NASSAU, BAKER, COLUMBIA,
BRADFORD, UNION AND CLAY
Eugene F. (Gena) Shaw
P. 0. Box 1086
Stake (D)
Ralph C. Tyre
P.O. Box 660
Lake City (D)
DUVAL
Dan Scarborough
404 W. Monroe Street
JacksoovUle (D)
Tad Alvarex
13937 Duval Rd.
JackaonvUle CD)
George B. Stallings, Jr.
331 E. Forsyth SL
Jacksonville (D)
Lew Brantley
422 Copeland Street
JackaonvUle (D)
John Crider
2024 Hendricks Ave.
JackaonvUle (D)
Lynwood Aronld
1604 Harbor Oaks. Road
Jacksonville (D)
Fred Schultz
4314 Ortega Foreet Dr.
JackaonvUle (D)
Gifford Grange
2326 Laurel Road
JackaonvUle (D)
S. Gordon Blalock
730 American Heritage Life Bldg.
JackaonvUle, 32202 (D)
Don Nichols
220 E. D
220 E. Adams Street
JacksoovUle (D)
Joseph G. Kennelly, Jr.
2647 ParkSL
JackaonvUle (D)
<*
ALACHUA AND MARION
Ralph D. Turlington
117 N. E. 16 Ave.
GataenvUle 09
wuiiam V. BUI Chappell. Jr.
204 Lapel Canter
Ocala (D)
BUI Andrews .
1611 N. E. Twelfth Terrace
Gainesville (DO
PUTNAM, FLAGLER, ST. JOHM
AND LAKE
w. a (BUly) Ready
Box 1406
EartM CD)
James N. Beck
P. O. Bon PM
Pilate 09
A. H. (Gee) Craig
P. O. Drawer 99
L Aegaattae (D)
VOLUBIA
WUlalm R. Cenway
724 Jcka Andaraca Dr.
Ormond Baaak 09
James H. Sweeny, Jr.
P. O. Box 670
Delted, 23139 09
WUllam M. dilates
332 N. Caeaeway

"WQI u 'Vfc-Up J
| Hardee O Q
Slide* \ I /
W V\\. l-N / (Hurt Mo /
/ dr r r,l ,wh
\ I lrewerd /
Woi /
\MooreJ Me /

ORANGE AND SEMINOLE
. 1 t*
Hmy W. Land
Bos 3S
Tangerine, arm (D)
John L. Duckor
a10 Wort Fairbanks
Winter Park (H)
Robert H. Sbadley
733 Ensenada
Orlando (R)
David L. Lindsay
2933 Pool Avenue
Orlando (R)
William D. Gorman
833 Balmoral Road
Winter Park (R)
Jan Fortune
2130 Sunderland Road
Maitland (R)
E. Pope Bassett
1518 Croton Drive
Maitland (R)
William L. Gibson
1432 Knollwood Circle
Orlando (R)
PINELLAS
John J. Savage
16919 First St. E.
N. Redlngton Beach (R)
Mary R. Grizzle
120 Gult Blvd., Bellealr Shore,
Indian Rooks Beach (R)
Ray C. Osborne
208 FUth SL North
SL Petersburg (R)
Charles E. Rainey
1363 Chesterfield Dr.
Clearwater (R)
Ed. S. Whitson, Jr.
308 So. Garden Are.
Clearwater (R)
A. S. "Jim Robinson
1600 Park SL North
SL Petersburg (R)
Doa H. Stafford
P. O. Bos 499
Largo, 33640 (JO
William H. Fleece
1373 N. Causeway Blvd.
SL Petersburg (R)
Jack Murphy
1306 Wood Avenue
Clear enter (R)
POLK AND SUMTER
John R. Clark
3111 E. Ihatorsoa Circle
Lakeland (D)
MXlhitll
Winter iteven (D)
FL Meads (DO
(Milton S. Yancey
301 Arcade Bldg.
Lakeland (D)
E. C. Rowell
P. O. Res 101
WBdtNSdO*
ujaoHM% erring, pas>
CO AIR) NBBMANDO
Wcbset T. Mhaa
TOO K. Jsha F. K sms dy Blvd.
Tampa (EO

V OJ

James L. Redman
1800 South Collins SL
Plant City (D)
William M. Register, Jr.
3633 Beach Dr.
Tampa, 33601(0)
El vln L. Marlines
1717 N. Howard
Tampa (D)
GuySpfoola
738 E. Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa, 33603 (D)
Terrell See sums
1113 Dunbar Avenue
Tampa, 33609 (D)
John L. Ryals
633 South Bylvan Drive
Brandon (D)
Part W. Danahy
SIS First National Bate Bldg.
Tampa (D)
Richard 8. Bodes
116 Ladoga Avenue
Tampa (D)
John R. Cul breath
RL 4, Bos 70
Brooksvllle (D)
Tommy Stevens
318 South Seventh SL
Dade City (D)
BREVARD, OSCEOLA, INDIAN
RIVER AND OKEECHOBEE
Charles E. Davis, Jr.
736 Rlomar Drive
Vero Beach (R)
Harry H. Pfeiffer
444 Fourth SL South
Cocoa Beach (R)
Clifford A. McNulty
Boa 347
Melbourne (R)
William E. Powell
3140 Todd Lane
Indlaiantlc (J)
ST. LUCIE
Charles Chuck Nergard
3306 So. Elizabeth
FL Pierce (JQ
MARTIN AND PALM BEACH
DoaaM H. Used, Jr.
614 N. W. Twelfth Terrace
Boca Raton OQ
Joseph W. H. Humphrey
3315. W. Tenth Ave.
BoynSoa Beach (R)
Jack Poorhaagh
706 8. W. 37 Avenue
Boynton Beach (JO
Robert C. De Young
P. O. Bos 9996
Riviera Bsasb (R)
>

Robert W. Rust
132 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach (R)
WUllam G. Jamas
136 Coconut Road
Delray Beach (R)
BROWARD
James R. Eddy
3650 N. Federal Highway
Pompano Beach (R)
Arthur H. Rude
630 N W. 14th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale (R)
George L. Caldwell
1369 S. W. 14th SL
FL Lauderdale (R)
Richard A. Bird
3450 N. E. 19 Avenue
FL Lauderdale (R)
Henry J. Prom Inski
1920 N. E. 26th SL
WUton Manors (R)
Joel K. Gustafson
1636 S. E. 12th CL
FL Laudsrdale (R)
Joseph M. Martinez, Jr.
1519 Yale Dr.
Hollywood (K)
A
Charles j. King
100 S. E. Sixth SL
FL Lauderdale (H)
DADE
Maxine E. Baker
1962 Opechee Drive
Miami, 31133 (D)
Maurice A. Ferre
1643 Brlcketl Avenue
Miami (D)
Carey Mathews
40 W. Rtvo Alto bland
Miami Beach 09
Louis Wolfaon, U
- 316 N. Miami Ave.
Miami (D)
Kenneth M. Myers
1180 S. W. Ist SL
Miami (D)
Murray H. Dubbin
814 DuPont Plaza Center
Miami (D)
Gerald Lewis
420 Tivoli A vases
Coral Gabies (D)
Richard A. Pettigrew
7700 S. W. 82 Coart
Miami (D)
Saady DAlembarta
1414 First Nafl. Bank Bldg.
Miami (D)
Jaaa Yarborough
206 Security Trust Bldg.
Miami, 22131 09

Walter W. Sackett, Jr.
2500 Coral Way
Miami (D)
Harold G. Feathers tone
700 E. Eighth Court
Hialeah (O)
Vernon C. Holloway
S2SS Montgomery Drive
Miami (D)
Jeff D. Gautier
6200 S. W. 62 Avenue
Miami, 33143 (D)
Robert C. Hector
7830 Erwin Road
South Miami, 33143 (D)
Robert Graham
16141 Aberdeen Way
Miami Lakes (D)
Robert C. fMrtnett
4410 Moneerrate St
Coral Gables (D)
Elton J. Gtssendaaner
12934 Banyan Rd.
N. Miami (D)
Marshall S. Harris
4725 Pine Drive
Miami (D)
Carl A. Singleton
235 AnUlli Avenue
Coral Gablee (D)
George Firestone
136016. W. 91 Avenue
Miaari (D)
David L. Brower
13366 W. Dixie Ogbway
M. Miami CD)
COLLIER, GLADES, HENDRY
LIE AND MONROE
Tod Randall
P. O. Boa 1466
Fort Myers (DO
James Loreaeo Walker
F. O. Box 419
Naples, 33940 (D)
Bents C. Papy, Jr.
P. O. Boa >7l
Key Went (D)
HARDEE AMD MANATEE
Jams Pratt
P. O. Bo* 67
Palmetto CP)
Tom Gallea
701 Hsvistt Street Want
DESOTO, GHjAMSB, CHAR CHARLOTTE
LOTTE CHARLOTTE AMD SARASOTA
J. K. (Jim) TUI mas
Rt 3, Baa MS
SaraaotaC)
Easts. MaWalay
203MWasttngtoa Drive
GraavtUe H. Crabtree, Jr.
asss mmbSl
aanastaOO