Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Vol. 60, No. 68

North Koreans Hijack U.S. Ship

TAYLOR SAYS
'Students Can
Abolish SG

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator News Editor
United-First party presiden presidential
tial presidential candidate Clyde Taylor vowed
Tuesday to offer a referendum
which will enable students to
abolish Student Government
under its present constitutional
setup at the end of his term of
office, if he is elected.
If Student Government can cannot
not cannot truly serve the students, then
it should not exist. If the students
do not believe that SG is really
doing anything for them, then
let's get rid of it and give stu students
dents students what they want, Taylor
said.
In other words, he contin continued,
ued, continued, I am asking my party and
all the students on this campus
to put up or shut up.
The candidate pointed out that
the election of Charles Shepherd
last year signaled student dis disillusionment
illusionment disillusionment with machine
politics and broken promises.
Shepherds election, he said, in indicated
dicated indicated that students wanted a
change.
The people of my party have
had a year to experiment with
the ideas that students really
want. And we made many ad advances,
vances, advances, highlighted by the re revised
vised revised student conduct code, he
noted.
He also indicated that there is
much SG can do for the better betterment
ment betterment of recreational, social and
cultural programs and at atmosphere,

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On the far right is the Southern Student Organizing Committee (SSOC), on the far
left is the U. S. Navy, and in the middle is the Peace Corps.
This is the arrangement of tables for these three orgainzations on the ground floor
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
The SSOC, the Peace Corps and the Navy are recruiting at the same place.
All three orgainzations will be seeking members the rest of this week.
Ed Freeman, 4AS, said the SSOC is giving information to conscientious objectors,

The
Florida Alligator

mosphere, atmosphere, but only if students
can be involved in SG through
dynamic leadership.
We know the problems and
needs of the students, Taylor
said. And I am convinced that
I can do the type of job as stu student
dent student body president that students
want. If I cant, then I am willing
to place the entire concept of
Student Government on the line
a year from the day I am inaug inaugurated.
urated. inaugurated.

Court Tightens
Bad Check Rule

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Staff Writer
Students passing worthless
checks will face stiffer penalties
under a new rule recently
adopted by the Honor Court in an
effort to curtail bad check
incidents.
By clearly defining passing a
worthless check as an offense,
the new regulation allows the
court to apply to student offenders
the same penalty as for stealing.
In the past, we were only able
to prosecute under the general
stealing statues by showing the
students intention to take some someone

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE: DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

PEACEFUL COEXISTENCE ON CAMPUS

w
HR
Jk nKW
'W. -ig?
CLYDE TAYLOR

Taylor said the main reason
students are dissatisfied with SG
is the unwillingness or the in inability
ability inability of student leaders to take
government to the students,
where it belongs.
(SEE TAYLOR PAGE 4)

one someone elses property or to deprive
them of that property, said
Charles Arnold, Honor Court at attorney
torney attorney general.
The new statute allows us to
prosecute anyone passing a
worthless check, he added.
Penalties for stealing, now ap applicable
plicable applicable to those passing worth worthless
less worthless checks, range anywhere
from a severe reprimand to
expulsion from the schoof, ac according
cording according to Robert Hughes, Honor
Court chancellor.
The statute, adopted from
Florida state statutes, defines
the offense as negotiating a

(SEE COURT PAGE 5)

Enterprise Steams
Toward Incident

WASHINGTON (UPI) -- The nuclear-powered
aircraft carrier Enterprise was reported
Tuesday night to be steaming into the Sea of
Japan where North Korea hijacked a U.S.
intelligence ship with a crew of 83 and forced
it into harbor.

and are willing to counsel anyone on dodging the draft. He said a Florida law prohibits
this, but so far no one has challenged him about it.
Freeman said the SSOC has attempted conversation with the Navy recruiters about
the immorality of the war, but the recruiters refuse to talk to them.
We play games in front of the recruiters called 'Dodge the Draft/ said Freeman.
He said it is played on a large board like a Monopoly board, and students are the
playing pieces.

The United States demanded
through diplomatic channels
that North Korea release the
906-ton USS Pueblo and its men
immediately. It asked the Soviet
Union, among other nations to
help.
The Navy said four unidenti unidentified
fied unidentified crewmen of the Pueblo were
injured one critically after
the ship was boarded and forcibly
seized by an armed North Korean
party from among four Commun Communist
ist Communist patrol boats. MIG jet fighters
circled the Pueblo while it was
captured.
The crewmen may have been
injured in hand-to-hand fighting
with their captors or while at attempting
tempting attempting to destroy the secret
electronic monitoring and com communications
munications communications gear aboard their
ship.
The Navy insisted Tuesday
night that at no point did the
Pueblo fire its guns -two 50-
(SEE U.S. PAGE 5)
Moscow Mum I
MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviet
news agency Tass by late Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday had not mentioned the capture
of the U.S. intelligence ship
Pueblo by North Korean patrol
boats and planes.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

By DARRELL GARWOOD

Inside
For Party Slates And
Election Information
See Page Eighteen


Congress:
Ship Seizure
Act Os War

WASHINGTON (UPI) -- North
Korea's seizure of the USS Pueblo
was condemned in Congress
Tuesday as an act of war.
One congressman urged Presi President
dent President Johnson to use military force
if necessary to recover the ship
and rescue the 83 men taken
prisoner.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
termed the incident a matter of
the utmost gravity."
Chairman Richard B. Russell
of the Senate Armed Services
Committee said the seizure
amounted to an act of war."
He urged President Johnson to
take a very strong position in
demanding release of the ship
and return of the men."

(Photo by Nick Arroyo)

*



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Question Os The Day

TOD A YS Q VEST ION
OF THE DAY: What
functions will your
vice president per perform
form perform your admin administration?
istration? administration?
Bill Mcride
Our will do
more than just preside over the
Legislative Council. He will be
a trouble shooter, inquiring into
all areas of campus life, par particularly
ticularly particularly problems in the resid residence
ence residence halls. He will revitalize a
stagnant Legislative Council,
making it a truly responsive,
representative body reflecting
the immediate student concerns
and ideas. He will initiate pro programs
grams programs and strengthen unproduc unproductive
tive unproductive committees.
Instead of a committee man,
we want a leader who is aware
of student problems and is eager
to solve them.
Clyde Taylor
The primary function of this
vice-president is to run the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council in an efficient
and orderly manner. Inexperi Inexperienced
enced Inexperienced men in the past have often
made this position a joke. The

2 Presidential Candidates
i
Object To Gator Editorial

The presidential candidates of
two political parties on campus
voiced strong objection yesterday
to an editorial in the Alligator
which called for them to withdraw
from the race and throw their
support to United-Firsts Clyde
Taylor.
Richard Houk of Contrived
Party said, I consider the edi editorial
torial editorial an affront to my integrity.
To imply that we would withdraw
in support of Taylor is ridic ridiculous.*
ulous.* ridiculous.*
Houk said, I am beginning to
feel like a criminal because Im
hurting Clyde Taylor."
Ira Brukner of Individual Party
complained of the editorial and
said he abhors Taylors campaign
so much that if he wins he wont

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naoi. na mipv* la aatarad aa aacood daaa auttor at too UaMad Statoa Poat Ofoa at Qalaaavfllo,
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MaoUttoi rata la 9 Id. 00 par paar of $4.00 par qaartar.
Tfea Florida >lHgator raoorvoa toa right to rafulata toa typographical toaa at aU advorHoaiaaata
aad to raftaa or tan auajr copy ***** H eooaldan oDJacHaotoa.
na Florida Alligator wUI aot ooOaldar adfaahoooto of paymoto lor any advarttaamaat Involving
typognpMeal arrow or arraaonaa laaartloa mao* aotloa la (toaa to too Advertising Manager witota
(1) oaa day aftor aitiarttosuoat tggirrr no Florida Alligator will aot ba mpoaottl* lor bon Hub
on miiHir ba stvao baton aa* tooarttoau

student government vice-presi vice-president
dent vice-president must know how to work with
the majority floor leaders, thus
insuring proper study of pro proposed
posed proposed legislation.
I expect Gary Goodrich to also
help me with the many adminis administrative
trative administrative duties and public relations
alia rs that the president must
attend. Too many times some
meeting or dinner is not attended
because the president is too busy.
In effect the student body is not
represented.
Both Gary and I must function
as the leaders of our party and
push together to get our plat platform
form platform into existence,
Ira Brukner
Since Vu Ramey, (write-in)
Individual vice presidential can candidate
didate candidate has had 33 years experi experience
ence experience building dams as a minor minority-majority
ity-majority minority-majority leader, I will util utilize
ize utilize him in that area.
Since Vic is good looking and
intelligent and athletic, I wifi
groom him to be a Rhodes scholar
candidate like his predecessor.
Finally, since Vic is dynamic,
he has interest to concentrate
on the important legislative,
academic, and cultural problems
of the students instead of figur figuring
ing figuring out the canoe-row boat ratio
at Wauburg or other such trivia.

let Taylor in the Reitz Union.
I am running a campaign
based on a concern for the stu students
dents students and The City of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. The idea that I should pull pullout
out pullout is so preposterous that only
the Alligator could have suggest suggested
ed suggested it, Brukner said.
Houk stated that there is so
little difference between the two
major contenders that he wanted
to give the students a choice.

FORWARD
with swtfa
Bill Mcride |

FOR PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

Mick Callahan
-
As vice-presidential candi candidate,
date, candidate, I can best answer the ques question.
tion. question. I will go to one end of this
campus to the other, raising hell
about the lack of an academically
and culturally oriented student
body. The normal functions of the
vice-president in Legislative
Council will be performed to
this end.
Contrived party will be mak making
ing making itself heard as long as I am
a student here. I realize that
money is much of the problem
in building such an academic
climate, but the lack of money
from the State cannot over overshadow
shadow overshadow my embarrassment at the
attitudes and philosophy of the
present student government^
TOMORROW'S QUES QUESTION
TION QUESTION OF THE DA Y: Do
you believe that action
should be taken to limit
campaign expendi expenditures
tures expenditures ? Please relate
your answer to the
total sum your party
will have spent by the
end of this campaign.

FORWARD
With HWSI3
Bill Mcride |

Ml Mr 'nBB WMBf JBmH£
Bk ||,, Jr
k mfl
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
JAN. 26. 1968 SI.OO ADMISSION 8:00 P.M.
T UR f ' U aoA & THt 5 THt A UVELY NtW SQIJNn & SPIRIT IN FOLK MUSIC

Zinober Calls For
Competent Counsel

Pete Zinober, Forward party
candidate for chancellor of the
Honor Court, has called for
assurance that students appear appearing
ing appearing before the Honor Court on
charges of Honor Code violations
will be provided with the most
competent legal representation
available.
No counsel, whether he works
under the attorney general or the
defense staff," Zinober said in a
statement Tuesday, should be
permitted to act as counsel for
any student without first having
attained competent knowledge of
Honor Court investigating prac practices,
tices, practices, Honor Court policies, and
rules of procedure.
The individual studentaccus studentaccused
ed studentaccused of violating the Honor Code
has far too much to lose if given
less than competent counsel, ** he

HARDY PICKARD
for
Business Administration
LEG COUNCIL
S' 3.4 ACCOUNTING
S FLORIDA UNION BOARD COMMITEE
S PRESIDENTS COUNCIL, IFC
S' PRESIDENT, SOCIAL FRATERNITY
/MEASURER, SOCIAL FRATERNITY
UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

continued, and the student body
will be injured if prosecution is
insufficient.
Zinober called for providing
the roost competent counsel poss possible
ible possible by instituting compulsory,
formalized training of all Honor
Court counsel, under the joint
guidance of the chancellor and
the Honor Court Bar Associ Association.
ation. Association.
Zinober also charged that a
political advertisement for
United-First party opponent Jack
Horner in Tuesdays Alligator
was inacc.nrat.p-

It's Time
f o r
TAYLOR



OPEN LETTER
.. ~ -)
TO THE
STUDENT 80DY...

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FORWARD > with Bill Mcride
(Paid Political Advertisement) ~

X?.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Judge Says
Bail Request
Expected Soon
TALLAHASSEE, (UPI) A
federal judge promised Tuesday
he would rule promptly on a
request for bail for two civil
rights workers being held at
Gainesville on contempt of court
charges.
U. S. District Judge Harold
Carswell took under advisement
the case of Irvin Lee Dawkins,
a Negro, and Mrs. Carole Thom Thomas,
as, Thomas, the wife of a University of
Florida professor, following an
our long hearing.
Taylor
Asked specifically how he plans
to provide the leadership which
will make SG responsive to stu student
dent student needs, Taylor said:
~-eI will take government to the
students. I will offer them our
ideas. I will involve them, in interest
terest interest them, prove to them that
SG can and is doing what they
want done.
If at the end of my term,
they are still dissatisfied with
SG, then Ill give them the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to replace it with what whatever
ever whatever they want, such as a faculty facultystudent
student facultystudent board to act as a central
service agency.
If Student Government can cannot
not cannot truly serve the students, he
continued, then it should not
exist. If SG cannot be responsive
to student needs, then it should
be replaced by something that
is.
Taylor also noted that SG has
long been plagued by petty pol politics
itics politics which have ruined Student
Government.
We think, he concluded,
that we can take petty politics
out of Student Government. If we
cant, then the only answer is to
take out Student Government.

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'Florida Engineer 1
Sponsors Contest
The Florida Engineer magazine has announced its third annual
paper contest with first, second and third place prizes of $75,
SSO and $25.
The contest, which closes March 9, is open to all UF engineering
students. The papers should concern technical or non-technical sub subjects
jects subjects pertinent to the general topic of engineering.
The papers will be judged by members of the College of Engineer Engineerings
ings Engineerings faculty.
Winners will be announced at the Engineers Ball in the Reitz
Union March 29.
Entries may be submitted to Joe Wetherington, the magazines
editor, in room 523, Engineering and Industries Building. The papers
should be typed, double-spaced]and limited to 12 pages.

REST SELLERS
.(UPI)
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
J Fiction
THE CONFESSIONS OF NAT TURNER
William Styron
TOPAZLeon Uris
THE GABRIEL HOUNDS
Mary Stewart
THE CHOSENChaim Potok
A NIGHT OF WATCHING
Elliott Arnold
CHRlSTYCatherine Marshall
ROSEMARYS BABYIra Levin
THE VALE OF LAUGHTER
Peter DeVries
THE ARRANGEMENTEIia Kazan
THE EXHIBITIONISTHenry Sutton
WHERE EAGLES DARE
Alistair Mac Lean
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I British Group Meets I

The Trans-Atlantic Brides and
Parents Association is inviting
student members to its new
Gainesville chapter. The TABPA
offers social and travel opportun opportunities
ities opportunities to all British persons
married to U.S. or Canadian
service or ex-servicemen.

Got A Sick Corvair?
We specialize in Corvair service thats
backed up by 30 yrs. experience with Gen General
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Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
Were the students friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELROD S AUTO REPAIR
1031 So. Main Phone 376-7771
BUSINESS STUDENTS
Elect
Bruce Bokor
Honor Court Justice
\
Dean's List
3.8 in Accounting
# Murphree Area Council
JFC Rush Committee
Fraternity Sec. (Paid Political Announcement)

The group attempts to foster
Anglo-Canadian relations by or organizing
ganizing organizing cut-rate travel charter
to the United Kingdom and Ire Ireland.
land. Ireland.
Anyone interested in member membership
ship membership can contact Mrs. Robert
Boothby at 372-2172.



calibre machine guns.
A Navy spokesman said the
Pueblo did ask for help at the
time of the boarding at 11:45
p.m. EST Monday. The ship was
approached at 10 p.m. by the
first North Korean patrol boat
which was joined an hour later by
three others.
Asked what the Pueblo did dur during
ing during the hour and 45 minutes be between
tween between the first approach and the
boarding, a Navy spokesman said:

Attack Diverts
U.S. From Viet,
UF Prof Says
By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Oscar Svarlien, professor
of political science at the UF r
feels that the boarding of the
American ship USS Pueblo, Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday was a diversionary tactic.
I believe the North Korean
Government has taken these steps
in order to divert attention and
troops from the Viet Nam war,
he said. Right now, the South
Korean Army has several thou thousand
sand thousand troops in Viet Nam, I feel
that North Viet Nam has asked the
North Koreans to force these
troops home.
As far as possible U.S. actions,
Svarlien was uncertain.
All they can do now, he said,
is to protest through a third
party, because the U.S. doesnt
recognize the government of
North Korea. The charge would
be violation of freedom of the
sea, well just have to wait and
see what happens.

sm|^hhh|hbripp*bqhhhhhHH|
Student Government Experience
Ki ALLAN CASEY
,<£ w| j / -s
for Treasurer
Allan Casey is the only Candidate for Treasurer that has Treasurer of the Student Body,
any Experience in Student Government.
i r
S Allan Casey has complete knowledge of the workings of Y' Chairman of Budget Finance Committee (One Year)
Student Government Finances and Law.
. --.
s' Allan Casey is Treasurer of the Student Body now. It won't
take hiniTmonths to learn his job. S Chairman of Religion in Life Committee.
VOTE UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

U.S. Ship Hijacked

"If continued its mission in
international waters.
He said the ship was in contact
with higher authority, leaving
the presumption it was acting
undgr orders. The spokesman
added that no one ordered the
Pueblo to submit it was
boarded. By this, he said he
meant the ship was taken forcibly
and did not surrender.
The four patrol boats forced the
Pueblo to the port of Wonsan on
North Koreas east coast. The
Pentagon said the hijacking took
place on the high seas.
The last message from the

Engineering Queen Contest
'' j /
Opens; Applicants Sought

The annual Engineers Fair
Queen Contest is underway.
This years queen will be
crowned at the Engineers Ball
in the Reitz Union Ballroom
March 29, the week preceding
the Fair.
Last years winner, Miss Jan Janice
ice Janice Biewend, earned a trip to
Nassau aboard the S.S. Miami and
a $l5O wardrobe from Maas
Brothers of Tampa.
Any co-ed interested in en-

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Pueblo was sent at 12:32 a.m.
EST Tuesday, or at 2:32 p.m.
Wednesday, Korean time. It said
simply that its engines were at
all stop and that it was going
off the air.
The Defense Department de described
scribed described the Pueblo as a navy
intelligence collection auxiliary
ship 179 feet {long and 33
feet wide with a displacement of
906 tons, with a 10.2 foot draft.
Its maximum speed was said to be
12.2 knots.
The crew consists of six
officers, 75 enlisted men and two
civilians, the Pentagon said.

tering the contest may pick up
an application form at the Stu Student
dent Student Activities desk in the Union.
Applications should be returned
to Room 303, Reitz Union, by
Feb. 2.

FORWARD
with
Bill Mcride |

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Check Bouncing

worthless check of your own or
anothers.
Upon receival of a returned
check, a letter will be served
to the student by an Honor Court
Justice informing him to make
his check good within 48 hours
after receiving the letter/' said
Arnold.
If the student does not honor
the letter, Arnold added, he
can be held in contempt of the
Honor Court, and may be punished
to lose up to 9 quarter hours. In
addition, he could be prosecuted
under the new law, he said.
He added that first offenders
would not be prosecuted under
normal circumstances as long

Its Time
f r
TAYLOR

I BRAKE JOB I
14*129* I
Hr Other Amerieon
m'S- JISST IP HERE'S WHAT WE DO
m: l. New Broke Lining
1 J 1 2. Rebuild Wheel Cyl*. M
! 3. Turn All 4 Drums
(/ '/ /*/ fir / 4. Repack Front Wheel
L //? ! rJ Bearinos
V? (If 5. Add Broke Fluid .Ml
MTI.7 W'C A B. Check Crease Seals
/ '// J| v\ 7. Precision Grind
mOU Am* S Lininqs
MSB/ ,-yt/ 1 8 25.000 Mile Cuarantee
- __ v' No F*avment 'Till Mar 4 V
IfeOOQQIQDQCa
US 405 NW 13th St y
Mg A l 37?-5030

as the student honors the check
within the specified period of
timeT timeTSomeone
Someone timeTSomeone violating the reg regulation
ulation regulation more than once or with
obvious bad intentions could and
probably will be prosecuted,
Hughes said.
The Honor Court hopes the new
statute will reduce the cases of
worthless checks, Hughes said.
Hear all the
candidates
speak on
R.O.T.C.
McCarty Auditorium
8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 24
Sponsored by
Student Peace Union

Page 5



Page 6

S, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

The
Florida Alligator
JlKjxGf) To Let The People Know
jmi Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
Ami/am Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Boh Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
Ike Florida Alligator's official poeltloa on 'iiom la exproesed
only la Ike oolomns below. Otbsr material in this laaua may
reflect the opinion o t the writer or oartoootat and not neceeaarlly
that of the Florida Alligator aaleee apedfloally indicated.

Monday morning, and
again, yesterday, The
Florida Alligator stated
that Clyde Taylor should
be the next president of
the UF student body,
:J
Today we remain firm
in this conviction.
We are equally firm in
believing that Gary Good Goodrich,

It is our conviction that
both candidates for the post
of treasurer are equally
qualified. Forward partys

For the position of Honor
Court Chancellor we re recommend
commend recommend Forward partys
Pete Zinober. We believe
Mr. Zinober to be the truly
candidate for this

Marti Cochran will make
the best Honor Court Clerk.
If Miss Cochran is elected
she will be the first worn an
to hold a major elective
post in student government.
We think this in itself is
important. Moreover,
Marti Cochran has the ex experience

Open Honor Court

UF students will have the
opportunity Thursday to
vote for open sessions of
the Honor Court.
We think they should.
Our Honor Court, which
has grown to become one
of Floridas most cher cherished
ished cherished and little known in institutions,
stitutions, institutions, must be open to
pul)lie scrutiny if stu students
dents students are to receive the
fair trials to which they
are entitled.
Until recently, when a
single case was historical historically
ly historically opened for the Alli Alligators
gators Alligators inspection, there
was no chance for the press
to even observe Honor

Gators Finest

For Treasurer: ioth Good

Zinober For Chancellor

Cochran Is Clerk Choice

rich, Goodrich, Taylors running
mate, will make the best
vice-president for the stu student
dent student body.
However, we do not re recommend
commend recommend that the student
body vote for Taylor and
his United-First party
down the line.

Phil Burnett and United-
Firsts Allan Casey will
both make good treasurers.

important position and it is
our hope that he will, if
elected, work to make more
of the honor courts pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings public.

perience experience and the ability to
handle this largely admin administrative
istrative administrative position.
In the Legislative Coun Council
cil Council we have no preferences.
Here we urge our readers
to vote their consciences.
Most important of all,
we urge you to vote.

Court proceedings. Cur Currently
rently Currently cases are being
opened on a case-by-case
basis.
This is far from ideal.
Any student who has ever
been before the Honor
Court knows that the ex experience
perience experience can be fright frightening.
ening. frightening. Too often justice
operates in a vacuum, free
from public inspection and
consideration.
The democratic process
demands an open court.
Therefore, in the interests
of a better Honor Court and
a more perfect student ju judiciary,
diciary, judiciary, we urge you to vote
for an open court*
Justice demands this!

if y'i ;/9/_£A k"\ ~ JftolmtL
I l -^(^^?^^^
I

EVERYBODY KNOWS WHAT YOU ARE!"

FREE LANCER

UFs Next Step:
Burn Books

More and more UF is becoming
a trade school. The latest move
by the ACCENT Committee to
deny Adam Clayton Powell a
chance to speak here is the most
witless action yet taken.
More than denying UF students
the opportunity both sides of a
controversy, the student oriented
Accent Committee has assumed
the responsibility of protecting us
from evil people. They have
taken it upon themselves, by
refusing to invite Powell, to keep
Florida students safe from cor corrupting
rupting corrupting opinions.
A UF professor once remarked
that is was impossible to be to
the right of George Wallace and
remain out of jail. It seems the
same is true of the University
of Florida.
Rather than encouraging stu students
dents students to view both sides of an
issue the ACCENT people have
stifled radical or dissent dissenting
ing dissenting voices on this campus. If

Alligator Staff
A Student Newspaper
DAVE DOUCETTE MICHAEL ABRAMS
Assistant News Editor Editorial Assistant
JANICE SIZEMORE JOE TORCHA
Campus Living Editor Entertainment Editor
STAFF WRITERS James Almand, Beth Brandon, Arlene Caplan, David
Chafin, James Cook, Linda Daniels, Jeff Denkewalter, Duffy, Glenn Fake,
Janice Forsberg, Anne Freedman, Mary Gantt, Brenda Gevertz, Janie Gould,
Margie Gross, Sam Hansard, Steve Hulsey, Kathy Keim, Leslie Lepene,
Roy Mays, Fred McNeese, John Parker, Lori Preece, Al: Pierleonl, Raul
Ramirez, Dave Reddick, Neal Sanders, Barbara Schaefer, Jerry Silberberg,
Jeff Scurran, Lori Steele, Dee Dee Horn, Gail Shinbaum.
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Nick Arroyo, Mike Huddleston, Al Jensen.

by Jeff Alford

this is a trend, their next pro probable
bable probable step will be to march on
the library en masse and burn
all the books by Marx and Lenin
since they too are unpopular
figures in the United States.
If this is to be a true univer university
sity university then dissenting viewpoints
should be heard not just the
popular ones.
Even more than the Marshall
Jones case this is the most
flagrant violation of the freedom
of speech yet encountered.
However this time, five stu students
dents students are to blame for barring
Powell from the campus. Ap Apparently
parently Apparently the administration is not
the only conservative power here.
If this state wants educated
individuals instead of products
then it must allow us to think
for ourselves.
If this state wants the univer universities
sities universities to train educated in individuals
dividuals individuals then we must have open openminded
minded openminded individuals to govern us.



OPEN FORUM:
)
- ; ami ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man

Jones Hurts Diploma Worth

MR EDITOR:
In The Alligator of Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, January 17, was a letter
stating that Mr. Jones Is honest
and hard working and that he
should be free to involve him himself
self himself in activities outside the aca academic
demic academic sphere as long as he
does not harm anyone . .
Well, Mr. Jones IS hurting
someone. Hes hurting ME. I am
a student at the U. of F. and

WOMEN VOTERS SHORTCHANGED

MR. EDITOR:
A short while ago, as I recall, it seems that there was some talk
going on about something called womens rights on the campus.
Judging from the way candidates are running their campaigns, one
would almost think that women had never gained the right to vote.
Tonight I attended the second in a series of campaign debates
between all four of the presidential candidates. For the first time, I
had the chance to hear them speak without having to listen to fifteen
minutes of memorized garbage or rather, I should have had that
chance. But since the debates did not begin until after 10 p.m., and
since my week-night curfew (along with that of all female under underclassmen)
classmen) underclassmen) is 11 p.m., I had to leave after hearing the candidates
answer only two questions.
It seems to me that women could be given a little more consider consideration
ation consideration in this matter. I see no reason why the problem could not be
solved either by starting the debates an hour earlier, or by extend extending
ing extending curfew.
People speak of apathy on the campus, especially on the part of
the women; but if they dont even give us a chance to hear the most
interesting and worthwhile part of the election campaign, what do
they expect?

I
1967 CELEBRITY TEAM
. ~ ... A
<£,-roK£CV v 'THE" DQurtvMjfS ADAfD CLAVTA'J H \ \
[ iIIm
! |
!
I.' . .' -;
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intend to receive a diploma from
here. But with Mr. Jones making
such disturbances I wonder just
how much my diploma will be
worth. What is the image of a
university that has teachers on its
faculty which go on hunger
strikes? How many citizens of
the state of Florida will vote
money needed to hire and keep
good professors to such a uni university?
versity? university?
Without good professors my
diploma is not worth much.

CATHY DEWITT, lUC ERWIN E. CRAMPTON JR., 4EG

Whether his causes are just or
not (and I believe that they are
although his means are question questionable)
able) questionable) his association with this
university is hurting my chance
of good employment after gra graduation.
duation. graduation.
I would like to ask Mr. Jones
a question. Mr. Jones, why are
you doing these things? If it is
for yourself, why dont you just
go some place else where things
are as you like them? If it is
for me you are doing them .
please DONT. In plainer words:
Mr. Jones if you dont like
the boat were in, get out! And
as you leave, please dont rock
it.
BILL JOYNER, 2UC
LET ME SEE DOW
'
MR. EDITOR:
I am disheartened from read reading
ing reading Mr. Starkeys letter concern concerning
ing concerning Dow Chemicals. If Mr.
Starkey insists on protesting, I
suggest a more constructive
cause, for example, money for
Education.
I for one do not appreciate
his efforts to tell me whom I
can and cannot see at the Univer University
sity University of Florida Placement
Bureau. Mr. Starkeys personal
views of Dow Chemicals should
not affect my right to use the
Placement Bureau to seek
employment.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator, 1

YIDDISH NOT HEBREW!
MR. EDITOR: ~7
In regard to Jacob Deganias letter of January 22, entitled "He "Hebrew
brew "Hebrew not Yiddish, I feel it necessary to make the following re replies.
plies. replies.
Mr. Degania, it is perhaps a common error for a non-Jew to mistake
Hebrew for Yiddish. They are both written in the Hebraic alphabet,
except that Yiddish has no vowel sound indications. Moreover, the
average is more familiar with Yiddish (at least in knowing of its
existence) than with Hebrew. I would be willing to correct this common
error without becoming condescending and irate.
Secondly, Yiddish, a dialect of German, has been the chief unifying
factor for the scattered Jewish people in the Twentieth Century.
Hebrew is the national language of Israel, true. It has been reserved
for sacred writings and prayers, true, But it is only spoken in one
country of the world. But where you find Jewish people, you find
Yiddish. I would go so far as to say it is one of the most universal
languages in existence today. One is never lost in a foreign country
(with the exception of Egypt) if he can speak Yiddish.
Thirdly, you made the point that Yiddish is dying out and is being
replaced by Hebrew. It is dying out, but it is being replaced by the
language of the country of residence. The fact is that third generation
immigrant children cannot be bothered, unfortunately, with learning
the ways of the old folks. It is not dying because it is . the
language of the peddler and ghetto dweller. That is a generalization
which I find both highly derogatory and unwarranted.
Fourthly, and most important, the Yiddish language was the chief
unifying factor for all Jewish immigrant groups at the turn of the
century. It is the language of the Jewish theatre, a powerful force
in the early 1900s. It is the language of Jewish humor, which has
made increased inroads into our American culture. It is the language
of the people who have managed to maintain their individuality, folk folklore,
lore, folklore, humor, and culture (Fiddler on the Roof is not a Hebrew play)
in the pressure cooker of American society.
In short, Mr. Degania, Hebrew may be the language of the Israe Israelites,
lites, Israelites, but Yiddish is the language of the Jews.
JEROLD A. GREENFIELD, 7AS
FEW FEEBLE FEMALES
1
MR. EDITOR:
I am writing in reference to an article written by Michael Abrams
January 12th.
He refers to college coeds as some of the feeblest specimens
of the female sex ever gathered together.*
May I inquire as to whether our illustrious (and I use the term
loosely) essayist is acquainted with the opposite sex in any capacity,
or does he prefer his own since he has such disillusionment with
the other?

He asks if his assumptions are
an exaggeration. I answer his
inquiry with a definite yes. First
I must say that I am not speak speaking
ing speaking from the outside. I live in
a dorm with 37 other girls on
my floor and 600 others under
the same roof. I see these girls
day after day, and I see few
who fit his description of a
feeble specimen'*.
Granted, there are those of us
who could improve upon
ourselves (some more than
others), but is Mr. Abrams so
preoccupied with physical cha characteristics
racteristics characteristics (as he seemed to
emphasize in his article) that he
ignores everything else?
The purpose of our camou camouflaging
flaging camouflaging (as he so oddly states
it), is not to hide ourselves,
but to accentuate our assets for
male enjoyment and satisfaction
as well as giving ourselves con confidence
fidence confidence in our own being.
r
Beauty among women is
exceptionally rare. So, too,
among men. Granted, a girl with
an exceptionally good asset such
as creamy white skin or
bright blue eyes may have
some other less beautiful quality;
however, we all have some fea feature
ture feature which may be considered
a good asset, and what a mis miserable
erable miserable world it would be if all
beauty were incorporated among
a select few!
SHERRY A ATHERTON, 3AS

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| lor soU I
FOR SALE: Brand new crash
helmet and face shield only
$20.00, originally cost $35.00.
Call Bill Northup at 372-9363.
(A-68-3t-p)
1963 VESPA. Excellent transpor transportation
tation transportation In fine running condition.
New seat and tires, SIOO.OO.
376-5493. (A-68-3t-p)
ANTIQUES sale. Early American
and Oriental art Glass, China,
Brass, Jewelry, old fashioned
clothing, opposit art center. Mi Micanopy
canopy Micanopy Sat. and Sun. (A-68-
st-p) ___
FOR SALE: 4 keystone mags
mounted on 4 new wide track
30,000 mi. ultra-sonics, 378-
4440. 8:00 to 5:00, after 5:00
call 376-6174. (A-68-st-c)
MOBILE HOME for sale 12 wide
2 bedroom 1 1/2 bath. 1967
model. Newly installed $500.00
carpet in Master bedroom, hall,
kitchen and living room. Call
Lee at 378-8628. (A-64-st-c)
nm -
HONDA 305 Scrambler, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, metallic green greenchrome,
chrome, greenchrome, $475. Call 376-
9161 after 7:30 ask for Phil
Room 434. (A-64-st-p)
IMMACULATE By owner"
No qualifying Central heat and
air, built in kitchen, cypress
panelling, step-down living room,
sliding glass doors opening on
garden area. Perfect Condition.
$19,000. 6% mortgage. Call for
appt. 372-0328. (A-65-30t-c)
OVER $1,600.00 EQUITY FOR
$400.00 3 bedroom, concrete
block, study with bookcases.
$600.00 down, small monthly pay payments.
ments. payments. Mile from city. Call 376-
1968. (A-66-3t-p)
COMPLETE set Ludwing drums
never been hit. $300.00. New
Fender Jaguar Electric guitar.
$285.00. 376-6671. (A-66-3t-c)
GOYA GUITAR. $75.00. Call 378-
1253 after 5:30 p.m. (A-66-3t-
P)
PACEMAKER Mobile Home, 10 x
50, 2 bedroom, central air, Town
n Country Trailer Park, Call
378-4890. (A-67-st-p)
SOLID STATE STEREO SYSTEM!
Includes: 2 AR4x speakers, Sony
250 A tape deck, Knight KG-854
amplifier and KG-765A tuner,
Weathers Townsend turntable
with Empire 880 PE Cartridge.
Best offer over SSOO. 372-7203
or 376-9420. (A-66-st-p)
FINE IMPORTED German type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Olympia SM-9. Portable
with case. Like new. SBO or
highest offer. Call 378-3720. (A (A---
--- (A--- 3t-p)
MUST SELL! 1965 Honda 305
Dream. White, incredible con condition
dition condition -- must be seen. 376-
3211 Ext. 5453, Harry or leave
message with secretary. (A-67-
st-p)
BASENJI PUPPIES, trained,
shots, wormed, ready to go out
looking for a home, AKC, cham champion
pion champion background, reasonable
rates. Ph: 376-4103. (A-67-10t-
P)_
MUST SELL 1966 Yamaha Twin
100. Excellent condition with hel helmet,
met, helmet, $240.00. 378-8427. (A-67-
st-p)
1966 HONDA-450, 14 handle
bars, brand new battery, King-ko
exhaust pipes. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell. Call 372-5976.
(A-6?-st-p)
FLY! Flying Hawks Inc. has
shares available in a Cessna
Sky hawk. Dual radios dual omni.
Full panel. 372-1290 or 372-
6045 after 6:00. (A-67-7t-p)

I for sale |
MUST SALE 1967 VW sunroof
16,250 miles SI3OO. Radio,
luggage rack, other extras, 376-
6619 after 5 p.m. (A-66-3t-p)
1961 VW Dombi in excellent con condition
dition condition all around. Gasoline
heater. Must sell. 1410 SW 10th
Terrace, Apt. 41. (A-68-st-p)
for rent j
WHY LIVE in a traffic-jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
of all parking problems. Fully
furnished spacious 1 bedroom
apt., AC, gas heat, fully equip equipped
ped equipped kitchen including washing
machine. Call 372-3357 or 372-
5240. (B-58-ts-c)
MALE STUDENT vacancy in
double room. AC, 3 blocks from
campus; S7O rest of quarter;
327 NW 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-60-10t-p)
FURNISHED ROOM. Business
lady has room in private home,
kitchen privileges, phone. Male,
after 5:30 p.m. or weekends,
814 NE 11th Ave. (B-64-st-p)
THE CENTER OF ACTIVITY.
Live life a little better. Live at
University Gardens. We have
more than the others. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (B-66-st-p)
NOT SETTLED YET? Rooms
walking distance from campus..
CH and AC. Phone 378-8122 after
5:30 p.m. (B-68-9t-p)
LARGE 2-bedroom apartment for
rent. Ideal for 3 students. SIIO.OO
a month, all utilities included.
Phone 376-8314 after 5:00. (B (B---68-st-p)
--68-st-p) (B---68-st-p)
'
wanted
WANTED 1 or 2 female room roommates
mates roommates for French Quarter Apart Apartment,
ment, Apartment, #97. Call Cynthia or Ce Cecilia
cilia Cecilia at 376-8183. (C-67-2t-p)
ROOMMATES WANTED. Male or
Female. Check with office of
University Gardens. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (C-66-st-c>

378-

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Page 8

* MARCELI 0 MAS IROIANNI *CI

(, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

I wanted |
ONE OR TWO female UF stu students
dents students wanted to share furnished
apartment one block from cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 378-5601 after 5:00p.m.
(C-68- st-p)
WANTED: attractive lUC or2UC
female to wash dishes once a week
for two students. FeS open to
negotiation. Fringe benefits. Call
Pukt. 376-9578. (C-68-3t-p)
JUNIOR coed wants football
(non-varsity) playmates for fun
and competition. Call Anne after
3 p.m. 376-1613 Ext. 166. (C (C---68-2t-p)
--68-2t-p) (C---68-2t-p)
WANTED: 1 preferably 2 male
roommates to share 2 bedroom
apartment with fireplace, $25.00
per month plus utilities. Call
Dave, 378-1884 after 5:00. (C-__
68-st-p)
WANTED: law or grad student
to share large 2 br. AC apart apartment
ment apartment near law school with another
law student! Available now. 378-
5449 evenings. (C-68-3t-p)
OLYMPIA APTS. Modern 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished, carpet, sound soundproof,
proof, soundproof, central AC, and Heat. 3
blocks from campus. $150.00
monthly. Call 376-1965 after
3:00. (C-68-st-p)
WANTED: GO-GO GIRL to dance
Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
nights. Must be good. Call Bobby
at 468-9443. (C-68-3t-p)
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share Olympia Apt. $37.50 per
month plus utilities. Call 372-
8728. (C-68-3t-p)
$50.00 REWARD for information
leading to the recovery of my
Honda 450. Stolen from Murphree
Area Tuesday or Wednesday Jan January
uary January 16, or 17. Black and Silver,
Tag Number 19A569, Frame
Number 1021521, Call Jon Cie Ciener,
ner, Ciener, 372-9306. (C-66-st-p)
ONE MALE roommate to share
1 bedroom apartment. University
Gardens Apts. Starting no later
than February. 378-7903. (C-68-
3t-p)
WANTED: A Ticket for PP & M
Concert. Call 372-9388, ask for
Haynes in 256. Call after 6 p.m.
(C-67- 2t-p)

I wanted |
WANTED: Ride to ATLANTA
weekend of Jan. 27-28. Need to
see girlfriend badly. Call 372-
9138 for Keith in Room 527.
(C-67-2t-p)
WANTED female roommate. Rent
$50.00 a month. 1403 NW 6th
Ave. Call 372-3073. (C-67-3t-p)
WANTED: 1, preferably 2, female
roommates for FRENCH QUAR QUARTER,
TER, QUARTER, Apt. 72 (on the pool). Call
Peggy or Sue at 378-7858. (C (C---61-10t-p)
--61-10t-p) (C---61-10t-p)
NEED 1 or 2 female roommates
immediately. French Quarter
Apt. #lO7. Rent paid for Jan.
Call 378-8253 or come by any anytime.
time. anytime. (C-66-3t-p)
r
FEMALE roommate One bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment $50.00. Call
378-5369 before 11:00 a.m., after
7:00 p.m. Near campus. (C-66-
3t-p)
FEMALE roommate to share du duplex
plex duplex behind Norman Hall. Phone
378-6258. (C-67-st-p)
help wanted j
WAITERS to work 11 2 daily.
Inquire Longhorn Steak House.
14 SW Ist or call 372-2405.
(E-66-4t-c)
HELP WANTED. Student wives
interested in sales or cashier cashiering.
ing. cashiering. Apply Personnel Office, Col College
lege College Inn. 1728 W. University Ave.
(E-66-st-p)

st. mnnm
. open Feature at
6:30 7:07 & 11:10j
*4 HOWHwHjiMrXS
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cofeature at 9:15
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Barefoot in the Park

HELD Valley
OVER of Hie
3rd WEEK Dolls
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1:00
3:10
5:20
7:30
9:40

\ 1
help wanted
The University of Florida has
challenging positions available
for inexperienced and exper experienced
ienced experienced Clerk-Typists and Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringe bene benefits
fits benefits include the opportunity to
attend one (1) college course
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the Hub.
(E-61-ts-c)
Gator Ads Sell

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Trevor Howard
'A MATTER
OF INNOCENCE



CLASSIFIEDS

autos
*63 TR-3: $l5O for those who like
to work on sports cars. Good
engiiie. Call 378-8595. Jeff Dunn.
(G-68-2t-p)
1964 FORD GALAXIE 500-XL.
All power, V-8, bucket seats,
wide oval tires, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, just overhauled. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. Call 372-5976.
(G-67-st-p)
1959 FORD 4-door, V-8, auto automatic
matic automatic transmission, radio, heat heater,
er, heater, runs good, Excellent tires,
$225.00 cash or terms. Phone
378-5556 or 372-2466. (G-68-
3t-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 Rambler Am American
erican American Station Wagon. $600.00.
See at 1750 SW Williston Rd.
(G-66- st-p)
*6O VW Van Good condition.
Runs fine. Bunks wood panel.
Must sell. $275 or make offer.
372-9128. Dave in 106. (G-65-
st-p)
BUICK 4-dr. hardtop. 1963 Le-
Sabre, power steering brakes,
radio, heater, air, sl,2oo,ex sl,2oo,excellent
cellent sl,2oo,excellent condition, 378-2735, 3 to
7 p.m. (G-61-10t-p)
1956 DODGE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Power steering, power
brakes, radio, heater, push but button
ton button transmission. Priced to sell.
Call 378-4200 after 5:00. (G (G---65-st-p)
--65-st-p) (G---65-st-p)
-L., ,
1963 PONTIAC Catalina 2 dr.
Hardtop. Radio and Heater, power
steering and power brakes. 4
new tires. Excellent condition.
Reasonably priced. Ph. 378-5133.
(G-68-st-p)
SB Chevy 4 dr. 23,000 actual
mi. Excellent mech. condition.
Good body. Needs seatcovers.
SIBO.OO or best offer. 378-8467.
(G-68-lt-p)
57 AUSTIN HEALY 100-6 (same
as 3,000) New tires, paint, ton tonneau
neau tonneau cover and regular top. Must
sell 372-7951. (G-68-3t-p)
| pertonal j
SONG AND DANCE man George
Murphy makes LBJ face the
music. The tune is the Great
Society. 8 p.m. film, 361 Union.
(J-68-lt-p)
RAR Happy 21st Birthday. Can
I have all your fake IDs? Love,
One of the Herd. (J-68-lt-p)

BgL ; ~*
Ernie Ha slam

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

personal
NOW YOUR FAMILY may come
from Miami to Gainesville every
Saturday for only $lO round trip
per; person. Late model station
wagon. Call 372-8371. (J-67-st (J-67-std)
d) (J-67-std)
GET A PRIVATE license for
$350. Fly in a Cherokee-180
with auto-pilot, two crystal con controlled
trolled controlled radios, like new. Con Contact
tact Contact Bill Fernandz, 376-7871. (J (J---67-2t-p)
--67-2t-p) (J---67-2t-p)
lost-found
LOST in Matherly, Silver
Cross Ballpoint Pen with ini initials
tials initials NW on Cap. Sentimental
Value. Call 372-2679. (L-68-3t-
P)
LOST: Pair of glasses in black
case. If found please call 372-
3621. Jeri, room 413. (L-65-4t-
P)
FOUND: one pair horn rim
glasses on lawn in front of In Infirmary.
firmary. Infirmary. Call Ext. 2495, Mr.
Lotter. (L-67-3t-nc)
FOUND: One fraternity pin found
in laundry, 21 blue stones, in insignia
signia insignia is missing, diamond
shaped, Alpha Epsilon, Call 376-
1351 after 6:00. (L-66-3t-nc)
FOUND: a watch left in room
237 Little last week. Please
claim. Call Elaine Wiggins, 372-
3621. (L-66-3t-nc)

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
ELIZABETH RICHARD
Taylor Burton
LAST NIGHT 8:15
* Admission $1.50
Both Shrew 1 and Faustus 1 $2.50
Tickets On Sale At Union Boxoffice

Ernie Haslam
college of engineering
Legislative Council
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
with Honors
S' 3.5 Upper Division Average
President Social Fraternity
Eta Kappa Nu Tau Beta Pi
Sigma Tau. I.E.E.E.
UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

Page 9

services
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. (M-54-ts-c)
SPECIAL: Dear Estes will give
$18.50 frosting for $12.50 for
limited time. Call 372-5549. (M (M---61-10t-c)
--61-10t-c) (M---61-10t-c)
PHOTO SPECIAL, portraits, all
needs and occasions. Sneeringer
Photography. 378-1170, 1013 1/2
W. University Ave. (M-65-3t-c)

W o
I &ATOR \
j I ADS I
Jy SELL \

H|
BP
,: Wm r > f. ^J^BBH
J
1 .; ; /."-M m : \V .c. ft
ft Ik M r
\ Jt £ / f
s % /'' ' :
GATOR G/RL
Freshman Carin Sargent is todays Gator
Girl. A Sigma Kappa, Carin is an arts and
sciences major.

Value Rated Used Cars
CADILLACS 27 in Stock
67 Fleetwood, One owner, low mileage. Air Cond.
In warranty.. .$5695
64 Convertible. Black leather. Ride in style .. .$2195
62 Coupe De Ville. Beautiful condition. Air... 51395
61 Sedan. Sharp. Charcoal Grey... 5995
OLDSMOBILES 20 ; n stock
67 Dynamic 88 sedan. Air cond. Save $ 1400...53095
63 Hardtop sedan 88. Air cond. Nice.. .$1295
62 Super 88 sedan. Air cond. White. Very good
* ...$5795
Pontiac Bin Stock
.- ;C
67 Grand Prix. Htop cpe. Air. Loaded... $3595
65 Tempest. Two door. White. Air Cond. Clean
...$1595
64 Grand Prix. Burgandy. 3 card, 4 speed.. .$1695
Ford II in Stock
66 LTD Htp cpe. Vinyl top, sterio tape,
air c0nd...52495
62 Comet Wagon. Nice buy... 55695
Buick 6 in Stock
65 Custom Wildcat hardtop coupe. A beauty.
Burgandy Air conditioned.. .$1995
Chevy 9 in Stock
65 Impapa. htp sdn. Air C0nd...51695
63 Convertible. White. Solid.. .$1095
OTHER MAKES 7 in stock Ramblers, Dodges, Jeep.
BRASINGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile Inc.
2001 NW 13 ST. 378-5301



), The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Page 10

Orange .n d
BLUE BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 24
Navy Officer Recruiting, Union
Games Area Lobby, 8:30 a.m.
Hill el Faculty Assn.: Dr. Siegel,
Tension Between Religious
Principles and Loyalty to Gov Government,
ernment, Government, 233 Union, 12:15
p.m.
Religion in Life Luncheon: Dr.
Warren A. Quanbeck, Vatican
n Observations," 235 Union,
12:15 p.m.
Religion in Life Supper: Dr. Mor Morton
ton Morton Siegel, Impromptu Re Remarks,"
marks," Remarks," Hillel Foundation,
5:30 p.m.
Benton Engineering Council:
meeting, 346 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Institute of Judaic Studies: be beginning
ginning beginning and intermediate Heb Hebrew,
rew, Hebrew, Jewish history, introduct introduction
ion introduction to Jewish thought, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Architecture Dept.: Mr. Bruce
Graham, The Future of Am America's
erica's America's Cities," 105 B AFA,
7:30 p.m.
Religion in Life: Dr. Warren
A. Quanbeck and Dr. Morton
Siegel, Protestant and Jew Jewish
ish Jewish Views of Ecumenical
Change," 235 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Peace Union: debate on
compulsory R.0.T.C., McC
Aud., 8 p.m.
U of F Young Republicans: film,
Great Society," 361 Union,
8 p.m.
Union Movie: Taming of the
Shrew," Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom:
distributing books and pam pamphlets,
phlets, pamphlets, Service booth, all day.
Southern Student Organizing
Comm.: recruiting, Union
Ground Floor Lobby, all day.
Thursday, January 25
Navy Officer Recruiting, Union
Games Area Lobby, 8:30 a.m.
Baptist Student Center: fellow fellowship
ship fellowship supper, 1604 W. Univ.
Ave., 5:30 p.m. everyone wel welcome.
come. welcome.
Paint for Fun: art lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom:
Why Youth in America is
Going Conservative," 346 Un Union,
ion, Union, 8 p.m.
Fellowship of Christian Athletes:
Jon Braun, Sex, Love and
Marriage," Univ. Aud., 8 p.m..
Dept, of History: Prof. George
Mowry, Recent Presidents in
American Culture," 105 B
AFA, 8:15 p.m.
Southern Student Organizing
Comm.: recruiting, Union
Ground Floor Lobby, all day.
Student A.C.E.: Manette Sweat,
Reading in the Kinder Kindergarten,"
garten," Kindergarten," 250 Norman, 7 p.m.
Friday, January 26
Fellowship of Christian Athletes:
John Braun and the New Folk
Singers, Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.
Union Movie: Ipcress File,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:05 p.m.
Mens Interhall: dance featuring
the Lovelites, Union Ballroom,
9 p.m.

# Visit Us At Our New Home
Low Interest Rates On Loans '' t* p&pffil cEa| j|S>- ; BtoflWp
Auto Specialty lHl|j^
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIISSN^PI|i! |, £L,*v..

CAMPUS CALENDAR

Union Box Office
Tickets are now on sale for the
Lovelites, the New York Pro
Musica, the New Folk Singers,
and Juan Serrano, flamenco
guitarist.
All unpaid reservations for
Peter, Paul and Mary will be
broken if not picked up by
5:00 p.m., January 24.
ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are ex expected
pected expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
CPS 122: Thursday, Jan/ 25,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,
2,4,7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D) to Little 121 or 125;
(E) to Little 113; (F) to Little
227, 233 or 235; (G) to Peabody
101,
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or
209; (I-J) to Flint 110 or 112;
(K) to Walker 301, 303, 307 or
308; (L) to Little 201, 203, 205,
or 207; (M) to Little 213,
215, 217, 219, 221, 223 or 225';
(N) to Little 237; (O) to Little
239; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102;
(R) to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
CSS 112: Tuesday, Jan. 30,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2,
4,7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D) to Little 121 or 125; (E) to
Little 113; (F) to Little 227, 233,
or 235; (G) to Peabody 101, 102,
112, or 114; (H) to Peabody 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) to
Flint 110 or 112; (K) to Walker
301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207;
(M) to Little 213, 215, 217, 219,
221, 223 or 225; (N) to Little
237; (O) to Litt|e 239; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V)
to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
LEAVE REGULATIONS
CHANGES: A number of major
changes regarding leave policies
for state employees have been
placed in effect at the University.
Detailed explanations of the new
regulations are available to rep representatives
resentatives representatives of colleges and de departments
partments departments from the Personnel
Division on the second floor of
the Student Service Center. The
changes were explained in a
recent meeting conducted by the
Personnel Division. Any depart department
ment department not represented at the meet meeting
ing meeting should obtain a copy of the
changes.

AFROTC QUALIFICATION
TEST will be given in Room 208
of the Military Building at 7:45
a.m., Saturday, Jan. 27. The
test is a prerequisite to accept acceptance
ance acceptance in the advanced program or
award of a financial assistance
grant. Since financial assistance
grant selections will be made
early in 1968, it is necessary
that all freshmen and sophomore
applicants take the exam,
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION MAJORS
All teacher education majors, re regardless
gardless regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence or enroll enrolling
ing enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and the
elementary block (EDE 300, 301,
and 302). English and speech
majors do not take the test, as
SCH 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are being now made in Room 124,
Norman Hall.
MINIMUM WAGE: Effective
Feb. 1, all non-faculty personnel
shall be compensated at a rate
of at least $1.15 per hour, re regardless
gardless regardless of the source of funds.
The University work week, as
defined under the Wage and Hour
Law will be 42 hours rather than
44 hours per week, effective Feb.
1. Therefore the establishment of
the work week of 42 hours means
that employment for non-exempt
employees for over 42 hours in
a 7-day period obligates the Uni University
versity University to a liability of an over overtime
time overtime rate of one and one-half
times the employee's normal
hourly rate. Every effort should
be made to restrict the work
of employees to within the 42-
hour week.
PRE-MEDICAL and PRE PREDENTAL
DENTAL PREDENTAL STUDENTS: Please
register with the Pre-Profes Pre-Professional
sional Pre-Professional Counseling Office, Room
103, Anderson through Jan. 26.
Be sure to bring the full names
of all instructors, course and
section numbers.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM EXAMINATION:
INATION: EXAMINATION: Feb 2 is the deadline
for the applications for all foreign
language functional examinations
to be given Saturday, Feb. 10.
Application should be made in the
Department of Foreign Langu Languages,
ages, Languages, 3 Anderson Hall.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE STU STUDENTS:
DENTS: STUDENTS: This is to remind you
that academic advisers are avail available
able available in 358 Little Hall every
hour each school day for consul consultation
tation consultation on any aspect of educational
goals and progress. Students are
urged to take advantage of this
service and to maximize the
opportunities which the Univer University
sity University provides for education.

GENERAL NOTICES
ACCENT SYMPOSIUM COM COMMITTEES:
MITTEES: COMMITTEES: Applications for
positions in the ACCENT Sym Symposium
posium Symposium committees may be ob obtained
tained obtained in the ACCENT office,
third floor of the Reitz Union
through Jan. 26. Positions are
available in the following areas:
speakers, publicity, public rela relations,
tions, relations, personnel, finance, maga magazine,
zine, magazine, technical and program.
PINSTRIPER APPLICATIONS
are being accepted in the Infir Infirmary
mary Infirmary through Feb. 1.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. All companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Mar. June and Aug.
graduates unless indicated other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.
JAN. 24, 25: ARMSTRONG CORK
CO. All majors. Must be U.S.
citizen.
JAN. 24, 25, 26: INTERNA INTERNATIONAL
TIONAL INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS SERVICES.
Elementary and Secondary Ed Education.
ucation. Education. At least two years
teaching experience.
JAN. 25: AMERICAN ELECTRIC
POWER SERVICE CORP. EE,
ME, CE. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 25: SMITH BRALEY &
JOHNSON. Acct.
JAN. 25, 26: FIRESTONE TIRE &
RUBBER CO. Process Eng.,
Staff Eng., Quality Control Eng.
R & D Eng., R&DChem. Juniors
for summer employment.
JAN. 25, 26: FLORIDA POWER &
LIGHT CO. EE, ME, IE. Must
be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 25, 26: FLORIDA POWER
CORP.
JAN. 25,26: BLOUNT BROTHERS
CORP. BC, CE, ME. Must be
UJS. citizen.
JAN. 25,26: EASTERN AIRLINES
JAN. 26: PURE OIL CO. Bus.,
L.A. Must be U.S. citizen and
military requirements must be
fulfilled.
JAN. 26: ALBUQUERQUE PUB PUBLIC
LIC PUBLIC SCHOOLS. Secondary and
Elementary majors. Must be
U.S. citizen.
JAN. 26: STONE & WEBSTER
ENGINEERING CORP. CE,
ME, EE. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 26: ENVIRONMENTAL SCI SCIENCE
ENCE SCIENCE SERVICES ADMINIS ADMINISTRATION.
TRATION. ADMINISTRATION. CE, ME, EE, Math,
Physics. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 26: SCHLUMBERGER
WELL SERVICES.
JAN. 26: BENDIX CORP.
JAN. 26: DYNATRONICS, INC.
JAN. 26: THOM Me AN SHOE CO.
JAN. 26, 29: COOPERATIVE
COLLEGE REGISTRY. Art,
Chem., Edu., Physics, Polit Political
ical Political Science. Masters and doc doctorates.
torates. doctorates. Military requirements
must be fulfilled.

[SALES
I A
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WITH
Gator
Ms



UF Observatory May Open Soon

By JIM DAVIS
Alligator Correspondent
A massive crane lowered the
seven-ton dome of the UF ob observatory
servatory observatory into position Monday.
Placement of the prefabricated
dome marked a final stage of
completion of the facilities, ac according
cording according to Dr. Alex G. Smith,
chairman of the astronomy de department.
partment. department.
The observatory, located be between
tween between Bronson and Williston, 25
miles southwest of the campus,
was placed far from Gainesville
to avoid interference from the
city's lights.
An opening date for the
$112,000 research center has not
yet been announced, but Smith is
hopeful it will be within the next
two months.
One problem with opening is
that there is no road leading to
the facilities yet only a jeep
trail, Smith said. We hope
to interest the Levy County of officals
ficals officals in building one soon, he
continued.
The telescope is a 30-inch
reflector (30-inch referring to
the diameter of the optical unit)
constructed by the Tinsley Lab Laboratories
oratories Laboratories of Berkeley, Calif., at
a cost of $75,000.
Smith said the telescope is one
of the best in the Southeast, the
University of Virginia having the
only one equal to its size in the
region.
Construction of the facility was
financed by funds from the $4.2
million Science Development
Grant the UF received last July
and by the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration
(NASA).
NASA has an interest in the
observatory because after the
Administration's primary ob objective
jective objective of landing a man on the
moon is realized, attention will
be turned largely to astronomical
investigation, according to Smith.
Several thousand dollars were
saved on construction through
the efforts of Morton H. Teller,
astronomy and physics curator,
Smith said.

GOOD GUYS
WEAR
STA-PREST
LEVI'S
z
si
FROM FREMACS
Levis Trim Cuts
7 00 10 900
HOME OF THE U i
CRAZY LITTLE TAILORS VT

Teller and his family worked
out in the wilderness on this
project, Smith said. Teller sub subcontracted
contracted subcontracted certain phases of the
work and supervised nearly all
the actual construction, accord according
ing according to Smith.
The position of the observatory
low in the Northern Hemi Hemisphere

Its Time
so r
rTtOT.SH
TAYLOR

GRADUATING ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
WITH
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

w JfMi* -flr l in w
vrC-:-vfcv-; ;XvA;>>

This majr be the chance you have
been waiting for an exceptional
professional opportunity with an
industry pace-setter on Floridas
subtropical Gulf Coast in St.
Petersburg.
For qualified graduates in
electronic engineering, ECI offers
excellent career opportunities in
such areas of advanced develop development
ment development and design as coding, mod modulation,
ulation, modulation, digital communications,
microelectronics, RF communica communications
tions communications technology and satellite sys systems.
tems. systems.
ECI is a recognized leader in
command and control systems,
miniaturized transmitters and re-

/gp

FEATURES 30-INCH REFLFC TOP

ECPs St. Petersburg Division
* -ON CAMPUS INTERVIEW JANUARY 31

So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal dinner for intetested electronic
engineering students and their ladies at the University
Inn, beginning at 6:30 Jan. 30. Please let us know that you
are coming by calling us in advance at 372-6333 between
6 a.m. and 3 p.m. and asking for Mrs. Nickolls.

sphere Hemisphere gives it a special ad advantage
vantage advantage since the fraction of the
sky it can scan is greater than
telescopes farther north, Smith
said.
The facilities will not be used
for undergraduate work and only
small groups of graduate students

ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
SL Petersburg, Florida
*
an equal opportunity employer

JOIN S.S.O.G.
Now recruiting at the Reitz Union
Hear Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant" on tape.
SPONSORED BY STUDENT PEACE UNION

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

will work in the observatory in
a classroom situation.
No new additions to the faculty
will be necessary for the effect effective
ive effective use of the observatory, Smith
said.
We have nine Ph.D.s in as astronomy
tronomy astronomy on our faculty, five

ceivers, multiplex systems and
space instrumentation. With 2000
employees, ECI is large enough to
offer the facilities, programs and
.security you are seeking, but small
enough to stress individual
achievement and to give you every
opportunity to realize your capa capabilities
bilities capabilities to the fullest.
As a member of ECPs profes professional
sional professional team, you will be encouraged
to continue your education with
postgraduate study. ECI offers a
full tuition refund.
Visit the placement office today
and make an appointment to talk
with Electronic Communications,
Inc. on January 31.

trained in optical astronomy,
Smith said. And all are eager
to begin research.

FORWARD
with saga
Bill Mcride ]

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

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AMERICA WEEK PROJECT

; Mrs.- Gary Ashley, artist for the, UF En Engineering
gineering Engineering Publications office is pictured above
with an exhibit which will be on display at
the world-famous Harrods Department Store
in London, England, this spring.

Standard Machines
Scheduled For Use
In Thursday Election

Voting machines on loan from
Alachua county will be used in
Thursdays election in place of
the IBM voting machines that
were used previously.
There will only be 44 voting
machines available instead of the
50 used in the last election,
Dames Holding
Setting Contest
Dining With an International
Flavor is the theme of a table
setting contest now being con conducted
ducted conducted by UF Dames.
Each dames group will set a
table in the manner of a par particular
ticular particular country. Amy Vanderbilt
will be the authority by which
the tables will be set.
Each table will be displayed for
one week at Mary Turners Gift
Shop, 2325 SW 13th.
The tables will be judged on
originality, color scheme, at attractiveness,
tractiveness, attractiveness, suitability, and
proper form.
A $25 prize will be awarded
to the winning group, which will
be announced on awards night,
April 27.

NOW EACH AND EVERYDAY
THE EARLY BIRD BREAKFAST SPECIAL
6:OOAM TO 8:30 AM
2 EGGS
g 2 HOT CAKES
Pittfa 2 STRIPS OF BACON ONLY M mC
J§ # TOAST & JELLY MM
/ l OJ7/UJ j A "' dC FFEE PHONE
- UNIVE RSrTY 372-6666

according to Joe Hilliard, secre secretary
tary secretary of the interior.
Hilliard said the IBM machines
were easier for him to use in
counting the votes because the
voters choices were registered
on IBM cards and the results
could be obtained by simply run running
ning running the cards through the com computer.
puter. computer.
With the standard voting mach machines
ines machines the totals must be read off
each machine and then totaled.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said it will
probably take four to five hours
to count the votes Thursday night.
Shepherd said the contract for
the voting machines was can cancelled
celled cancelled because of the cost (ap (approximately
proximately (approximately $13,000) and various
complaints by students concern concerning
ing concerning their operation.
The voting machines were
leased through September, 1967
from IBM.

FORWARD
with Bwsa
Bill Mcride ]

FRIDAY IN AUDITORIUM
The New Folk Group
To Perform In Concert

By LINDA DANIELS
Alligator Staff Writer
The New Folk, billed as a
revolutionary new folk group, will
present a concert in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium at 8 p.m. Fri Friday.
day. Friday.
On tour of college campuses
in Canada and the United States,
the group will be appearing in
Florida this week presenting a
new sound and spirit in folk music
with a clear presentation of the
claims of Christianity.
Their concert consists of popu popular
lar popular songs such as Up, Up and
Away and Groovy and folk
music like If I Had My Way
and You Can Tell the World.
The New Folk travel on be behalf
half behalf of Campus Crusade for
Christ International, an inter interdenominational
denominational interdenominational Christian student
movement of students and pro professors
fessors professors around the world.
Campus Crusade, which spon sponsors
sors sponsors a College Life meeting at
UF each week, works on hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of campuses in this country
and in over 40 foreign countries
with a staff of more than 1,000
college graduates.
The New Fold program con consists
sists consists of musical entertainment

It's Time
so r ra !Ttk .n
TAYLOR

n
''f 3.1 Overall Average
Jack Horner
Law Review Editorial Board
yf Highest Grade in Pre-requisite Course for
Chancellor; Evidence
Assistant Chief Defense Counselor
Vole UNITED FIRST

of the folk-rock variety mixed
with humor and religion.
Reported as always an
audience favorite is their ar arrangement
rangement arrangement of Dixie.
Later that week The New Folk
drew a turnaway crowd of over
3,000 at Northern Illinois Univer University.
sity. University.
Tickets for Fridays concert
are now on sale for $1 each at
the Reitz Union box office, Gold
Coast Restaurant, at various

The Sound Shop
Music for Everyone
You don't have to be an expert to
appreciate music. The Sound Shop offer
quality sound at the lowest prices in
town Come in and listen.
All Transistor, 90. watt FM Stereo Rec
The Fisher soo-T,
378-7277 604 NW 13th St.

ticket booths around campus, and
by members of Campus Crusade.
Tickets will also be on sale
at the University Auditorium be before
fore before the concert.

FORWARD
with mrm
Bill Mcride j



Model UN Undergoes
Change In Sponsorship

The Deep South Model United
Nations, slated for the UF cam campus
pus campus Feb. 22-25, has undergone
a major sponsorship change. The
event, originally sponsored by
the Florida Union Board, has
been taken over by the Inter-
Fraternity Council.
Miss Lynn Anne Bachman,
chairman of the event, resigned
her post with the board because
registration fees received by
her committee were being placed
in the Union Board General
Fund."
Miss Bachman said that there
was no assurance from the Union
Board that she would be able to
use all the funds she had col collected.
lected. collected.
Twenty-five colleges in the

U.S. In 2000 A.D.
Subject Os Speech
In UnionOn Monday

The American Academy of Arts
and Sciences has assigned a group
of 28 intellectuals to try to an anticipate
ticipate anticipate what life will be like
at the turn of the century.
1 wtmgtgm m |
I V % ft
1 m
I
, &
DANIEL BELL
Educators
Convene
Florida educators will convene
here Thursday, Jan. 25, for a
three-day conference of the state
Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.
Theme of the conference is
Personalized Instruction.
Dr. Ernest Melby, distin distinguished
guished distinguished professor of education
at Florida Atlantic University
and former dean of the New York
University College of Education,
will present the keynote speech
at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the
Ramada Inn.
On Jan. 26 conference ses sessions
sions sessions will move to Gainesville
High School and include a film,
group discussions and a business
meeting.

YTf fiK n JHAK6

l£ JL a TTUrdt
FEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
DINING ROOM
COUNTER
CARRY OUT
Open Til/1 AM
*
i6IO S.W. 13th St.

South have expressed a desire
to participate. Each has for-
warded a $25 registration fee,
said Bachman. The Union Board,
however, put these funds into a
general account and would not
assure the chairman that she
would have all of &em at her
disposal.
IFC representative George
Stuart, formerly a member of
the Union Board, admitted that
the cost of sponsoring such an
event would be a problem, but
the IFC chose to take on the
expense.
The overall good for the uni university
versity university will by far surpass any
financial drawbacks we face right
now, said Don Sleznik, IFC
Director of the project. We
want to change the general image

The chairman of the Commis Commission
sion Commission for the Year 2000, Daniel
Bell, will present a public ad address
dress address at 8:00 p.m. Januar r 29,
in the Reitz Union Auditorium on
the topic, The United States in
the Year 2000. A reception will
be held at 9:30 p.m. also in the
Union.
Bell is professor and chair chairman
man chairman of the department of socio sociology
logy sociology at Columbia College, Colum Columbia
bia Columbia University. He is a member
of the American Sociology
Society, the Industrial Relations
Research Association, and the
American Association of Public
Opinion Research.
Monday morning, January 29,
Bell will speak on Recent Social
Trends in UJS. Society, in Room
3(H of Peabody Hall. Bell will
also speak before the University
College Honors Program in 109
Little Hall on General Edu Education
cation Education at 3:35 Monday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon.
Tuesday morning, January 30,
Bell will speak on Recent Social
Trends in U.S. Society, in Room
301 of Peabody Hall. There will
be an informal luncheon for the
Sociology Department at the
Winn jammer Restaurant at 12:30
Tuesday afternoon. Bell will pre present
sent present Methodologies of Social
Change that same afternoon in
Room 349 of the Union.
Bells visit on campus will be
sponsored by the UF chapter of
Phi Beta Kappa.

FORWARD
With
Bill Mcride

of the fraternity man.
We hope to use the mock
U.N. to create interest in is issues,
sues, issues, Miss Bachman said.
There arent many academic
programs outside the classroom
other than ACCENT. We hope
the mock U.N. will create inter interest
est interest and excitement on campus.
At the proposed mock session,
actual declarations will be passedl passedlby
by passedlby the delegations represented.
John Stesinger of the Political
Affairs Division of the U.N. in
New York and Senator Claude
Pepper will be the keynote speak speakers.
ers. speakers.
Campus groups and foreign
student clubs are expected to
send delegations to the session.
Foreign Student Adviser Glenn
A. Farris said, We feel .ii
will create an atmosphere of
excitement to have foreign stu students
dents students carrying on discussions on
procedural and political subjects
in a mock organization.
Miss Bachman said that to
effectively formulate the atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere of the General Assembly,
the Reitz Auditorium has been
selected for the assembly.

y i i. i i -i in >
Its Time
for ra|gpa|
TAYLOR

a Frustrated...
w
Campus elections tactics bore us. Our funny posters have made a point.
Campus politics survives on contrived issues and contrived candidates.
We've dared to be different. Now it's time to get serious.
HERES WHAT CONTRIVED PARTY WILL DO:
# Establish a program of campus-wide faculty-student discussions
# Get Professors' names in course schedule book & publish a
course description book.
# Sponsor more prominent speakers
# Coordinate all student body sponsored cultural events
, v ; .' *' n
# Get tough with the problems, not with the Administration
Contrtoeb
IS NOT A JOKE
.- . V ;r\
(Paid Political Advertisement)

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

I Graduate Lectures Set
A new graduate lecture series to bring nationally known scholars
In education to the UF campus this winter and spring was announced
Monday by Dean Kimball Wiles of the College of Education.
Beginning Feb. 1 with an address by Dr. William Stanley of the
University of Illinois, the series will link research with teaching
and the thought of educators from other parts of the country with
those on the Florida campus.
The talks beginning at 8:30 p.m. in Norman Auditorium are pri primarily
marily primarily for graduate students and faculty in education but are open
to the public. =>

|V . UF REPRESENTATIVES I
Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
1 Dan Sa PP David Wilson
Tom Stewart Bill Worsham
> At George Corl Arlie Watkinson I
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w> univ. Ave I
, NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 I
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS ]

Gainesvilles Newest Night Gub
Dancing Nightly Til 2 A. M.
This is not a teen club . You must be 21, and you must prove
it. Our live entertainment features some of the swingingest
groups available on Tues., Thur., Frl., and Sat. nights. Admis Admission
sion Admission is SI.OO on Tues. and Thur. and $1.50 on Fri. and Sat.
For reservations, call 376-4792 or 378-7586. We specialize
in barbeque and catering to private parties, clubs, etc.
N.W. 39th Ave.-2mi. West Os of 1-75

Page 13



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CAMPUS
= LIVING

Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

WHATS HAPPENING

IN THE VIEW FROM VATI VATICAN
CAN VATICAN TWO: Dr. Warren A. Quan Quanbeck
beck Quanbeck will speak on Vatican II
Observations* at a Religion-in-
Llfe luncheon to be held in room
235 of the Reitz Union at 12:15
today.
And, religiously adhering to
this line of thought, we could
also mention:
I __
A Hillel Foundation Supper
at 5:30 today at which Dr. Mor Morton
ton Morton Siegel will make Impromp Impromptu
tu Impromptu Remarks**
A get-together in room 235
of the Union at 7:30 tonight where
Dr. Siegel and Dr. Quanbeck
will speak on the topic of Pro Protestant
testant Protestant and Jewish Views of Ecu Ecumenical
menical Ecumenical Change
A Hillel Foundation luncheon
at 12:30 today in room 233 of the
union.
A Conference in rooms 8235,
245, and 246 of the Union at 7
tonight.
IN CINEMASCOPE POLITICS:
George Murphy returns to his
natural habitat, the movies, to
speak on LBJ*s Great Society.
This film will be shown tonight
at the Young Republicans Clubs
meeting in room 361 of the union
at 8 tonight. t
IN RELIGION-IN-LIFE, BRIG BRIGHAM
HAM BRIGHAM YOUNG STYLE: Mormon
Students at UF will have a dis display

\'' '
m MB;
T Wl ?
V <^ s \ I Alis^: v 71^7
iM 11l \ rtW^' e \ /si* beZ o* 0 * Cl >ai /
e \
\ *tx* e 01 \
' c ... . ... .. ' . r **
<> \
Leadership + Results = Bill Mcride
- 1 .- .-o-- ; ... *
,*'
'c_
...... Forward
(Paid Political Announcement)

play display set up in front of the Col College
lege College Library all day today and
tomorrow in conjunction with
Religion in Life Week.
IN PROVING THAT SOME
GREEKS DID MORE THAN JUST
HAVE PARTIES: Greek Sculp Sculpture**
ture** Sculpture** and Open Window are
two films that will be screened
in room 105 B of the Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts building
tonight at 7:30.
IN THINKING THAT THERES
MORE TO CARROTS THAN
MEETS THE EYE: The Vege Vegetable
table Vegetable Research Conference meets
in room 346 and 347 of the union
today at 10 a. m.

LURCH SPECIALS FBOU BSC
V O CHUCK WAGON MEALS
tw gge
jkjOPEN 11 AM -9 PM
"PIDEROSA
JUL i stbakhouct
In Gainesville at the Westgate Shopping Ctr.
, 3321 W. University Ave. at 34th St.
ALSO IN ORLANDO AND TITUSVILLE

Drinking Question Delays
Handbook Publication

The new University of Florida
student handbook cannot be
printed until UF President
Stephen OConnell announces his
decision on drinking on-campus.
This is the latest in a series
of delays that have held up pub publication
lication publication for over six months.
Publication was previously de delayed
layed delayed until the new Student Code
of Conduct was available and then
until a president of the univer university
sity university had been named.
Work on the handbook began
in September, 1966. Bill Wall,
graduate assistant in charge of
the handbook, said, We would

It's T i m'e
f r
TAYLOR

like to have it finished by next
quarter.
Among the new items featured
in the handbook are sections de devoted
voted devoted exclusively to counseling
services, the Florida Union, and
student regulations.
The handbook will contain about
130 pages and 25 photographs
focusing on the new buildings

s SPECIAL NOTICE
To all students and university personnel
| DISCOUNT I
Z 3. Off Our Low-Low Prices
5 FOOD TASTES MUCH BETTER AT H
I aSrfi. f- |
i Wst CAFETERIAS LORI DA g|
5 Wfcmk 1 11:30 AM 2:00 PMI
wSn, 14:30 PM 8:00 PM
S GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER S
1212 North Main Street
(Just Four Minutes From Campus)
ffiflifaiaifliflifliiaiiiiaiiiaiaiaiaii*

on campus.
The last handbook was pub published
lished published in September 1965.

FORWARD
with fan**a
Bill Mcride |



LEADERSHIP PROFIIc

Coed Leader Prefers
'Effective Male Logic

By LORI PREECE
Alligator Staff Writer

What kind of weird species
is the UF breeding? It's called
the female leader. This years
president of Mortar Board, Judy
Schnabel, is a prime example
of it.
While wails of more power
for women sound throughout the
campus, Judy shows that the
woman on the UF campus can
make a place for herslf.
She started off with a lively
interest in people, added a major
in English for balance and was
on her way. Beginning as a pledge
in her sorority, Kappa Delta, by
Winning the activities award, she
continued by copping the posts
of assistant treasurer, trea treasurer,
surer, treasurer, and finally the presidency
this year.
Judy claims shes not the
politics-type, but she has done
her stint by working with Student
Government on the Code of Con Conduct
duct Conduct and Student Affairs Com Committee
mittee Committee last year.
This year she is on the ex executive
ecutive executive committee of Project 20
a commemorative series of
discussion, panels, speakers and
banquets in honor of the 20th
year of coeds on the UF campus.
She is also a member of the
new womens leadership honor honorary
ary honorary organization, Savant.
Perhaps her biggest claim to
fame is her office of president
of Mortar Board. Membership it itself
self itself is the highest honor a UF
coed can achieve, as this or organization
ganization organization takes into account not
only the fun-filled extras but that
worked-for grade point average
as well. Judys 3.0 over-all made
her eligible but it took some something
thing something special to raise her to the
elected post of president. She
has recently been recorded in

Patterson-Cloud
Engagement

Catherine Cloud and Hugh Pat Patterson
terson Patterson announce their approach approaching
ing approaching marriage on March 16. They
plan a honeymoon in the Bahamas.
Hugh is a 4EG in Chemical
Engineering. Catherine has com completed
pleted completed course work at Polk Junior
College in Winter Haven.

Jack Horner is For YOU!
To give an equal chance to all students f
'x-'-\. 1 ;
Final Examinations in C-Courses will be re returned
turned returned to the student and placed on file in the
library
i
To establish a commission to study the
effectiveness of the Honor System and re recommend
commend recommend changes
To provide a booklet and informational service
explaining the Honor Court and Honor System
to entering students
VOTE UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

Whos Who Among Students in
American Colleges and Univer Universities
sities Universities and this years Hall of
Fame.

When asked if she had any
advice to aspirants to Mortar
Board, Judy emphasized the fact
that you dont have to be president
of a flock of organizations a
conscientious job in appointed
positions is just as good. She
claims the main thing is to work
hard in a field that especially
interests you.
A high degree of service in
music is just as acceptable as
a position in Student Govern Government,
ment, Government, she added.
Judy thinks women on the UF
campus should definitely be more
active. There just arent enough
who really care and show an
interest.

Judy says she knows shes
going contrary to the accepted
view of the womens organiza organizations
tions organizations on this one though
women are qualifed to take
high positions and big respon-

I January 25th
SPONSORED

sibilities on campus, she has to
admit that a mans logic is often
more effective.

j|_ M
<& V
* JK
: <..* w.
i jb
* &
\^BBBHwwP^^Kr >t : w
1
..^^*?^i£- %mn >
gjg&s^

JUDY SCHNABEL
heads Mortar Board

FORWARD
with Bowes
Bill Mcride 1

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

CAMPUS
LIVING

Coed Activity Book
Planned By Interhall

Women's Interhall Council will
m eet tonight to discuss final plans
for a new student activities book booklet
let booklet for women. The booklet, as
yet un-named, will serve as a
directory listing opportunities
for coeds from Student Govern Government
ment Government to honorary and profession professional
al professional organizations to the Rifle
Team. Distribution of the book
is set tentatively for the next
couple of weeks.

5
to
every day
-**
nobody
gets you to
TAMPA
like
Trailways
Thru to Ft. Myers
Downtown to downtown... fast as driving. 1
You save money, too! Work or snooze as
you travel easy in living room comfort. No
worry about seats... well have one for you.
f From GAINESVILLE 1-Way
ST. PETERSBURG $5.00
5 convenient trips daily
SARASOTA $6.05
The only Thru service
JACKSONVILLE $2.30
3 convenient trips daily
NEW YORK $32.30
Faster Thru service short route J
Trailways
easiest travel on earth

Interhall members will also
have pictures taken tonight for
the yearbook.
The meeting will beginat 7 p.m.
in room 357 of the Reitz Union.

Its Time
for
TAYLOR

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

BALLOT FOR SPRING ELECTION JAN. 25

OFFICE
Pres, of Stu. Body
V. Pres, of Stu. Body
Treas. of Stu. Body
Chanc. Hon. Court
Clerk Hon. Court
Justice Hon. Court
Agriculture
Architecture
Arts & Sci.
Bus. Ad.
Education
Engineering
Forestry
Health
Journalism
Law School
Medicine
Nursing
Pharmacy
Phys. Ed.
Univ. Coll.
Fresh.
Univ. Coll.
Soph.
-
Agriculture
Architecture
and Fine Arts 2
Arts and
Sciences 5
---
Bus. Ad. 3
Education 4
Engineering 3
Forestry
Health
Journalism 2
Law 2
Medicine
Nursing
Pharmacy
Phys. Ed.
Univ. Coll.
Freshmen 5
Univ. Coll.
Soph. 7
President
V. President
Members 4


I
Absentee Ballots Due
&
Anyone who will be physically unable to
vote Thursday and wishes to do so by ab absentee
sentee absentee ballot must apply by 5 oclock at
the Student Government Offices in the Reitz
Union. Patients in the infirmary will auto automatically
matically automatically be provided with absentee ballots.

UNITED-FIRST
Clyde M. Taylor
Gary L. Goodrich
Allan Casey
Jack Horner
Marti Cochran
Manny Ponce
Jackie Jedel
Marc Fine
Kathy Ramers
Michael Leonard
Marie Headley
Elaine Fuller
Jim Kincaid
Donna Walter
Robert Mount
Linda Grover
David E. Byron
Susan Johnson
Jim Callahan
Eileen McDargh

Sally Bendroth
Charles E. Warren
Jim Manuel
David Coggshall
Ira Hatch
Stewart Hersey
Nancy Isenberg
Barbara Nunn
Robert Buck
Hardy Pickard
Steve Rushing
Barbara Banks
Sharyn Hackney
Clare Lipich
Becky Pierce
Rod Brock
Robert Harris
Ernie Haslam
Kathv Monaghan
Clifford Schulman
Larrie Sikorski
John Kuder
Bill Sadowski
Joe Conord
Tom Jackson
Glenn Repple
Jeff Bayman
Roy E. Brewer
Mike Sligh
David Story
Charlie Truett
Bill Barr
Roger B. Davis
Robert Fleischman
John Kesler
Bobbie Klein
Kris Leet
Sharod Tuell
Dianna Leach
Nandy Register
Joyce Bartlett
Lauren Lucas
Kathy Price

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MEMBERS

Denny Dennison
Thomas W. Cayce
Jo Franklin
Charles W. Riley, Jr.
Martha Troetschal
Mark Misiaszek
Diane Dolan
Letty Jones
Marie Sardinha
Donald M. Nelson
Bonnie Granat
Susie Whalton
David R. Howland
Joel Wadsworth
Lianne Brown
Pat Callahan
Elo-ly Saarna
Mary Street
L" Tinsley
Tish Burchard
Kevin Dowling
William Flader
Rhett V. Rednour
Rick Reynolds
Tei*ry Russell
Pat Sterne
LYCEUM COUNCIL
Mary Jo Holland
Mary Stewart
Carol Bussey
Candy Moler
Linda Rudd
Esther Smith

CONTRIVED
Rich Houk
Mick Callahan

FORWARD
BUI Mcride
Toby Muir
Phil Burnett
Pete Zinober
Ron Carpenter
Bill Retey
Ben Walbert
Jeffrey H. Klink
Bruce H. Bokor
Jill Vandroff
Kent Withington
Bob Dees
Patricia Hulsey
Missie Hollyday
Richard Lazzara
Jerry French
Susan Elizabeth Davis
Sandra Fasano
Bill Womble
John DuPont
Linda Satlof
Jacob Stuart
Becky Wright
Howard Foster
John Jourdan
James Kersey
Richard Horder
Bill Levens
Armistead Neely
Bob Snyder
Bob White
Mike Hill
Jim Morgan
Alan Starling
Sharon Desvousges
Cathy Lynn Dittmar
Tony Laue
Sherry Segerman
Chris Bauer
Bob Henderson
Mario Martinez, Jr.
Kenneth McLaughlin
Jan Dyro
Ronnie Bloom
Ed Tolle
Dick Brodeur
Albert Parker
Robert Grady Ashley
Patti BarbarOwicz
Tom Flowers
David Tullis
Scott Holloway
Jay Howell
Bob Marshall
Elvin Phillips
Jerry Troller
Fred Dobbins
Susan Erb
Bob Glenn
Joy Greene
Joan Mazzawi
Betty Jo Padron
Pat Tidwell

15 Places To Vote

Fifteen polling sites for the Jan. 25 general election, five at residence
areas and the other 10 at upper division colleges, have been set
up by the secretary of the interior and the director of elections.
Lower division students may vote at any of the living areas.
All students in an upper division college will vote at the polling
site set up for their respective college.
Several upper division colleges will share polling places for the
election. Agriculture and forestry majors will vote at McCarty
Hall, while students in the colleges of medicine, nursing, pharmacy,
and health related professions will all vote at one polling site at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
The polling site for the college of arts and sciences will be located
at the Hub, and engineering students will vote at the main engineering
building.
Other upper division polling sites will be at the following colleges:
architecture and fine arts, business administration, education, jour journalism
nalism journalism and communications, law, and physical education and health.
No student will be allowed to vote in this election unless he can
present his fee card and picture ID card.

UNAFFILIATED
Ira Brukner
Sandra Fuller
Steven M. Brown
Unless otherwise
stated there is
one elected
A v
Graham McKeel
Morris Mathers
. f
5
Tim Blake
Doug Henson



Innocent Hayley Still Has
A Long Way To G 0...

By JOE TORCffIA
Entertainment Editor
Take your kids to see A
Matter of Innocence at the
Florida. The sign outside clearly
says NO CHILDREN, and the
ad says Suggested for Mature
Audiences but alas! *tis but
another gimmick.
If they get the risque sub subtleties
tleties subtleties (which I guess sometimes
arent so subtle), all the better
for them they shouldnt have
stayed home in the first place.
Just because Hayley Mills semi
falls in love with a not-so-nice not-so-niceguy,
guy, not-so-niceguy, who will sleep with any fe female
male female tourist who can afford him
and just because theres a couple
of all-too-queers; and just be because
cause because theres an occasional nasty
word, is no reason to keep the
children home.
Innocence is basically the
story of innocent Hayley who goes
on a world tour with her fat,
nauseating, ignorant and very
rich aunt. But as fate has it,
her aunt dies and Hayley is left
to grow up.
Her aunt eats an over-gener over-generous
ous over-generous portion of spare ribs, goes
in the pool for a dip and never
comes up so Hayley is left
with a few jewels, some cash
and a nicely-furnished pad .
and she promptly goes about the
business of growing up.

Vice-President
Toby Muir
Vice President Resident
Staff Board '67
Graham Area Council
' )';
Resident Assistant
Murphree Areas
w MiM
Chancellor
Pete Zinober
Chief Investigator Honor
Court
Assistant Attorney General
President's Cabinet
Secretary of Labor

With the help of Amaz (Sha (Shashi
shi (Shashi Kapoor), a guy with connect connections,
ions, connections, she gets contact lenses,
Hew clothes, new hair-do and
loses her virginity (not neces necesso

Movie
Review

sarily in that order)
Amaz, her lover, turns out to
be a nice guy so nice, in
fact, that you wonder how he could
be so bad in the first place. His
sloppy sentimentality is so badly
handled that Shashi Kapoor dras drastically
tically drastically fails in his first (and may maybe
be maybe last) major role.
But Hayley is trying, she real really
ly really is, and we cant help but give
her a little credit. In The Fam Family
ily Family Way she showed us a little
of her not-so-big body, and still
we werent convinced she has
grown up. In this one, she does doesnt
nt doesnt show us any of it (thank God!)
and she is a little more convin convincing.
cing. convincing.
Os course she had a lousy
script to begin with, so we cant
be too harsh. But her journey
from girl to woman was so fast.

so necesso unconvincing and so unbelieve unbelieveable,
able, unbelieveable, that it is still apparent she
has a long way to go.
But she had a few good scenes,
as did the movie. On the whole,
however, Innocence* is uncoor uncoordinated,
dinated, uncoordinated, unbelieveable and unin uninteresting,
teresting, uninteresting, and its a shame they
threw in Trevor Howard, usually
a very fine actor, when he had no
business being there.
(Rating: 1/2)
fmenOs, Romans.
GATOR ADS SELL

MOVE FORWARD
WITH THE BEST
* isssi
President
Bill Mcride
Special Assistant To The Student
Body President
Outstanding Student Government
Cabinet Member Award
General Chairman of Dollars
For Scholars

FORWRD^b
(Paid Political Advertisement)

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Concert Here Sunday

The New York Pro Musica,
founded by Noah Greenberg and
now directed by John Reeves
White, will appear here Sunday,
at 4 p.m. in University Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium under the aegis of the Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council.
The Pro Musica, specializing
in authentic performances of
music of the Middle Ages and
of the Renaissance, is making its
second appearance at UF.

Dine for less at L&W
Low prices, every day!
Wednesday Night Thursday Night
Mouth Watering Smothered Salisbury
Veal Parmagiana Steak & White Rice
49c 58C
Bar BQ Chicken Southern Style
and White Rice Fried Chicken
58C 49C
313 W. UNIV. Serving
1/2 Block hf nfrdl U 4*! 11:15 -2 PM
from f/yCAFETERIA L
i P^^
Florida Theater iSESBSH

Tickets for this event are now
on sale at the Reitz Union box
office. Admission is 50 cents for
students, $1 for faculty and staff
and $2 for the general public.

FORWARD
with ranrrai
Bill Mcride |

Treasurer
Phil Burnett
Registered Stock Broker
Goodbody & Company
Graduate New York
Institute of Finance
BS in Finance and
Economics
HPT >
9RKB|i
Ron Carpenter
Resident Manager Flavet 111
Governor's Scholarship
98 Percentile LSAT

Page 19



Page 20

), The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

If your major
is listed here,
\ IBM would like
1 : \ to talk with you
V '§&££. \ Febniarysth,6th

Sign up for an interview at your placement officeeven if
you're headed for graduate school or military service.
Maybe you think you need a technical background to work
for us.
Not true.
Sure we need engineers and scientists. But we also need
liberal arts and business majors. Wed like to talk with you even
if you're in something as far afield as Music. Not that we'd
hire you to analyze Bach fugues. But we might hire you to
analyze problems as a computer programmer.
What you can do at IBM
The point is, our business isn't just selling computers.
It's solving problems. So if you have a logical mind, we need
you to help our customers solve problems in such diverse areas

as government, business, law, education, medicine, science,
the humanities.
Whatever your major, you can do a lot of good things at
IBM. Change the world (maybe). Continue your education
(certainly, through plans such as our Tuition Refund Program).
And have a wide choice of places to work (we have over 300
locations throughout the United States).
What to do next
Well be on campus to interview for careers in Marketing,
Computer Applications, Programming, Research, Design and
Development, Manufacturing, Field Engineering, and Finance
and Administration. If you cant make a campus interview, send
an outline of your interests and educational background to
Mr. C. F. Cammack, IBM Corporation, 1447
Peachtree St., N.E., Room 810, Atlanta, Ga. |
30309. We're an equal opportunity employer. cJuLHy iLMJI



Dean Page Would 'Do It Again

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Ralph E. Page, dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences,
has reached age 65 and is re retiring
tiring retiring June 30 from his admin administrative
istrative administrative position which he has
held for the past 20 years.
My experiences here have
been very happy, he said, sit sitting
ting sitting at his desk in Anderson Hall.
I have enjoyed my work at the
university and if I had the last
20 years of my life to live over
I would be glad to do exactly
as I have done. The dean smiled
and his dark eyes and eyebrows
contrasted sharply with his white
hair and matching moustache.
As a purely selfish reaction
I suspect that I hate to feel I
have reached what I somewhat
facetiously refer to as the age
of academic senility. I dont
think that in my case I have. I
am completely convinced that it
is wise to get new blood, new
ideas and younger persons into
these important administrative
positions, he said.
As a matter of theory I de definitely
finitely definitely favor the idea of re removing
moving removing administrative personnel
at age 65. In my own case I
dont particularly like the idea
of stepping out of the picture but I
still realize the wisdom of this
policy. The Indiana-born dean
said when he came here in 1948
there were only 603 students en enrolled
rolled enrolled as majors in the College
of Arts and Sciences as compared
to 3,009 majors this year.
I suspect that one of the things
that I was particularly interested

CARPENTER HHi
FOR
CLERK HI
* Resident Manager Flavet 111
* Governors Scholarship
* 3.0 Overall Average
* 98 Percentile LSAT
* Pre-Law Student
- > ' ~ J ----- ----- i.---
Ron Carpenter For Clerk Os The Honor Court
Forward
wuh dii j MrRPinP
(Paid Political Advertisement)

in when I first came here was
breaking down an academic iron
curtain that separated one college
from another college, he con continued.
tinued. continued.
I have tried to make the Col College
lege College of Arts and Sciences an
integral part of a total univer university
sity university program so that we did not
feel ourselves as an institution
set apart from the others, he
said.
Take our relationships with
the University College, for ex example.
ample. example. Over the years we have
worked out a very satisfactory
relationship with them. The same
thing is true with our relation relationships
ships relationships with the College of Edu Education.
cation. Education. These are plans which I
.definitely had in mind when I
came here.
Dr. Page said that he will
remain with the university in a
teaching position until he is 70.
He said that he has no direct
part in naming his successor
and he has no idea who is being
considered.
I am thoroughly convinced
that this university is on the
verge of being a truly great
educational institution, he said.
Assuming that the money is
made available and assuming that
the support from the state con continues
tinues continues as it has in the past I am
completely convinced that this in institution

FORWARD
with
Bili Mcride

PERSONALITY PROFILE

stitution institution is going to be one of the
truly outstanding institutions of
higher education.

EXPERIENCE
IMPORTANT!
.
FOR HONOR COURT CLERK
President of Womens Interhall
\
President of North Rawlings
Alpha Lambda Delta (Freshman Honorary)
S W.S.A. Executive Committee >v |
Womens Study Commission
S' 3.6 Grade Point Average
vote UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

In my estimation UF is the
outstanding university in the
southeastern part of the United

States at the present time. I
think it will continue to develop
along this line, he concluded.

Page 21



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r lm You And Youre Me, See?

By JOE TORCHIA
Entertainment Editor
Saturday morning Phil Spool,
lUC, got out of bed rather early,
showered, brushed his teeth, then
at 8:30 a.m. wished his brother
a happy birthday.
Unusual? Not so, I guess.
yfmmm m lEv
m
i' i C
PHIL SPOOL
... or is it
Mark Spool?

In Defense Os Smoking

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
Recently a rather humorously
exaggerated article appeared in
the Alligator which attacked
the beloved institution of cigar cigarette
ette cigarette smoking and those brave
souls who smoke. In yesterday's
Letters to the Editor there ap appeared
peared appeared a letter supporting this
article.
One must not take those biased
opinions too seriously since there
is much to be said f art of smoking and the brave
majority of smokers.
There is nothing more relaxing
or enjoyable (with the exception
of sex) than leaning back in an
easy chair and lighting up a good
cigarette. To feel the smoke
reach the inner depths of the
lungs and to taste the smoke of
rich Virginia tobacco roll over
the tongue is sheer bliss.
Then there is the institution of
the cigar. Balzac once said that
the only thing that could substitute
for a good woman is a good
cigar. Whether the cigar is made
in Tampa or Jamaica, is domes domestic
tic domestic or imported or is flavored
artificially or naturally makes
little difference. The pleasure
one receives from rolling a cigar
around in one's mouth and chew chewing
ing chewing on the wet stump is im immeasurable.
measurable. immeasurable. The smell is rich
and aromatic and the sight of a
light blue cloud of cigar smoke
emitting from the mouth or nos nostrils
trils nostrils is a beautiful sight.
In defending smoking and
smokers pipes must not be ex excluded.
cluded. excluded. Pipes are the sophis sophistication
tication sophistication of smoking chivalry
personified is the pipe smoker,
puffing on his pipe and filling
the room with an exquisite bou bouquet
quet bouquet of joyful fragrance. Pipes
are the symbol of the smoking

FORWARD
with tama
Bi!i Mcride

Saturday morning Mark Spool,
lUC, got out of bed rather early,
showered, brushed his teeth, then
at 8:40 a.m. wished his brother
a happy birthday.
At 8:30 Mark was 19 years old
and Phil was 18; at 8:40 both were
19.
Theyre identical twins.
When they were both in high
school, a friend of Phils came up
to Mark, punched him and said
he was ugly.
The friend, who Mark didnt
know, was only joking.
As Mark was about to return
the punch, Phil came along to
break up the near-fight.
M We dont mind being id identical,
entical, identical, the two agree. As
a matter of fact, its fun.
Their parents cant tell them
apart; their friends cant tell
them apart; when this reporter
saw Phil one day, then saw his
brother two minutes later, he
went out and got thoroughly drunk
before he looked up an analyst.
Last year, when they were
18, Phil notified his draft board
one day, and Mark the next.
When Mark went the next day,
his local draft board thought he
was patriotic: notifying them
twice!

elite, of manhood, of intelligence*
of leisure in short, the pipe
symbolizes the ideal of the
American male.
Os course, for those who are
beyond the world of ordinary
types of smoking for pleasure
there is the realm of smoking for
kicks. That is the smoker of
pot and/or hashish. Here is the
typical example of the person who
has been through the ordinariness
of the common cigarette, the
bulkiness of the cigar and the
eliteness of the pipe. He is In a

j&>-< *f*'***r ,
JOURNALISM
STUDENTS
Deans List
3.5 in Public Relations
0 Religion in Life Discussion Comm Comm
Comm I.F.C. Speakers Bureau
FORWARD^b
Graham Area Council
Asst. Editor, TEP Rush
Book (Paid Political Announcement) I

DOUBLE TROUBLE

Sometimes they enjoy as assuming
suming assuming the other's identity
sometimes they dont.
When Mark was elected vice
president of his high school stu student
dent student body, Phil got the congra congratulations;
tulations; congratulations; once an enemy of
Marks mistakenly beat up Phil.
In high school, Mark was good
MARK SPOOL
o or is it
Phil Spool?

minority, unlike smokers of to tobacco,
bacco, tobacco, yet he enjoys his smoke
with perhaps even greater relish
than do the tobacco smokers.
Turn your attention now to the
smoker himself. Hes a likable
sort, unaware that he is annoy annoying
ing annoying the people around him with
his delicate smoke completely
convinced that he is giving
pleasure to his neighbors. And
his innocence has been ruthlessly
attacked by those few non nonsmokers,
smokers, nonsmokers, the ones who cough
when a match is lit.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

in phys ed and Phil in history historyso
so historyso they exchanged each other's
classes and both got good grades.
We exchanged classes often in
high school, Mark said. The
trouble was that teachers would wouldnt
nt wouldnt believe us when we changed
back.
i
Both these students from

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THAT /rANKUN GIRL
An air of innocence is creeping into the
fashion picture. Fresh as a wooded hamlet
. . quiet simplicity of line o This one onepiece
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cotton has 'the jumper-look with its
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body on the dress. Junior sizes.
franMms
* Bourn & College Shop
Open Monday Through Saturday 9 To 5:30
2401 SW 13 th St.- Village Square

Miami agree the advantages out outweigh
weigh outweigh the disadvantages.

FORWARD
with Enrra
Bill Mcride ]

Page 23



Page 24

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Century Tower: Stands
Ta 11... But Thats All

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Staff Writer
Century Tower stands like a
gigantic frozen phallic symbol
in January Gainesviie, reaching
upward for the sky at a height
of 155 feet and 11 1/2 inches.
UF students see the tower each
day and hear the hymns and hour
being chimed from the carillon,
but it appears that not too many
students know anything of the
towers history.
The original plan was for the
tower to be connected with the
University Auditorium and to
serve as a Memorial Center as
well as an alumni center. The
estimated cost of the planned
structure was almost $1 million.
Also included would have been
conference and seminar rooms,
a chapel-concert hall, a green
room (reception hall), lounges
and a grand stairway.
Ah, they had great plans for
this red brick and limestone
structure. According to a hand handbook
book handbook about the Memorial Center
it was to be the spiritual and
cultural focus of UF and would
have preserved the gothic tra tradition
dition tradition of the campus.
Guy C. Fulton, the architect
to the Board of Control in 1953,
and Jefferson M. Hamilton, pre previous
vious previous consulting architect to UF,
planned for two levels at the top
to be dedicated to university
heritage. There was to be a
sightseeing tower and a Florida
museum depicting UF history.
In the words of the previously
mentioned handbook: Under the
carillon will be galleries devoted
to depicting Florida cities, in industries,
dustries, industries, natural resources and
scenic wonders . galleries
exhibiting beautiful exhibitions of
art which at presgnt are with without
out without adequate fadmjjtf on the
university eutePMa^ffeileries
for Mae tac Amt
traveling art! M gal galleries
leries galleries msmacy/
of almnnf when abase
in our nation' s w&bs^T
Officials BlanmnUtifiSnanetiaie
center thraugjh jUrfrignUiity Md
ions, alumni' (ttoaJttfljfc. students,
parents off lovers
and tiric asfiadctlSMwfis. But,
like most big fcjflP* and Plans,
this one fell short of expectat expectations.
ions. expectations. The problem was a severe
lack of funds.
Former UF consulting archi architect
tect architect Jefferson M. Hamilton said
that he and the university presi president
dent president could never get the Board
of Control to carry through with
funds.
I worked directly with the
president, he said. We were
concerned with establishing
something for a landmark for the
university. We wanted the center
to become a symbol for the
university.
Hamilton said that the univer university
sity university had quite a dedication in
1954 when the tower was erect erected.
ed. erected. He said that it commemo commemorated
rated commemorated the 100th anniversary of the
formation Some&aie I hope we'll get
the funds for the mull thin of
the ceukVr,* he cowcMM. Tins
carillon was doweled to toe uad-
W/rstty and operate' similar tea
pipe organ- k is i iMhiltagriMk
product and has toe ..isatn onm onmtrols
trols onmtrols in the CMitaeriHyAwditte CMitaeriHyAwditteium.
ium. CMitaeriHyAwditteium.

FORWARD I
with
Bill Mcride j

Century Tower, 14 years after
its creation, is now merely a
storage room for archaic library
books. No elevators carry
visitors to the top for a pan panoramie

J\
j I
14 mImbl 1 If 'Mil


1111111 tllllililB : : H&ifff::- : jf'k I
aWS .. s a jf a f '|j||j
w. B Bo6 B
C y : B fl
4|||H |j| 1
Atmosphere for Achievement

If you are contemplating a career in
aerospace, your next ten years are
critical ones. The exposure you get
to major projects, the caliber of your
associates, the quality and availability
of educational institutions for advanced
study, and the recognition you get for
personal achievements will all count
heavily toward building your
reputation and your income.
At Convair you will find management
sensitive to the importance of your
personal development and you
will work in an atmosphere of
achievement side by side with some
of the most capable people in our
iimdmstrythe people who developed
Alias-Centaur and other space age

oramie panoramie view of the campus. There
are no admirers viewing the
scenic interior and art gallery
or Florida museum.

The space for a real carillon
at the top is empty and im impotent;
potent; impotent; electronic bells tell the
time instead of reverberating
one. Century Tower is less than
a memorial center or even a
place for UF heritage. It sym symbolizes
bolizes symbolizes the partially fulfilled
dreams of men who would once
have created an important land landmark
mark landmark in the southeast.

J. Hillis Miller, former UF
president, once said, I invite
you not to complete a univer university
sity university but to participate in build building
ing building it. His statement today is
indeed ironic in the face of de defeated
feated defeated goals.

It's Time
f o r
ELBELEB
TAYLOR

equipment and systems which are
making headlines the world over. You
will have access to four highly rated
colleges and universities for advanced
study. Your assignments will be
selected from more than one hundred
key study and development projects.
A variety of outstanding career
opportunities are yours at Convair
in the following areas of concentration:
aeronautical, electrical, electronic and
mechanical engineering; engineering
mechanics and engineering physics.
Engineers will be assigned to
the following areas: advanced systems,
systems analysis, space sciences, life
sciences, information sciences,
scientific data processing, aero-

GENERAL DYNAMICS
Convair Division
Sao Diego, California
An Equal Opportunity Employer

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j"""""" Don't forget to vote tlnorro^^^""""^

ballistics, dynamics, thermodynamics,
guidance, structures, mechanical
design-, electrical design, reliability,
test engineering and materials
research.
, L. l
See your placement officer to arrange
a personal on-campus interview with
our representatives, or write to
Mr. J. J. Tannone, Supervisor,
Professional Placement and Personnel,
Convair Division of General Dynamics,
5492 Kearny Villa Road. San Diego,''
California 92112.



Lambda Chi Alpha Takes Lead
- r- _______
In Race For Presidents Cup

By PAUL KAPLAN
Assistant Sports Editor\
The Orange League race for the
Presidents Cup has boiled down
to a three-team struggle, and
for the first time this year, Lam Lambda
bda Lambda Chi Alpha has emerged as
the leader of the 16- house con conference.
ference. conference.
The Lambda Chis topped Pi
Lambda Phi in the bowling fi finals
nals finals Monday, 1,745 to 1,663, as
Gordon Mann led the winners
with a 388 set. The win gives
them a total of 415 league points.

Joe Medwick Voted
Into Hall Os Fame

United Press International
Joe Ducky Medwick, a driv driving
ing driving force behind the fabulous Gas
House Gang of the St. Louis
Cardinals who barely missed
making it last year, today was
voted into the baseball Hall of
Fame by the Baseball Writers
Association.
Medwick, a loser to Red
Ruffing in a runoff election in
1967, earned a coveted berth in
the Cooperstown shrine by re receiving
ceiving receiving 240 votes of 283 votes
cast. He needed 213 votes, or
75 per cent of the ballots cast.
Roy Campanella, the former
Brooklyn Dodgers star catcher,
failed again to make the Hall of
Fame, missing by eight votes.
Campanella, whose baseball
career was brought to an end
by an automobile accident 10
years ago this month, was named
on 205 ballots. He had been
considered a good bet, along
with Medwick, among the 51 play players
ers players who got votes.
Lou Boudreau, Enos Slaughter
and Ralph Kiner rounded out the
top five in the balloting but nei neither
ther neither received as many as 150
votes.
Medwick, one of the National
Leagues all time great slug-
Gridders Get
Their Letters
Varsity football letters have
been awarded to 41 members of
the 1967 UF team, Gator Director
of Athletics Ray Graves announ announced
ced announced today.
Indication of the emphasis
placed on youth this past year
is evidenced by the fact that
28 of the lettermen are under underclassmen.
classmen. underclassmen. Only 13 seniors let lettered,
tered, lettered, including a pair of in injured
jured injured linemen who did not play
after the early season contests.
Floridas junior and senior let lettermen
termen lettermen by classes are:
Seniors (13) Wayne Barfield,
Jack Coons, Bobby Downs, Don
Giordano, Tom Hungerbuhler,
Brian Jetter, Wayne McCall,
Mike McCann, Graham McKeel,
J.D. Pasteris, DougSplane, Rich Richard
ard Richard Trapp and Harmon Wages.
Juniors (14) Tom Christ- 1
tan, George Dean, Guy Dennis,
Bill Dorsey, Gary Duven, Bill
Gaisford, Tommy Glenn, Mike
H ealey, David Mann, Terry
Morris, Gene Peek, Larry Rentz,
Larry Smith, and Jim Yarbrough.

FORWARD
with
_ Bill Mcride

Sigma Nu, who earned only 60
points in bowling, dropped into
second place with 400 points,
15 behind the leaders. Pi Lam
remains in third place, only 25
points out of first.
Lambda Chi got into the finals
after beating Delta Tau Delta in
the semifinal match. The Lam Lammies
mies Lammies rolled by Alpha Epsilon
Pi, Kappa Sigma and Sigma Phi
match.
In their semi-final event B.D.
Sherman led Pi Lam to victory
over SPE by a scant three pins.

gers, made the shrine in his last
try as an active player
those who performed during the
years 1948-1962. Had he failed,
he would have gone into an old oldtimers
timers oldtimers category for future con consideration
sideration consideration by a special commi committee.
ttee. committee. Medwick retired in 1948.

ZINOBER,
Having Seen UF Problems As
A Student For 7 Years,
-
Talks Honor Court Issues :
EXERT PRESSURE ON FACULTY TO CHANGE EXAMINATION
QUESTIONS EVERY YEAR in order to remove incentive for test thefts j
INSTITUTE formalized training for honor court X
COUNSEL to insure competent defense for accused students
REVITALIZE THE HONOR COURT SPEAKERS BUREAU
by regularly bringing it into living areasto inform the students
of policy and strengthen individual faith in the honor system, y
BEFORE ARBITRARILY OPENING THE COURT TO THE PUBLIC,
EXAMINE THE STUDENTS OPINION THROUGH REFERENDUM
PETE ZINOBER
for FORWARD^
CHANCELLOR
(Paid Political Announcement)

Stan Kaplan rolled three con consecutive
secutive consecutive strikes in the 10th frame
to sew up the win.
A1 Cowan rolled a 382 set to
leas Tau Kappa Epsilon to a
1,647 to 1,535 win over Pi Kappa
Phi in the final round for the
Blue League title.
The next Orange League sport
is basketball, and Sigma Nu ap appears
pears appears to have possibly the strong strongest
est strongest team of all the houses. A win
by the Nus would once again
turn the league lead upsidedown.
The all important division draw
has placed Lambda Chi and Sigma
Nu in the same bracket; this
will knock one of them out at
the start.
Delta Tau Delta, another strong
cage team is in the division with
Pi Lambda Phi.
Here are the team standings
and totals through the first four
sports. WB is waterbasket waterbasketball;
ball; waterbasketball; VB is volleyball; FB
is football; and B is bowling.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Standings
v
WB VB FB B TOTAL
Lambda Chi Alpha 75 90 130 120 415
Sigma Nu 100 150 90 60 400
Pi Lambda Phi 50 130 ilO 100 390
Beta Theta Pi 75 110 70 60 315
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 150 70 50 40 310
Delta Tau Delta 100 60 70 80 310
Tau Epsilon Phi 50 70 150 40 310
Sigma Phi Epsilon 50 90 90 80 310
Sigma Chi 75 110 70 40 295
Phi Delta Theta 50 90 110 40 290
Alpha Tau Omega 125 50 70 40 285
Alpha Epsilon Pi 75 90 70 40 275
Kappa Alpha 50 50 90 60 250
Phi Kappa Tau 50 90 50 40 230
Kappa Sigma 50 70 50 60 230
Pi Kappa Alpha 50 50 70 40 210
lost Your Contact?
a*
cjatop <\6s make contacts!

Page 25



Giant 7-2 Steve Turner
Looms Big In UF Plans

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor
Neal Walk is a midget.
Compared to Steve Turner.
At 7-foot-2, Turner is taller
than UCLAs Lew Alcindor. And
Turner is still growing and still
in HIGH SCHOOL.
Turners doctors at Bartlett
High in Memphis, Tenn. say the
prep senior may reach 7- 5 before
he stops growing.
And the college basketball
scouts are drooling.
But UF may be the one that
wins out.
Seriously courted by over 500
major colleges, Turner has ac accepted
cepted accepted an invitation by the Gator
coaching staff to tour the campus
in early March.
With invitations coming from
such schools as Vanderbilt,
Southern California and Michigan
State, Turner can not possibly see
all 500 schools.
So quite naturally, head coach
Tommy Bartlett and his assis assistant,
tant, assistant, Dick mms, are quite
pleased with Tajpners decision.
" Who wouldn't be? said
Davis, also the head recruiter.
When you have Tennesees
No. 1 prep player coming to visit
you, one can be proud, said
Davis.
Usually men that tall are awk awkward,
ward, awkward, said Davis, but not
Steve.
Bartlett High runs a fast fastbreak
break fastbreak offense and Turner is in on
every play, adds Davis.
Averaging 24 points and an
amazing 28 rebounds a game,
Turner fits right into the Gator
future.

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^j|^jjjj|j^22SE3!K^3^^3E2E^9E3Kl^3S^sifllilliii^
j

Walk and Andy Owens will
be gone in two years and UF will
be without a big man, said
Davis.
But, on the other hand, Tur Turner
ner Turner could be the next big man,
along the lines of a Gary Keller
or Dick Davis, said Davis, the
offense and the defense 'could re revolve
volve revolve around him.
But other colleges also feel
Turner fits into their plans and
have told Turner so.
A lot of schools have scouted
and expressed more than a casual
interest.
For instance, the University
of Tennessee has scouted six of
his first 12 games, summed
up Davis.
Many colleges have pressured
Turner into going into my
school. But Davis has main maintained
tained maintained a hands-off policy.

Florida Field Won't Grow
For At Least Four Years

Dreams of making Florida Field
into a bowl will have to wait at
least four more years before be becoming
coming becoming a reality.
UF Asst. Athletic Director Per Percy
cy Percy M. Beard said plans to add
concrete seats to the south end
zone were definitely being consid considered
ered considered for the future. However, he
said home football games would
have to continue to draw full crowds
for the next three or four years
before any definite date could be
set to begin construction.
Beard said the recently con constructed
structed constructed east stands would have to
be paid for before this new pro project
ject project could be undertaken. Once the
current debt is paid, the Univer-

Bartlett High coach Glenn Es Essary
sary Essary requested interested col colleges
leges colleges wait until the end of Tur Turners
ners Turners season.
I send Steve brochures and
pamphlets but thats that, said
Davis. I comply with the coachs
request.
Turner is a quiet boy, hardly
saying a word on or off the court.
Bout the only words I have
heard him say are, Nobody is
going to stop my shot once I
attempt one. And then Ill be
down-court to get that defensive
rebound.
Thats all Ive heard him say
except Yes Sir, No Sir, said
Davis.
Davis and possibly the future
of Florida basketball will be hop hoping
ing hoping for a Yes Sir when UF
asks Turner for his John Han Hancock
cock Hancock on a Gator-grant-in-aid.

sity still must find someone will willing
ing willing to finance the new construc construction.
tion. construction.
Beard estimated the addition
would cost about $1 million.

FORWARD
with
Bill Mcride |

I I
g Student For 7 Years,
Talks Qualifications:
> CHIEF INVESTIGATOR FOR STUDENT BODY
> ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL
> DIRECTOR OF TRAINING FOR STUDENT BODY COUNSEL
Counsel for Student Body
Assistant Business Manager, Law Revision
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity
Honor Court Bar Association
American Bar Association, Law Student Division
John Marshall Bar Association
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities
PETE ZINOBER
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SPORTS

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Page 26

Letters Given

Ten members of the 1967 UF
cross country team have been a awarded
warded awarded varsity letters, Gator Di Director
rector Director of Athletics Ray Graves
announced today.

GATOR ADS GET QUICK RESULTS

FORWARD I
with- fzmsd
Bill Mcride |



Frosh Cagers Need Height Experience

By PAUL KAPLAN
Assistant Sports Editor
The Gator junior-varsity cage
team is a strong one. Give them
a tall rebounder and theyll have
no competition.
Thus far this season, the game
group of freshmen have amassed
an impressive 6-2 record, but
Coach Skip Higley feels that a
big man would make them even
better.
These boys make up a strong
crew, Higley says. Theyre
fast, they shoot well, and theyre
pretty good ball-handlers but
we just dont have the height we
need.
The tallest man on the squad is
Vernon Chewning, a 6-5 Tampan
who has a soft shooting touch.
Vernon is a good shooter, but
he is rather poor on defense,
Higley notes. When his defense
gets better, his height will serve
him much more effectively.
Height isnt the teams only
drawback. The talented young youngsters
sters youngsters show poor discipline on the
court.
But this is a problem that ev every
ery every junior varsity team must cope
with. The squad is made up of
somewhat inexperienced players
who are competing togettpr for
the first time, and floor mistakes
must be expected.
The boys make a lot of mis mistakes,
takes, mistakes, but theyve had enough
scrapping ability to keep the mis mistakes
takes mistakes from costing them any
games so far, Higley explains.

HPHIL BURNETT
TREASURER
Don Braddock, Elected Treasurer 1967-68 Had
Financial Experience
Return Proven financial Experience To The
Office of Treasurer By Electing
. 'jJ .. \
'*" i
Phil Burnett
, J
Stockbroker Goodbody & Company 2 years
9 Graduate of New York Institute of Finance
i /, #
Bachelor of Science Finance & Economics U of F

A Chairman Homecoming Sweetheart Contest
-. 3LW
John Marshall Bar Association
FORWARD >
.
. x... -V -V---(Paid
--(Paid -V---(Paid Political Advertisement) -V

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TODD LALICH

The teams inexperience
makes their record more
amazing.
Most of their competition
comes from junior colleges
whose players are mostly sec second-year
ond-year second-year men. They too have a
large player turnover, but their
opportunity to groom several
players in their freshman year
while the sophomores do most of
the playing, must be considered
a distinct advantage.
Here, tnen, is a rundown on
the JVs starting five, with com comments
ments comments by Coach Higley:
JERRY HOOVER At 5-10
Jerry is short even for his guard
position, but he hustles, is good
on defense and is always scrap scrapping
ping scrapping for the ball.
JEFF MILLER Jeff is a
great shooter, possibly our best.
Hes averaging around 20 points

TO BETTER STRONG TEAIV

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SKIP LEWIS

per game and hes improving all
the time. He must work on his de defense.
fense. defense.
SKIP LEWIS Skip is also a
good shooter averaging around 20
points per game. Hes also valu valuable
able valuable under the boards; he is
strong. Skip is a poor defensive
player and must improve.
TODD LALICH lf any one
boy is our most valuable, it just
might be Todd. Hes a good shoot shooter,
er, shooter, a good defenseman, and at
the same time, hes averaging 27
points per game and is also our
top rebounder.
VERNON CHEWNING Ver Vernon
non Vernon has a fine outside shot, but
is a poor defensive player; when
he gets up on defense hell be a
good all-around player.
The answer to this teams
success, is their consistent hus hustle,
tle, hustle, says Higley. Theyre poor
on defense but they make up for
it with their scrap and desire.

Wednesday, January 24, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

'M
y ' A

JEFF MILLER

Higley says that at least four
of his players will be fighting
for starting jobs on the varsity
squad next season.
Hoover, Lalich, Miller and
Lewis are good enough to threat threaten
en threaten the varsity starters, he says.

Kirouac Wants Pay

(UPI) -- The Atlanta Falcons confirmed Monday that Lou Kir Kirouac,
ouac, Kirouac, a guard-placekicker waived before the season was over, has
taken, legal stops to force the Falcons to pay him for the two games
they played after he was cut.
" ......
Kirouac is a former Boston College end who was with the New
York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Baltimore Colts before Atlan Atlanta
ta Atlanta picked him up in the 1966 National Football League expansion
draft. He claims Atlanta should have placed him on the injured list.
If he had been waived injured, we would have had to pay him/
Falcons general manager Frank Wall said. But our doctors say
he was no more injured than when he first joined the Falcons.
Players who are waived injured continue receiving their salaries.
This is not true under NFL rules, of players who are cut because
of poor performance, Wall said. I don't think he has actually
brought suit against us, Wall said. We got a letter from his
attorney and turned it over to our attorneys.

'.-: i &isiiSfcl^^^E^^U§&§qS^^Es!y- : ii£b^s'§if&ii&ir& } -':
V. 111

JERRY HOOVER

As for Higley, it's his first and
last year as a freshman coach.
He is presently working on his
masters degree in secondary
school counseling, and will make
it his profession starting next
year.

Page 27



t, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Page 28

The Issue Is
Maturity
-' . 4 -*
MH Elect
B|B Clyde
Taylor
President
RH9QM| A Mature Campaign
for
fi "%,
..
A Mature Student Government


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*?*...*' ~ ------- \.
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