Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Mcride Leads In Alligator Survey

Forward Party's Bill Mcride Is the leading
contender for student body president, according
to a telephone poll conducted by the Alligator
Saturday.
Forty per cent of the sample votes went to
Mcride, and United-Firsts Clyde Taylor re received
ceived received 30 per cent. Twenty-three per cent of the
students polled were either undecided or not vot voting.
ing. voting.
Contrived party's Rich Houk and Individuals
Ira Brukner received four and three per cent,
respectively.
The poll, conducted by three Alligator editors,
embodied four criteria: fraternity affiliation, clas classification,
sification, classification, on- or off-campus residence, and sex.
The off-campus surveys were made by random
choices from the campus directory. The on-campus
polls were made by calls to dorms picked at
random.
A total of 45 independent men and 20 inde independent
pendent independent women were questioned. Staffers figured in
35 bloc votes with 20 for Forward and 15 for
United-First.
Os the men questioned, 18 were lower division
students, seven were upper-division, five were

Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 70s
Low In The 40s

Vol. 60, No. 67

OKD BY COMMITTEE
SPU Invites
Rep. Powell

By JIM ALMAND
Alligator Staff Writer
A request by two student or organizations
ganizations organizations that Congressman
Adam Clayton Powell be allowed
to speak at the UF has been
approved by the faculty lectures
committee, Mrs. Eleanor Rob Roberts,
erts, Roberts, public functions manager,
told the Alligator Monday.
A UF graduate student, David
N. Nobles, reportedly prompted
the request and subsequent ap approval
proval approval by the committee.
I sent a telegram to Powell
last Tuesday asking him if he
would consider another invitation
ACCENT or no ACCENT,
Noble said.
I as an individual can't invite
him so I secured the backing of
the Student Peace Union (SPU)

Opp Against Rent Plan

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
A plan which would require single students
to pay 44 per eent of their rent at once has
not been approved by Carl Opp, director of
off-campus housing.
The plan does not have my approval
tacit or otherwise, he said Monday.
The plan needs further study, he said.
It is strictfy in the discussion stage.
Under the proposed plan, landlords would
collect rent only four times a year instead of
every month. Tenants would pay 44 per cent
the first quarter, 25 per cent the second
quarter, 21 per cent the third quarter, and
ten percent the fourth quarter.
In other words, students whose monthly rent
is now $l7O would be required to pay SB6O at
the beginning of the first quarter.
Opp stated that he felt this initial payment
would be too heavy a financial burden on the
-student. -
He does, however, approve of paying by the
quarter instead of by the month. He said there

The
Florida Alligator

and the Afro-American Student
Association (AASA), Noble ex explained.
plained. explained.
SPU President Jerry L. Siegel
and AAS A President Wayne Ful Fulton
ton Fulton sent a letter to Dr. Allen
M. Sieve'rs, chairman of the com committee
mittee committee requesting the necessary
authorization to sponsor a speech
by Powell on the problems of
youth and politics.
The committee met Friday and
approved the request.
Sievers released a statement
Monday concerning the commit committees
tees committees approval of the invitation:
About a week ago, at the height
of public interest in the status of
Accent's negotiations with Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Powell, the Alligator
asked me as chairman of the lec lectures
tures lectures committee what action we
(SEE POWELL PAGE 3)

44 PER CENT AT ONCE

off-campus lower division students, 11 were off offcampus
campus offcampus upper- division students and five were
graduate students.
The womens sample was composed of 10 on
campus UC's, four on-campus upper-division stu students,
dents, students, two off-campus UCs, and four off-campus
upper-division students.
A total of 100 students were polled. Their
names were taken for purposes of record, but
not for publication.
Mcride showed surprising strength with on oncampus
campus oncampus independent men. He received 14 votes,
as compared to Taylors four. Houk got one vote,
and Brukner received three. Three were undecided.
Off-campus men favored Taylor, but many were
undecided or not voting. Five votes went to Taylor,
three to Mcride, seven were undecided, and six
did not plan to vote.
Among independent, upper-division women, Tay Taylar
lar Taylar was also the favorite. He got six votes, as
compared to Mcrides three. Again, six votes
wei'e* still uncommitted. Houk also captured three
votes.
The poll was taken before the Alligators en endorsement
dorsement endorsement of Taylor appeared in Mondays issue.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

are several advantages to such a system:
It would aid students whose roommates drop
out of school during the middle of the quarter.
They would have already paid for the entire
quarter, so roommates would have a longer
time to find new roommates.
The way it is now, Opp continued, stu students
dents students are stuck paying rent for the rest of the
quarter when a roommate drops out.
He said paying on a quarterly basis also
would give students extra time to find new
roommates during quarter breaks.
He also cited the fact that students wouldnt
have to pay for parts of the month when theyre
not in school.
Even if the quarter runs into only six days
of June, he said, students now have to pay
for the entire month. ...
The Gainesville Apartment Owners Associ Association,
ation, Association, which is handling the problem, decided to
table it until after the January 25 presidential
election. The GAOA met Thursday with leaders
of the two major political parties, Forward
and United-First to hash out the question.

i H HSffc yMpll §ll
_ .... f>i n cl (Photo by Mike Huddleston)
Candidates Debate On Radio Show
Taylor Calls For Apology
For Forward Party Flier

United-First party president presidential
ial presidential candidate Clyde Taylor called
for an apology for the blue sheet

K
THE POLL
-'f i :
Favor Mcride 40%
Favor Taylor 30%
Favor Houk 4%
Favor Brukner 3%
Undecided Or Not Voting 23%

thrown last week by the Forward
party attacking an Alligator edit editorial
orial editorial and a United-First coalit coalition
ion coalition during a Sunday night debate
while Forwards Bill Mcride
announced he would "stand by
the blue sheet thrown by my
party.
Taylor repeated during the de debate,
bate, debate, broadcast over WGGG ra radio,
dio, radio, that he would gladly with withdraw
draw withdraw from the campaign if his
opponents could prove any char charges,
ges, charges, made on the sheet.
"But since I havent heard any anything,
thing, anything, he continued, "Im a assuming
ssuming assuming it cant be proven and
that somebody is due an apology.
"I keep hearing about the blue
sheet and I keep wondering what
everyone is afraid of, Mcride
said.
"Ive seen Student Government
officials and elections swayed by
the Alligator, he continued.
"I'll stand by the blue sheet
thrown by my party, but its a about
bout about time everyone became more
responsible and started reporting
and talking objectively. Lets
start looking at the candidates.

Inside
VP Jim Valentine
Backs Bill Mcride
See Page 2

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Posed with the question of what
action they would take in the event
they lost the election, Mcride
and Taylor both said they would
offer their services to the winner.
"They (the winning party) cant
use just people in their own
party, Mcride said." The pro problems
blems problems are too big for one party
to handle.
Rich Houk of Contrived party
said he would continue to work
with any candidates from his
party that might win seats in
Legislative Council, while Indiv Individuals
iduals Individuals party candidate Ira Bru Bruknersaid
knersaid Bruknersaid that he did not plan
to meet or work with his oppo opponents.
nents. opponents.
"Im so much 'on an opposite
stand that I have no desire to
join with them, saidrukner.
INDEX

Campus Living p. 9
Classifieds p. 8
Editorials p. 6
Letters p. 7
Review p. 13
Sports p. 14



Page 2

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Question Os The Day
FOR PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

TODAYS QUESTION
OF THE DAY: Will
you do anything to im improve
prove improve the social life of
on-campus indepen independents,
dents, independents, and if so what
specific actions will
you take?
Clyde Taylor
United-First
On the more immediate
aspects, I feel much more liberal
open house rules and hours are
needed for the mens dorms, es especially
pecially especially on Friday and Saturday
nights. I will work through the
dorm councils and counselors for
better and longer hours.
Plans have already been setup
for a Ratskeller in the Main
Cafeteria basement. I will see
that this social center is com completed
pleted completed as soon as possible (before
September).
The ultimate answer to
improved on-campus social life
is completely coed dorm areas.

r Vofe For Taylor/
Shepherd Urges
Student Body President Charles Shepherd issued a plea Monday to
all independents to vote for Clyde Taylor in the Thursday presidential
elections.
*l urge all independents, and especially those who voted for me, to
vote like theyve never voted before, Shepherd said. Last year, we
broke the monopoly of big fraternity men who held on to Student Gov Government
ernment Government and did nothing with it. >
Id hate to see Student Government fall back into those hands,
Shepherd said. Clyde Taylor stands for independent leadership.
If individuals really believe the things weve done are important, they
must vote to continue them with Taylor.
Shepherd cited such items as the revised student code of conduct,
the conduct committee, and his administrations policy with the tuition
increase.
We promised wed raise hell if tuition went up to $150, he said.
We formed the Council of Student Body Presidents, and forced the
legislature to hold the line at $125.
When Mcride tells the students that student government doesnt
stand up for their rights, he continued, he is lying for his own polit political
ical political ends.
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Enjoy Fine Foods Served Everyday In A Pleasant Atmosphere
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Watch For Our Specials
Your Hosts Mr. and Mrs. Korl Hulsmonn
On Hiway 4414 Miles South of University Avenue
PHONE: 372-9227
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the offlcixl student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la published five times weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, GalnesvUle, Florida, 32601. The Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
The Florida AUlgator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertislng
tislng Advertislng Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.

I propose to work for more coed
dorms, particularly Tolbert Area
and Rawlings Hall, which were
originally built to be coed.
Rich Houk
Contrived
% : ~ .- *-r ; : ;
We dont give a damn about
improving the social life here
because every student will seek
his own social life. The other
candidates will do nothing new
here either. Its time that some someone
one someone gave a truthful answer to
such a question.
Bill Mcride
Forward
There are few opportunities
for many dorm residents to meet
people. Men in some fields dont
have a single girl in any of
their classes. And mass dances
are not the answer. People want
to be introduced on a more indi individual
vidual individual basis.
Buckman Hall will be holding
a new kind of dorm social this
weekend with the women of the
Towers as a pilot for the kind
of thing we want to institute.
The response has been tremen tremendous.
dous. tremendous. People who want to attend

have signed up and the girls will
be called for and driven to the
Union. The girls are providing
refreshments and the men are
supplying a small orchestra. A
social committee representing
each dorm will be host.
We will provide student
government support for a co-or co-ordinated
dinated co-ordinated program of get-togethers
like this to include transfer stu students
dents students and graduates. ;y v
Ira Brukner
Individuals
- Os course, I am a.i indepen independent
dent independent living in a. dormitory, and
I don't like the idea of only cer certain
tain certain people in my dorm having
an active social life.
Specifically, I will give some
dignity to social functions to get
the women out of their dormi dormitories
tories dormitories by establishing a series
of informal mixers for the pur purpose
pose purpose of meeting people and break breaking
ing breaking the ice.
Once the women without dates
think that it is not below them
to attend and they have met
some men, I think the ratio
will even out and an initial im improvement
provement improvement will have been made.
TOMORROWS QUES QUESTION
TION QUESTION OF THE DAY:
What functions will
your vice-president
perform in your ad administration?
ministration? administration?

FORWARD
With GHEEB
Bill Mcride

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; MM^iuUi*Hii4ntillubCs*.-:-*.----- - .....
t 4\£M*. .*

VP VALENTJNE says
'Bill Mcride Is
Most Qualified

Student Body Vice-President
Jim Valentine told the Alligator
in a prepared statement Mon Monday
day Monday I feel an obligation to the
student body to say that I am
supporting Forward Partys pre presidential
sidential presidential candidate, Bill Mc-
Bride.'*^
Valentine said Mcride has
demonstrated exceptional qual*
ities of mature leadership and
effective organizational skills
needed to be a president of the
student body.
Bill Mcride has more than
proven his interest in the student,
individually and collectively,
Valentine said.

Pd. Adv.

The Sound Shop
y
Come in and hear 14 different
j* *.
pai rs of speakers and see the best
of these brands
Sherwood Dua |
is^er Wharfdale
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The vice-president, who was
elected on the First party ticket
almost a year ago along with
Charles Shepherd, current stu student
dent student body president, added that
Bill Mcride, in my estimation,
is the candidate most qualified
and capable of carrying out the
pro-student programs initiated
under the now forgotten spirit
of First Party.
BE



CRUSADE-FOR-CHRIST SPEAKER-
Braun To Discuss Sex
By LINDA DANIELS
Alligator Staff Writer #

Sex will be the topic of a lecture delivered by Jon Braun, acclaimed
as one of the most outstanding collegiate speakers in America today,
Thursday at 8 p.m. in the University Auditorium.
Braun is currently the national campus coordinator for Campus
Crusade for Christ, an inter-denominational student Christian move movement
ment movement with chapters on over 200 campuses inAmericaandin over 40
countries.
As national coordinator, he serves as the director of 311 of the
1,100 staff members who are in charge of the campuses.
Before joining the staff of Campus Crusade for Christ, he gra graduated
duated graduated from San Jose State, attended Fuller Theological Seminary
and graduated with a bachelor of divinity from JNortn Theo Theological
logical Theological Seminary, North Park, Illinois.
Braun speaks on over 50 campuses each year to a total college
audience of nearly 60,000 students. His lecture series on sex draws
more students than any such series in the United States, according
to Campus Crusade release.
Sex is a great thing. Its here to stay. Its a sure winner in any
conversation. Believe it or not, it was God who came up with the
idea of sex/ says Braun in his controversial lectures.
While on campus, he will participate in the concert by The New
Folk Friday night.
Thursday nights lecture is sponsored by the Fellowship of Christian
Athletes, and 'there is no charge.

v : xmm
Powell Invitation Approved

from page Wm
were contemplating.
I told the Alligator truthfully
that we were not a party to any
deliberations concerning Powell.
I now reiterate that Accent acted
independently of the lectures
committee throughout, and hence,
Accent acted improperly.
On Thursday, the committee
received a properly filed request
from two recognized student or organizations
ganizations organizations to invite Powell
sometime in the spring to speak
on a topic of their designation.
The committee met Friday
and authorized Mrs. Roberts,
Public Functions Manager, to

13 of the 25
V ...
Dorm Presidents
are supporting
CLYDE TAYLOR
WHY!

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
July 16, 1967
by Ernie Litz
lootball seating as a political plum
to entice and control fraternities
during political elections.
The ball began to roll.
1 This writer contacted Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council president Clyde
Taylor about the bill.
Now, Tavlor is one of those rare
individuals that like to keep their
promises AFTER elected. When
running for IFC president he
pledged himself to work for a fair
bloc seating system. This bill of offered
fered offered him that opportunity, and he
accepted it. Taylors premise is

VOTE UNITED FIRST
- .. .... ** ' >
(Paid Political Advertisement)

notify the applicant organizations
that the lectures committee ap approved
proved approved their request subject to
the usual conditions relative to
financial responsibility.
A registered letter has been
sent to Powell on Bimini by
AASA, Noble said. All that
remains are some mechanics
with Powell.
Siegel said that his group is
co-sponsoring the Powell invita invitation
tion invitation because many people on
campus seem to be annoyed that
ACCENT would not allow him to
speak here.
Earlier Chi Phi fraternity was
publicized as having invited
Powell

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
JULY 1966
by Ernie Litz
... To Clyde Taylor a real Thank You for ar
man with real integrity. He means what he says, and!
keeps his promises. A completely atypical IFC prexy I
he gets my nomination for truly being the outstanding!
, student leader for 19661
... why is Mike Bowen getting so much oppo opposition
sition opposition and pressure in his efforts to ascertain the
truth about the Lyceum Council and its financial
operations?
... No Dr. Reitz, a strike is NOT any pitch that
the batter' does not swing at. In any event, a sincere
thanks to Dr. Reitz, vice president Mautz and Dean
Adams for taking the time and trouble to umpire
the SG-AUigator softball fiasco. (Wait till next year 0
Is Bob Harper really Maury Wills with an

&
m f&iFl PV yM
Tornadoes Batter U.S.
NEW YORKA total of 570
tornadoes hit the United States
during 1966, according to the
Insurance Information Institute.


In a written statement Monday
Chi Phi president, Stephen R.
Kaufmann, stated that the invita invitation
tion invitation was invalid because it was
not an official letter of the fra fraternity.
ternity. fraternity.
Kaufmann said, The article in
the Alligator of Jan. 18, 1968, and
the invitational letter to Powell
were completely the opinions of
a minority of two members who
were not officially representing
th^iewsofCh^h^raternity ;
Wl] J

Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Absentee Ballots Available
Anyone who will be physically unable to vote Thursday and wishes to
do so by absentee ballot must apply by 5 o'clock Wednesday at the
Student Government Offices in the Reitz Union. Patients in the infirm infirmary
ary infirmary will automatically be provided with absentee ballots.
a
Ihjfl Jr
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'ijrT ~ JlPai 9B£p.
''--JBmP*
IHipr 3M Jljj |j§ |l
TAYLOR GOODRICH
Be First
Vote The
UNITED TEAM
CLYDE TAYLOR
£?
GARY GOODRICH
a -'
They Stand For YOU
CLYDE TAYLOR FOR PRESIDENT
Executive Aide, President of Student Body
President of Interfraternity Council
President of District Four IFC
President, Sigma Nu Fraternity
Fair Bloc Seating Committee
Whos Wno in American Colleges
and Universities
Utility Rates Investigation Committee
Deans List
0* _," "
GARY GOODRICH FOR VICE-PRESIDENT
#
President of Miami-Dade Junior College
Majority Leader of Legislative Council
Minority Leader of Legislative Council
Legislative Council (3 years)
President of Graham Area
Asst General Chairman of DIALOGUE
Omicron Delta kappa
(Honorary Leadership Fraternity)
32 G.P.A.
UNITED FIRST
i, X__ w _. (Paid Political Advertisement)
' . . J *"*?

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

IFC Frolics
To Feature
The Holly;

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Winter Frolics on Feb. 16
will be the best all-around show
the UF has ever seen,*'lra Lees Leesfield,
field, Leesfield, Interfraternity Council
social chairman, told the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator Wednesday.
The Hollys, an English group
who sings Bus Stop, Maryanne,
and other recent hit songs, will
be the feature attraction. Flip
Wilson, a popular comedian who
has appeared on the Ed Sullivan
Show, will entertairi.
Leesfield said the IFC was very
lucky to get the Hollys on such
short notice. They decided on
impulse to visit the United States
after just having completed a tour
in Australia.
Leesfield received notice that
they might be available from a
theatrical agent in New York and
was able to set up the contract
with their agent.
But another singing group, the
Doors, has cancelled out.
X :
Among the other hopefuls to
fill the vacancy of the Doors,
who became involved in legal
matters, were Jonathan Winters
and the Association, but both
have other commitments to ful fulfill
fill fulfill at the time of Frolics.
Tickets for Frolics go on sale
in February.

FORWARD
with Essd
Bill Mcride |

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER SAYS
'Students Adopt Asian Religions

By JANICE FORSBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
c ... ~ -- * J ~
An astonishing number of col college
lege college students are finding their
spiritual homes within the Asian
religions, according to Dr. Hus Huston
ton Huston Smith, who gave the keynote
address for the Religion-In-Life
Week Monday night.
These students are unsatis unsatisfied
fied unsatisfied with their own religions and
look elsewhere, said Smith, a
philosophy professor at Massa Massachusetts
chusetts Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
> %
Smith said students* interest
in psychedelic drugs that trig trigger
ger trigger religious experiences in a
mystical direction link them with
the Asian religions.
These students are also influ influenced
enced influenced by the involvement of such
singing groups as the Beatles,

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C WANNA HEAR WHAt\
* r:
/-23

Rolling Stones, and Donovan, in
the International Meditation So Society
ciety Society founded by Maharishi Yogi.
In discussing The Meeting
of ReligionsEast and West,
Smith viewed the religious world
in three ways.
First, all the faiths of mankind
can be viewed as having common
themes. Smith said they all
believe in the existence of an un unseen
seen unseen realm from which our world
derives its ultimate meaning.
Secondly, the religious world
can be divided into the religions
of the WestChristianity, Islam,
and Judaismand of the East
Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucian Confucianism,
ism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism.
The differences dividing them
are not absolute, said Smith.

Whereas the Western religions
believe in a personal God, an
individual soul, and the holiness
V-
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JBk
SMITH"
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of what might be, the Asian
religions advocate an impersonal
God, a universal soul, and the
holiness of the here and now.
Lastly, the religious worldcan
be divided into the West, China,
and India. Viewed in terms of
mans natural, social, and psy psychological
chological psychological problems, each divi division
sion division special izes in one of these
great and inescapable problems
of life, he noted.



FOR ARTS & SCIENCES
Committee Reviews
Dean Nominations
By MARGIE GROSS
Alligator Staff Writer : :
Finding a dean for the College of Arts and Sciences is
an imposing task for the five-man selection committee review reviewing
ing reviewing candidates for the position which will be vacant as of
July 1.
In accordance with Florida state law requiring adminis administrators
trators administrators to step down from their positions at the age of 65,
Dr. Ralph E. Page, present Arts and Sciences dean will
retire and retain a teaching position in the college.
A search and screening committee has been set up
which may only recommend candidates, said Dr. Ernest
R. Bartley, committee chairman. It is then up to President
Stephen C. O'Connell and the Board of Regents to make the
final decision.
The person selected must have several prerequisites,
said Bartley. He should be:
a scholar and teacher in his particular field,
familiar with the problems of research and publication
t catholic in outlook,
able to pick competent subordinates and get along with
them,
well-motivated and have the ability to be an adminis administrator,
trator, administrator,
9 >
a middle man who knows how to coordinate possible con conflicts
flicts conflicts above and below him,
capable of knowing when to represent his college or his
own personal convictions.
Beginning in November, 1967, the committee, composed of
Arts and Sciences faculty, asked other faculty members to
submit nominations for prospective candidates.
Since then, the committee has carried out the preliminary
screening and has several potential candidates within the
university and from other institutions in mind, said Bartley.
Invitations will soon be extended to the off-campus can candidates
didates candidates to view the university and consider the deanship.
The final selection for the Arts and Sciences dean is
scheduled to be made by July or September, 1968.

a
Vice-President
Toby Muir
Vice President Resident
Staff Board '67
Graham Area Council
Resident Assistant
Murphree Areas

Wm
Chancellor
Pete Zinober
Chief Investigator Honor
Court
Assistant Attorney General
President's Cabinet
Secretary of Labor

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President
Bill Mcride
Special Assistant To The Student
Body President
Outstanding Student Government
Cabinet Member Award
General Chairman of Dollars
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(Paid Political Advertisement)

400 Asked To Participate
In Teacher Evaluation

By LINDA DANIELS
Alligator Staff Writer
Instructors of 400 comprehen comprehensive,
sive, comprehensive, introductory, and upper di division
vision division courses were mailed
invitations this week to partici participate
pate participate in UFs first extensive
course and teacher evaluation
being conducted by Student Gov Government
ernment Government at the end of this quar quarter.
ter. quarter.
Sections within these courses
were selected at random with without
out without knowledge of the individual
professors.
Any UF teacher desiring to
participate in the program should
make an application to SG before
Feb. 2.
The evaluation will be taken
during the week of Feb. 26-March
1.
It is our main intention to im improve
prove improve the quality of education
at this university through the use
of the evaluation,* said Bob Im Imholte,
holte, Imholte, chairman of the course and
teacher evaluation.
A questionnaire based on the
Purdue Rating Scale for Instruc Instruction
tion Instruction is designed to measure stu-

Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

dent attitudes toward teachers
and courses. It consists of three
parts, eleven questions on teach teacher
er teacher evaluation and 15 questions
on course evaluation. These are
followed by a checklist and space
for student comments in writing.
The completed evaluation will
serve professors, deans, and stu students
dents students in course selection and de determining
termining determining attitudes on the
classes.
A teacher report form will be

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sent directly to the teacher to
provide him with confidential In Information
formation Information about his teaching. The
information will also be noted
on course report forms for the
use of deans and faculty.

Treasurer
Phil Burnett
Registered Stock Broker
Goodbody & Company
Graduate New York
Institute of Finance
BS in Finance and
Economics
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Ron Carpenter
Resident Manager Flavet 111
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Page 5



-* S F-..
l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Page 6

FV;,
M_

Tb* Florida Alligator's official position on Issues la expressed
only In the columns below. Other material In this Issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist and not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically Indicated.
Taylor Needs Votes
Os Independents

Third parties have
proved two things in the
American political arena.
They T cant win, but they
can make the ms Ives heard
and get their platforms and
ideals incorporated by the
powerful parties in power.
This has proved true at
the UF too, where a more
liberal aryl progressive
tone has been set in stu student
dent student government with the
incorporation of third party
attitudes and programs by
the party in power this
year.
Charles Shepherd, and
his First party, have moved
to bring UF student gov government
ernment government out of the dol doldrums
drums doldrums and" into the fore forefront
front forefront of student leadership.
Much now remains to be
done and Clyde Taylor,
carrying the banner of Uni United-First
ted-First United-First party, is the man
to do it.
But, Taylor will not be
able to carry on the work
of the Shepherd adminis administration
tration administration unless he is elec elected.
ted. elected.
To be elected, and to
defeat that product of old oldfashioned
fashioned oldfashioned machine politics,
Bill Mcride, Taylor needs
third party backing.
Therefore, in the inter interests
ests interests of the student body,
Contrived and Individual
parties should throw their
considerable weight behind

Once again the UFs
annual Religion in Life
Week program is in full
swing. We are happy to see
it back this year,
. Religion-in-Life Week is
one of the UFs best tra traditions
ditions traditions because it brings
us interesting speakers
year after year who both
bring credit to the univer university
sity university and pleasure to listen listeners.
ers. listeners.
This year all four major
speakers at Religion-in-

The
Florida Alligator
A Student Newspaper
Steve Hull
Editor

Harvey Alper
Managin^Editor
Harold Aldrich
News Editor

Religion-ln-Life

Harold Kennedy
Executive Editor
* Boh Padecky
Sports Editor

Mr, Taylor, the man who
best represents the inter inter*
* inter* ests of both these parties
'and the only man who has
a chance of winning this
election and enacting their
programs.
Ira Brukner, of Indivi Individual
dual Individual party, is not a serious
candidate for president. He
knows this and we think
he should act NOW to let
his supporters know that
Clyde Taylor is their man.
Contrived party, on the
other hand, takes itself
very seriously and we do
too. Beyond doubt, Con Contrived
trived Contrived has something to say
and we are listening. There
is too much petty politics
in student government, stu student
dent student government is not stu student
dent student oriented as it should
be and elections are indeed
too often a joke.
But, Contrived party
hasnt a chance of winning.
And there is only one man
who can incorporate the
Contrived program into his
own to successfully get
something done.
That man is Clyde
Taylor.
Therefore, we urge both
Contrived and Individual
parties to support Clyde
Taylor. He can defeat the
machine, He can be elected
with third party support.
Clyde Taylor is whats
best for the UF this year.

Life Week convocations
will be persons of authority
in their field.
Dr. Huston Smith, Bishop
John J. Dougherty, Dr.
Warren A. Quanfyeck and
Dr, Morton Siegel are all
men who should be heard
and who have developed ex excellent
cellent excellent ..reputations as ex experts
perts experts in religion,
We urge our readers to
attend Religion-in-Life
Week programs.
This program deserves
being heard.

Muh Patient Is Doing Just Fine, Fine ,
CROSSROADS ======^==
Vote Your Conscience
===== by RICHARD KRIEG

The upcoming election for the student
body president is the most important
in UF history. As election time approach approaches,
es, approaches, we find our school pathetically vul vulnerable
nerable vulnerable and unjustifiably subject to con conditions
ditions conditions and pressures not befitting an
educational institution of twentieth century
America.
The second tuition hike within several
months has been foreshadowed,debated,
and accepted.
The quarter system, symbolized by
Saturday classes, proves worse than our
worst expectation. The gross misappro misappropriation
priation misappropriation of credit hours coupled with (the
appropriate) non-commital utterances for
rectification, do little to right the wrong.
When one adds a financially unstable
College of Education, movements to pol polarize
arize polarize the campus press, and other un unprintable
printable unprintable maladies, the current crisis
on this campus is partially illuminated.
We are all in this together. We all are
directly affected by rising cost comple complemented
mented complemented by lowering of opportunity. It
is in this light that Election 68 faces
us.
To be sure, we need someone equipped
to face a year of potential decline; some someone
one someone capable of not only leading, but of
fostering the sharp wit, intelligence, and
flexibility demanded in a demanding year.
We need someone who is able to defy
and logically dispute when such action
is mandatory for UF sustinance and better betterment.
ment. betterment.
Leadership is important and so is ex experience.
perience. experience. However, how have these traits

Alligator Staff
* P2 UC^TTE MICHAEL ABRAMS
A slstant Nm Editor Editorial Assistant
JANICE SIZEMORE JOE TORCHIA
Campus Living Editor Entertainment Editor 1

left to themselves fared us, the student
body, in years past? A change is needed neededan
an neededan opportunity to fight back against the
injustice done our school- for the future
that rightfully belongs to a great univer university
sity university in a great state.
There will be four alternatives on this
election's ballot. If the past repeats itself
(as it invariably does) fraternity and so sorority
rority sorority members will be requested to vote
blindly, in accordance with bloc vote pro procedure.
cedure. procedure. However, what have we gotten in
past years? How much greater are the
problems now? All fraternity and soror sororj
j sororj ity people should be urged to vote as
their consciences dictate. What is better,
a small white lie to a brother that I
voted for or a deep lie to
yourself and your school's future?
What is the purpose of the bloc vote?
The fraternity-sorority system at the UF
is powerful. Once more, it is basically
a good system, capably officiated and in internally
ternally internally oriented. Do you think that any
one candidate will alter any aspect oi
a single house or the entire system itself?
Is the fate of one brother and his pro promised
mised promised appointment more important than
your fate and the school you chose to
come to? These questions will have to
be reconciled by every fraternity member
and every girl in a sorority on the campus.
The problems of the university demand
it.
Can a candidate not backed by powerful
behind the scenes interests win the elect election?
ion? election? The answer is yes if what he stands
for is reasonable and if people vote in
accordance with what they believe right.
Florida firstfraternity second.



= PALE RIDER =============
J
No Honeymoon
MICHAEL ABRAMS
In President Stephen OConnells recent and commendable sojourn
to the cities to raise money for UF he unfortunately skipped
over the very essence of what a great university ought to be.
In three months of his presidentship, it would seem that the one
colossal obstacle to OConnells idea of greatness is lack of funds
for UF.
But to think that money can remedy the academic illness of UF,
the spector of the cow college, the lampooning of UF by the freer
and higher echelons of academic life in America (such as it is)
would be to surmount the topmost pinnacle of bombastic folly.
.... . 1
Suppose we are given ten million dollars. Suppose we get fifty
million dollars. Suppose a hundred! Well, then What of it?
Will we remain the same university that bars speakers from its
campus on the astonishing premise that public opinion would not
like it?* (Perhaps what Board of Regents Chairman Chester Ferguson
had in mind is that Chester Ferguson would not like it.)
Will UF remain that same feeble institution proclaiming through throughout
out throughout the land that its .students are simply not mature enough to listen
to ideas which may sound strange, and therefore ought to be feared?
Will UF remain the same university that denies tenure to a pro professor
fessor professor because he has ideas which may tend to be suspicious? On
the same grounds Beethoven would be horsewhipped, Pasteur
would be clamped in irons, and every economics and political science
professor on this campus would be set to work writing autobiographies.
Every man who ever breathed freedom would be set to the rack and
whipped. France Needs No Scientists!
On and on the story goeth. And where is the blame to be layed?
It would seem that President Stephen OConnell is responsible in
a large way for what transpires on his property. No amount of political
sidestepping, waltzing, or judicial logic can convice 20,000 students
that he is not responsible as president of UF.
The idea that the Board of Regents rules with an iron hand over
the affairs of the state university system is only true only if the
presidents of the university system want it to be true.
How pleasant it would be to find that our new president is really
dedicated, as he says, to give students the greatest amount of freedom
that is possible.
The honeymoon with Stephen OConnell has lasted three months.
He is no longer on the bench of the Supreme Court of the State of
Florida. His task is not to pass legal judgments but to become a
leader a man who has the ideas, the inspiration, and the fortitude
to stand by himself.
Such a man we need.

Higher Tuition Not Needed

MR. EDITOR:
'r
Mr. Tom Waddell stated, in
his letter of January 17, that
University of Florida students
should be willing to pay an in increased
creased increased tuition fee if they are
interested in getting an education.
This is fine. But there is no
need for a tuition hike. There
are many excellent revenue
sources that are not being tapped.
Florida has a tax arrangment
to attract industry to the state.
Stated simply, there is a 3%
sales tax on the first $166,000
that a business spends on equip equipment,
ment, equipment, and above that, nothing. So
long as a firm makes a single
purchase, it will pay the same
sales tax of $4980 on a SIOO
million purchase that a smaller
business pays on one of $166,000.
Obviously, this arrangment helps
the big businessman the big
manufacturers, paper mills,
railroads, utilities, and the citrus
and phosphate interests.

The Alligator has the right to edit alt
letters submitted for publication. Letters must
be typewritten not to exceed 500 words.
The editor reserves the right not to publish
letters which might tend to be libelous. Letters
must be signed.

State Revenue director J. Ed
Straghn estimates that the State
could realize an extra $7.8
million each year if all heavy
equipment and industrial mach machinery
inery machinery were taxed, across the
board, at 3%.
Another enormous loss of re revenue
venue revenue is in the area of sales
tax exemptions on groceries. Re Removal
moval Removal of the food exemption woul d
mean over SIOO million in in increased
creased increased revenue over the next
two years. Also, elimination of
the tax exemption on medicine
would add over sl4 million to
the State's coffers over the same
period.
Automobiles and certain kinds
of machinery and equipment for
the farm are taxed only 2%. If
this tax were raised by 1% the
State would realize an additional
$15.3 million each year.
The big phosphate interests of
south Florida argue that other
phosphate producing States do not
levy a severance tax on phos-

OPEN FORUM:
Atkwuml 'DiArf
There is no hope for the complacent man.**

No Man Is An Island .

MR. EDITOR:
I think that anti-fraternity
letter writers like Mr. Coberly
miss one of the fine points of
life that is so ably spoken by
John Donne in his Meditation
XVII:
No man is an island, entire
of itself; every man is a piece
of the continent, a part of the
main(land); if a clod be washed
away by the sea, Europe is
the less, as well as if a pro promontory
montory promontory were, as well as if

Freedom Os The Press?
MR. EDITOR:
With reference to President OConnells decision to allow publi publication
cation publication of an expose on stolen exams .
What is freedom of the press* if someone other than the Alligator
staff gets to decide what story may or may not be printed?
EUNICE TALL MARTIN
Smoke Gets In Your Fate
MR. EDITOR:
Please deliver my accolade to the writer of But, Doc, I Dont
Even Smoke. As a non-smoker, I find his facts indisputable. The
presence of just one smoldering cigarette in a classroom can make
being there uncomfortable. More than one is pure hell.
I have found attractive dates who dont blow smoke in my face
but how can one avoid classroom smog? Smokers, if you cant
abstain for 50 minutes why not carry a filter to prevent air pollution?
If I wanted lung cancer I would smoke the cigarette myself.
NAME WITHHELD
Willie Rivers In Minority

MR. EDITOR:
The January 16 article con concerning
cerning concerning the murder of Mrs. Per Person
son Person was too irritating to be
ignored as more of the Alli Alligators
gators Alligators usual mediocrity. The

phate and if Florida had a sever severance
ance severance tax the State producers
would have difficulty competing
because Africa is already taking
some of Floridas phosphate
trade on the worldjnarket. Os
the competing States, all but Wy Wyoming
oming Wyoming levy corporate profits
taxes against their phosphate in industries.
dustries. industries. But Florida does not
have a corporate profits tax.
Also, Florida phosphate gets the
sales tax break discussed above.
All this adds up to a loss to
the State treasury of over $220
million every two years and
this is a conservative estimate.
Obviously, if Florida is to im improve
prove improve its budget problems, the
special interests in the State must
contribute their fair share.
So, Mr. Waddell, I can see
no reason why students should
pay higher tuition when there are
so many revenue sources that are
untapped.
DONALD R. AVERY, 3JM

Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

a manor of thy friends or of
thine own were; any mans
death diminishes me, because
I am involved in mankind; and
therefore never send to know
for whom the bell tolls; it tolls
for thee.
The fraternity system, as a
whole, provides a continent*
from which its members can gain
aid, help, and a feeling of mu mutual
tual mutual affection. It is of the ut utmost
most utmost importance that fraternities
do things as a group. Without

line, **Tls da season to be
jolly" was disgusting as a por portrayal
trayal portrayal of the typical Lincoln High
student. I have personally known
and worked with several of these
students through a local com community
munity community improvement program,
and cannot shrug off your general
,i m &ge of them as educational
and moral disappointments.
Willie Rivers is a sorry and
pathetic figure, but he is
definitely a minority among teen teenagers
agers teenagers who, despite the frustrat frustrations
ions frustrations of low income families and
limited advancement opportun opportunities,
ities, opportunities, remain intelligent and hon honest
est honest citizens. And, may I add, I
have yet to hear one of them
utter such a word as "da" as
part of his or her most casual
speech.
JEANNE MARTIN, lUC
Mud
MR, EDITOR:
As students of UF we find it
very hard to vote for a presi presidential
dential presidential candidate in this next
election. With all the mud sling slinging
ing slinging and dirty politics this election
should be fought in a pig stye.
i
The way things are going, we
would not vote for either party.
I think there will be a lot of
write-in votes for Lassie, at
least when Lassie is digging
through the dirt shesnot heaving
it at everyone in sight.
THE GIRLS FROM FOURTH
FLOOR-BROWARD

common goals and the united
effort that it takes to accomplish
these goals, the MEN of the fra fraternity
ternity fraternity system would have noth nothing.
ing. nothing. Each man In a fraternity
is joined in his undertakings by
the spirit of his respective house
and his brothers. Each man must
link himself to some kind of
establishment if he has any idea
of progressing in the world.
This does not only apply to
the social fraternities on the
campus. It applies to every seg segment
ment segment of campus life and extends
into the careers that most plan
on while in college. Architects
have the AIA, which aids them
and in which they gain recog recognition
nition recognition throughout their own pro profession.
fession. profession. Service organizations
such as the Rotary; Kiwanis, must
be, according to Mr. Coberlys
article, repulsive.
Yet these organizations contri contribute
bute contribute a great deal to the com community
munity community in which they operate.
This applies to fraternities.
Though classed as social most
of them carry on an extensive
amount of service projects that
aid the community in which they
are located. The 27 brotherhoods,
which are part of the fraternity
system here at UF, act together
to make UF a better place to go
to school.
RUSTY SKINNER, 3AS
'Small Talk
*
MR. EDITOR:
It seems to me that with the
number of students enrolled and
classes that are scheduled, the
time spent ip these classes should
be spend dwelling upon the sub subject
ject subject which the student must pass
in order to reach his goal, what whatever
ever whatever it may be.
y
There are certain professors
who feel that they can get closer
to the students and on their level
in order to win their admiration
by making very off-color* re remarks.
marks. remarks. The students are always
going to take these two-way
insinuations the wrong way. I
believe that the students, among
themselves, are very capable of
shucking off this frustration fully
without the professors* feeling
that they need to add it to the
curriculum.
Also when a class period is
half spent in discussing some
small-talk** subject thisalso
seems a waste of time for both
student and teacher. Granted, a
few minutes taken up in this kind
of thing is a means of perhaps
relaxing everyone in order to get
down to brass tacks*.
I just don't feel, however, half
a period needs to be used. Some
students will of course not agree
with these views, but for the
more serious and stimulated per person
son person (I know from talking with
a few personally), the end result
with too much of this gibberish
is boredom and loss of interest.
NAME WITHHELD

Page 7



Page 8

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

POLICE CHIEF SAYS
'Get Used To Walking

A six-story parking garage and the street
improvements necessary to handle the increase
in traffic near them would cost about $2,600
per space, according to the new traffic and park parking
ing parking survey.
"I dont think the taxpayers are going to spend
that kind of money so students and faculty will
have a place to park," Campus Police Chief
A.I. Shuler stated.
The advantage of a multi-level parking facility
is in the amount of land area it would save and
the ability to locate it in a convenient spot,
Schuler said. However, he feels these advantages
are outweighed by construction costs.
"People are just going to have to get used
to the fact that with 12,000 cars on campus daily
and only 5,300 parking places they wont always
be able to park near their destination,* Shuler
stated. "We think everyone can expect to walk
at least five minutes from where they park."
Our policy is to issue only as many decals
for a restricted area as there are parking places,"
Shuler said, "When these are full someone wishing
space in that area must settle for the nearest
area with space available."

Gainesville's
Dry Cleaning
Prices Upped
Think the dry cleaning prices
in Gainesville are too high? Then
start getting ready for another
increase in prices early this
year say the local dry cleaning
merchants.
Wade H. Townsend Jr.,
manager of Bobs Cleaners and
Laundry, and a graduate of the
UF, said, "There has been much
speculation concerning an in increase
crease increase in prices among the local
merchants."
He says that the reason behind
the increase is a rise in labor
costs. This February the mini minimum
mum minimum wage increases from SI.OO
an hour to $1.15, anc} next year
it goes up to $1.25.
Restaurant
To Contribute
To DFS Fund
Tills years Dollars for
Scholars (DFS) campaign will
strive to keep the burden of fund
raising "off the students and on
the capable contributer" stated
Tim Blake, assistant chairman
of the program in an announce announcement
ment announcement Thursday of another DFS
fund-raising event.
"So many local merchants fun funnel
nel funnel their promotional exercises
for the so called benefit of the
individual student but very few
do so at a direct loss," said
Blake.
"One local merchant, the man management
agement management of Burger Chef, has
decided to let a direct loss bene benefit
fit benefit the students nine times over,"
Blake added.
Wednesday the management of
Burger Chef, 715 NW 13th St.,
is going to donate to DFS a sum
of money equal to the price of
all food sold between the hours
of 3 o'clock and 6 oclock.
"Local Gainesville residents
and students alike will be able
to support DFS without really
giving a money contribution,"
Blake said.

Advertise

Depends on the giant. Actually, some giants are just regular
kinds of guys. Except bigger.
And that can be an advantage.
How? Well, for one thing, youve got more going for
you. Take Ford Motor Company. A giant in an exciting
and vital business. Thinking giant thoughts. About develop'
ing Mustang. Cougar. A city car for the future.
Come to work for this giant and you 11 begin to think
like one.
Because you're dealing with bigger problems, the
consequences, of course, will be greater. Your responsibilities
heavier. That means your experience must be better more
complete. And so, you'll get the kind of opportunities only a
giant can give.
Giants just naturally seem to attract top professionals.
Men that you'll be working with and for. And some of that
talent is bound to rub off.
Because there's more to do, you 11 learn more. In
more areas.

Whats it like
to work
for a giant?
V 7. :
- .V
l
. ' '
- v-
fr * o
o*=S '
*
d like e hi( *

Parking, in Shulers opinion, is the key to the
traffic problem on campus. "Most of the traffic
is a result of people cruising around looking for
a parking place near their destination," he said.
The immediate solution is to either restrict
the number of cars on campus or to provi
parking, Shuler explained/"Hopefully we
a little of both."
Traffic lights to regulate the flow of traffic
on campus are impractical, according to Shuler.
They would smooth the flow at peak periods and
actually impede it at other times.
"We try to have a man directing traffic at
strategic locations during peak periods," Shuler
stated.
For several years during peak periods, Campus
Police manually operated the lights on 13th Street
intersections adjacent to campus. Recently the
Gainesville Police have not allowed this since it
interferes with their attempt to syncronize the lights
for a certain speed.
"They have been promising us extra time on
these lights on a week-to-week basis for the last
three weeks," Shuler said, "but nothing has come
of it."

Its Time
f o r toiwx.Fa
TAYLOR

University police recovered a stolen late-model car on campus
Monday.
Officer L. H. Wilkerson of the campus police discovered the 1965
Falcon in a parking lot south of Rolfs Hall Monday morning. The
car had no UF parking decals
A check with the Florida Highway Patrol revealed the car was
stolen from Adolf Prez in Tampa Dec. 7
The American Fatality Fire Insurance Co. f which insured the
car, has already replaced it.
A representative from the insurance company will come to get
s he car from the university police Sunday.
Police said the car was unlocked when it was found, and appeared
to have been well taken care of. ...
fmAKn tHRKfI
I U3L CL TtlmaJL I
IfEA TURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE I
I DINING ROOM §
I COUNTER I
I CARRY OUT I
I Open Til 1 AM I
I 1610 S.W. 13th St. I

Pd. Adv.

You'll develop a talent for making hard-nosed, imagina imaginative
tive imaginative decisions. And you 11 know how these decisions affect
the guts of the operation. At the grass roots. Because you'll
have been there.
If you'd like to be a giant yourself, and your better
ideas are in finance, product engineering, manufacturing,
marketing and sales, personnel administration or systems
research, see the man from Ford when he visits your campus.
Or send your resume to Ford Motor Company, College
Recruiting Department.
You and Ford can grow bigger together.
THE AMERICAN ROAD, DEARSORN, MICHIGAN
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYEE.

Police Find Stolen Car



UF Women Represented
In Campus Politics- Finally

Wf I
I JM
, & kJb
"\
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MARTI COCHRAN
Clerk hopeful

Baker Apprentice
Learns In Union

By D.D. DINSMORE
Alligator Correspondent
Have you ever had a doughnut
hole? Have you ever wondered
how the jelly got Into the jelly
roll? Leonard Lones is a stu student
dent student on the UF campus and these
are typical questions hell have
/ to answer on his progress tests.
Leonard, a nineteen-year-old
from Huntsville, Ala., spends
his Saturday nights at the Reitz
Union, but unlike others, he
comes here to learn.
Leonards criteria is older
than history yet as modern as
sugar-free foods. His instruct instructor
or instructor is a master (of sorts) whose
work is well known throughout
the academic community.
Leonard is learning the art of
baking and William Ulrich is his
tutor. In the Unions basement
bake shop, Ulrich explains the
craft to his ward as they combine
to produce nearly 2,000 doughnuts
nightly for gator breakfasts.

MATURITY
During the heat of a political campaign, the candidates are
placed under great pressure, and their true selves are re revealed.
vealed. revealed. The President of The Student Body is under more pres pressure
sure pressure after he takes office.
CLYDE TAYLOR
believes a mature campaign based on
reasons will be reflected after the
election in a mature Student Government
v /__.*
v' believes a Student Body President
a 1 *
should be able to take criticism as
well as acclaim
r ft y
nrr, vote UNITED FIRST

By JANICE SIZEMORE
Alligator Staff Writer
Marti Cochran is running for Clerk of the Honor Court. Why is
this such an extraordinary statement? Marti Cochran is a woman.
Coeds have been on the UF campus for 20 years and only once
in those two decades has a female vied for one of the five top offices
in Student Government. That female, who sought the job of treasurer,
was unsuccessful.
I think a woman candidate stands little chance of being elected
if she runs strictly on the fact of being a woman, said Marti.
Women in politics is not new in this country, but it is a rarity
on this campus. In the past, men at the UF have had the idea that
womans involvement in Student Government was strictly secretarial
and decorational.
The rise in status of the female student is and has been an indirect
project of the Dean of Womens office.
I am delighted that the opportunity exists for women to run for
one of the major student offices, commented Dr. Betty Cosby,
Dean of Women.
Loyce Katz, Assistant to the Dean, and long time supporter of
| female leadership, added that the fact that Marti is running means
a great deal to the female status quo in general.
Marti interjected that able women deserve to be recognized but
insisted that her platform is based on qualifications not sex.
1

Ulrich, a 64 year-old baker for
Servo-mation Inc. which caters
to the Universitys culinary
needs, provides the necessary
lectures for Lones in the friend friendly-yet-serious
ly-yet-serious friendly-yet-serious atmosphere of the
craftsman-apprentice tradition.
Leonard has been on the job
only a week now, but already he
likes his new-found trade. In
this time hes mastered the rudi rudimentary
mentary rudimentary stages of doughnut mak making
ing making and is learning quickly. In a
few weeks time hell be able
to handle a days order himself
and be given keys to the kitchen,
but until then, experience in the
human form of William Ulrich
will continue to teach its lessons.
In the meanwhile, just keep on
dunkin.

Gator Ads Sell

Reisinger,
Robinson
Engaged
Jeane Reisinger and Don Rob Robinson
inson Robinson announce their engagement
and approaching wedding date of
June 15th. Don is a 4EG in the
Chemical Engineering class of
69. Jeane is a sophomore major majoring
ing majoring in education. Both are from
Miami and plan to spend the
summer in Pennsylvania.

Its Time
f o r l^iy.r.r?
TAYLOR

CAMPUS
LIVING

Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

WHATS HAPPENING

IN PROFOUND THOUGHTS AND
SOUL SEARCHING DEPART DEPARTMENT:
MENT: DEPARTMENT: Bishop John J. Dougherty
will speak this afternoon at a
12:15 luncheon. Tonight at 7:30,
he heads the list of speakers at
the University Convocation in the
Florida Gymnasium. What is
Happening in the Roman Cath Catholic
olic Catholic Church will be followed by
a commentary from Dr. Warren
Quanbeck and Dr. Morton Siegel.
FOR WARDING OFF RAPISTS,
LARGE DATES AND WILD
ANIMALS: The Intramural
Karate Club will conduct classes
for beginners. All interested
meet on the gym floor at 4
this afternoon.
HOW NOT TO PSYCH OUT A
GEORGIAN: Prof. Thomas Bever
will speak on The Psychological
Approach to the Human Language
User in Room 347 of the Reitz
Union this afternopn at 12:30.

48 HOUR |\ WATCH REPAIR
Quality Work II
Factory Parts IU4I I l
Unconditional i\IJULA£AJ|0 # Un
Guarantee V* y
376-2655 103 W. UNIV AVE JEWELERS
ho-ahho,ho
ho-ho,lio ho-ho,liokgfiat
kgfiat ho-ho,liokgfiat
thebosss
unfunny
jotes?
Theres a less trying way to
succeed in business. Check /
out our Campus Internship
Program. Fact: 22% of this
companys 50 top agents be began
gan began learning and earning
while still in college. Top
agents are independent and
laugh only when they want to.
Stop by or phone our campus
office today.
W. D. Thompson, Jr.
And Associates, Inc
Consultants
Lakeshore Towers
Phone 376-1291
PROVIDENT
MUTUAL*** LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA
/
\
' r 77 ,', ~-V 7:
.* N

FORWARD
with
Bill Mcride |

Page 9

Adv.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale |
FOR SALE: YashicaD camera
plus extras, 1958 Cushman Eagle
Motorscooter, 7 x 50 Binoculars,
coin collections. Call 378-6582
after 9:00 p.m. (A-63-st-p)
MOBILE HOME for sale 12 wide
2 bedroom 1 1/2 bath. 1967
model. Newly installed $500.00
carpet in Master bedroom, hall,
kitchen and living room. Call
Lee at 378-8628. (A-64-st-c)
*66 HONDA 305 Scrambler, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, metallic green greenchrome,
chrome, greenchrome, $475. Call 376-
9161 after 7:30 ask for Phil
Room 434. (A-64-st-p)
A BEAUTIFUL portable Royalite
typewriter. Excellent condition.
Must sell, leaving for home homecountry.
country. homecountry. $35.00 or best offer.
Also, bicycle and stereo. Call
378-6313 after 5:00. (A-64-3t-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 All-State Scoo Scooter;
ter; Scooter; good condition; new tires;
two seats. $125.00. Call 372-
9510 or 378-7230. (A-65-3t-p)
FOR SALE OR RENT: 1 Br.
trailer, air cond., new gas heater.
Good condition nice location for
students. Call 378-8288 or 376-
6217. (A-65-3t-p)
IMMACULATE By owner
No qualifying Central heat and
air, built in kitchen, cypress
panelling, step-down living room,
sliding glass doors opening on
garden area. Perfect Condition.
$19,000. 6% mortgage. Call for
appt. 372-0328. (A-65-30t-c)
OVER $1,600.00 EQUITY FOR
$400.00 3 bedroom, concrete
block, study with bookcases.
$600.00 down, small monthly pay payments.
ments. payments. Mile from city.
1968. (A-66-3t-p)
COMPLETE set Ludwing drums
never been hit. $300.00. New
Fender Jaguar Electric guitar.
$285.00. 376-6671. (A-66-3t-c)
GOYA GUITAR. $75.00. Call 378-
1253 after 5:30 p.m. (A-66-3t-
P)
PACEMAKER Mobile Home, 10 x
50*, 2 bedroom, central air, Town
n* Country Trailer Park, Call
378-4890. (A-67-st-p)
SOLID STATE STEREO SYSTEM!
Includes: 2 AR4x speakers, Sony
250 A tape deck, Knight KG-854
amplifier and KG-765A tuner,
Weathers Townsend turntable
with Empire 880 PE Cartridge.
Best offer over SSOO. 372-7203
or 376-9420. (A-66-st-p)

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
mmrn ELIZABETH M RICHARD
Taylor Burton
JAN. 22, 23, & 24 Brls p.m.
Admission $1.50
Both 'Shrew' and 'Faustus' $2.50
Tickets On Sale At Union Boxoffice

I for safe
FINE IMPORTED German type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Olympia SM-9. Portable
with case. Like new. SBO or
highest offer. Call 378-3720. (A (A---67-3t-p)
--67-3t-p) (A---67-3t-p)
FOR SALE: AE, ART, BCN
Drafting Table, $35. Accompan Accompaning
ing Accompaning metal-edged, covered board
and T-square, S2O. Assorted ac accessories.
cessories. accessories. 378-4447 after 5 p.m.
(A-67-lt-p)
MUST SELL! 1965 Honda 305
Dream. White, incredible con condition
dition condition -- must be seen. 376-
3211 Ext. 5453, Harry or leave
message with secretary. (A-67-
st-p)
BASENJI PUPPIES, trained,
shots, wormed, ready to go out
looking for a home, AKC, cham champion
pion champion background, reasonable
rates. Ph: 376-4103. (A-67-10t-
P)
MUST SELL 1966 Yamaha Twin
100. Excellent condition with hel helmet,
met, helmet, $240.00. 378-8427. (A-67-
st-p)
1966 HONDA-450, 14 handle
bars, brand new battery, King-ko
exhaust pipes. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell. Call 372-5976.
(A-67-st-p)
FLY! Flying Hawks Inc. has
shares available in a Cessna
Skyhawk. Dual radios dual omni.
Full panel. 372-1290 or 372-
6045 after 6:00. (A-67-7t-p)
for rent
i
WHY LIVE in a traffic-jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
of all parking problems. Fully
furnished spacious 1 bedroom
apt., AC, gas heat, fully equip equipped
ped equipped kitchen including washing
machine. Call 372-3357 or 372-
5240. (B-58-ts-c)
MALE STUDENT vacancy in
double room. AC, 3 blocks from
campus: S7O rest of quarter;
327 NW 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-60-10t-p)
2 BEDROOM apartment, across
from Tigert Hall. $75.00 a month.
Call Carol -372-3915 after sp.m.
(B-65- 3t-p)
BRAND NEW one bedroom apt.
furnished, unusual design, very
private, CHand AC, many extras
real bargain at $105.00. 376-
3619 or 376-3211 ext. 5235. (B (B---63-st-c)
--63-st-c) (B---63-st-c)

for rent |
"furnished ROOM. Business
lady has room in private home,
kitchen privileges, phone. Male,
after 5:30 p.m. or weekends,
814 NE 11th Ave. (B-64-st-p)
THE CENTER OF ACTIVITY.
Live life a little better. Live at
University Gardens. We have
more than the others. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (B-66-st-p)
wanted
NEED 1 or 2 female roommates
immediately. French Quarter
Apt. #lO7. Rent paid for Jan.
Call 378-8253 or come by any anytime.
time. anytime. (C-66-3t-p)
FEMALE roommate One bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment $50.00. Call
378-5369 before 11:00a.m., after
7:00 p.m. Near campus. (C-66-
3t-p)
WANTED 1 or 2 female room roommates
mates roommates for French Quarter Apart Apartment,
ment, Apartment, #97. Call Cynthia or Ce Cecilia
cilia Cecilia at 376-8183. (C-67-2t-p)
ROOMMATES WANTED. Male or
Female. Check with office of
University Gardens. 376-6720.
708 SW 16th Ave. (C-66-st-c)
SnsUftsH
law, at sr. roa|
-open Feature at
6:30 7:07 & 11:10J
RJg ImHnHHRfRS m
I mwm I
I MMMIWMM I
I KIIBSKI ifIIIUIIIIVI 1
I I
cofeature at 9:15
Jane Fonda
in
Barefoot in the Park

_ LAST TIMES
TbDed-orndffced M
NO IBUTS ABOUT IT, ITS 3-5-7-9 OUT
'ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST! MlMflMf I
/If%r m 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:30-9:40
mofttieJDolls
as,\ mbkiwsmii [[[GRMiMffloiMl
IWW.*- COLOR by DELUXE ''
16:30 1
Show Thw TPM PUIS AT 912 j

wanted
$50.00 REWARD for information
leading to the recovery of my
Honda 450. Stolen from Murphree
Area Tuesday or Wednesday Jan January
uary January 16, or 17. Black and Silver,
Tag Number 19A569, Frame
Number 1021512, Call Jon
Ceiner, 372-9306. (C-66-st-p)
WANTED: A Ticket for PP & M
Concert. Call 372-9388, ask for
Haynes in 256. Call after 6 p.m.
(C-67- 2t-p)
FEMALE roommate to share du duplex
plex duplex behind Norman Hall. Phone
378-6258. (C-67-st-p)
WANTED: Ride to ATLANTA
weekend of Jan. 27-28. Need to
see girlfriend badly. Call 372-
9138 for Keith in Room 527.
(C-67-2t-p)
'A Truly Fantastic
Group
John Yates U N C
Better Than The
New ChristyMinstrals
Chris Becker UCLA
Dynamic, In Fact
Sensational
Gayle Newman
UNIVERSITY AUD. I
JANUARY 26,1968
8:00 P.M. I
Adiio SI.OO |

0-
wanted
WANTED female roommate. Rent
$50.00 a month. 1403 NW 6th
Ave. Call 372-3073. (C-67-3t-p)
Lively New Sound
In Folk Music
slow On Tour of
r In 111 'll
UNIVERSITY AUD.
JANUARY 26,1968
8:00 P.M.
Adaissioa SI.OO
1:32 3:31 5:30
7:29 9:28
.dpMJWTHELMS
W BIGGEST
AND BOLDEST!
MUM MARTI M
os MATT HELM
THE
HMBUSHERS
TECHNICOLOR
w A".
Ijk 1:41 3:33
9:29
> >.' I < f v J,
ts itur jU4lnca""'
T^vofifowari^
A MATTER
OF INNOCENCE*



wanted
WANTED: 1, preferably 2, female
roommates for FRENCH QUAR QUARTER,
TER, QUARTER, Apt. 72 (on the pool). Call
Peggy or Sue at 378-7858. (C (C---61-10t-p)
--61-10t-p) (C---61-10t-p)
DESPERATE for 1 or 2 female
roommates. University Gardens
Apartment. Call 378-3903 any
time. If no answer between 8-5
call 376-3261 Ext. 2005. (C-63-
st-p)
WANT TO BUY Barbell Set
or Plates only, 100 lbs. App.
Call 372-9200 sifter 8 p.m. (C--
67-lt-p)
autos
'63 TR-3: $l5O for those who like
to work on sports cars. Good
engine. Csdl 378-8595. Jeff Dunn.
(G-68-2t-p)
1964 FORD GALAXIE 500-XL.
All power, V-8, bucket seats,
wide oval tires, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, just overhauled. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. Call 372-5976.
(G-67-st-p)
1961 BUG-EYE SPRITE. I put
$500.00 into engine and suspen suspension
sion suspension last summer. New top; body
excellent, $700.00 or best offer.
378-3162 evenings. (G-67-lt-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 Rambler Am American
erican American Station Wagon. $600.00.
See at 1750 SW Williston Rd.
(G-66-st-p)
1961 VW Dombi in excellent con condition
dition condition all around. Gasoline
heater. Must sell. 1410 SW 10th
Terrace, Apt. 41. (A-68-st-p)
MUST SALE 1967 VW sunroof
16,250 miles SI3OO. Radio,
luggage rack, other extras, 376-
6619 after 5 p.m. (A-66-3t-p)
6O VW Van Good condition.
Runs fine. Bunks wood panel.
Must sell. $275 or make offer.
372-9128. Dave in 106. (G-65-
st-p)
BUICK 4-dr. hardtop. 1963 Le-
Sabre, power steering brakes,
radio, heater, air, $1,200, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, 378-2735, 2 to
7 p.m. (G-61-10t-p)

(jVA/Sj \Aj^Av^
USE - V :
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

CLASSIFIEDS

| onto. |
1956 DODGE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Power steering, power
brakes, radio, heater, push but button
ton button transmission. Priced to sell.
Call 378-4200 after 5:00. (G (G---65-st-p)
--65-st-p) (G---65-st-p)
FOR SALE: '65 Mustang, V 8
pale blue. $1,450.00. Call Mrs.
Hinton. Campus Credit Union.
Ext. 2973. (G-63-st-c)
help wanted
.
The University of Florida has
challenging positions available
for inexperienced and exper experienced
ienced experienced Clerk-Typists and Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringebene Fringebenefits
fits Fringebenefits include the opportunity to
attend one (1) college course
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the Hub".
(E-61-ts-c)
WAITERS to work 11 2 daily.
Inquire Longhorn Steak House.
14 SW Ist or call 372-2405.
(E-66-4t-c)
HELP WANTED. Student wives
interested in sales or cashier cashiering.
ing. cashiering. Apply Personnel Office, Col College
lege College Inn. 1728 W. University Ave.
(E-66-st-p)
lost-found
FOUND: "one pair horn rim
glasses on lawn in front of In Infirmary.
firmary. Infirmary. Call Ext. 2495, Mr.
Lotter. (L-67-3t-nc)
FOUND: One fraternity pin found
in laundry, 21 blue stones, in insignia
signia insignia is missing, diamond
shaped, Alpha Epsilon, CdTl 376-
1351 after 6:00. (L-66-3t-nc)
FOUND: a watch left in room
237 Little last week. Please
claim. Call Elaine Wiggins, 372-
3621. (L-66-3t-nc)

[ lost-found
LOST: Pair of glasses in black
case. If found please call 372-
3621. Jeri, room 413. (L-65-4t-
P) __
LOST brown wallet in library.
Reward given for return. Ivan
Rosenthal. Call 378-7606. (L (L---65-2t-p)
--65-2t-p) (L---65-2t-p)
| services
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. (M-54-ts-c)
SPECIAL: Dear Estes will give
$18.50 frosting for $12.50 for
limited time. Call 372-5549. (M (M---61-lot-c)
--61-lot-c) (M---61-lot-c)
NOW YOUR FAMILY may come
from Miami to Gainesville every
Saturday for only $lO round trip
per person. Late model station
wagon. Call 372-8371. (J-67-5t-
P> .
GET A PRIVATE license for
$350. Fly in a Cherokee-180
with auto-pilot, two crystal con controlled
trolled controlled radios, like new. Con Contact
tact Contact Bill Fernandz, 376-7871. (J (J---67-2t-p)
--67-2t-p) (J---67-2t-p)
PHOTO SPECIAL, portraits, all
needs and occasions. Sneeringer
Photography. 378-1170, 1013 1/2
W. University Ave. (M-65-3t-c)
personal
TWEETY-BIRD: Happy tenth
month anniversary . Purr,
Sylvester. (J-67-lt-p)
MY DENTIST TO BE: Yes, Honey,
dreams do come true. Congra Congratulations,
tulations, Congratulations, and much love. Freck.
(J-66-lt-p)
DEAR CARL: Happy January 23.
Come over and I will help you
celebrate. Luff, Jami. (J-67-lt (J-67-lt-2)
-2) (J-67-lt-2)

Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Mobile Units Used
In IFC Blood Drive

The Interfraternity Councils (IFC) annual blood donor drive,
which began Monday, is using everything from a mobile unit to award awarding
ing awarding trophies in an effort to encourage donations.
Basically, we feel that the blood drive is the most important
service project that the IFC performs as a group, said Bob Hudson,
secretary of the IFC and coordinator of the drive.
According to Hudson, the mobile units are used to make donating
mere convenient to the fraternities. The unit will be in four locations
during the drive, which will continue through Feb. 13.
The unit will be at the Delta Tau Delta house Jan. 25, at the
Sigma Phi Epsilon house Feb. 1 and at the Phi Delta Theta house
Feb. 8.
A trophy will be presented at Winter Frolics to the fraternity
which donates the greatest amount of blood. Last Years winner
was Sigma Phi Epsilon, with 114 pints.
When a boy donates, his name is put on our account, Hudson
noted. If he or his immediate family ever needs blood, it will be
given free of charge. So its kind of an insurance policy.
Leslie McKay, of the blood bank at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, said the IFC donations are essential.
We appreciate this blood more than most people know. There
is always an Increased need after the holidays, so the drive is coming
at a very good time.
Husdon said he knew of this additional need and started the drive
as early as possible.
We usually start late in February, but I tried to get the drive
started this year as soon after rush ks I could.
Last year the IFC drive contributed 650 pints to the bank. This
years goal is 1,000.

College Os Dentistry
Plans 1971 Opening

By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas first and only College
of Dentistry will soon be built
at the UF.
Dr. Edmund F. Ackell, dean
of the College of Dentistry, said
the college is expected to accept
its first class, about 60 students,
September, 1971.
Ackell said the new college
will confer the Doctor of Den Dental
tal Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree. It
expects to eventually have a gra graduate
duate graduate program leading to the
Ph.D. degree in the Basic
Sciences.
He said the school is one of
five which are presently being
built or planned across the
country. There are 50 now in
operation.

%£zgi,tiJz
HOME OF THE ORIGINAL
BIG BOY
'*' DOUBLE-DECK HAMBURGER
TUESDAY SPECIAL
I PERCH-A-PLENTY I
AH the perch you can eat.
Dining room only.
Fillet of Perch
French Fries $1 oo
Cole Slow I
Rolls and Butter
GAINESVILLE 2035 N.W. 13th STRFET
TELEPHONE 578-2304

By BONNIE CURTIS
Alligator Staff Writer

The first act authorizing a
college of dentistry at UF was
adopted by the state legislature
in 1957.
Little else was done until 1965,
when the legislature appropriated
planning money for an initial
staff.
Ackell and Dr. Jose E. Medina,
associate dean of the College of
Dentistry, are the only two staff
members at present.
The college is expected to open
with a faculty of 62. This is
expected to more than double by
1975. v
Ackell said state legislatures
are asking the states to prepare
their own students for dentistry.
This trend is putting a burden
on non-resident students who
wish to attend schools outside
their state of residence.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Shorty: He Is
One In 10,000

One in 10,000.* Thats what
a doctor told John Shorty De-
Witts mother when he was born.
DeWitt, who is four feet tall,
works as a bricklayer at the
main librarys new open openair
air openair plaza, but says he prefers
working around flowers.
When I was born my grand grandfather
father grandfather looked down and saidlets
name him after me and maybe
we wont have another runt in
the family, he said jokingly.
DeWitt, a husky nine pounds at
birth, developed a rare type of
calcium deficiency in his youth.
I had no calcium in my bones
from the knee down. They kept
me on a calcium diet and.its
just by the grace of God that I
outgrew it.
Theyve got a name for it
this long, he said stretching his
arms out wide.
Thankfulness to John DeWitt is
being able to walk after being
confined to a wheel chair for 16
of his 39 years.
When I was sixteen I decided
I couldnt lay around in a wheel
chair all my life. I just kept
trying. It was rough, but I was
walking when I was nineteen,
he said.
An auto accident several years
later put him back in a wheel
chair with both legs broken, but
he never gave up.
They told me Id never walk
again then too, but I didnt give
up. It was rough. I never went
through such pain, he said.
Thanksgiving Day will be spent
with his fiancee who is five feet,
four inches tall. The height dif difference
ference difference doesnt worry them for
they plan to be married in Decem December.
ber. December.
I wont boss her, she wont
boss me. Well just get along,
he said.
A native of Green Bay, Wis.,
he says his biggest handicap is
getting jobs. He once held a be behind
hind behind the scenes job with a
traveling carnival standing up
wooden cats in an amusement
booth.
I didnt like moving around...
wanted to settle down, he added.
DeWitt has lived in Gainesville
seven years and been working
for UFs Plants and Grounds
Department for nine weeks. He
worked in UFs nursery, water watering,
ing, watering, weeding and planting flowers
before getting the bricklaying job.
I might go down to the Cape
later. Theyre crying for little
guys to crawl around in their
rockets. The pays pretty good
too, he said.
Finding boys size clothing is
no sweat for DeWitt who says
he wears the same clothes he
did in high school.
In his spare time he likes to
build model airplanes and boats.
I used to have a big collection,
but I gave them all to a crippled
boy who said he liked them,
he said.
He also enjoys the companion companionship
ship companionship of his black poodle, Napol Napoleon.
eon. Napoleon.
I live right next to a pooch
parlor, but the dogs dont bother
me a bit, he said.
DeWitt, wearing a faded gray
Florida sweatshirt, said he is a
Gator fan and enjoys cheering
for the boys. He added that he
often listens to games on the
radio.

DeWitt, who calls himself a
hard worker said that he liked
living in Gainesville and had
many friends here.
It doesnt bother me when
people laugh at me. If theyre
ignorant enough to laugh, let
them, he said with a shrug.

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The motivation for this switch
from drugs to meditation, acc according
ording according to the current issue of
Look magazine, stems from the
teachings of a diminutive monk
from India, Maharishi Mahesh

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Yogi, who gained instant fame
as the jet-age guru who guid guided
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of a new, non-chemical turn turnon.
on. turnon.
Maharishis followers, esti estimated
mated estimated worldwide at 250,000 with
more than 5,000 on U.S campuses,
claim that meditation has cumu cumulative
lative cumulative results, but the immediate
effects are the release of tension
and more individual stability.

One thing that has made
people so receptive to Mahar Maharishis
ishis Maharishis message is hallucinogen hallucinogenic
ic hallucinogenic drugs, a Yale Student is
quoted in the magazine. After
having tried LSD and having med meditated
itated meditated for about a year now, LSD
well it's just not real.

Its Time
f o r
TAYLOR



RENEWS

'With Kennedy 1

By JOHN MacMILLAN
Special From The Rea
And The Black
What makes a best-seller?
This is a simple question which
seemingly can be readily
answered. However, a review of
books which have made the
best-seller list in the past twenty
or thirty years brings an in individual
dividual individual to no concrete answer,
but allows one conclusion to be
drawn anything can make the
best-seller list if the climate
is ripe. And so it was, and still
is, with Pierre Salingers candid
and revealing memoir, With Ken Kennedy.
nedy. Kennedy.
As press secretary to the late
John F. Kennedy, Salinger re recounts
counts recounts those thousand days of
fever-pitched excitement, tri triumph
umph triumph and failure, intrigue and
ultimate consuming grief of the
Kennedy administration. Salinger
writes armed with insight of
knowledge of the intricate com complexities
plexities complexities and inner workings of
the Presidency, and, from his
position as Liaison between J.F.K.
and the powerful media of mass
communication, of relations be between
tween between the government and the
governed.
To give the reader this in insight,
sight, insight, Salinger places no limit
on his perspective and delves
into various facets of both do domestic
mestic domestic and international politics,
as well as depicting the late
Presidents family and social
life. But it is in his recapturing
of those moments during the Bay
of Pigs, the Cuban missile crisis
and the Kennedy-Krushchev con confrontations
frontations confrontations where the apparent
fact replaces fantasy and the
reader is finally able to grasp
the personal side of the late
President.
Salingers style is at times
somewhat rambling and dis disorganized.
organized. disorganized. His content is repeti repetitive
tive repetitive and slightly melodramatic,

f Corner
Jack Horner Candidate for Chancellor
The Board Os Masters is chosen from
<5
the top three Law Students.
Its function as an advisory board to the
Chancellor, interpreting the laws and constitution
of the student body.
JACK HORNER
~~ is the only qualified candidate for chancellor who
has served on the Board of Masters.
VOTE UNITED FIRST

but his purpose was not to write
a literary masterpiece, but to
present to the American public
an account of his days with the
late President. Salinger is cap capitalizing
italizing capitalizing upon a near-idol worship
for the late John F. Kennedy
which the author himself is al almost
most almost directly responsible for
initiating and propagating. He has
succeeded overwhelmingly.

IN STATE OF STATE SPEECH
Kirk Cites Education I

By BARBARA FRYE
fALLAHASSEE,, Fla. (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirk told the state
Monday night that Florida must
restructure education and
write a new Constitution in 1968.
Kirk said the state also must
strengthen its weapons against
crime and win this war on
those who have placed them themselves
selves themselves outside the law.
His first annual State of the
State report to the people was
taped and delivered over a state statewide
wide statewide television network.
i
Summing up the first 384 days
of his four year term as
Floridas first GOP governor in
modern times, he said they
have been days filled with hard
work and with accomplish accomplishment
ment accomplishment for you and for Florida.
But he promised Im going to
work even harder all through
1968 to do an even better job.
My goal is to make Florida
first.
Inviting citizens to be full
partners in his administration,
Kirk said he take his weekly
public opinion baths on the
road this year, setting aside
time in various communities for
five minute conferences with
anyone who wishes to come.

Dramatist Edward Albee
To Speak Here Feb. 7

Edward Albee, Americas
best-known playwright and author
of Whos Afraid of Virginia
Woolf? will be on the UF campus
February 7 for a lecture and
reception.
Albee, who recently won the
Pulitzer Prize for his latest
play Delicate Balance, will
speak at 8 p.m. in the ballroom
of the Reitz Union. Student
Government and the Forums
Committee, co-sponsors of the
event, will host a reception for
the author after his lecture.

The governor touched only
briefly on next Mondays con convening
vening convening of a special session of
the legislature to grapple with
the problems of adequately
financing quality education.
He said his commission of
citizens, legislators and educa educators
tors educators who met for the last
time Tuesday to make their
recommendations final has
done a remarkable job.
The commissions proposals
for a complete restructuring: of
Florida education will be pre presented
sented presented to the Legislature for
immediate action, he said.
I am confident our legis legislators
lators legislators will meet their responsi responsibilities
bilities responsibilities to educational excellence
and that they will enact an ed education
ucation education program which the citi citizens
zens citizens of Florida will approve.
Kirk boasted in his report to
the people that he had kept his
promise to hold the line on taxes,
standing firm against the plead pleadings
ings pleadings of every pressure group
for more money.

<
Its Time
f o r
TAYLOR

Tuesday, January 23. 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Known internationally as Am Americas
ericas Americas Angry Young Play Playwright,
wright, Playwright, Albee rocketed to fame
in 1959 with his shocking one oneact
act oneact play zoo Story. The play
opened in Berlin after a number
of New York producers turned
it down a comment on the
very attitude which Albees plays
so often criticize.
He went on to win critica.
acclaim for The American
Dream, a savage satire on the
American Way- of- Life and
The Sandbox, an absurdist

And without any new or in increased
creased increased taxes, he said, we
will still be able to spend more
in this two year biennium than
ever before in Florida history historysl,334,ooo,ooo-and
sl,334,ooo,ooo-and historysl,334,ooo,ooo-and this includes
the largest teacher pay raise
the state has ever granted.
He touched on the need to
find another $445 million to
meet essential highway needs,
but did not say if hed ask the
special session to approve a bond
issue of this amount. Earlier,
he had proposed a $435 million
bond program but Monday night
he used the figure $445 million.
While saying a new constitution
was a must for this year, he
did not say whether he would ex expand
pand expand his special session call to
include constitutional revision or
call another separate session
sometime later-maybe after a
new Legislature is elected in
November.


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farce. His widest fame, however,
came with the film version of*
Who's Afraid of Virginia
Woolf?" with Elizabeth Taylor
and Richard Burton as Albee's
primordial couple, George and
Martha. The play is his state statement
ment statement about both the home and
the society: This country hasn't
lived up to its beginnings," he
has said.
Albee's plays have been icono iconoclastic
clastic iconoclastic not only in ideas but in
presentation. He has used sub subjects
jects subjects and Anglo-Saxonisms never
before heard on the Broadway
stage; he has made his characters
describe or perform acts of per perversion
version perversion and violence which strike
at the very heart of our vio violent
lent violent way of life; he once refused
to permit an intermission in a
three-act play. He is presently
working on a play about man's
evolution which he would rather
not talk about.
Tickets for the lecture go on
sale today at the Union Box Of Office.
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students, $1.50 for others.
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Page 13



Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Ex-Vol Star Rates UF Strong, Weak

k~*'iSr wml
;.j 4/~-, leg
SSki.. ; v x .'MJHb
PP^y----.
|P
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NEAL WALK
o o Gator rebounder
SEC Week
This weeks schedule:
Monday: Kentucky at Tennes Tennessee,
see, Tennessee, Alabama at Mississippi
State, Georgia at Florida, Geor Georw.
w. Georw. Tech at Ohio State.
Tuesday: No games. v
Wednesday: Clemson at Louis Louisiana
iana Louisiana State.
Thursday: Tulane at Kent State.
Friday: Hofstra at Florida
State.
Saturday: Kentucky at Louisi Louisiana
ana Louisiana State, Georgia Tech at ikorth
Carolina, Auburn at Georgia,
Alabama at Florida, Tennessee
at Ole Miss, Vanderbilt at Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi State, Tulane at Pitts Pittsburgh.
burgh. Pittsburgh.
SEC Standings
Cons All
Team W L W L
Tennessee 5 1 10 2
Louisiana State 5 1 9 3
Kentucky 5 2 9 3
Florida 6 4 9 6
Vanderbilt 5 3 12 3
Georgia 3 4 8 4
Mississippi St. 2 5 6 8
Auburn 2 5 6 8
Mississippi 0 7 3 10
V
Independents
Team W L
Florida State 11 4
Miami Fla. 11 6
Virginia Tech 9 7
Georgia Tech 6 6
Tulane 5 6

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>es
Florida Theater

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
A familiar figure in an un unfamiliar
familiar unfamiliar role visited Florida Gym
during Saturday nights UF-Ten UF-Tennessee
nessee UF-Tennessee game.
Former Tennessee basketball
star Ron Widby, dressed in a
bright orange Volunteer blazer
instead of a basketball uniform,
sat with the Tennessee coaching
staff and glumly viewed the ac action
tion action as the Gators scored a 59-
46 victory.
After the game, Widby explain explained
ed explained his presence.
UFs Fencers:
Souths Best
Florida Fencers blade-clash blade-clashing
ing blade-clashing No. 1 epee team defeated
all the Souths top fencing teams
Sunday to win the first annual
D.C. Raab Epee Team Trophy.
Three man teams, mostly non noncollegiate,
collegiate, noncollegiate, from throughout the
South gathered in Clearwater,
Fla., Sunday to fence the team
event. 4
The epee is a thrusting weapon
by which points are scored with
the point anywhere on the oppon opponents
ents opponents body.
Jose Sasek, Rick Leonard, and
Rush Elkins matched their talents
to defeat many national and South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern ranked teams.
Jack Dale, team captain for
Florida Fencers second team,
added his fencing to the accuracy
of Lloyd Chesney and speed of
first time r epee fencer Mike
McCarthy to slide into sixth
place.
Only four of the teams com competing
peting competing represented Florida
schools UF with two teams,
Florida Presbyterian College and
U. of South Fla. with one team
each.
The Fencers hope to continue
its victory in epee at the states
first intercollegiate individual
tournament this Saturday, at
Norman Hall Gym. The public
is invited free of charge.
The event will start mid- morn morning
ing morning and continue through late
afternoon. It is sponsored by the
UF and Florida Fencers (the
University fancing club).

lve been scouting high school
players for Coach Mears (Ten- f
nessee head basketball coach)
since the start of the basketball
season, said Widby. Also Ive
been working toward my degree
4n physical education at Tennes Tennessee.
see. Tennessee.
Widby stated he had finished
his scouting work with the Vols
and would be reporting to the New
Orleans Buccaneers of the Amer American
ican American Basketball Association this
week. He said he hoped to finish
his required hours for a deg degree
ree degree this summer.
When asked to compare this
years Tennessee team to the one
which he captained and starred
on last season, Widby said, Ov Overall,

EXPERIENCE
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FOR HONOR COURT CLERK
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VOTE UNITED FIRST
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erall, Overall, I think this team is strong stronger
er stronger on the boards and has more
offensive punch. This is because
they are bigger that last years
squad.
Widby credited Vol guard Bill
Hann with leading the Tennessee
offense.
He does a great job of dir directing
ecting directing the attack and keeping the
whole team poised during the
game.
In comparing this years Gator
team with last years squad, Wid Widby
by Widby cited center Neal Walk with
great improvement.
He gives their team more re rebound
bound rebound strength this year than last
season.
While at Tennessee, Widby let-

tered in football and golf in ad addition
dition addition to basketball. During the
past football season, he punted
on the Dallas Cowboy taxi squad.
Widby expressed confidence that
he would be a Cowboy regular
next season.
I would like to be able to play
both pro football and basketball
for a few years, stated the six sixfoot-five,
foot-five, sixfoot-five, 210-pounder. After
my playing days are over, I want
to coach basketball.

FORWARD
with sm
Bill Mcride |

Pd. Adv.



IN BOWLING

Pi Lam, Lambda Chi
Set Orange Pace

Pi Lambda Phi and Lambda
Chi Alpha continued their march
toward the Orange League lead
as both won close exciting
semifinal matches Thursday
afternoon at the Reitz Union
Lanes.
The winner of the final match
on Monday afternoon at 4:30
will take over the Orange
League lead.
t
PLP, with Mike Segal carry carrying
ing carrying nine pins on his last ball
defeated SPE 1,636-1,633. The
Pi Lams who trailed by 26
pins going into the final game
were led by Stan Kaplans 159-
352, and the Sig Eps by Joe
Martins 353.
In the other semifinal match,
LXA, who trailed DTD 806-805
after the first game, rallied be behind
hind behind Bill Howards 225 and
393 set to defeat the Delts
1,713-1,595. Harry Bopps 184-
364 led DTD.
The most Impressive showing
to date in both leagues was
registered by Tau Kappa Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon of the Blue League as
they defeated Delta Chi 1,853-
' 1,603.
The TKEs who averaged 185
per man were led by Jim Rup Ruppersberger
persberger Ruppersberger with a 256-449, and
A1 Cowan had a 224-403.
Pi Kappa Phi defeated Phi
Pappa Psi 1,602-1,528 to gain
the finals against the TKEs.
Bill Morwood led PKP with a
184-360 and Joel Aptaker led
PKP si with a 233-378.
UFs Killer
Judo Chops
Dade, 29-19
The UF Judo team, showing
depth, led by two of the states
outstanding judo players, Dave
Frisby and Nelson Mallo, de defeated
feated defeated Mlami-Dade Junior Col College,
lege, College, 29-19, Friday night, at the
Florida Gym.
UF had victories in the 150
pound class, Jan Katz, 165, Dave
Frisby, 180 Steve Squires, and
heavy weight Nelson Mallo. The
outcome was still in doubt until
the final match where a Dade
victory could earn them a tie.
Dades Harold Kray was de defeated
feated defeated by the Gators Clyde Kil Killer,
ler, Killer, cinching the win for UF.
Miami-Dade proceeded on to an another
other another meet with the powerful
Seminole judo team at Tallahas Tallahassee
see Tallahassee on Saturday, January 20.
This was the 1968 season
opener for the Gators and a
tune-up for the Collegiate Cham Championship
pionship Championship to be held March 30
at Miami.

FORWARD
with
Bill Mcride

BASKETBALL
RESULTS
ENGINEERING LEAGUE
Agricultural 26 A.I.C.H.E* 4 20
A.S.M.E. 37 Civil 15
Metallurgy 25 Eng. Sci. 22
LAW LEAGUE
Faux Pas 44 Homogenizers 38
Freedom Riders 16 Takers 0
All-Stars 38 Hackers 30
Knockers 30 Legal Mets 15
Lizards 28 Tortfeasors 19
Hooks 25 Roundballs 18

Its Time
f o r fcf.iw.r.ni
TAYLOR

m
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m ]
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I fl I HI HV M m|r
iBMHr m # M
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Tuesday, January 23, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Gators 'Walk* Over Dogs, 90-63

By 808 PADECKY
AuitdtOf Sports Editor
It was Florida again at home
in a cake Walk. Georgia was the
batter Monday night and Neal
Walk did the mixing. UF beat
the Bulldogs, 90-63, in a South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference basketball
game before 5,103 that ranked
among the roughest of the year.
Three Gators Andy Owens,
Gary McElroy, Dave Miller
sustained injuries serious enough
to leave the game.
In fact, during the last 10
minutes of play, only one UF
starter was in the game, Walk.
But by then Walk was all Florida
needed.
With 33 points and 25 rebounds,
Walk paced the winners to their
10th victory in 16 games, 7-3 in
the SEC. Georgia is 8-5 overall
and 3-4 in the SEC.

Tennis Ball Bounces
With Neely, Pressly
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Writer
A month still remains before the opening of the season
for the Gator tennis team, but Coach Bill Potter already
has his squad singled out as a top contender for the SEC
crown this year.
Potter has at least two good reasons for his optimism,
and theyre both champs. The first is Armi Neely, a
returning varsity star who stood first in the SEC last
year. Second is Jamie Pressly, who finished second.
These two players will make up the nucleus for this
years squad. Six out of nine of last years varsity is
back, including Steve Beeland, Greg ffllley, Will Sherwood
and Lee Steele.
| Florida will be looking for their first SEC title since
U 1961. Mississippi State has dominated tennis in the south southfi
fi southfi east for the past several years.
j **Fd say were certainly in contention. said Potter.
With almost the entire squad back, plus some excellent
H new talent, this should be the year to watch.
H Three of the new faces seeking positions on the Gator
I squad are Paul Unetta Miami, Bruce Bartlett New
I Orleans, and Glenn Cox, a junior college transfer from
San Diego.
1 Florida has 26 scheduled matches this year, opening with
South Florida Feb. 24. The season lasts until early May,
when the SEC Championships will be held. Last year,
Florida placed second in the SEC, and went on to tie for
seventh in the NCAA Tournament.
WINTER TERM
Graduation Announcements

Now On Sale At
The CAMPUS SHOPS BOOK STORE
For 25< Each
I Hie faculty
and
Graduating Classes
of tke
University of Florida
. i announce tke
Winter Quarter Graduation
Tuesday, M arck nineteentk
Nineteen kundred sixty*eigkt
Gainesville, Florida
COMMENCEMENT CONVOCATION
TO BE HELD
JUNE NINTH, 1968

In the freshman prelim, St.
Petersburg Junior College dealt
UFs frosh its only second loss
of the year, 64 63. Anthony
Thomas sank a free throw with
six seconds left to give the Tro Trojans
jans Trojans the tight win.
The Baby Gators, now 6-2,
had four men in double figures.
They were led by Todd Lalichs
17 points. Jeff Miller contributed
13 points in a losing cause while
Vernon Chewning and Skip Lewis
chipped In with 11 each.
In the varsity game, both teams
traded a pair of baskets. Then
Florida quickly ran off eight of
the next nine points. Walk scored
half of them.
From then on, it was a question
of how big a score the Gators
would run up. The Bulldogs helped
things out, hitting only 29 per
cent of their field goals in the
first half.

At the games end, Florida
connected on 54 per cent of its
floor shots, compared to
Georgias 35. The winners were
equally impressive rebounding,
snaring 61 to the losers 37.
Besides Walks 25, Owens
grabbed 13 rebounds and McElroy
added 12. But the pair sat out
most of the second half, Owens
with a twisted knee and McElroy
m
DAVE MILLER
. . Gator captain

is TMIUPkoWcT/ori cf
he Bollrr mA.
ICS I n
This is
HORNER
The ONLY Qualified
for Chancellor
Jack .Horner
By Law, Every Candidate For Chancellor
Must Take The Course In Evidence In Law School
'v Jack Horner received the highest grade in Evidence
Horner was recommended by the Past Chancellor
v Jock Homer has served with distinctions in the Honor Court
S Jack Horner will continue to serve you.
Vote Experience
UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

with a cut above the eye. Miller
joined the walking wounded with
a sprained knee.
Only Owens is listed among the
serious. Owens, a sophomore av averaging
eraging averaging 16 points a game, has a
history of ankle Injuries and
problems.
Guard Boyd Welsch played a
valuable role in the second half,
scoring 13 points while substi substituting
tuting substituting for Miller. Miller hit for
12, two above his average. Owens
connected for 13.
The Gators host Alabama this
Saturday, one of the last four
home games left on the schedule.
UF also has Walk, who the only
college player in the nation who

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ranks both in the top 10 in
scoring and rebounding.
With a 26.6 scoring average
and a 19 rebounding standard,
Walk has scored more points and
pulled down more rebounds in 15
games than Gary Keller did all
last year. Keller, All-SEC for-
Tommy Bartlett in 1967, is play playing
ing playing pro ball for the Minneapolis
Muskies of the American Basket Basketball
ball Basketball Association.