Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Partly Cloudy
Low in the 50s
High 70-75

Vol. 60, No. 65

; PV**Siwv jmiy jmiy-V
-V jmiy-V 's
llp| v? ->, %%
<&. : ./:
.
; ::
::: :;::: ::: :
.

UF Police Wont Enforce
Helmet Law Until Verified

By BARBARA SCHAEFER
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Police De Department
partment Department will not enforce the
helmet law on campus until it
has been further clarified, Chief
A. I. Shuler said Thursday.
Lt. V. K. Holliman declared
previously that the campus polity
would issue a ticket to anyof*
riding a cycle without proper
equipment starting Jan. 15.
This repealed enforcement
regulation at UF is a result of
the confusion over the law passed
during the 1967 session of the
Florida legislature to satisfy the
standards of the National Highway
Safety Act of 1966.
The statute requires all cyc cyclists
lists cyclists to wear a helmet, goggles
or face mask. However, initial
confusion arose from the failure
of the law to designate the exact
location where the helmet was to
be worn.
The helmet was then defined
as a device primarily intended
to protect the upper part of the
wearers head against a blow.
Glass or plastic eye pieces
worn over the eyes and held in
place by a temple piece or head headband
band headband for protection of eyes and
eye sockets, were stated to be
Police Tow
Cars! Away
University police impound impounded
ed impounded seven cars Thursday which
were towed away from the
Reitz Union.
Police said the cars were
parked in the unions service
drive leading up to the load loading
ing loading ramp.
They said signs designating
additional tow-away zones
were erected in the union ar area
ea area Monday.
_ Owners can recover cars
", impounded by police at the
university police department
by paying the towing fee.

The
Florida Alligator

These Cyclists May Be Breaking The Law

safety goggles.
During the time until exact
provisions of this new cycle law

Religion -In-Life Week
Begins Sunday Night

UFs Religion-in-Life Week
program, scheduled Sunday
through Wednesday will center
around the general topic of re religious
ligious religious change in a changing
world.
The four major speakers,
Dr. Huston Smith, Bishop John
J. Dougherty, Dr. Warren A.
Quanbeck and Dr. Morton Sie Siegel,
gel, Siegel, plan to emphasize the
meaning and spirit of the Ec Ecumenical
umenical Ecumenical Movement.
Dr. Smith will deliver the
keynote address on The
Meeting of Religions East
and West at 7:30 p.m. Sun Sunday
day Sunday in the Reitz Union Ball Ballroom.
room. Ballroom.
Bishop J Dougherty, pres president
ident president of Seton Hall Univer University
sity University and auxiliary bishop of
Newark N.J., will give the
principal address at the Uni University
versity University convocation at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday inFloridaGym inFloridaGymnasium.
nasium. inFloridaGymnasium.
Following his talk there will
be commentary by Dr. Quan Quanbeck
beck Quanbeck and Dr. Siegel who give
major talks Wednesday on
Protestantism and Judaism.

Guess Whats Tomorrow
The Alligator would like to remind its readers (who by now must
think the UF is one huge perpetual motion machine) that tomorrow,
Saturday, they will be required to attend classes again.
Saturday classes tomorrow will go according to the usual Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday schedule. And, happily, tomorrows Saturday classes will
conclude the bout with weekend classes at least for this year.
So, we hope you make it to Wednesday's classes on Saturday
(which is tomorrow) and we hope that as you grow old you will
forget you ever had to go to school on Saturday.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

j|L 1
I

- *o* .<%*: a
s
....- £M||jrak WmSm BBPSp^s%
*****
KB8S&, w
'mml imM
~....... M JhbhL
lii
- .Jkgjpg j yy 1 B
r#yl| IT "xblbhb
(Photos by Dave Doucette)

are presented, violations of any
kind pertaining to cyclists rid riding
ing riding equipment will not be issued
at UF.

All events are open to the
public and, except for the
convocation, will be held in
Reitz Union.

FBK President Fuming

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida Blue Key President
Bill McCollum is fuming over
the use of Blue Key as part
of a political game by pre presidential
sidential presidential candidates Clyde Taylor
and Bill Mcride.
Im concerned about the use
of the fraternitys internal affairs
in the campaign by Blue Key
brothers in both major parties,
McCollum said Thursday.
The Blue Key president said
that actions by presidential can candidates
didates candidates Mcride and Taylor in
the election have proved unsavory
to him.

IN BOND CASE

Judge Orders
Court Hearing
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Federal District Judge G. Harold Cars Carswell
well Carswell has ordered two Gainesville civil rights workers released from
jail on SSOO bond unless Circuit Judge James C. Adkins can show
sufficient reasons for denying them bail on contempt of court con convictions.
victions. convictions.
In an order signed late Wednesday and released Thursday, Carswell
ordered Alachua County Sheriff Joe Crevasse to seek a hearing be before
fore before Adkins to put the facts on the record to support the order of
that court denying these petitioners bail pending appeal.
Carswell ordered a transcript of the hearing before Adkins be
completed by next Monday and set a hearing in federal court here
for Tuesday to rule on the petitions of Irven Lee Jack Dawkins
and Mrs. Carol Thomas to be released on bond.
Dawkins is serving a six month sentence and Mrs. Thomas was
sentenced to four months.
The federal judge said that if Adkins declines to hold a hearing,
Dawkins and Mrs. Thomas will be allowed to post SSOO bond each
as of 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22, without a further federal court hearing.
Adkins complied with the order and set a hearing for 3 p.m.
Friday on his refusal to grant bond.
I have no comment on Judge Carswells order, said Adkins
during a court recess Thursday. I have simply invited attorneys
for the state and the defense to get all sides of this on the record.
Dawkins, a Negro, and Mrs. Thomas, the white wife of a Univer University
sity University of Florida professor, were sentenced to jail last month for con contempt
tempt contempt of court after they distributed literature which was highly
critical of the Alachua County Grand Jury and the Gainesville police
and fire departments.
Adkins refused to set bail pending appeal of the convictions.
Carswells order said the record of the contempt case does not
provide any sufficiently clear factual basis to determine the valid validity
ity validity of the conclusions expressed in denying bail.

He said that due to the seriousness of the charge of which these
petitioners stand convicted and the presumptive validity of the correct correctness
ness correctness of the acts of the trial court, this court has concluded that the
circuit court for Alachua County should be afforded opportunity to
develop and to place upon the record the actual factual basis for the
denial of bond on appeal.

OVER 'POLITICAL GAME

I think that such allegations
by both parties should be brought
before the members of Florida
Blue Key and our Ethics Com Committee
mittee Committee in particular, and have
no place in the Student Govern Government
ment Government elections campaign, Mc-
Collum told the Alligator.
He noted that United First
party has seemingly attempted to
resurfect the now dead image
of Florida Blue Key that of
a strong power interest seeking
control of student government
in an effort to attack Blue Key
for political reasons.
McCollum noted the Florida
Blue Key chapter today is not
the same chapter that reaped so
much criticism (on this basis)
1 ittle more than a year ago.
Asked about statements'made
by Forward party that coercion
was used in Alligator Editor Steve
Hulls induction into Blue Key,
McCollum stated these too have
damaged the image of the Blue
Key chapter.
He said few, if any, Blue Key
members voted against the tap tapping

Friday, January 19, 1968

ping tapping of Hull Into Blue Key last
November.
McCollum turned over a copy
of the flier to the Florida Blue
Key Ethics Committee Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday for investigation.
The Ethics Committee, which
is to meet within a week,"
would make recommendations to
the chapter and then the active
members will make any final
decisions, according to Mc-
Collum.
He noted that both Mcride
and Taylor are members pf Flo Florida
rida Florida Blue Key, a fact they
sometimes seem to forget."
Large portions of the steer steering
ing steering committees of both major
parties are Blue Key members,"
McCollum noted.
He said he considered him himself
self himself apolitical. I have great re respect
spect respect for both Taylor and Mc-
Bride," he said, adding that he
thinks both of them would make
excellent student body pres presidents."
idents." presidents."

Inside
But I Don't
Even Smoke
See Page 19



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19. 1968

Bulletin News
State, National, International Nows
Kirk Accuses LBJ
WASHINGTON (UPI) -- Florida Republican Gov. Claude Kirk
Thursday accused President Johnson of using a double set of books
to give Americans an untrue budget picture in his state of the union
message.
Kirk, taking part in a seven-governor news conference via tele telephone
phone telephone hookup, lashed at the budgeting figures Johnson unveiled
in his Wednesday night address before Congress.
Kirk said the switch in the method of stating the nations fiscal
picture, which Johnson said he adopted on the advice of fiscal experts,
enabled him to project a possible sl2 billion deficit that actually
would be S2O billion.
Eartha Kitt Protests
WASHINGTON (UPI) Negro singer Eartha Kitt shouted
at Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson Thursday at a White House luncheon
that the nations youth are rebelling because they are snatched off
to be shot in Vietnam.
Miss Kltts outburst visibly shocked Mrs. Johnson and 50 other
guests invited to the White House to discuss the Presidents pro proposals
posals proposals to reduce crime in the streets.
The First Lady sat in pale, stunned silence as Miss Kitt declared
that American youth were angry because their parents are angry...
because there is a war going on that they dont understand. .
that they dont know why.
Cut Approved
LONDON (UPI) The House of Com mons Thursday night app approved
roved approved Prime Minister Harold Wilsons drastic economy program
at the conclusion of a bitterly resentful debate on Britains shrunken
role in the world.
The opposition Conservative party abstained from voting on the
crucial decisions.
The House approved the program which will shrink Britains world worldwide
wide worldwide defense commitments to the continent of Europe and which makes
major reductions in spending for the governing Labor partys cher cherished
ished cherished welfare state.
Riots In Japan
SASEBO, Japan (UPI) An estimated 50,000 anti-American de demonstrators
monstrators demonstrators swarmed through Sasebo Thursday and warmed up for
an all out riotous protest against the arrival of the UJS. aircraft
carrier Enterprise with a rally and a street brawl.
A band of several hundred leftist protestors tried to storm the
U.S. naval base for the second straight day and were beaten back
by 6,000 riot police who used clubs, tear gas, and water hoses. The
brief clash injured 72 persons and prompted 15 arrests.
About 9,000 socialists, communists and other leftists held a noisy
rally at the Sasebo baseball park Thursday afternoon to denounce
the Enterprises scheduled port of call. As the rally broke up a crowd
of several hundred headed toward the naval base.
Why wait for a book
sale? We have sale prices
every day.
Birds of Prey ...was $25 $12.95
25 Centuries of Sea Warfare $3.95
The Best Remaining Seats $5.95
Man & Time $5.95
The Gun & Its Development $7.95
Birds of the World $9.95
a
Browse today at
MIKES BOOK STORE
116 SE Ist Books-Tobacco-Papers-Magazines
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida
and la published five Umes weekly except during June, July and August when It Is published
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the
official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. Hie Alligator Is entered
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at GalnesvUle, Florida, 32601.
Subscription rate Is $14.00 per year or $4.00 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves tfca. rlght to regulate the typographical tone of all adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy whlch It considers objectionable. = j-
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Adver Advertising
tising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will
not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. for correction must be given before next Insertion.

Question Os The Day
~' r '~ -c PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

TODAY* S QUESTION OF THE
DAY: What is your position on stu student
dent student publications autonomy?
Clyde Taylor
United-First party
My position is quite clear: contrary to my opponent
who feels he must agree with his fraternity brothers
veto (Don Braddock, former SG Treasurer) as well as
UF President Stephen OConnell (another fraternity
brother), I want Student Publications autonomy now.
I feel that by granting student publications tempor temporary
ary temporary autonomy for the remainder of this year the Board
of Student Publications will be in a much stronger
position in August to request permanent autonomy
from President OConnell.
Only by letting the Alligator and other student pub publications
lications publications handle their funds now, will we be able to see
if they are capable of being autonomous permanently.
Rich Houk
Contrived party
Freedom of the press here on the University
campus has in the past been blantantly violated. There
exists no logic that could support student govern governments
ments governments financial control over the Alligator. Students
money should be used to pay a reasonable subscript subscription
ion subscription rate to the Alligator through student government
with no strings attached. The advertising revenue
should and must be under the control of the Alligator
staff alone. My party stands behind autonomy tempor temporary
ary temporary or permanent and we will work to establish it.

Protesting UF students made a
second attempt at communication
with the CIA Thursday in the
university placement office.
Eight students representing the
Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS) gave a letter to a place placement
ment placement office representative tore torelay
lay torelay to the CIA interviewer.
The letter asked that a duly
authorized representative be

Filet of I
FISH 1,19 I
Dinner I
"You'll like It"
FRIDAY NIGHT FROM 5 TIL 9 P.M.
n th. Oinfng Roan, on rh. Curb, or Cnv-out. I
A generous serving of filet of white fish
with French fries a plenty, side dish of I
tongv cole slaw and tastv hush puppies H
f yery l rida y at JERRY'S ror just
$1.19. 1
iIffMEBT 2 Goinmllle Locations H
i LUMjhW 23,0 Sw. 13th STREET |
1505 N.W. 13th STREET I
l

SDS Tries Again

sent to this campus to engage
in a dialogue with students
concerning the function and ac activities
tivities activities of the CIA.
The representative, who asked
to remain unidentified because of
his messenger-boy function
between the SDS and the CIA,
stated at that time that he would
not interrupt the interview sche scheduled
duled scheduled to deliver the message. He

Bill Mcride
Forward party
It the Alligator is to perform its function as a
forum for the free exchange of ideas it must be
without political control and pressure. We are not
proposing temporary measures. Instead we will call
for immediate permanent autonomy.
On the day I take office I will appoint a committee
of Student Government and Alligator representatives
to establish the necessary fiscal safeguards within
the Board of Student Publications. We will give the
Alligator a permanently secure position.
Ira Brukner
Individual's party
Self-rule is necessary prerequisite for liberating
organizations from cumbersome types of inter interference,
ference, interference, political or otherwise, thus giving them
independence and individuality.
However, before the Spirit of 76 carries us too
far, an important aspect of the problem must be
considered, its feasibility in this case. Here we move
out of fairyland into the reality of financial control,
and looking over the records I am skeptical of the
accountancy of Student Publications.
In short, being in Student Publications I favor'its
autonomy, qualified only by the fact that it is mature
and responsible enough to adequately and shrewdly
use it.
TOMORROWS QUESTION OF THE
DAY: Why are you 'running for
Student Body President?

said that it would be delivered
after the interviews were con concluded
cluded concluded and before the interviewer
left the building.



Jones Plea Answered,
But Not Yet Released

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF administration an answered
swered answered Dr. Marshall Jones* peti petition
tion petition for an open hearing
Thursday, but no one is saying
what the answer is.
Jones petitioned the adminis administration

Illegal Phone Confiscated
University police confiscated an illegally owned telephone at the
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house Wednesday after being tipped off
by the Southern Bell telephone office in Jacksonville.
Southern Bell Security Officer Ray Leach said two long distance
calls had been made on the telephone to Melbourne, giving a Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville number which had been disconnected in December.
The president of SPE denied knowledge of the telephone and granted
permission to Gene Watson, chief investigator of the university
police, to enter the room in which the telephone was allegedly located.
The two occupants of the room admitted having the telephone and
turned it over to the police. The occupants of the room said they had
permitted fraternity members to make local calls on the telephone.
The long distance calls in question were paid for and the matter
was turned over to the dean of men.

tration administration for open hearings on his
controversial tenure case. The
case would be handled by the
Faculty Senate Committee for
Academic Freedom and Tenure.
According to Dr. Paul L. Hanna,
professor of social sciences,
Thursday was the deadline for

_.--y / Rg| :; .;Kv
% j 8881.. w I
m£i WSBk k. % \
: A 9B: ; .. |
H B Vk H. R, 4JV mk ti
Hr 1 V Wtmmt IV -vs.\
mmm ~ hsrbPw m
- ; R| Sb-Mt.,
| -MMff 4 V . Ji
K IMME ImMI 4 f .'***
n B *SB BHR; .. P -mm
gM&\ ..-.< *s&
! /v V Hk || Rn- B % ;|||j
?. ,V V 4JR .. Rp v* \
vs&R
iBBMBp 'Bk
HAPPY NEW SHAKEYS!

Shakcys Pizza Parlor \ Vs IuMii
House is a New Years party. any time
of the year. It's a -how. are your"
"whatll you haver" type of place.
Its your local eentet lor gourmet
pizza. (Nobody Iras ever nude pizza like
Shakcys.)
Imagine a heavenly, .delicate crust,
topped with many different kinds of
cheeses and imported delicacies. >m< ked
Oysters. Or Canadian Bacon Or heap heapings
ings heapings of White Mushrooms.
Imagine 21 different kinds oi pizza.

answering the petition.
Hanna told the Alligator the
reply would come through the
presidents office, but Vice-
President Frederick Conner re referred
ferred referred the Alligator to Robert J.
Farley, professor of law and one
of the committees legal repre representatives.
sentatives. representatives.
Farley refused to divulge the
nature of the reply to Jones*
petition.
Hanna said the faculty commit committee
tee committee would meet as soon as
everyone can assemble. He said
one member is out of town until
Sunday, so the group cant meet
until Monday, at the earliest.
Jones could not be reached for
comment at press time.
Jones was denied tenure last
summer by former UF President
J. Wayne Reitz because of Jones*
belief in overt rebellion as a valid
way to initiate change, according
to Conner.

then come to Shakes N. for Shake) 's
has em.
Its \our own local puh. With an old
Knglish fireplace.dark wood ceiling and
little red lamps (W eve added sparkling
space-age kitchen- and ample parking.
I'ur dont let it throw y.oii.)
CnHVmZZAPARLOa&
mAAmUI ll Ve Public house

MonThurs 4pml2
Fri 4-1 Sat 11-1 Sun H-12
3510 SW 13th Street

Friday. January 19. 1968. The Florida Alligator,

Broadcast Seminar
Scheduled Today

A seminar on broadcast pro promotion
motion promotion at UF entitled What
Every Red-Blooded Gator Should
Know About Broadcast Pro Promotion**
motion** Promotion** will be held today in
Room 236 of the Stadium building.
The seminar, sponspred by the
Florida Broadcast Promotion
Association and the College of
Journalism and Com munications,
will feature speakers from
Florida television and radio
stations.
From 9:05 to 9:55 a.m. and
from 1:25 to 2:15 p.m. the dis discussion
cussion discussion will feature What Is
It You Do At That Station, Son?**
and The Name Os The Game.
Color Me Communicative*
and The Care And Feeding Os
Columnists* will be discussed
from 10:10 to 11 a.m. Tnese
talks will be repeated at 2:30 p.m.
Talks on how to prepare sales

It's the place to bring your family
and have food and fun for a whole eve evening
ning evening for less than youd spend on fruit
ant 1 nuts at the holiday season.
It's a wonderful place for lunch. And
the only pliice you can buy Shakeys
Pizza to go.
It's beyond comparison. And itsopen
now. So come and see for yourself what
a Shakeys Pizza Parlor Sc Ye Public
House is like.
Bring a party. And enjoy yourself
at ours.

promotion entitled Tell You
What Pm Gonna Do," and on
understanding and using effective
program rating information In
radio and television The Num Numbers
bers Numbers Racket, will be held from
11:15 to 12:03 p.m. and from
3:35 to 4:25 p.m.
So You Want To Lead A
Band will tell interested par participants
ticipants participants the how's and why's
of a career in broadcasting pro promotion.
motion. promotion.
Gator Meets
The Florida Alligator editorial
staff will have a meeting this
afternoon at 4 p.m. in the Student
Publications suite of the Reitz
Union.
All Alligator staff, members
are required to attend.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Bayman
Refutes
Charges
Scott Bayman, Student Govern Governm
m Governm ent*s representative on the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Department ticket commit committee,
tee, committee, told the Alligator Thursday
that charges made by Forward
Partys Bill Mcride were ri ridiculous
diculous ridiculous
Mcride had charged the pre present
sent present administration with bungling
student football ticket distrib distribution
ution distribution and disclosed plans for lea leaving
ving leaving ticket windows open until 7
p.m. next year.
Bayman, saying he wanted to
set the record straight, outlined
the structure behind ticket po policy.
licy. policy.
The student government has
a cross-section of people, in including
cluding including the Secretary of Married
Students, and the minority and
majority floor leaders, who work
through me. I give their recom recommendations
mendations recommendations to the Athletic de departments
partments departments ticket committee for
final decision and they usually
cooperate fully with student go government.
vernment. government.
Bayman said that the present
set-up had worked well in the past
and that it is established policy
to leave the windows open to
9 p.m.
Math Dept
Gets Grant
A $67,730 grant was recently
awarded to the University of
Florida Department of Math Mathematics
ematics Mathematics by the National Science
Foundation to upgrade in service
secondary mathematics teach teachers.
ers. teachers.
Dr. William A. Gager, who will
direct the grant, said courses
in college geometry and intro introductory
ductory introductory analysis will be conduc conducted
ted conducted June 7 to August 20.
Interested secondary teachers
should write to Gager at the un university
iversity university for instructions and ap application
plication application blanks. p

T.V. LOG
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET From COUCHS Inc.
7:00 Westerners vSley Peyton Place Jack and the what's New Your Dealer Since 1933
7*30 Wlld Wild off tQ
World o 1 See the
o.nn Wild, Wild Wizard Challenge of 1
8:00 West MOVIE space jj
8:30 Star Trek £T #r Spectrum
9:00 Star Trek MOVIE Koltanowski K^
9:30 s H q rr 633 Squadron Playhouse
10.00 Telephone Hour Telephone Hour
10 30 ZENITH SOLID-STATE
AM TABLE RADIO
11*00 News News News News T h* crime ..
The ETUDE Model Y22sTransistorized AM radio
11 on Johnny MOVIE r Johnny 1 offers ' nge / life through cooler operation operation-11:30
-11:30 operation-11:30 Carson MOVIE Joey Bishop Carson ~~ mstent warm-up. 1000 milliwatts
- 1 The Doctors * undistorted Wavemagnet antenna for
Dilemma" : best reception. Automatic gain control.
Easy-to-read dial. Polystyrene cabinet in
beautifully grained Walnut color
FEARLESS FORECAST 8 wamui color.
Damn Yankees" (1958) If you like a baseball musical comedy, ICUuLHS Inc. 608 N. Main St.
watch this! /

TUMBLEWEEDS
- THIS MONTH, THE COVETED
BLACK FEATHER (30ES TO AN
OLD FRIEND! THAT CONJURINSCDRN
BALL, THATM.R IN MOCCASINS:
MEDICINE MAN, I NAME YOU,
INDIAN OF THE MONTH.'

Taylor Willing To Withdraw
If Accusations Proved Correct

By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student body presidential can candidate
didate candidate Clyde Taylor expressed
willingness Thursday to drop out
of the presidential race if 50
per cent of the charges made
against him in a circular dis distributed
tributed distributed on campus could be
proved.
The circular was distributed on
campus Wednesday by Forward
party following an Alligator ed editorial
itorial editorial on Forward party candi candidate
date candidate Bill Mcride and United-
First party candidate Clyde Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor.

mAK n tHAKf
ujl a trmoi
FEA TURING-QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
DINING ROOM
COUNTER
CARRYOUT
Open Til 1 AM
1610 S.W. 13th St,

The circular accused Alligator
editor Steve Hull of being con controlled
trolled controlled by United-First party, a
coalition of Charles Shepherds
First party and Gary Goodrichs
United party.
It also accused Clyde Taylor
of being a do-nothing poli politician.
tician. politician.
Taylor said the people res responsible

ME?] GOSHJ I'M
OVERWHELMED] I CAhTT
BELIEVE IT! WHAT A SURPRISE]
TELL ME] HOW PIP YOU

ponsible responsible for the circular were
immature and out of touch with
reality.
Taylor stated that the people,
thrown out of student govern government
ment government by CharTes Shepherds el election
ection election last year, will apparent apparently
ly apparently stop at nothing to win this
years election.

EUROPE
(rQ I
CAR
3 WEEKS
= $325
Interested?
Call Ex 2741 or
Visit 310 Florida Union

by TOM K. RYAN
\ / ,/^OMVEWEREsrnw'x
\\ // ( AROUND, SCRAPING THE )
W VBOTTOM O' THE BARREL/
~

He said he views the charges
made against him in the blue
sheet as a personal affront to
him and his supporters.
If Bill Mcride, John Ritch,
Manny James or any other stu student
dent student on campus can prove even
50 per cent of the charges/
said Taylor, Pll be willinc to
step out of this race/



v' 4g|4~


5S H. j
p^' y v 3kshbb&:. *£*.
,/*IB pv#
A ; r

GATOR GIRL
Todays Gator Girl
is Happy Arken, 3ED.
A member of AEPhi
sorority, Happy has
been TEP Sweetheart
for the past two years
and was second run runnerup
nerup runnerup in the Miss Wau Wauberg
berg Wauberg Contest,
Help Needed
By Accent
Students Interested In commit committee
tee committee work on the Accent Sympos Symposium,
ium, Symposium, being held April 1-6, are
invited to submit applications.
Positions are available on all of
the committees including pro program,
gram, program, personnel, publicity, tech technical,
nical, technical, public relations, speakers,
magazine, and finance. Secretar Secretaries
ies Secretaries who can take shorthand and
type efficiently are also needed.
Persons interested in applying,
should contact the Accent Office,
room 304 of the Florida Union
to fill out an application and
sign up for an interview.
FUN WORKING
IN EUROPE
-> pmpp ;'
Jobs Abroad Guaranteed
BRUSSELS: The Intl Student
Information Service, non-profit,
today announced that 1,000
GUARANTEED JOBS
ABROAD are available to
young people 17V2 to 40, Year-
Round and Summer. The new
34 page JOBS ABROAD maga magazine
zine magazine is packed with on-the-spot on-the-spotphotos,
photos, on-the-spotphotos, stories and information
about your JOB ABROAD.
Applications are enclosed.
LANGUAGE-CULTURE-FUN LANGUAGE-CULTURE-FUNPAY-TRAVEL.
PAY-TRAVEL. LANGUAGE-CULTURE-FUNPAY-TRAVEL. For your copy
send SI.OO AIRMAIL to: ISIS,
132 Rue Hotel des Monnaies,
Brussels 6, Belgium.

mmmmmmmmmmmmmrnmmmmmmm ~ Mg :
u. M? Bd||&%*
*s: ;.- : < .-. : : ' r 4m*
xf'i.g.y > ll\ s ---- -. \ % ... \ |- i.
f I f : I >
A BL
i^/Vv'4^'.'. ;y 's':4 ?'- : ;v£' v^''-; ; "//£^. #\a^ >I: 'V s.%i } ~-4 X[-v. : 'j :'-:.?' ; 1 -- : O''j'lggfk' 2& -.at. .. B,' ', . ( fV '*-, V, /r .1 *** rh \* K \ e J '- 1
I 1 K; Hr Jr J|
ifflr b i I #
.IliF lr r^f
- ? .JW
<*>.'r ... 1 V' .-rJ f Jin
< .a ; H? ;/ s K JH t *. : /. t fV ., y ,^ t J r v * K ,C l J '-
B
M|
H
H iB bH
H ma H Br
H if H 3 4 S y, r '-yjf g % a t 'vy
B ? It Jm
bUbs I U'B j
Hk jSBK/. A ;
4mm-SSSM 9 m W *:
it. m m, m rn U mt m Wk m m T > H S K .aM V
1 jH. Hf B |B . : 1111 9rfl
j-BS.B BB B *. B W -BB- iw.. .* _ /. v ** n"i -. v * 4- -.*. 1 ? >v,
ygfe |K ; MB MK ME Hm|j| W JS
|B JBk gBL s mBB j 8. 'ip

LSD-Sun
Labeled
HARRISBURG, Pa. (UPI)
Gov. Raymond P. Shafer said
Thursday the reported LSD sun
blinding of six college students
was a hoax fabricated by a blind
state official who became emo emotionally
tionally emotionally involved over use of the
drug by children.
The official, Dr. Norman Yo Yoder,
der, Yoder, was immediately suspended
from his $20,000- a- year job as
state commissioner of the blind.
Yoder said he was sick and
would enter a hospital.
His hoax fooled state officials
from the governor on down and
made front pages from coast to
coast.
The true story was smoked
out early Thursday after Shafer,
who had told a news conference
Wednesday he was reasonably
sure the story was true, ordered
an investigation by the state
Justice Department.
J
Shafer slightly apologetic
announced that he personally went
to Yoders office with state Atty.

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Blindness
Fabrication

Gen. William C. Sennett and de demanded
manded demanded documentary evidence on
the blindings.
Dr. Yoder stated the whole
thing was a fabrication, Shafer
said. He is distraught ... he
stated he is sick and wants to
be admitted to a hospital. He
apparently attended a lecture on
the use of LSD by children and
became concerned and emo emotionally
tionally emotionally involved.
Yoders fantasy took shape last
Friday when he told a reporter in
Washington that six western Pen Pennsylvania
nsylvania Pennsylvania college students were
totally and permanently blinded
18 months ago when they stared
at the sun for 6 to 8 hours while
under the Influence of LSD, a
hallucinogenic drug.
Yoder refused to give names.
So skillfull was the duplicity

that Shafer said he himself knew
the name of the college where
the blindings took place but
that he was not going to identify
it.
Shafer said Yoder stated he was
the only person involved in the
fabrication. He said Yoder ad admitted
mitted admitted he prepared fictitious
forms Wednesday to back up his
story. The governor said Yoder
apparently used extracts from
legitimate case histories of blind
students in Pennsylvania col colleges.
leges. colleges.
MAULDINS
AUTO
GLASS
Fast attention to Insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
FRH ESTIMATIS
623 N.W. Mi SI.
East Side ACL Depot

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Page 6

The
Florida Alligator
*' The Florida Alligator Is A Student Newspaper"
kad f S r
J{(l Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
j Managing Editor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Boh Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
At Florida Alligator's official position on lsausa Is szprssssd
only la tbs columns balow. Other material In this Issue may
reflect the opinion at the witter or cartoonist and oat necessarily
that at the Florida Alligator unless specifically Indicated.
Klan Tactics Relived

The action taken by a
person or persons unknown
late Tuesday night, when
kerosene fire-bombs were
thrown through the bed bedroom
room bedroom window of Circuit
Court Judge JC. Adkins
home, is disgusting.
It would be a fair guess
that the bombs were thrown
by either civil rights work workers
ers workers or Negroes unhappy
with Adkins decision that
Mrs, Carol Thomas andlr andlrvin
vin andlrvin Jack Dawkins must
serve four and six month
sentences respectively for
contempt of court.
The fact that Adkins de decision
cision decision has been upheld by
a higher court, the fact
that there is no proof that
he failed morally in his
decision, the fact that he
apparently made a legally
sound decision, have all
been forgotten by the per persons
sons persons who perpetrated
Tuesday nights unlawful
act.
Perhaps it should also be
pointed out that these mili militant
tant militant extremists, these
rabble-rousers of the left,
are now resorting to the

'Keep Your Cool

To control ones emotions
is a virtue and for a poli politician,
tician, politician, its a necessity.
Any public official, in including
cluding including the president of
* the UF student body, is ex expected
pected expected to remain cool under
pressure and criticism.
And when holding the
highest student position on
campus, the student body
president gets few congrat congratulations
ulations congratulations for a job well done.
Buddy Jacobs, student
body president in 1966,
stated it very well when
he said, Dont expect
thanks when you leave this
job,-But do expect to lose
some friends*

same type of tactics which
Ku Klux Klansmen have
used for years.
Apparently those who
now seek to have something
done for the Negro, and who
feel sufficiently frustrated,
see nothing wrong with
bombing the home of a
judge.
Will they next bomb a
white church?
It is our hope that they
will see the error of their
ways. It is oil:? hope that
they will realize that dis dissent
sent dissent when carried to this
extreme ceases to be dis dissent
sent dissent and becomes anarchy
and lawlessness which
must be punished.
Fire bombings will not
assure Gainesville Ne Negroes
groes Negroes greater civil rights,
nor will they earn local
Negro citizens greater re respect.
spect. respect. J
It is unfortunate that
many persons will now
undoubtedly consider the
entire Negro community
and all white civil-rights
sympathizers as guilty of
this crime.

Bill Mcride, Forward
party candidate for presi president
dent president has displayed in the
past two days that he has
a problem in accepting
criticism.
In an emotion packed
meeting with Alligator ed editors,
itors, editors, Mcride exploded in
a tirade against an edi editorial
torial editorial appearing in an issue
of the Alligator.
Mcrides outburst and
consequential smear sheet
concerning the editorial
has raised an important
question: Can a candidate
who gets upset over crit criticism
icism criticism handle a job which
comes under constant crit criticism?
icism? criticism?

NEWS ITEM: VIOLENT WINTER WEATHER SLAMMED
THE EASTERN SEABOARD CAUSING DRIFTS UP TO
10 FEET
EDITOR S NOTEBOOK

Political War

This years student body presidential
campaign is shaping up to be one of the
most hard fought and bitterest the UF has
ever encountered.
Bill Mcride, Forward party candidate
and Clyde Taylor United-First party pre presidential
sidential presidential pick are vying for the huge fra fraternity
ternity fraternity bloc vote plus the all-important
independent vote.
At the present time, Mcride is up
470 fraternity bloc votes over Taylor. How However,
ever, However, Taylor's leftover First party sup supporters,
porters, supporters, most of which are hard core
independents have swung an undying support
for Taylor.
In the other political camps, Contrived
party candidate Rich Hbuk is running a
game campaign but without monetary sup support
port support his chances of winning are looking
dim. Contrived party will probably act
as a sponge for undecided independent voters
and possibly sway the election to Mcride
if too many of the independents decide to
vote for Houk instead of Taylor.
Houk has experienced difficulty in aquir aquiring
ing aquiring space to place his campaign posters.
It seems know one knows when or how
the green boards should be placed on
campus.
Finally, Ira Brukner, Individual party

Alligator Staff
A MICHAEL ABRAMS
Assistant News Editor Editorial Assistant
JARICE SIZEMORE JOE TORC9A
Campus Living Editor Entertainment em.-.
S^ AFF WRITERS James Almand, Beth Brandon, Arlene Caplan, David
Cna.fin, James Cook, Linda Daniels, Jeff Denkewalter, Duffy, Glenn Fake,
??"**? F rsber8 Anne Freedman, Mary Gantt, Brenda Gevertz, Janie Gould,
!* Sard St6Ve Hulsey Kathy Kelm Leslie Lepene
Roy Mays Fred McNeese, John Parker, Lori Preece, As: Plerleonl?Raul
JeSc e urrTLortlte^. Neal Bartora Jerry Sllberberg,

=BY STEVE HULL
candidate is basing his campaign on the
premise that student government should act
as a force in state politics instead of
dealing with petty issues on campus.
Brukner and Houk have spent negligible
amounts of money on their campaign, while
Mcride is leading the pack in expen expenditures.
ditures. expenditures. Taylor is second.
Mcride has been amazing in the fact
that he has been able to distribute poop
sheets in a few hours after his steering
committee writes the copy. A good example
of this was Mcride's recent smear sheet,
which some people call dirty politics.
Taylor has not distributed any such poop.
Both main party candidates are sup supposedly
posedly supposedly cut from the same cloth".
But the difference in each is quite evident
once ycu overlook their outside attributes.
Both candidates are members of social
fraternities, and have taken an active part
in Interfraternity Council affairs.
One Interesting sidelight, Taylor defeated
Mcride in the election for president of
the IFC.
Nevertheless, the campaign is an in interesting
teresting interesting one and /with what has developed
so far in the warding camps, the political
parties should develop a new slogan all's
fair in love and war, but not In politics."



=PALE RIDER

The response to last weeks column on college coeds
has been delightful. I have received numerous letters
from female correspondents urging me to reexamine
my biased views to save my bloody soul from the
fiery depths.
Several coeds generously offered to introduce me
to the right girl.
Otherwise, it has been suggested that I am a bitter
and unpalatable person or that perhaps I am overly
fond of beads and laces.
First of all these arguments lie flatly against all
the known facts. Secondly, they are not true. It is
to argue that if I had blue eyes I would be a Holy
Roller.
Certainly not all girls fall under the category of
peasant intelligence. For example many girls I
have known are sharply intelligent. I am convinced
that much of what passes for feminine intuition these
days is merely a mysterious form of higher intelli intelligence
gence intelligence a knowledge of living which apparently

;'
OPEN FORUM:
mi ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man. 99

Napalm Saves American Lives

MR. EDITOR:
After a time Mr. Average Joe
Majority gets fed up with the
inane dribblings of some of the
misguided of this campus. I point
my brief remarks to those of
this school who have singled out
agencies of the government (ex (examply
amply (examply CIA) and companies of
industry (example Dow) to vent
their immaturity and short shortsightedness.
sightedness. shortsightedness.
Somebody once said that the
best defense is a good offense.
In this vein even the most simple
minded who have been fortunate
enough to have grown up in these
United States can see the
necessity for an intelligence
gathering agency such as the CIA.
We shouldnt have to be reminded
that there is a large majority
of the population of the earth
who advocate overthrow of our

MR. EDITOR:
I am deeply concerned about
the recent assaults on University
coeds in our campus.
As Chief Instructor of the
United States Karate Association
I wish to offer my services
to teach the most basic and prac practical
tical practical elements of unarmed self selfdefense
defense selfdefense to coeds.
I am proposing a two-hour
seminar, to be held at a con convenient
venient convenient location, such as the
ballroom of the Florida Union,
on Tuesday or Thursday evening
(6-8 p.m.), Monday night (8-10

KARATE CLASS OFFERED FOR COEDS

College Girl Revisited

way of life by any means possible
and how they go about trying this
is a subject that I hope some somebody
body somebody is keeping abreast of. Thus
the CIA.
As for the napalm that Dow
helps produce, from personal
experience I have not seen it
indiscriminately used. I have only
seen it used when forces on the
ground and knowledgeable of the
enemy situation have singled out
an obstacle that could not be
cleared in any other way. Na Napalm
palm Napalm and other high potency
weapons are used as much to
save American lives as they are
to Inflict enemy casualties. True,
this might cause civilian casual casualties
ties casualties but UJS. commanders at
every level go to great lengths
to minimize this regardless of
the weapon used.
War is a tough situation, easy
to criticize when youre cooling

p.m.), or any time during the
weekend.
The self-defense seminar
would cover such topics as: how
to release holds on the wrists,
arms or body, how to defend
against choking, arm-twisting,
bear hugs, hair hold, etc. plus
a rundown on easy to remember
striking techniques such as knee
and groin kicks, elbow strikes,
chopping and thrusting attacks to
the windpipe and the eyes, etc.
The best choice of clothing
for this seminar would be some
loose-fitting jeans and sweater.
This seminar may be repeated

in confined to the female side.
One wonders if the world might not be run better
if women were listened to more. The modern female
complains she is not appreciated for her ideas or
her creative abilities. She is treated as a form of
recreation. Thus, the emphasis on physical beauty
to which she tries to adhere.
Democratic mans ideal of beauty a gross and
lascivious display of thighs, the frow-frow of perfumed
skirts, the squirming go-go girl, the convex playboy
bunny is no more compatible to the true nature of
the world than a Methodist bishop is to a Chinaman.
You see, I am not overly concerned with physical
looks. It is the American concept of ideal beauty which
disgusts me the prevailing idiocy. Not for the
universe would I trade my acquaintances with girls
or feelings for them for they were and are each
beautiful in their own way.
Women are perhaps the one remaining adventure,
the one great gamble, man has left. The Indians

away on campus but tough to fight
when* youre Seating the bushes
in Southeast Asia. Once you are
committed you give your men the
best weapons at your disposal
Including napalm.
The semantics of the good vs
bad, right vs wrong can be argued
untill your beard grows to the
ground.
You ought to see what a man
looks like on Christmas Day when
he tries to befriend a Vietnamese
7 year old and receives In return
a loaded grenade from this same
child.
Its a strange war, neighbor,
and the CIA and Dow have as
much right to recruit unimpeded
as you or I do to express our
opinions.
DAN NOBLE, 7BA
FORMER CAPTAIN, UJS. ARMY

with the same or different con content
tent content if there is sufficient interest.
There will be, of course, no
charge.
My experience teaching women
both in New Mexico,
and here in Gainesville, permits
m e to select onl y those techniques
that would be most effective for
women in this situation.
I hope you will act on this
urgent matter as soon as
possible. You can contact me
calling 378-4126.
DIRK MOSIG, SAN-DAN,
8.A., 7AS

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

have been chased away the forests cleared the
skies explored yet where is the man who claims
he can understand his woman? What a challenge!
Women have a rough time of it in a world run by
such scoundrels as us men and it is the mark of
a vain and petty man not to comfort some winsome
lass by and by.
But my personal feelings are neither here nor
there. What rides me, what I hawk at, what I speak
of is the general Intelligence of the typical college
coed. That it is difficult to find a girl who has not
been conditioned to respond and think just like every
one of her friends is common knowledge even
among females.
I speak of the sunglassed nonentities roaming this
campus. I speak of the "lamentable coedipus."
Perhaps a better definition can be given by one
wiser. All in all, I am just as susceptible to the
enticements of femininity as the next man and enjoy
it immensely so I cannot claim to be purely ob objective.
jective. objective. All I know is what I see.

WOMEN ALSO CAPABLE IN SG
MR. EDITOR:
A woman is running for one of the top five positions in SG. Women
leaders are demanding equal opportunities to demonstrate that they
are capable of holding the positions of leadership in SG.
For the first time in UF history both major political parties have
had to recognize the coed as an integral member of the student body.
Both major political parties are promising to place women in positions
of leadership in SG which have never been held by women on this
campus before.
This election directly affects each UF coed. As women students
of this university, we owe it to ourselves, to the women leaders
who have made known the potential of the coed, and to future women
on the campus, to carefully evaluate each candidates platform and
qualifications.
Men politicos must be made aware that they are insulting the
intelligence of the woman student by carting her off to fraternity
socials, surrounding her with good-looking pledges and endeavoring
to buy her vote with a snow job. Thus, the Women's Study Commission
issues a challenge to each Florida coed, to take an interest in this
election, to weigh with, an open mind both candidates and to vote
Intelligently Thursday, Jan. 25.
JANET DIPPENWORTH, CHAIRMAN
PO WELL DECISION BLOW TO UF

MR. EDITOR:
The decision by the Accent
Executive Committee to recall
their invitation to Adam Clayton
Powell to speak here is one of
the most asinine and narrow narrowminded
minded narrowminded decisions that have been
made at this university.
It appears to me Incongruous
that Robert Shelton and George
Wallace are welcome to speak
here yet Powell is not. A board
of regents member stated Powell
has nothing constructive or
worthwhile to present to the stu students."
dents." students." Did Shelton have any anything
thing anything worthwhile to say or does
Wallace have any constructive
ideas?

U OF IOWAS 'DISSENT '67

MR. EDITOR:
Last year at Drake Univer University
sity University in lowa, the Accent program
featured several controversial
figures. There was no attempt to
suppress their comments or to
prevent their appearances. We
heard the countrys well-known
atheist, Madylyn Murray OHair;
the head of the American Nazi
Party, George Lincoln Rockwell;
the editor of the American Com Communist
munist Communist newspaper; and the public

by Michael Abrams^

Why the Accent Committee
rejected" such a newsworthy
figure as Powell who would have
certainly drawn an overflow
crowd to hear him speak is a
question that should be answered.
Pressure put on the members
of the committee by the board of
regents and President OConnell
certainly influenced their de decision.
cision. decision. Perhaps there is
prejudice among some members
of the board of, regents this
is only a possibility. However,
there is a certainty that this
decision shows a lack of sound
judgement and constitutes a blow
to our university.
STEVE SHOMION, 2UC

relations director of the John
Birch Society.
We called our program Dissent
67. Our academic community in
no way supported these peoples
ideas, but felt that the students
had the right to be informed and
to decide for themselves.
By preventing Powell to speak
here, UF is not going to be in informed.
formed. informed. We will remain a part
of the ignorant audience.
BARB SHIREK, 3 JM

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale |
Trailer for students with child children,
ren, children, reasonable enough for any
budget. Small equity and monthly
payments of $46.00 a month 3
years. Phone Mrs. Morris 372-
3727. (A-61-st-p)
FOR SALE: YashicaD camera
plus extras, 1958 Cushman Eagle
Motorscooter, 7 x 50 Binoculars,
coin collections. Call 378-6582
after 9:00 p.m. (A-63-st-p)
HONDA 50 Excellent Condition
$120.00. Call 372-8420. (A-63-
3t-p)
MOBILE HOME for sale 12 wide.
2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths. 1967
model. Newly Installed $500.00
carpet in Master bedroom, hall,
kitchen and living room. Call
Lee at 378-8628. (A-64-st-c)
1964 VW SEDAN, gray, good
condition. $550.00. Also brand brandnew
new brandnew 3-speed Schwinn bicycle,
$50.00. 321 SW 13th St. Apt. 3.
(A-64-3t-p)
WELL KEPT carpets show the
results of regular Blue Lustre
spot cleaning. Rent electric
shampooer. SI.OO. Lowry Fur Furniture.
niture. Furniture. (A-63-2t-p)

§p* Do-It-Yourself *sj|
I? Classifieds 1
To order classifieds, use the form below. Mail it with ||3
c|| remittance to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330 Reitz
g? Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
§1 DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE p 3
IcLASSIFICATIONI IDAYS TO RUN] 1
$2 for sale (consecutive)
for rent 1 day |||
wanted 2 days
sss help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
>gj; autos 4 days (*lO% Discount)
gl* personal 5 Days and Over P?
lost-found (*20% discount) gg
gl t tOE ADI.INESI M
>§3 IvVORDINGI Orders nwt be RECEIVED
$ days prior to pdbUoatlon. flgH
@ IDETERMINE COSTi 1|
Count tho words, omitting s, an A tbs. Addroasss and pbona numbers count jrab
vgA .as one word. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 20 words. For each additional apJ
word add 3s. Multiply the total by number at days tbe ad la to run. Sub- a34
gp tract tbe dlsoount (if applicable) and enclose a check for tbe remainder.
For esample, a Si-word ad to run 4 days ooats $4.00 ($8.44 less 54f). SgU
iiAME. H
j|| Student # Phone ||
- <[£
fttat e -d***** .... V^ZZi.T"-' 'tZZ.'

| for sole |
SCUBA EQUIPMENT, 72 Cu.
Tank Doublce Hose Regulator,
Reserve, depth gauge, compass,
knife, flippers, mask, etc. Call
Chris Merrit, 376-9370. (A-63-
2t-p)
*66 HONDA 305 Scrambler, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, metallic green greenchrom,
chrom, greenchrom, $475. Call 376-9161
after 7:30 ask for Phil Room
434. (A-64- st-p)
A BEAUTIFUL portable Royalite
typewriter. Excellent condition.
Must sell, leaving for home homecountry.
country. homecountry. $35.00 or best offer.
Also, bicycle and stereo. Call
378-6313 after 5:00. (A-64-3t-p)
FOR SALE: 1964 All-State
Scooter; good condition; new
tires; two seats. $125.00. Call
372-9510 or 378-7230. (A-65-3t-
P)
64 ZUNDAPP, 250 cc, $175,
dependable. Call 378-7041 after
5:30 p.m. (A-65-2t-p)
V 1
FOR SALE OR RENT; 1 Br.
trailer, air cond., new gas heater.
Good condition nice location
for students. Call 378-8288 or
376-6217. (A-65- 3t-p)

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968 --

Page 8

for sale
IMMACULATE By owner.
No qualifying Central heat and
air, built in kitchen, cypress
panelling, step-down living room,
sliding glass doors opening on
garden area. Perfect Condition.
$19,000. 6% mortgage. Call for
Appt. 372-0328. (A-65-30t-c)
for rent
WHY LIVE in a traffic-jam? Walk
to classes and be relieved of all
parking problems. Full furnished
spacious 1 bedroom apt., AC,
Gas heat, fully equipped kitchen
including washing machine. Call
372-3357 or 372-5240. (B-58-
tfOc)

" AfArrHELM'S fi/D/NG HIGH ...
with
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents An IRVIN 6 ALLEN Production
mfr MHM MNRVIMo,matt helmi n
' m TMI HMHISHItt
SllNlHlEMmiiMiiimis |i
an
we*
--W s -IB W3T* , -
nayley Mills irevor Howard
Shashi Kapoor ,"K Matter of Innocence
TECHNICOLOR HT ' i
1 Suggested For Mature Audiences 1 ~ ' r r*****,**i.*r,.
*****,**i.*r,. r*****,**i.*r,. V , , f t t ft
- : j * * a-- t ** *; ~r-y-ir i % r *
. ' ~ : : ' . : ' f i, *f ?*" r t

| Rocking Chair Twin \

'V&lley-
I 7"
"5800^
.-Sr :
|| PkUL iHA * H
T *ll G UB 'I Blip
7&OAY/S 1j32 3.31 5;30 6:32 7:29 8:31 9:28



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 for rent *1
MALE STUDENT vacancy in
double room. AC, 3 blocks from
campus; S7O rest of quarter;
327 NW 15th Terrace. 372-8929
afternoons. (B-60-10t-p)
ROOM in private home for mature
male student. Linen & maid ser service,
vice, service, separate entrance, off
street parking. 376-5306. (B (B---65-2t-c)
--65-2t-c) (B---65-2t-c)
'. <
2 BEDROOM apartment, across
from Tigert Hall. $75.00 a month.
Call Carol 372-3915 after 5
p.m. (B-65-3t-p)
BRAND NEW one bedroom apt.
Fursnihed, unusual design, very
private, CH and AC, many extras
real bargain at $105.00. 376-
3619 or 376-3211 Ext. 5235. (B (B---63-st-c)
--63-st-c) (B---63-st-c)
CAMPUS APTS. 1 bedroom fur furnished,
nished, furnished, incl. washer. 3 blocks
from campus. Sublet. Contact
#39, 1824 NW 3rd Place, or call
372-5239. Ask for George. (B (B---53-3t-t>'\
--53-3t-t>'\ (B---53-3t-t>'\
BUTLER 1-bdrm. apart, sub sublease.
lease. sublease. Webcor recorder, excel excellent
lent excellent condition, new $225, sell
for SSO. Brand-new Polaroid 220
Camera, sells for $75, will sell
for S6O. Call 378-3937. (B-64-
3t-p)
FURNISHED ROOM. Business
lady has room in private home,
kitchen privileges, phone. Male,
after 5:30 p.m. or Week-ends,
314 NE 11th Ave. (B-64-st-p)
wanted
WANTED: Male roommate to
share quiet apartment on S Main
Street. $40.00 per month plus
1/2 phone, no utilities, AC, Call
Bruce, 378-8537. (C-62-st-p)
WANTED: 1, preferably 2, female
roommates for FRENCH QUAR QUARTER,
TER, QUARTER, Apt. 72 (on the pool). Call
Peggy or Sue at 378-7858. (C (C---61-10t-p)
--61-10t-p) (C---61-10t-p)
fiMiTsXr
r WINNER OF 5 ACADEMY AWARDS? J
A J Airlift'if MAM IMIHkkISI mm
f j
I HAMLET" 11
3:00 11:20 | j
CSUN 3-6:10-9:20 -j
"PROVOCATIVE j
HIGHLY POLISHED
ENTERTAINMENT!
fed I
fiMbl
f PLUS 1
I" King of the Wild Waves "j

wanted
LISTENERS WANTED: will pay
$2.00 for 1 hr. listening session.
Must be native English speaking
and have normal hearing. Please
call Ext. 2307. Mrs. Pam Deloach
for appo. (C-63-st-c)
WANTED: One female roommate
to share 2 bedrm. apartment
close to campus. S4O-./per month
plus utilities. Come by 605 NW
13th Terrace after 5 p.m. (C (C---
--- (C---
WANTED: 1 preferably 2 female
roommates to share 2 bedroom
University Gardens Apt. Call
378-3968. (C-64-3t-p)
WOMAN TO CARE for two-year two-yearold
old two-yearold weekdays in our home. sls
weekly, transportation. Call 378-
8953 after 5:30 p.m. (C-64-3t-p)
MALfr ROOMMATE WANTED.
Large, very quiet apartment.
Nicely furnished. Air-condition Air-conditioning,
ing, Air-conditioning, heating, stereo, TV, big
bedroom. Excellent for studying.
$42.00 monthly. 378-2135 or 378-
3458. (C-64-3t-p)
' ; i
DESPERATE for 1 or 2 female
roommates. University Gardens
Apartment. Call 378-3903 any
time. If no answer between 8-5
call 376-3261 Ext. 2005. (C (C---
--- (C---
1 MALE ROOMMATE Land Landmark
mark Landmark Apartments. $43.75/mo.
plus utilities. Call 378-3939 after
3:30 p.m. (C-63-3t-p)

DESPERATE: 1 or 2 male room roommates
mates roommates for 2 bedroom University
Gardens Apts. 378-7069. (C-63-
3t-p)

Tin. 7*M
STARTS TODAY
Open 6:30 Show Starts 7:00
Feature at 707 +11:10
JOHN WRffI(MITtHUM|
IS THE GUNFIGHTER IS THE SHERIFF J
Co-Feature at 9:15
JANE FONDA In
"Barefoot In The Park

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator.

autos I
1951 MG TD Classic. Perfect
mechanical condition. Call 372-
5147 between 5:00 and 6:30 p.m.
(G-58- st-p)
6O VW Van Good condition.
Runs fine. Bunks wood panel.
Must sell. $275 or make offer.
372-9128. Dave in 106. (G-65-
st-p)
1956 DODGE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Power steering, power
brakes, radio, heater, push button
transmission priced to sale.
Call 378-4200 after 5:00. (G-65-
st-p)
1965 VW, radio, white wall tires,
top condition. Approx. 30,000
miles, brand new battery, main main.
. main. tenance record, $l,lOO. Call 376-
2916. (G-63-3t-p)
FOR SALE: '65 MUSTANG V 8
Pale Blue. $1,450.00. Call Mrs.
Hinton, Campus Credit Union,
Ext. 2973. (G-63-st-c)
65 IMPALA, 327 cu. in. Full
Power Loaded. 31,000 miles.
$1,950. Call 372-2407, Terry.
Mercedes Benz, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, $2,100. (G-63-3t-D)
1960 feulckT J efe r Vdiol l air
conditioned and full power. Ex Extra
tra Extra clean. Terms arranged. Tel
l 7 9 -3778. After 5:30 p.m. (G (G---el-stHfl
--el-stHfl (G---el-stHfl
65 AUSTIN-HEALY. 3,000-Im 3,000-Immaculate
maculate 3,000-Immaculate new radial pirellis,
discs adj. steering wheel
overdrive S3OO equity & take
over payments or SI,BOO cash.
378-4390 after 5:00 p.m. (G (G---60-7_t-r)
--60-7_t-r) (G---60-7_t-r)
Suick tar. haratop 1963" Le-
Sabre, power steering-brakes,
radio, heater, air, SI2OO, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, 378-2735, 2
to 7j?.m. (G-61-10t-p)

Page 9

personal
PHOTOGRAPHS for the Seminole
senior and Greeks are being
taken this week through Friday.
Hours are 9 a.m. to noon, 1-
4:30 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Dress
for males, coat and ties; women,
dark sweater. Friday hours are
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If any questions,
please call Student Publications,
Ext. 28321 (J-62-4t- nc)
KAREN Happy Anniversary
Friday, LoveGeroge. (J-63-3t-p)
PHOTO SPECIAL, portraits, all
needs and occasions. Sneeringer
W. University Ave. (M-65-3t-c)

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
_ ELIZABETH M RICHARD
Admission $1.50
Both 'Shrew' and 'Faustus' $2.50
Tickets On Sale At Union Boxoffice
IN PERSON
Question Mark
and The Mysterians
1
Saturday Night 8 to 12pm
at THE PLACE
809 W. University
Sr
Friday Night Dance Nation Rocking Shadows
__ \
> , ' K,
- Entertainment For The Young Adult
_ , v V-'... . J- . irt iV ,Vv ... 4 iVV

personal
i Hi
DEAR BUNNY, Happy 20th birth birthday.
day. birthday. One more year and you
can come drinking with us. With
Love and Affection, Tony. (J (J---65-lt-p)
--65-lt-p) (J---65-lt-p)
SHEEPSKIN SLINKERS wanted
to pose for off-campus humor.
No experience. Nightly hours
only. All proceeds go to 207.
SA & LF. (J-65-lt-p)
ANITA M. Even though you smoke
candy cigarettes, I still think you
are cool. B.E.W. (J-65-lt-p)
DEMIAN has a sewing machine.
(J-64-2t-p)



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Friday, January 19
Mensa Members: daily lunch luncheons,
eons, luncheons, South wing of Main Cafe Cafeteria,
teria, Cafeteria, 11 a.m.
History Lecture: Prof. Shepard
B. Clough, Recent European
History/ 361 Union, 2:30p.m.
Special Colloquium: Dr. Francis
Clauser, Mass Exchange Be Between
tween Between Stars and the Interstellar
Medium/ McC Aud., 3:45p.m.
Afro-American Student Assn.:
meeting, 361 Union, 7 p.m.
Union Movie: Taming of the
Shrew/ Union Aud., 7 & 9:15
p.m.
Gymnastics meet: University of
Florida vs. Miami Dade,
Florida Gym, 4 p.m.
Saturday, January 20
Union Movie: Taming of the
Shrew/ Union Aud., 7 & 9:15
p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS

services
FLY to Fort Lauderdale. Cher Cherokee
okee Cherokee 180, 2 hours flying, 3 pass passengers,
engers, passengers, roundtrip only, leave
1/26, return 1/29, Don Kozich,
378-1863. (M-63-3t-p)
QUALITY CHILD CARE For Former
mer Former Fla. elementary teacher and
present mother of 2 preschool
age children offers play group
care in her home. $14.50 wk.
includes lunches. SW section,
Call 376-0046. (M-63-3t-p)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up and delivery on
and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489. (M (M---
--- (M--- 18t-p)
WILL TAKE CARE of your child children
ren children by the hour or week in my
home, 1210 NE 20th Plaza. Ph.
376-0024. (M-64- 3t-p)
WILL CARE FOR infant or child children
ren children in my home. Hot meals.
On campus Mon Fri. 288-
16 Corry Village. (M-64-3t-p)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second Street.
378-7330. fM-54-tf-c)
t
Get acquainted special. Edner
Lee will give free style cut with
price of shampoo and set. 372-
5549.
VisitpUs At Home yftf
''Serving U F Employees Since 1935" HKj^y
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREmT^|^i^^!^^ Av

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calander
Basketball: Fla. vs. Tennessee,
Fla. Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Tolbert and Jennings Dance:
City Steves band, Jennings
Hall, 9 p.m. Everyone invited
Sunday, January 21
Newman Club: general meeting,
Catholic Student Center
Lounge, noon. All members
are asked to be present
Jennings Hall: invitational opbn
house, 1 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, Union 150 C,
1:30 p.m.
y-, , /Ms
Union Movie: Taming of the
Shrew, Union Aud., 7& 9:15
p.m.
Religion-in-Life Keynote Ad Address:
dress: Address: Dr. Huston Smith, The
Meeting of Religions East
and West/ 235 Union, 7:30
p.m.

services I
SPECIAL: Dear Estes will give
$18.50 frosting for $12.50 for
limited time. Call 372-5549.
(M-61-10t-c)
I help wanted
WANTED: Girl to cook for 3
students in college of medicine
4 days per week. 376-3211 Ext.
5453. Dave or Harry. (E-63-
The University of Forida has
challenging positions available
for inexperienced aid experi experienced
enced experienced Clerk-Typists a id Secre Secretaries.
taries. Secretaries. Starting salaries depen dependent
dent dependent on experience. Fringe
ber f its include the opportunity
to atttnd one (1) college course
each quarter tuition free. Want
to work and learn more? Come
to the Central Employment Of Office,
fice, Office, 2nd floor of the. Hub,
(E-61-ts-c)
lost-found
LOST brown wallet in library.
Reward given for return. Ivan
Rosenthal. Call 378-7606. (L (L---6
--6 (L---6 5- 2t-p)
LOST: Pair of glasses in black
case If found please call 372-
3621. Jeri, room 413. (L-65-
2t-p)

Monday, January 22
Religion-in-Life Luncheon: Dr.
Huston Smith, World Univer University
sity University Service, 235 Union, 12:15
p.m.
Religion-in-Life: Dr. Huston
Smith, The Religions of
Man, 233 Union, 3:30 p.m.
Program Office: dancing lessors,
245 Union, 7 p.m.
Comm. Science: Prof. Thomas
G. Bever, The Psychological
Approach to the Human Lang Language
uage Language User, 347 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Block and Bridle Club: meeting,
254 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Basketball: Fla. vs. Georgia, Fla.
Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Union Movie: Taming of the
Shrew/ Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for the
Lovelites, the New York Pro
Musica, Taming of the
Shrew, and the New Folk
Singers.
Administrative Notices
PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are ex expected
pected expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
CPS 122: Thursday, Jan. 25,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,
2,4, 7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D) to Little 121 or 125;
(E) to Little 113; (F) to Little
227, 233 or 235; (G) to Peabody
101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) to
Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or
209; (I-J) to Flint 110 or 112;
(K) to Walker 301, 303, 307
or 308; (L) to Little 201, 203,
205 or 207; (M) to Little 213,
215, 217, 219, 221, 223 or 225;
(N) to Little 237; (O) to Little
239; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102;
(R) to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-z) to Walker
Auditorium.
MINIMUM WAGE: Effective
Feb. 1, all non-faculty personnel
shall be compensated at a rate
of at least $1.15 per hour, re regardless
gardless regardless of the source of funds.
The University work week, as
defined under the Wage and Hour
Law will be 42 hours rather than
44 hours per week, effective Feb.
1. Therefore the establishment of
the work week of 42 hours means
that employment for non-exempt
employees for over 42 hours in
a 7-day period obligates the Uni University
versity University to a liability of an over overtime
time overtime rate of one and one-half
times the employees normal
hourly rate. Every effort .should

Administrative Notices
** V
be made to restrict the work
of employees to within the 42-
hour week.
GRADUATE COUNCIL MEET MEETING
ING MEETING will be held Thursday, Jan.
25, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 235,
Tigert Hall.
General Notices
PINSTRIPER APPLICATIONS
are being accepted at the Infir Infirmary
mary Infirmary through Feb. 1.
ACCENT SYMPOSIUM COM COMMITTEES:
MITTEES: COMMITTEES: Applications for
positions in the ACCENT Sym Symposium
posium Symposium committees may be ob obtained
tained obtained in the ACCENT office,
third floor of the Reitz Union
through Jan. 26. Positions are
available in the following areas:
speakers, publicity, public re relations,
lations, relations, personnel, finance,
magazine, technical and pro program.
gram. program.
Placement Notices
JAN. 19: MILLIGAN & BURKE.
Acct. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 19: STONEROCK, HOL HOLLINGSWORTH
LINGSWORTH HOLLINGSWORTH & SIMONET. Acct.
JAN. 19: SUN LIFE ASSURANCE
COMPANY OF CANADA. Insur Insurance.
ance. Insurance. Must be U.S. citizen. Mil-

(I ilrrniii,^ 1 ^ liCjfw 'dtLJwJt >
// tMf iy fIR
Ms jl^Bfjp!|{|!ju mJr
Jv -**
w\ JtT M Hi
i JR. j|t|

Placement Notices
itary requirements must be ful fulfilled.
filled. fulfilled.
JAN. 19: MOTOROLA, INC. EE,
ME, ChE, Metal., IE, Physics,
Chem.
JAN. 19: ROSS GEAR.
JAN. 22: TRUST COMPANY OF
GEORGIA. Finance, Acct., Gen.
Bus. Must be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 22: WESTERN UNION
TELEGRAPH COMPANY. EE,
ME, Math, Physics, Acct., Bus.
Adm., Eco., Lib. Arts, Mktg. Must
be U.S. citizen.
JAN. 22: SYLVANIA ELECTRIC
PRODUCTS, INC. EE, ME, ChE,
Math, Chem., Metal., Physics.
Must be U.S. citizen.
Jan. 22: HOFFMAN-LA ROCHE,
INC. All majors. Must be U.S.
citizen. Military requirements
must be fulfilled.
JAN. 22: MAAS BROTHERS, INC.
Military requirements must be
fulfilled.
JAN. 22: DEFENSE CONTRACT
AUDIT AGENCY. Acct. Must be
U.S. citizen.
JAN. 22: MUTUAL OF NEW
YORK. All majors. Must be U.S.
citizen.
JAN. 22: KIMBERLY-CLARK
CORP.
JAN. 22: CONTINENTAL CAN
CO.



[action ']
1 line I
(EDITORS NOTE: Any questions or suggestions concerning campus
activities should be referred to UF Student Governments Coda-
Phone service at 376-4001. All calls will be answered.)
Editors note: Remember: when calling Act Action
ion Action Line, be sure to state your name and
address CLEARLY if you want to receive an
answer to your question.
Q* 1) When can you pick up tickets for
the basketball games? If you take a date,
does she have to accompany you to get the
tickets?
A. 1) Tickets must be picked up four days in advance so the
ticket office will know how many people will be attending each game
and how many tickets can be sold beforehand to the general public.
A student doesn't have to have his date accompany him in order
to pick up date tickets. Any student can get tickets for himself and
his date by presenting both ID cards.
ticket office, athletic department
Q. .2) What is Charles Goodyears plan for
purchasing football tickets?
A, 2) As we understand it, Goodyears plan is roughly this: Students
would have to plan for each game in advance. For example, a boy
could buy an extra book of season tickets along with date tickets for
each game to insure a ticket for his date. Also, girls would be en encouraged
couraged encouraged to buy tickets together so that they could switch seats
with another boy in order to sit next to their date.
Mr. Goodyear is assistant director of athletics.
Charles Goodyear, athletic department
Q. 3) What professors won the Florida Blue
Keys faculty awards?
A. 3) Award recipients were:
Dr. Paul Koefod, Economics
Professor John R. Greeman, Agricultural Economics
Dr. Robert J. Farley, Law
Professor Thomas Furman, Bio-environmental Engineering
Dr. William C. Thomas, Jr., Medicine
Dr. Lewis Berner, Biological Sciences
UF Information Services
Q. 4) Is there any way that the sprinkler
system could be operated at night?
A. 4) The sprinklers cannot run at night because no one from the
Grounds Department is on duty at night, and the system cannot
operate unattended.
Grounds Department
Q. 5) Who rates movies in the Alligator
by giving (or not giving) them those crazy
little stars?
A. 5) The star' ratings for movies are given by Joe Torchia,
Alligator Entertainment Editor.
Alligator offices

'MB&'
!:. v ;:-#l^'j|^HC UST
| ;.2* JH w '.

Jack Horner
By Law, Every Candidate For Chancel lor
Must Take The Course In Evidence In Law School
Jack Horner received the highest grade in Evidence
y/ Jack Horner was recommended by the Past Chancellor
J Jack Homer has served with distinctions in the Honor Court
Horner will continue to serve you.
.
Vote Experience
UNITED FIRST
(Paid Political Announcement)

This is
JACK
HORNER
The ONLY Qualified
Candidate
for Chancellor

Philosophy Prof. Awarded
Grant To Write Book

Thomas L. Hanna, chairman
of the UF Department of Phil Philosophy,
osophy, Philosophy, has been awarded a fel fellowship
lowship fellowship grant for the year 1968-
69 by the American Council of
Learned Societies (ACLS).
The ACLS is a council com composed
posed composed of 33 different professional
organizations, and is the most

AAUP Book Design Show
On Display In Gallery

An exhibit of the art of con contemporary
temporary contemporary book design is now be being
ing being shown in the Teaching Gal Gallery
lery Gallery of UF*s department of arts,
featuring the 25 best designed
books published during 1967 by
members of the American As Association
sociation Association of University Presses.
The AAUP Book Show, which
emphasizes excellence in graph graphics
ics graphics and typography, includes
many titles of art related books
which allow a more creative vi visual
sual visual approach in their design. All
books contain a list of specif specifications,
ications, specifications, from publisher to cover
processing which, although
sometimes meaningless to the
layman, certainly aid in their
appreciation.
Carl Zahn, graphic designer
and typographer from Boston, and
Mr. Jan Tschichold, world fam famous
ous famous European typographer and
book designer, selected the books
from entries by AAUP members.
Os the 18 universities represen-
Mortar Board
Applications
Applications for Mortar Board
are now available at the infor information
mation information booth on the first floor
of Reitz Union. They must be
turned in before February 1.
Qualifications for membership
include a 3.0 grade point average,
campus activities and junior
classification.

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

distinguished academic asso association
ciation association in the United States.
The ACLS grant is $8,500.00
for a six month period to write
a book on contemporary moral
directions.
Hanna stated that his book will
be aimed at persons 25 years
old or less. The reason for this,

ted, Chicago, Columbia, Harvard,
McGill, M.1.T., Oklahoma, Prin Princeton
ceton Princeton and Yale have been inclu included
ded included in the exhibit for the past
three years.
The show, made available in
Gainesville through the sponsor sponsorship
ship sponsorship of the University of Florida
Press, will be on view for the
next two weeks through Friday,
January 26, from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.

i LUNCH SPECIALS FBOM 6So:
iiv, n CHUCK WAGON MEALS i
jggs:
;! OPEN 11 AM-9PM i
1 "Mderqsa ;
j In Gainesville at the Westgate Shopping Ctr.
? 3321 W. University Ave. at 34th St. j
5 ALSO IN ORLANDO AND TITUSVILLE J

r nmvsi.KK a. E3
or^
1966 Simca
four door sedan, balance of new car warranty.
1965 Ford LTD
four door hardtop, V-8, automatic transmission,
power steering, radio & heater, EXTRA COOL.
1967 Valiant J
four door sedan, blue with white interior,
' automatic transmission, heater, 9,000 miles,
balance of service warranty, save sss
1967 Plymouth VIP
four door hardtop, dark gray with blue interior,
383 cu/in, automatic transmission, power steering,
radio & heater, 27,000 miles, balance of warranty.
1962 Oldsmobile 9B
four door hardtop, automatic transmission, radio
& heater, EXTRA CLEAN
COME IN AND SEE
Wilbur Sligfi Dave Bowman Jimmy Meeks
Jimmy Pague Don Westmoreland
Chester Stanley
at
*.
2 8

he said, is because this age group
makes up about half the popu population
lation population of the UjS. Hanna said
alsp that the attitudes of these
persons as to right or wrong is
entirely different today than ever
before in the country's history.
Hanna stated that in his book
he will spell out new directions
of thought and philosophy for
people to follow.
This past summer, Hanna fin finished
ished finished a book titled "The Other
l*s: An Essay on Ontic Project/
He said this book is a general
work that traces out new areas
of philosophy, and that his next
book, written with the ACLS
grant, will be a sequence to it.
Hanna plans to write his book
in Mexico some time next year.

Page 11



Page 12

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

'The Great Debates Underway

' v A .' s..i-T*y i jHHP^k
MiiMiiMlW igp_ \
ppf w
- : ; w
; r iM i IMih N|l 388i8%&&
aLJ9fflni
9r m*r g v w m^ r Z
****** *'*"? niieM^WlMflH
,J * ;*>/- -V
R R H
9v BBggflg r
IR^, > *#&* <:< .
Mcride Speaks While Taylor Listens

Council Responsibility
Topic Os V P. Discussion

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The responsibility and pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings of Legislative Council
provided a lively topic of dis discussion
cussion discussion Wednesday night as can candidates
didates candidates for vice president met
for a debate in the Main Cafe Cafeteria.
teria. Cafeteria.
Toby Muir, running on the
Forward party ticket with pre presidential
sidential presidential candidate Bill Mcride,
stated that Legislative Council
had in the past been unrespon unresponsive

' jt ;
BPflflk
Mk |r Hk
|fl Rmh
Rlhil Rl W :
Jfl BP B Bwlife3^Khji
JRK WndSf
f f§
§ f§ J
m i* m
m §Ss m R
1 II R
I I
H
-
R
1
I I
jfl B
- '**. s H I I
.. , j. *- s v k 1
jfl
M K
M Wk
m I
M B
y
Rich Houk Speaks ~

sive unresponsive to such student needs as
improving academic counselling
and increased parking facilities.
Its true that Legislative
Council hasnt done much about
things like parking, Contrived
party candidate Mick Callahan
said, and I dont think they
should.
The physical plant of the uni university
versity university should be the concern of
the state of Florida and should
not involve the concern of stu students
dents students and the use of students

Tuition Hike Subject
Os Presidential Debates

By DAVE CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
A spirited battle over a pos possible
sible possible tuition hike highlighted the
first of four presidential can candidate
didate candidate debates Wednesday night
in Hume Hall.
Contrived partys Rich Houk,
Forward partys Bill Mcride,
Individuals Ira Brukner, and Un United-Firsts
ited-Firsts United-Firsts Clyde Taylor aired
their opinions and policies be before
fore before a capacity crowd.
On the tuition question, Houk
said that he would work to form
an association of state university
student body presidents to get
people involved in the fight ag against
ainst against the tuition hike. He said
he would also ask Leg Council
for $5,000 appropriation to carry
on a publicity campaign against
the hike.
Taylor said he would take
a five or six-man delegation to
Tallahassee to talk to the indivi individual

money, he continued.
Leg Council should be con concerned
cerned concerned with academics and
government and not physical
plants.
I agree that it is not the
responsibility of Legislative
Council to pave parking lots,
Muir said in rebuttal. It is their
responsibility to call it to the
attention of the administration
and the Road Department.
When asked how important he
considered experience to be when
looking for a qualified presi presidential
dential presidential candidate, United-First
party candidate Gary Goodrich
maintained that the candidates
to look for are the men who
have proven that they can make
Student Government work.
Toby says he can preside
over Leg Council with Roberts
Rules of Order, Goodrich con continued.
tinued. continued. Mick says he doesnt
know the mechanics of student
government but that he can learn
them.
I respect them, but I have
this to say. They can learn
in about six months. It took me
that long to learn it.
Goodrich went on to stress the
experience of his partys slate,
saying that each of United-First
partys candidates had current
experience and experience to fit
the office the candidate was seek seeking.
ing. seeking.
I havent been in the mech mechanics,
anics, mechanics, said Muir, a resident as assistant
sistant assistant in Murphree Area, but
Ive seen it not work for my
residents.
Callahan called for an enlarge enlargement
ment enlargement of the UFs program of
speakers and cultural events,
saying that a university com community
munity community needed a large program
of this nature.
I like the comparison Mick
made with Stanford and Har Harvard,
vard, Harvard, Muir answered, but the
cultural emphasis they have wont
be a reality here as long as
Claudius Maximus reigns. The
activities of Lyceum Council and
the Union Board are all the
activities we may have, but they
are about as much as we can
afford.

dual individual ligislators in their offices
and present the facts and fi figures
gures figures to the law-makers.
If this failed to prevent a tui tuition
tion tuition hike, or if it appeared that
one was inevitable,then, said
Taylor, he would request a small
appropriation from each stud students
ents students tuition to form a loan fund
to help those students to whom the
tuition hike would be critical.
Mcride proposed to win the
support of people who were will willing
ing willing to fight a tuition increase by
pelting newspapers and people
with letters.
He proposed student lobby ag against
ainst against tuition in the four days be between
tween between the election and the first
session of the legislature. This
would not be difficult, said Mc-
Bride, since the structure al already
ready already exists.
Preventing a tuition hike, ac according
cording according to Mcride, is not a hope hopeless
less hopeless cause.
Brukner said he did not like
the idea of promising to do some something
thing something in the future, but would be
willing to go to Tallahassee now
if the students wished him to do
so.
When asked how he would al alleviate
leviate alleviate the problem of football
seating, Taylor proposed using
student man-power to staff six
windows instead of three and
keeping the windows open from
the Tuesday before the game.
If the athletic department would
not agree to this plan, said Tay Taylor,
lor, Taylor, we would try other measures
to correct the problem.

life
Ira Bruckner Individual's Candidate

In the past the big problem
has been that the students have,
been too lazy, or selfish, or what
have you, to stand up and act
together. We would, in effect, ask
the student body to put up or
shut up, Taylor declared.
Mcride stated he would app approach
roach approach newspapermen around the
state in order to get the foot football
ball football problem extensively publici publicized.
zed. publicized. Mcride said he would also
approach certain alumni who
would raise hell because their
sons or daughters had difficul difficulties
ties difficulties obtaining seats to football
games.
This campaign is important,
said Mcride, because it is a
test of whether the old student
government can perpetuate it itself
self itself and whether the old Al Alligator
ligator Alligator can elect another can candidate.
didate. candidate.
He said it is time for a can candidate
didate candidate to re-educate the stu student
dent student body on what student govern government
ment government is really all about.
Taylor promised a serious
student government fighting for
the students 365 days a year.
The only way to overcome prob problems,
lems, problems, said Taylor, is to have
faced them in the past and to have
overcome them.
Houk called for a mature
student government that would
have the respect of the people
in positions of power, while Bruk Brukner
ner Brukner waid that if he was elected
he would transcend organiza organizational
tional organizational lines. My party will re represent
present represent all the students, Bruk Brukner
ner Brukner said.



X;!;IvX;X-: fl
Want a company JH|dM|rl: I
where you can really I
put your education I
Some of the engineers who graduated before me ...jj ; 4MPmBy,- 1
complained that their education didnt mean mueh /ll :;^ : ||3H|
in their jobs. Thats not what I wanted, says IBMs : f|.. Mjj, m
Jim Carr. (Jim is a Manager of Mechanical Process i ff||f / "*
Engineering.) JBKf '*%mT < \ *]
At IBM I knew Id be using what I learned. Theres so \ ]
much diversity here that you can usually work in the specific "' jgjt
area you choose. In my own case, I majored in Mechanical ~^*
Engineering and minored in Metallurgy. Today my ME degree
means more than ever. And I often use my metallurgical
background. For example, Im now working on a process Jk
development program that requires a knowledge of machine
design, metallurgy, heat transfer, and chemistry, all of which
I studied in school. V
Another good thing about IBMs diversity is that it
creates an interdisciplinary environment. You get a chance
to work with and learn from people in many different fields. jHj^^B
Since our industry is growing so fast, the people you talk to
are likely to be working at state-of-the-art levels or beyond.
Theres a lot more to the IBM story than Jim has mentioned.
Wed like to tell you about it when were on campus. Well be V
interviewing for careers in Marketing, Computer Applications,
Programming, Research and Development, Manufacturing,
and Field Engineering.
Sign up for an interview at your placement office, even H|
if youre headed for graduate school or military service.
And if you cant make a campus interview, send an outline
of your interests and educational background to Mr. C. F.
Cammack, IBM Corporate Recruiting, 1447 rjr \r~\ rn |^^B|i
Peachtree St. N.E.,Rm. 810, Atlanta, Georgia ][]<] K V /| [ V^Ht
30309. Were an equal opportunity employer. CJC_zycJVLb
..afofrfrw <>
/ B
n
,
*
, '-r* 1 f

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, I^B

Is There Really Brotherhood?

By JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
(Editors Note: This is the second in a series on
the changing role of fraternities and sororities on
college campuses.)
The fraternity presidents of Valparaiso Univer University
sity University were the first to openly challenge their nationals
on the problem of discrimination.
The 11 fraternity presidents (TKE, PhiKPsi,
Pike, LXA, PhiSE, Phi Delta Theta, DTPhi, SPE,
TX, STG, and SPi) stated that the fraternities are
guilty of discrimination toward minority groups.
While many national fraternities have no clauses
specifically excluding certain people, gentlemens
agreements or some other arrangements on the
local' level strongly discourage the pledging of Ne Negroes.
groes. Negroes. Their break with national would eliminate
the claim of discrimination. Perhaps local autonomy
would hasten reforms within the organizations. With

Library Director Defends
Overdue Book Fines

By ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff Writer
Library Director Margaret K.
Goggin has expressed regret over
a recent Alligator editorial which
took issue with the librarys
fine system for overdue books.
If there were no fines on
books we would have no way to
get them back, said Dr. Gog Goggin.
gin. Goggin. The Agriculture library
tried working without fines but
this failed and they have been
forced to adopt a fine system.
The editorial, entitled Cash
Register Library, took the view
that the 10 cents per day fine
was unnecessarily high.
This is simply not true; a
check of the handbooks of other
university libraries will show
that we charge far below the us usual
ual usual fine, said Dr. Goggin.
A check of the library manuals
in the UF collection showed that
most libraries do charge more,
usually 25 cents a day. Librar Libraries
ies Libraries checked include the Univer University
sity University of Illinois, U.C.L.A., Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech, and the University of
California. Florida State and
other Florida state universities
charge the same as the UF.
We had to raise the fine from
nickel because it didnt seem to

AMERICAN TELEPHONE
AND TELEGRAPH CO.
LONG LINES DEPT.
Needs individuals with leadership potential
To fill Management Positions
' o
Youll be supervising
people, solving problems,
running a tough job from
the first day, expected to
advance rapidly. And
youll be held accountable
for your own success or
failure. Sign up at the
placement office. Interviews
here on campus January 23,
' 24, 25.
~ y f -1

mean much, added Dr. Goggin,
and we may have to raise it
again.
A higher fine, according to Dr.
Goggin, means that either the
books are in great demand or that
students just arent careful about
bringing them back.
These books are in demand
but people just arent bringing
them back on time, Dr. Goggin
emphasized.
Her words were borne out by
a check of the IBM readout used
by the main library. It showed
that as of Jan. 14 nearly 250
of the 2,519 books checked out
had been overdue for a month
or more.
' The latest fine receipt book
showed that of the 400 fines paid
during November and December
only six were overdue for only
one or two days but 162 had been
overdue for 10 days or more.
If someone can come up with
away to get these books back
without fines we will be glad to
hear it, said Dr. Goggin, but
so far this is the only way.
The fines, which have amounted
to as much as $1,525.43 during
a single month do not stay with
the library but instead go to
the state.
One final irony of the Cash
Register Library criticism is

DISCRIMINATION?

this decision, the unit rule or blackball system
would be abolished.
The issue of whether or not brotherhood actually
exists has become a limiting factor in many spe special
cial special groups. The brotherhood is limited to the
confines of the house, leaving anything but a brother brotherly
ly brotherly feeling for the outside. It is only fair that the
students, faculty, and administration see the Greeks
for what they are and not for what they claim to
be. As important, the social group should take an
objective view of itself.
At Duke University, fraternities and sororities
had been ordered to get rid of discrimination by
September 1, 1967. The administration sent a letter
dated June 23, 1966, to all fraternity-sorority pre presidents
sidents presidents which stated that the university would not
allow any organization to use campus facilities if
their charter barred members due to race, creed,
or color.
However, the three fraternities involved, Phi Delta
Theta, Sigma Chi, and Sigma Nu, no longer have

that only one of the 12 univer university
sity university libraries has had enough mo money
ney money budgeted to it to afford a
cash register.

^Bg I 1
WSt
Lets Talk
About
Issues
(not
ii nii>\~Bm
CLYDE TAYLOR I
has proposed a plan by which Student |
leaders from all the Universities would |
go to Tallahassee and lobby against any
Tuition increase. Clyde has gathered information
on the financial hardship that an increase 1
would cause*the students. 1
. ; r 7 jjj
_ .. ft!.:
-
(Clyde Taylor has plans, not promises) m
UNITED FIRST I

discriminatory cl&uses on the local level. But the
Sigma Nu national has not removed the clauses.
The Greeks at the University of Louisville were
given the ultimatum of stopping discrimination ag against
ainst against Negroes or face expulsion from the campus.
In another case, the University of Colorado pro prohibited
hibited prohibited discrimination in fraternities and suspended
the privileges of Sigma Chi. When the national
chapter filed suit, a U.S. district court upheld the
Universitys action.
Administrators at the University of California,
Wisconsin, and Minnesota have also issued warnings
against discrimination.
One fraternity president from the University of
Kentucky stated that if blackballing a rushee is
done on the basis of race, then thats the problem
of the fellow who votes against the pledge. One must
remember that the fraternity belongs to the members
and if they cant live academically or socially with
a fellow, they have every right to deny him mem membership.
bership. membership.

ROBBIES
For The Best In
Meals,R^^andwichea
'color t.v. & billiards"*
1718 W. University Ave.
'OnThe Gold Coast 1



January Registration Improved

By MARLYN RUBIN
Alligator Correspondent
In September 3,000 attempts
were made by UF students to
register in filled sections. They
all had to use drop and add cards
to get into classes.
In January this was no longer
a problem, says Vernon Voyles,
director erf records and regis registration.
tration. registration.
The computers used in the fail
were not programmed to reject
students attempting to register
for filled sections. They are now
programmed to reject cards with
filled sections, Invalid numbers
and schedule conflicts/ Voyles
said.
Richard E. Whitehead, director
Faculty
By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Twenty-three UF professors
will be released from teaching
and administrative duties to de devote
vote devote full time to research and
intellectual updating next year.
Vice President of Academic
Affairs Robert B. Mautz re recently
cently recently announced the names of
23 faculty members who were
awarded grants under the Faculty
Development Program for the
1968-1969 academic year.
The object of the program,
in its second year of operation,
is to improve and develop
faculty members Mautz said.
Any instructor with six years
service to the UF who is class classified
ified classified as an assistant professor
is eligible to apply. Proposals
are submitted to college screen screening
ing screening committees and then to the

Interhall Dance At Union
Psychedelic light-effects will show off the Love Lites at a
dance sponsored by Men's Interhall Council in the Reitz Union Ball Ballroom
room Ballroom Friday, Jan. 26.
; 7 T* : -* O. ... Q_.
o
The show, similar to the one the Love Lites presented early
last quarter, will include two bands, climaxing with the blasting
and smashing of musical instruments.
Charlie Warren, Interhall dance director, says this is going to
be their biggest event during this and all students will be
admitted.
Tickets are on sale this week and the next at the Student Union
Box Office or through dorm representatives for $1 and $1.50 at the
door.
The dance will start at 9 p.m. and will last until 1 a.m.
cmSeieTN
I HUE Jll I
I
W 1 Sighltly Higher
W/. \ \ Jlw? Jw HERE'S WHAT WE DO lT*
1- New Braka Uninf SB
1 2. Rebuild Wheel Cyls.
t 3. Turn All 4 Drums
IT y s'/ / 4. Repack Front Wheel
V sl> K l BeaHnas
L Jr ,/ \ // & 5. Add Brake Fluid,
T '/TIT'W7 L' \V 6 Check Crease Seals
Jz h vV 7. Precision Grind
HIV '' \ Lininqs
) 8. 25.000 Mile Cuarqntee
i. No Payment 'Till Feb. 23
pamxnxl
NW 13th St A r y

j j
_ 'irnua luVistTi l CijVi i ft
*m^r,w W M,t,rmr, e .SM,srrre^ w ,, ryfryt / *"

V. v 7
BETTER PROGRAMMING HELPED

of admissions and registrar, ex explained
plained explained that last fall the student
would receive a slip saying, You
have completed your registra registration,
tion, registration, even when he signed up
for a class that was closed or
involved a class conflict.
During the winter quarter re registration,
gistration, registration, the computers were
programmed to reject such con conflicts.
flicts. conflicts. The student was given a
blue slip telling him what was
wrong and to correct his mis mistake.
take. mistake.
Two more improvements were
made. Each college had its own
representative in the gym and the
colleges were able to override
the computers.
t
Having a college represen-
Awarded
University-wide selection com committee.
mittee. committee.
Next years grant recipients
and their fields are:
Prof. Phillip A. Ward, art;
Dr. Ernest Bartley, political
scieriSe; Dr. David M. Chalmers,
religion; Dr. L. N. McAlister,
history.
Dr. Allen M. Sievers,
economics; Dr. Robert O. Strip Stripling,
ling, Stripling, education; Dr. Seymour D.
Block, chemical engineering; Dr.
Mickie Newbill, journalism and
communication.
Prof. Walter Probert, law; J.R.
Jones, Jr., Assistant Librarian;
Dr. Irene Zimmerman, Associate
Librarian; Prof. Biron H. Wal Walker,
ker, Walker, English; Dr. Thomas J.
Walker, biological sciences.
Dr. Melvin Fried, biochem biochemistry;
istry; biochemistry; Dr. Melvin Greer,
medicine; Dr. Kenneth C. Leib Leibman,
man, Leibman, pharmacology.

tative on hand in the gym kept
students from having to walk to
the departments for approval of
a schedule change.
For example, if the student
needed to make a change, in instead
stead instead of having to report to the
dean of his college for appro approval,
val, approval, the representative was au authorized
thorized authorized to make the change.
Whitehead explained that In the
past, colleges set a limit on the
number of students for their clas classes.
ses. classes. Tbis would be programmed
into the computer, and as each
class was filled, the computer
would reject any additional stu students.
dents. students.
But the change made the clo closing
sing closing of classes more flexible.
Although the computer still
Grants
Dr. Paul L. Pfahler, agronomy;
Dr. Max R. Langham, agricul agricultural
tural agricultural economics; Dr. Shreve S.
Woltz, plant physiologist; Earl
Kelly, County Agent; Mrs. Susan
C. Camp, nutritionist, and Dr.
Stanley E. Rosenberger, market marketing
ing marketing specialist.
Funds for the program are pro provided
vided provided by the 1967 legislature.
Professors have the option of
taking a one, two or three quarter
leave of absence. Research will
be conducted abroad by some
professors and within the nation
by others. A few areas that will*,
be researched are ceramic
chemistry, Indonesian economy
and the social structure
and change in Spain.

f
CARPENTER
FOR
CLERK

* Resident Manager Flavett 111
* Governors Scholarship
* 3.0 Overall Average
* 98 Percentile LSAT
*
R.
* Pre-Law Student
: ; . v : : -J -v
v r 'tr : t .
Ron Carpenter For Clerk Os The Honor Court
FORWARD > with Bill Mcride
5 (Paid Political Advertisement)

Friday, January 19, 1908, The Florida Alligator,

rejected the extra student after
a class filled up, he was sent
to the representative from his
college for advisement.
Since there is usually room
for one more/ the represen representatives
tatives representatives were authorized by their
college to add the student to the
class roll/ said Whitehead.
The problem of inadequate
course offerings to meet the stu student
dent student demands was eased this
quarter by pre-advising in the fall
for the winter and spring quar quarters
ters quarters but a lack of facilities and
teachers makes this a difficult
problem to solve," added White Whitehead.
head. Whitehead.
When asked the advantage of
using computers in registration
Whitehead answered, Morethan
10,000 faculty-staff hours of work
are saved each year."

Watch For The
Crazy Days
Next Week
Hmtipraity
1620 West I'niversify Avenue Caroivn Plaza

It'S
Here
Now! h
Austin-Healey Sprite
at a Spirited Price
*
Now
At
Crane
Import
East University
372-4373

fl mRL
j s> sa. JBn v / v
* m, 3 Ms,?*'

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

LBJ Calls For Peace, More, Jobs

By MERRIMAN SMITH
United Press international
WASHINGTON President
Johnson Wednesday night spurned
peace at any price in Vietnam
and challenged Americans at
home to provide new jobs, hous housing
ing housing and stronger law enforcement
in the nations troubled cit
In a State of the Union mes message
sage message promptly criticized by Re Republicans
publicans Republicans as full of election year
politics, the President also dis disclosed
closed disclosed plans for a $10.4 billion
increase in the federal bud budget
get budget next year, applied anew for
higher taxes and called for re removal
moval removal of the gold backing for the
dollar.
Johnson was applauded 43
times during his 52-minute
speech before a joint night ses session
sion session of Congress and a nation nationwide
wide nationwide radio and television aud audience.
ience. audience. He drew cheers as well
as applause only oncewhen he
declared that the American peo people
ple people have had enough of rising
crime and lawlessness.
Johnsons prescription for a
nation marked by a certain
restlessness, a questioning was
a vast, long-range program of
domestic social and economic
reforms, which dominated his
speech.
In his comparatively brief re remarks
marks remarks on Vietnam, the President
appeared to have hardened his

Republicans Call
Speech Political

WASHINGTON (UPI) Con Congressional
gressional Congressional Republican leaders
attacked President Johnsons
State of the Union message Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night as a political cam campaign
paign campaign speech that failed to deal
effectively with the problems
either at home and abroad.
They scored the address on
almost every score taxes, Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam spending and the cities. They
said the President had spotlighted
difficulties but the most part had
proposed inadequate solutions.
At a news conference follow following
ing following the speech, House and Senate
GOP leaders charged that the
President was offering short
term answers to long-term dif difficulties,
ficulties, difficulties, and wanted to spend too
much money while doing it.

I ASK HERMAN

terms for a halt in the bombing
of North Vietnam.
He said he was exploring re recent
cent recent statements from Hanoi link linking
ing linking a bombing halt to peace
talks, and would report at the
earliest possible moment the re results
sults results of these explorations.
But he said the enemy must
not take advantage of our re restraint
straint restraint in any bombing halt.
This nation simply cannot ac accept
cept accept anything less without jeop jeopardizing
ardizing jeopardizing the lives of our men and
our allies, he said.
: -- %
If peace talks can be arranged,
Johnson said, the United States
would try to make a complete
cessation of hostilitiesa really
true ceasefire the first order
of business.
J
The President gave no details
of the financing of his plans
to turn despair into confidence
among Negro slum dwellers.
Presumably these will be out outlined
lined outlined when he submits his pro proposed
posed proposed budget for the next fiscal
year to Congress, late in Jan January.
uary. January.
But he did say the estimated
new budget of $lB6 billionfig billionfigured
ured billionfigured for the first time this year
to include trust fund spending spendingwould
would spendingwould contain $3 billion more
for defense, nearly $1 billion in
higher interest charges, about
$4.5 billion for Social Security,

On the other hand, Democratic
leaders enthusiastically en endorsed
dorsed endorsed the Presidents speech
and the program he offered
except for his renewed call for
a tax increase.
Speaker John W. McCormack
termed the message majestic
and said: Lyndon Johnson has
given us a real blueprint to
accomplish these marvelous
things. We can do it if we
have the will. I believe we have.

ABOUT MIKE
. . Why The
UNISPHERE
!s The Official
Microphone Os
Hermans Hermits
On Tour
Herman knows his micro microphone
phone microphone is his link with his
audience. He wants you to
hear his voice and the lyr lyrics,
ics, lyrics, naturally, without
howling feedback, without
annoying close-up breath
"pop, without audience
sounds. Pretty tough test
for a microphone . rou ;
tine for the incomparable
Shure Unisphere. Just ask
the better groups.
Shure Brothers, Inc.
222 Hartrey Ave.
. Evanston, 111. 60204

IN STATE OF UNION SPEECH

Medicare and Medicaid, veterans
and farmers, and $1.6 billion for
recently approved pay increase
for government workers and the
military.
A 10-year campaign to build
6 million new housing units for
low and middle-income families,
with a start of 300,000 new units
next year.
A five-year child health care
program to provide prenatal care
through the childs first year for

f A Downtown
(/%/ OF GAINESVILLE
, .- vZIW
i a :
Our Semi-Annual
Stocktaking
Clearance
S- ng Monday
ex
JANUARY 22 AT 9'30 AM.
.
Save 1/4 i/3 i/j & More
This is a store wide clearance sale,
when Wilsons cleans house of odd
lots, broken sizes Sc color ranges and
V
manufacturer discontinued styles.

so shop early while selections are
good..
* ..
SHOP
Wilsons
;T ~ t
MONDAY-SATURDAY 9..30 AM. -9 PM.
__ L_ . ? -

families who cannot afford it.
Strengthening of local law en enforcement
forcement enforcement officers and agencies
with federal help, more vigorous
enforcement of drug laws by
increasing federal narcotics a agents
gents agents by one-third, and adding
100 FBI agents to federal law
enforcement.
. Johnson made a carefully
worded appeal for congressional
support of his request for a 10
per cent income tax surcharge,

which never got past a skepti skeptical
cal skeptical House Ways & Means Com Committee
mittee Committee last year.
In apparent effort to persuade
Rep. Wilbur Mills, D-Ark., the
committee chairman who fears
such a tax hike in the midst
of inflationary pressures would
become permanent, the Presi President
dent President said: This must be a temp temporary
orary temporary measure, which in
less than two years. Congress
can repeal it sooner if the need
has passed/'

Downtown



By JANICE SIZEMORE
Alligator Staff Writer
7 '
Here it is the end of the third
week of winter quarter. Get
ready, mid-terms are just around
the corner. Ive heard there are
going to be some really good
Death of Saturday Classes
parties this weekend. Thats as
good an excuse as anynot to
mention the fact that there are
alot of visitors invading our cam campus
pus campus this weekend. Havent heard
about it? Theyre the boyfriend boyfriendgirlfriend
girlfriend boyfriendgirlfriend types from those really
backward colleges who are
still on the old semester system.
Theyre having a break about
this time while we eat our hearts
out!
Heres the round-up:
Lambda Chi Alpha-
Last Sunday 25 brothers and
pledges visited with 46 young youngsters
sters youngsters at Sunland. This year, the
Lambda Chis are sponsoring ten
12 year-olds in Ashwood cottage.
Adding that feminine touch to the
refreshments were several pin pinmates
mates pinmates and Little Sisters.
Monday found new pledge Kent
Foster helping out the bowling
team to victory over the Pikes.
Speaking of new pledges, new
Lambda Chis are: Larry Big Bigney,
ney, Bigney, Jay Buss, Stuart Campbell,
Jim Cannon, Jim Chastain, Ross
Ellington, Warren King, Roger
Leemis, Mike Mosley, Larry
Murrah, George Nikerson, Rocky
Shiver, Bob Stacey, Bob Stall Stallworth,
worth, Stallworth, Larry Sylvester, and
Bradley Thomas.
Womens Interhall
Womens Interhall held a Floor
Rep Workshop Wednesday night
in the Union Ballroom. The ob object
ject object was to stimulate enthusiasm,
to increase efficiency and share
ideas. Guest speakers were
Dr. Riker, director of housing;
Dean Cosby, Dean of Women;
as well as RAs, counselors and
floor reps.
Phi My
Seven new pledges at the Phi
Mu house are Ellen Adkins, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Anderson, Maxine Chandler,
Pam Geist, Trish Forum, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Wilson, and Winkle Wilson.
The Phi Mu cagers walloped
the Phi Sigs 17-2 Tuesday night.
Delta Sigma Phi
Little Sisters of the Nile
were chosen by the Delta Sig
brothers recently. They are:
Carla Schlecht, Mary Salem me,
Penny Pockrass, Dee Duncan,
Mary Cobb, Sandy Hill, Sandy
Carson, Holly Chanega, and
Laura Gordo.
Alpha Tau Omega
The fall pledge class has adopt adopted
ed adopted little brothers from Meghee
cottage at the Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch in Live Oak. 45
Gifts were sent during Christ Christmas
mas Christmas to the boys and in Decem December,
ber, December, the pledge class spent the
day with their little brothers.
Further plans for this worthy
service project is to bring the
little yougsters to Gainesville
for a weekend in January or early
February.
Alpha 'Epsilon Phi
Maybe I should just combine
the AEPhis and Teps news from r

CAMPUS CORRAL

nov/ on. Seems like a monopoly.
*
AEPhi sister Cathy Horn has
been selected sweetheart of the
Pi Lam pledge class and Phyl Phyllis
lis Phyllis Singer won the same honor
|rom the Tep pledges. The
Tep brothers chose Happy Arkin
for the second time as their
sweetheart.
Linda Tarler was recently
elected vice president of Hillel

,
1 .... .-> .. <
k- 7 .' .. - :
For the next 35 days, get your two etita out
wm.
Anniversary Special
HAMBURGERS^^p
: : -- ---* r ~ *- :
o celebrate Krystal's 35 years, hamburgers are now only 10$. This
special offer Is good until February 17. Take advantage of It now
...and often.
Krystal Restaurants have been serving the South for 35 years.
The basic idea that built Krystal is still building them...quality food and
service at the lowest possible prices.
OFFER ENDS FEBRUARY 17,1968
or
'.' G
(i Wwli Serving Gainesville at
1423 West University Avenue
*
.. w
' i' ;
~..**'' j t
'

and Mimi Buxbaum and Phyllis
Karol are two new SAE little
sisters. Susan Shapiro and Bev
Canton are Kappa Sig little sis sisters
ters sisters and Gail Hineman is a lit little
tle little sister of AEPi.
Three new pledges have been
added to the growing AEPhi pled pledge
ge pledge roster. They are: Toby
Goldstein, Sherry Hinersfeld, and
Dee Dee Walshun.

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

. Sigma Alpha Epsilon
The SAE news is kind of scanty
this week, only a list of new
officers. However, the news
sheet had an ominous message
at the bottomWe will remain
on top. Hope to hear more
about thissounds interesting.
New officers include: Frank
Snell, president; Jake Schickel,

treasurer; Fred Cantrell, treas treasurer;
urer; treasurer; Rick Miller, herald; John
Merritt, chronicler; Wayne Nel Nellums,
lums, Nellums, warden (?); John Riggs,
correspondent; Hugh Loomis,
social chairman; Bob Glenn,
pledge trainer; and Jim Brad Bradford,
ford, Bradford, housemanager.
- c'
Maybe next time, I should just
list the brothers who arent of officers.
ficers. officers.

Page 17



Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Four Speakers Highlight Weeks Events

By LORI STEELE
Campus Living Staff
Bishop Dougherty
What Is Happening in the
Roman Catholic Church? will
be the topic of Bishop John J.
Dougherty's lecture at the Uni University
versity University Convocation this Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. in the Florida
Gymnasium.
The Roman Catholic Bishop is
a scripture scholar and theo theologian
logian theologian of international reputation.
Presently he is Auxiliary Bishop
of Newark and President of Seton
Hall University in South Orange,
New Jersey.
Bishop Dougherty was recently
named by the U.S. bishops as one
of four scholars to draft a national
statement on the nature and pre present
sent present condition of the Catholic
Church.
Graduating from Seton Hall in
1930, Bishop Dougherty was or ordained
dained ordained a priest in 1933 in Rome,
where later he took graduate
studies leading to the degrees
Licentiate of Sacred Theology
and Doctor of Sacred Scripture.
From 1937 to 1959 he was pro professor
fessor professor of scripture at Immaculate
Conception Seminary. In 1958 he
was consecrated bishop.
Bishop Dougherty has been
horwredfrecmentl^Lsadl^Jtiiig-
BISHOP DOUGHERTY
ulshed leader in the ecumenical
movement. In 1965 he was cited
by the National Conference of
Christians and Jews. In the same
year he received the annual
Americanism Award of Bnai
B'rith.
Dr. Smith
Centering around a theme con concerning
cerning concerning religious change in a
changing world, keynote speaker
Dr. Huston Smith will initiate
Religion-In-Life Week Sunday
night with an address on "The
Meeting of ReligionsEast and
West.
Author of the well-known book
The Religions of Man, Dr.
Smith is a specialist in the field
of comparative religion and phi philosophy.
losophy. philosophy. Since 1956 he has been
professor of philosophy at MIT,
the first such appointment since
the early days of the institute.
He accepted this position be because,
cause, because, it offers an unparallel unparalleled
ed unparalleled opportunity to tackle, head headon,
on, headon, the problem of closing the
gap in understanding which has
developed between the scientific
and humanistic components of our
culture.
Born of missionary parents
in Soochow, China, Dr. Smith
lived in China until he was 17,
giving him an appropriate back background
ground background in his field. A grad graduate
uate graduate of Central College in Mis Missouri,
souri, Missouri, he received his Ph.D. from
the University of Chicago in 1945.

Since his acceptance at MIT,
Dr. Smith was appointed Austral Australia's
ia's Australia's first Charles Strong Lectur Lecturer
er Lecturer on World Religlons_(296l)_and^
m
DR. SMITH
became an annual lecturer toThe
John Dewey Society (1964).
Dr. Siegel
Discussing the Jewish half of
Protestant and Jewish Views of
Ecumenical Change, topic of
Wednesday night's session on re religion,
ligion, religion, will be Dr. Morton Sie Siegel,

Gainesvilles Newest Night Club
Dancing Nightly Till 2 A. M.
This is not a teen club . You must be 21, and you must prove
it. Our live entertainment features some of the swingingest
groups available on Tues., Thur., Fri., and Sat. nights. Admis Admission
sion Admission is SI.OO on Tues. and Thur. and $1.50 on Fri. and Sat.
For reservations, call 376-4792 or 378-7586. We specialize
in barbeque and catering to private parties, clubs, etc.
N.W. 39th Ave.-2mi. West Os of 1-75

I l MBHSuRE ap? I
I I a Our slacks do-do you? No taller trousers I
AT \ .T hereabouts, by any standard of measure. No
\ \ \ truer taper, no huskier cloth, no workmanship
x a\ that stands up half as well. In the 6B lineup,
. I jI . p... L [I.
I &tag M rag I
I 13 W. Univ. Ave. ~ 1
I Gainesville Mall I

RELIGION-IN-LIFE

gel, Siegel, director of education, United
Synagogue of America.
Dr. Siegel is presently an in instructor
structor instructor at the Jewish Theolog Theological
ical Theological Seminary of America and has
been the editor of three books:
Our Age, Synagogue School,
and Your Child. He is also
director of United Synagogue
Commission on Jewish Edu-
W
B| Vmmm
it ¥
iTIT JF
Y* V <
DR. SIEGEL

Dr. Quanbeck
The Protestant portion of
Protestant and Jewish Views of
Ecumenical Change will be dis discussed
cussed discussed by Dr. Warren A. Quan Quanbeck
beck Quanbeck at an evening session of
Religion-In-Life Week in the
Reitz Union Ballroom, Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
An Observer-delegate to the
Second Vatican Council, second,
third, and fourth sessions (1963-
65), Dr. Quanbeck will also speak
on Vatican II Observations at
a luncheon on Wednesday.
His experience includes teach teaching
ing teaching at the above universities, a
tutor for the Ecumenical Insti Institute
tute Institute of the World Council of
Churches, Celigny, Switzerland,

HOFBRAU
I (Formerly Rosalo's)
OUR SPECIALTY
also STEAKS and SEAFOODS
Enjoy Fine Foods Served Everyday In A Pleasant Atmosphere
from 4:30 except Thursday Closed All Day.
Watch For Our Specials
Your Hosts Mr. and Mrs. Karl Hulsmann
On Hiway 441 4 Miles South of University Avenue
PHONE: 372-9227
- -V

and a guest Professor of
Theology at the Lutheran Theo Theological
logical Theological Seminary in Gettysburg,
Pa.
: Sj| ljpffr : ; ' -3M
KL M
Bk&' ;
DR. QUANBECK



By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
She was beautiful.
Large blue eyes, bleached
blonde hair, slim figure.
How would you like to get
a burger? I asked nervously,
hopefully.
She scanned me with those blue
eyes.. Oh! those eyes.
All right, she smiled.
My imagination took flight as
we walked into the hamburger
joint. I ordered and we found a
table in a dark corner.
We talked about silly little
things. She laughed easily,
quickly, teasingly. /
I turned around in my chair
to see if the burgers were com com*->
*-> com*-> ing. I didnt have a clear view
of the counter so it took me a
minute to see that they were on
the grill.
I turned around, eager to stare
again into those beautiful blue

UnionTo Present
'Shrew 1 Tonight

Bv ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Union Films Com Committee
mittee Committee will present Taming of
the Shrew as the first big fea feature
ture feature of its new winter program.
We have planned our program
to appeal to every taste, com commented
mented commented Mark Spool, publicity
chairman of the films committee.
Our purpose is to bring to
campus the greatest variety of
current films and make them
available to the students at the
lowest cost possible.
Beginning tonight and running
through January 24 is the film
version of Shakespeares Tam Taming
ing Taming of the Shrew.
Staring Richard Burton and
Elizabeth Taylor, Taming of the
Shrew a comedy about the
sometimes misunderstood busi business
ness business of love and marriage, with
Shakespeare adding a few twists
of his own to the plot.
The plot of the picture revolves
around Katharina, played by Miss
Taylor, whose temper in dealing
with prospective suitors has
scared them away and made her
the despair of her father Bap Baptista,
tista, Baptista, played by stage actor
Michael Horden.
Katharinas sister, Bianca, is
just the opposite and so Bap Bapjtista
jtista Bapjtista decides the only way to
marry off Kate is to make sort
of a package deal.
Richard Burton, who playsPe playsPekruchio,
kruchio, playsPekruchio, a lusty but poverty povertyptricken
ptricken povertyptricken gentleman, becomes
part of the package.
As much attention has been paid
so the production of Taming of
khe Shrew as to the story.
Franco Zeffirelli, one of
Europes leading stage and opera

You Wont Believe
f*
Crazy Days
Wildest Prices Ever
v
>O2O Wo*t I'mversny Avsnu*. *,* >laZa

f uf,Doc,/ Dont Even Smoke

eyes, at those sparkling white
teeth, those....
I coughed. My eyes watered.
I couldnt get my breath.
The vision, .my dream, .a per perfect
fect perfect girl...
Again it was not to be.
She had blown two lungs of
cigarette smoke directly into my
face. I could feel the heat of
the cigarette on my eyebrows
as she leaned across the table,
clenching the filthy weed between
her teeth) in the middle of her
lips. ~
After choking down the
burgers, trying to nonchalantly
blow the clouds of smoke out
of my face, I finally escaped
into the clear night air and drove
her home.
At her door I did not even try
to kiss her. I wanted to kiss
a girl, not a camel.
The following Friday I went
to a doctor. I had a hacking
cough, and was losing weight.

directors is primarily respon responsible
sible responsible for the Burton-Zeffirelli
production.
Production designer for this
Rome-based film was Renzo Mo Monuardino
nuardino Monuardino with Oscar award
winner Elven Webb as art
director and twice Academy
Award winner Dario Simoni as
set director.
The cast and technicians have
combined to make The Taming
of the Shrew, in the words of
Burton very active, robust and
vital. The story is blatant, rough
and vulgar but also tender,
sweet and horrendous in parts.
! --V
jgk v
JhbV HhF v&K?
r,.
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
1 A.
- /
iiyf t. 7BP jt f|. 4*l
S 1 UH|. i v
£ s if
mM-M mM-M---RICHARD
--RICHARD mM-M---RICHARD BURTON

'QUIT, ANYWAY

After collecting my $lO, slap slaping
ing slaping a cold stethoscope to my
chest, and banging my knee with
a hammer, (in that order) he gave
me his diagnosis.
Youll have to give up smok smoking,
ing, smoking, he said.
But doc, I dont smoke! I
exclaimed.
Nonsense, said the doc.
Next patient.**
I went to my third period class
next day. I had a very consid considerate
erate considerate Drofessorhe let those
with the nicotine habit make the
whole period miserable for the
non-smokers.
I could feel my asthma coming
on. My throat was dry. I wish wished
ed wished I had a bottle of eyewash to
relieve the burning.
A boy on my right side passed
the ash tray over his shoulder
and spilled ashes down my collaiC
The girl on my left, being right righthanded,
handed, righthanded, was holding her cigarette
about three inches from my face.
I peered througn tne smoke
cloud which hung over her head,
partially obscuring her right ear.
She looked like she thought she
was especially sexy, holding a
100 centimeter, charcoal fil filtered,
tered, filtered, mentholated, pastel cig cigarette
arette cigarette in just that position.

I watched her put it to her lips.
She pursed them tightly, inhaled

I I Kiy/.m : I
H Ha
I
I ~ v-.'--
PHIL BURNETT
lI : ; \ J """T 7%.:. v
A man of experience
' . '- , £ ' j e
$400,000 is a lot of money ...
*
a lot of your money
It should be handled with
experienced financial ability.
if
Place your money in trusted
hands. 7 -
TREASURER
Forward
~ with Phil Burnett
(Paid Political Announcement)

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

deeply, and blew slowly. The
blue-tinted smoke rushed into the
darkening cloud, making it jiggle
slightly.
i
She held the cigarette over an
ash tray and tapped once with her
forefinger.
If she could only look in a
mirror at that moment!
The bell rang. I clenched my

I Take an exciting STOP tour of Europe via WORLD
AIRWAYS, largest and finest Charter Airline in the
World. Departures June 18, 23, 25, 28.
Choose from 12 itineraries of 46 to 60 days. From $llBO
all-inclusive.
Set Europe in the company of fellow students from all over the U.S. and
Canada. Procrams tailored with a younc look": discotheques, theatre eve evenings,
nings, evenings, sailing parties, escorted throughout by students from British uni universities
versities universities and lots of leisure time for your personal pursuits and intarests.
Also available: 13 spectacular European Programs via the all jet services of
TWA and transatlantic luxury liners-the SS France, Michelangelo, United
States*. Superior hotel accommodations everywhere, first class rail travel,
sightseeing in air conditioned motor coaches, other top quality features.
21 te 75 days from SS4O.M all-inclusive.
Meef the international safety standards for new ships developed In j
For complete information and complimentary brochure: jK
World Travel Service

books in my teeth and staying
close to the floor, crawled to
the door. Someone held it open
for me.
An open pack of cigarettes fell
in front of me.
I could see lettering on the side.
Squinting, I could make it out:
Caution! Cigarette smoking
may be hazardous to your
health.
I wheezed.

Page 19



Page 20

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Tennessee Williams Opens Season

Tennessee Williams Night Os
the Iguana opened the new year
for the Gainesville Little Theatre
last night. Performances are
scheduled for tonight and Satur Saturday
day Saturday at 8:30 p.m. at the Little
Theatre Playhouse, 4039 NW 16th
Blvd.
Night of the Iguana, is a
drama that the Playhouse feels
appeals to mature theatre goers.
This play depicts the lives of an
odd assortment of people caught
on a hot summer's day paral paralleling
leling paralleling the fate of an iguana caught
and tied by the throat.
~ -- - :i - -
*. -: Jay Lauer of the speech de department
partment department staff portrays the ir irreverent
reverent irreverent Mr. Shannon, and Ellen
Law plays Maxine, the incon inconsolable
solable inconsolable and insatiable widow.
Richard Burton and Ava Gard Gardner
ner Gardner played the leads in the movie
version of Night of the Iguana.
Betsy Steinberg is a delicate,
'. .c*
Why Do
You Read
So Slowly?
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple tech technique
nique technique of rapid reading which
should enable you to double your
reading speed and yet retain
much more. Most people do not
realize how much they could in increase
crease increase their pleasure, success
and income by reading faster and
more accurately.
According to this publisher,
many people, regardless of their
present reading skill, can use this
simple technique to improve their
reading ability to a remarkable
degree. Whether reading stories,
books, technical matter, it be becomes
comes becomes possible to read sentences
at a glance and entire pages in
seconds with this method.
s 0
To acquaint the readers of
this newspaper with the easy-to easy-tofollow
follow easy-tofollow rules for developing rapid
reading skill, the company has
Sprinted full details of its in interesting
teresting interesting self-training method in
la new booklet, How to Read
" "aster and Retain More, mailed
iee. NO obligation. Send your
iame, address, and zip code to:
leading, 835 Diversey, Dept.
64-011, Chicago, 60614. Apost Apostard
ard Apostard will do.
t

; 27,000
I .. ___ people are looking at this ad. Replace it with your ad next week.
* : ; 1 : 1 11 l 4- i

believable Hannah, who does
quick character sketches and
paintings in water colors or pas pastels.
tels. pastels.
In strong supporting roles are
such Little Theatre veterans as
Tom Godey, Eleanor Broome,
Wady Lynn, and Chad Reid.
Notable performances are also
given by newcomers Claudia
Madder, Joan Bickerstaff, and
Harry Tisdale.

msk m 91 V

Talks Honor Court Issues :
EXERT PRESSURE ON FACULTY TO CHANGE EXAMINATION
QUESTIONS EVERY YEAR in order to remove incentive for test thefts
* : i
.* ?
r- . r
INSTITUTE FORMALIZED TRAINING FOR HONOR COURT
COUNSEL to insure competent defense for accused students
REVITALIZE THE HONOR COURT SPEAKERS BUREAU
by regularly bringing it into living areasto inform the students
of policy and strengthen individual faith in the honor system
BEFORE ARBITRARILY OPENING THE COURT TO THE PUBLIC,
EXAMINE THE STUDENTS OPINION THROUGH REFERENDUM

PETE ZINOBER
for
CHANCELLOR

(Paid Political Announcement)

AT GAINESVILLE LITTLE THEATRE

The set, designed and con constructed
structed constructed by Tom Godey, is one of
the.highlights and delights of the
play, as is the storm sequence.
Kyle Sterling of the College of
Journalism and Communications
developed the storm sequence,
which produces a sheet of rain
on stage for the first time at
the Gainesville Little Theatre.

PETE
*
1 .
ZINOBER,
Having Seen UF Problems As
A Student For 7 Years,
*
- : ...... ... -j-., --- -'.. ~ 2

The play is produced by Pat
Godey and directed by dob
Morris. Morris experience in
professional and amateur theatre
dates back to 1947.
The performance dates are
Jan. 19-20 and Jan. 25-27. This
play is for mature audiences only.
The play will be reviewed in
Mondays Alligator.

FOR WAR^^

The Little Theatre players are
now in rehersal for their next
production of Arms and the
Man,* a comedy by George Ber Bernard
nard Bernard Shaw.



Political Vermin Plague Dorms

By DOUGLAS OLANDER
Alligator Feature Writer
The time has come to let all
the Alligator readers know that
Hume Hall is infested with ver vermin!
min! vermin! I have reason to believe
that the other dormitories are
being plagued by the same vile
creatures.
What are these things? I
havent been able to locate any
information in any zoology book,
and Ive checked about 200 books.
The creatures dont frighten eas easily;
ily; easily; indeed, often they will remain
immobile for hours, allowing
close observation.
5]
Finding no such animal listed,
I have decided it represents a
new species and have named it
politicus candidatus.
In fact, just last night I had
a frightening experience with
three of these things. I was
sitting at my desk, engrossed
in my latest issue of Donald
Duck, when I heard a tapping
at my door. I knew they had
come.
One cried out, We know
youre -in here somewhere.
(They have mastered our dicition
well.) I shivered. Indeed, they
soon discovered me.
Cl saw that there were three.
Two stood still, heads drooping,
as were their lower jaws, eyes
glazed. Their arms seemed un unnaturally
naturally unnaturally long. The third, ob obviously
viously obviously their leader, was lying
on my bed, its feet on my pil pillow,
low, pillow, busily gobbling my Oreos.
It mumbled, My name is Sal Salguod
guod Salguod Rednalo and I represent the
Collective Backward Party. (I
wondered what its real motive
was.) Is there anything youd
like to ask me?
Yeh. ..When do you leave?
Leave? Oh, come now, we
just arrived. Surely there must
be some problem thats been
plaguing you night and day that
we can help you with, like re repainting
painting repainting the toilet seats, or some
other important thing.
Okay, I replied, hoping to
appease it, tell me, can you
get a ruling passed allowing cars
for sophomores on campus?
Os course! Get that down,
boys. This man wants a car.
In fact, uh, were working on
providing each sophomore with
a 427 vette. Freshmen get
mustangs.
Hmmm. What other things
do you have planned?
I soon discovered that that was
NOT the question to ask.
Well, we plan on: giving
all students classes between noon
and 2 p.m.; making it snow and
building a mountain with ski slo slopes;
pes; slopes; cutting away about fifty miles
of Florida for Gainesville surf surfers;
ers; surfers; blowing up the dorms...
Thus it went for exactly three
hours. I discovered a mini tape
recorder glued inside its nostril.
It apparently had been played over
and over, as it was very worn.

It's Time
for
TAYLOR

One section of nearly an hour
was devoted to describing'the
things qualifications. It had
an overall average of 8.2, grad graduated
uated graduated number one in its Harvard
class, liad experience as a Sup Supreme
reme Supreme Court Justice for 40 years,
and so on and so on. (And so
on and so on and so on!)
Finally it came to an ena.

Its Not Really So Dull

By JOHN PARKER
It is a quiet night. A chilly wind is faintly stirring.
A yellow box at the side of the street makes the
only sound. It clicks, buzzes and whirs, putting the
solitary street light through its paces. Green, yellow,
red. Green, yellow, red. All night long.
It is the corner of 2nd Aye. and 6th St. This is
the location of a small fruit stand which has been
converted from an old-time gas station, the kind
with the pull-under shelter.
The fruit stand is open all night.
Out by the tables of apples, oranges, and grape grapefruit,
fruit, grapefruit, sits Dewey Ledford. He wears a baggy old
pair of trousers, a faded green jacket that says
ARMY over the left pocket and a slouch hat
that Jimmy Durante wouldnt think of putting on.
Isnt business rather slack in the wee hours?
Doesnt the job get boring?
Quite a few people come in, really, says Dewey.
People from all walks of life. Dr. Gordon, the
pastor from the First Presbyterian Church, nurses
from the hospital, just all kinds of people. Its
not boring at all. When it really gets quiet, I sit
and watch people try to run the red light. Some Sometime
time Sometime they dont get away with it.
When thats all thats doing, a traffic misdemeanor
must be pretty interesting.
A lot of people are so fond of the old-timer
that they stop just to chat. Some want more than
conversation.
One night during the summer a black,ford sedan
pulled in. Dewey walked out to the car to wait on
the two men inside. When he got up to the side of
the car, he found a revolver leveled at him. He
was ordered to surrender the money in the cash
box.
I just said, Hell no, and walked over to my
chair. I picked up my billy-club and they took off,

Lets Talk About
Student Government Experience
ALLAN CASEY
For Treasurer
* Allan Casey is the Candidate for Treasurer that has any
Experience in Student Government
* Allan Casey has served as Chairman of Budget and Finance
Committee for the past year
* Allan Casey has complete knowledge of the working of Student
Government Finances and Law
* Allan Casey is_ Treasurer of the Student Body now. It won f t take
him months to learn his job
UNITED FIRST
' Political Announcement)

ALLIGATOR HUMOR

I tried to awaken it, but couldnt.
The other two were still standing
as tho in a trance, nodding their
heads in agreement as they had
been since their leader had an answered
swered answered my first question. They
couldnt be budged, either.
In desperation I filled a coffee
can with cherry bombs, stuck it
under the one sacked out on my

PERSONALITY PROFILE

says Dewey, brandishing what could pass for a
real Paul Bunyan ax-handle.
Dewey has been here a long time. He came from
North Carolina as an ROTC instructor in 1929.
He seems to have ambivalent feelings about almost
everything. The students? Some are OK, some arent.
The ones that arent you just take in stride. Dewey
is used to it. Thirty-eight years is a long time to
get used to people here.
What is the biggest change in Gainesville in those
years? Are the people different? Does the town
seem more sophisticated?
No, not really, The biggest change has been
the growth. Sometimes it seems to have grown up
overnight. In 1929 the school was all boys. There
were only about a thousand students. Jennings Hall
was a dairy farm.
Dewey is interested in almost everything going
on in the University. He asks questions about them.
How is the football team going to be next year? What
kind of a job is the student government doing? Even
the leadership of the Alligator interests him.
I like to keep up with whats going on in the
school. Everything changes so fast. People come
here, stay for awhile, then they are off again and
you never see them again. Every five years or
so there is a whole new group of faces.
Five years must seem like a short time to Dewey
Ledford. And twelve hours of sitting by a table
of apples must go by in a flash.
So Dewey sits there in an old slat chair watching
people go by. When there are no people going by,
he just sits. A customer comes in every now and
then. After that, nothing.
The only sound is the yellow box on the side of
the street. It clicks, buzzes, tmd whirs, putting the
solitary street light through its paces. Green, yellow,
red. Green, yellow, red.
All night long.

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

bed, lit one of the cherry bombs
and ran to the other end of the
hall.
After the smoke had cleared,
I found it still reposing peace peacefully.
fully. peacefully. Now it was on the floor,
however, as my bed was lying
all around the room in little pie pieces.
ces. pieces.
Terrible, isnt it? But fear not,
residents! I have found away

to trap them. Take a bucket
of glue, (thats 5,026 little jars
of the stuff,) and spread it out
on the ceiling, wall or floor some somewhere
where somewhere out-of-the-way. Then
sprinkle on a couple handfuls of
freshly-ground voter. Gets
em every time.
r CONTINUING I
I OUR I
I YEAR END I
I
SALE
I Suits I
I Sport coats I
Sweaters
I
G Dress Shirts
I m Slacks I
I Jackets I
Coats
j with zip-in Linings j
I All Wool I
I Shirts I
| And many other J
I fine items reduced J
substantially for
I clearance! j
J All from our j
Regular stock
j Please -No Returns j
l On sale merchandise.
I Free customer parking f
1 at rear of Store. 1
I A Most Timely I
I Clearance in I
I Our J
Ladies Dept.
I MEZZANINE FLOOR j
Fine Wearables
I Reduced up to |
y 2 oft I
>ituemm I
I 225 W. Univ. Ave. I

Page 21



TAKE ON VOLS

Gators Vie For Upset

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports tditor
Floridas basketball team will
attempt a Kentucky against
Tennessee Saturday night at 7:45
in the Florida gym.
UFs frosh play Edison Jun Junior
ior Junior College in the prelim at 5:30.
A Kentucky for the Gators
will be repeating history. UF was
smashed by 23 points at Lex Lexington
ington Lexington and then whipped the Wild Wildcats
cats Wildcats by 18 here.
tI w?
|||ggnHP 2j|
. >s:. v.;
Jfe.
TOM HENDRIX


F f
\ jS Jf
K 'JK' t
JP
", jg| v fcBHV Jj Jr
s3rt&s ,: £*., >' s? SjfinSr
- : IK? i .. aSH
r j|hl||K I
F , BL JL k
!5-JJ'* ''t'* Ss* rIsST/'iflp
: v ,. i
fliiP
- iSt
sS|n
i ill?'2~
mm. fIHB
B B

w- |Bif
r>l I 1
Hr a B| jg &
lii -**' M~~ B k-.
Bylin 1 *I* 1 * js
VmmlmwZ-- ~~~
g _j£*tm£M
BgLa|£..- .;H .'.. h _, Jp
TOM BOERWINKLE
Tie seven-foot center had big night against
the Gators in Knoxville. <

The Gators lost, 67-52, to the
Volunteers last Monday night.
For Florida to do a Kentucky
will take a better effort than
Kentucky.
The reason is the loss of
guard Mike McGinnis. An out outstanding
standing outstanding substitute for Bartlett
the last four games, McGinnis
was playing himself into a start starting
ing starting guard spot. But McGinnis
bruised his hip against Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee and will be out for two weeks.
McGinnis was really playing
some fine ball, said Bartlett.
If I had worked him more at
the beginning of the season, he
may be starting right now.
But now, well, he may miss
from two to four games, said
Bartlett.
- Bartlett cites McGinnis as a
valuable cog to the Gator at attack.
tack. attack. But the Florida attack sput sputtered
tered sputtered against the Vols Monday,
shooting only 31 per cent of its
field goals and scoring only 52
points, the teams lowest out output
put output of the year.
I really dont know why we
shot so bad, said Bartlett, I
could give a reason if they were
shooting bad shots.
But they were shooting good
shots, in fact, great shots, said
Bartlett.
Tennessee put two men on UFs
Neal Walk Monday.
That always left one of our
men free for the good shot,
said Bartlett, But we just could couldnt
nt couldnt put it in there.
Walk, averaging 27 points a
game, made only 16 against the
Vols.
I consider 16 points against

a team that plays ball control,
said Bartlett, a good nights
work.
Tennessee didnt pose any big
surprises for the Gators, except
just one, seven-foot, 260-pound
Tom Boerwinkle. Boerwinkle,
averaging 14 points a game, had
his years best scoring night with
27 points.
Other Tennessee starters are
expected to be guards Bill Hann
and Bill Justus, and forwards
Tom Hendrix and Larry Mans Mansfield.
field. Mansfield.
.jM B
- ~ x
in fIM
Jlf
BH&
HHk.
f
Jbp'
BILL HANN

For Your I
Listening Enjoyment I
Tune-in to Great Symphonies on WRUF-AM from 8:00 I
10:00 p a m a on Sundays or WRUF-FM stereo from 7:30 I
9:30 p.m. on Mondays Spend a few leisure moments enjoy l
ing the beautiful dynamic sounds of such orchestras as the }
Pittsburg Symphony, with guest conductors including Steinberg, j
Mazer and others
Relax to compositions by Mozart Beethoven, and many I
more composers * from all over the world Tune-in to two I
hours of all the soft, moving, forceful, quiet sounds heard j
only on Great Symphonies, brought to you by. . I
a f I
-\/qainesville
J UTrLITIES

SPORTS

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

Page 22

Rifles Post Victory
Over North Georgia
by JEF£ DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Paced by Toby Muirs best performance this season, the Florida
Rifles edged North Georgia Military College last Saturday on the
UF rifle range.
Muir fired a 282 score out of a possible 300. This was the top
score by a Gator marksman in match competition this season.
Other Gator sharpshooters competing were Lee Morse, Jim Waugh
and Kerry Chatham.
The Rifles victory over North Georgia, the fourth-ranked team
in the nation, boosted their season mark to 15-2.
This was our best team effort of the year, said Captain Tommy
Smith, advisor to the Rifles. The men were battling a tough com competitor,
petitor, competitor, a brisk wind and 34-degree temperatures.
t At times my fingers became so cold I couldnt feel the trigger,
stated Muir.
Firing on an outdoor range in that type of weather makes no
sense, said Waugh. Rifle teams should compete only on indoor
ranges.
Its very embarrassing to be the only Southeastern Conference
school not to have an indoor range, commented Smith.
Next Saturday, the Rifles journey to Lakeland to fire in a four fourteam
team fourteam match with Florida Southern, Miami and Stetson.
Slated to compete in the match are Muir, Morse, Waugh, Chatham,
Larry Lunden and George Pringle.
Braves Get New Uniforms
ATLANTA (UPI) -- The Atlanta Braves will sport new uniforms
this year, vice president Paul Richards announced Thursday.
On the road, the Braves will wear grey uniforms with navy pin pinstripes,
stripes, pinstripes, blue stockings and a blue cap with a red bill.
Richards said the change would put more speed and dash into
the ball club.



Golfers End 'Warm-ups

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Sports Writer
Florida's golf team, now spor sporting
ting sporting a 1-0 record, travels to the
Jacksonville Naval Air Station
this Saturday to take on its final
warm-up opponent.
Golf coach Buster Bishop will
take 21 players with him to
Jacksonville this weekend. From
these 21, he has to find the six
who will serve as the starting
lineup before Florida goes ag against
ainst against South Florida and Rollins
Saturday.
I want to give every boy a
chance to play in these first
meets, said Bishop. These
first meets are more for the boys
than for the record. I don't con consider
sider consider the score to be a factor
* now, its just getting into the
competition.
Three of the six starting pos positions
itions positions have been filled. Steve Mel Melnyk,
nyk, Melnyk, Richard Spears, and John
Darr will definitely be on the
first team for the Gators.
All have impressive cred credentials.
entials. credentials. Melnyk, a junior, won the
Miami Invitational last year,
stood fifth in the NCAA rank rankings
ings rankings individually, and played in
the National Amateur Golf Tour Tournament
nament Tournament last year. Richard
Spears, also a junior, won the
Florida Intercollegiate Golf
Tournament, and qualified for the
National Amateur Tourney.
UF Mermen
Battle FSU
The Florida swimming Gators
travel to Florida State Saturday.
If tradition holds true, the meet
promises to be UF's roughest.
Last week's meet against
Georgia was costly for Florida,
as the team's top swimmers came
down with the flu. Now, coupled
with the fact Florida State will
field 96 swimmers against Flor Floridas
idas Floridas 26, FSU represents the
turning point in UFs season.
According to assistant coach
Ed Reese, the three swimmers,
Steve Macri, Barry Russo, and
Bruce Williams, will be able to
swim on Saturday. But Reese
is wary of the strength held by
the Seminoles.
FSU has pride, and a trem tremendous
endous tremendous spirit, said Reese.
They are one of the best po powers
wers powers in the South.
The fact FSU is traditionally
ready for the Gators is shown in
the past records of the two teams.
In the 19 years the two schools
have swum against each other,
Florida State has won 17 against
only six for Florida. Last year
the schools split one meet each.
The seminoles this year are now
2-0.
This Saturday will pit six
nationally known sprinters:
Florida State's Bob Bell and See Seeley
ley Seeley Feldmeyer against UF's An Andy
dy Andy McPherson, Steve Macri,
Mark McKee and Barry Russo.
x
One factor consistently in Flo Florida
rida Florida States favor is the size
of their team. While Floridas
recruitment is generally small,
Florida States is among the na nations
tions nations largest. Florida recruited
ten freshmen this year, and Flo Florida
rida Florida State recruited 25.
Os their 25 freshmen, they
m ight be able to develop as many
as 10 or 15 into real top-notch
swimmers, said Reese. Thats
as many as or more than we start
out with.
The Gators next home meet
will be against Tulane, Jan. 27.

Bishop hasn't decided on the
other three starters yet, but he
will know by next week.
Says Bishop, The meet this
Saturday will determine that.
Right now I would say there are
six or seven contenders. They
would be Wendell Coffee, Mike
Toale, Don RambO, Don Sayet,
Hal Hutchinson, and Kemp Ghol Gholson.
son. Gholson.
Florida has consistently rank ranked
ed ranked among the top college teams
in the country in golf. Last year
they ranked second in the SEC and
were invited to the NCAA Tour Tournament,
nament, Tournament, where they placed se second.
cond. second.
The team's freshmen play a se separate
parate separate schedule from the varsity
team. Bishop explained why he
does this.
Punt Rule
Dropped
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.
(UPI) College football lost
some flashy punt returns but
picked up some clock-saving first
down timeouts Wednesday as
National Collegiate Athletic As Association
sociation Association officials altered the
1968 rulebook.
The NCAA Rules Committee
also ripped out of the rule book
the tricky and hard-to-officiate
tackle eligible pass play and
put in a set of four statutes to
improve safety in the game.
The committee voted 14 to 1
to kill the controversial 1967
punt coverage rule which
required all interior linemen on
the kicking team to hold their
positions until the ball was boot booted.
ed. booted.
College and high school
coaches were unanimous in their
opposition to the rule, claiming it
made the fast ends and half halfbacks
backs halfbacks sent first to stop the run runback
back runback sitting ducks for squads or
blockers.
Reverting back to the 1966
rule, all linemen and backs next
season can rush the receiver
when the ball is snapped.
In a move that will add some
playing time to the games, the
clock must be stopped whenever
the referee registers a first
down. This is to allow the men
carrying the chains to assume
their new positions without the
clock continuing to tick. In the
closing moments of a tight ball
game, this could make a
difference of several vital
seconds.
Ivy B. Williamson, athletic di director
rector director of the University of Wis Wisconsin
consin Wisconsin and retiring chairman of
the committee, said his unit
passed a set of rules to put
considerable emphasis on the
safety factor.
He listed them as:
Elimination of the flex shift,
designed to draw the defense
offside. The new rule requires
an offensive player to hold his
position when he gets on or near
the ground. He is permitted to
move laterally, but this is dif difficult
ficult difficult without lifing up. Teams
such as Kansas and UCLA used
a flex shift ofterv last year
throughout the game.
Amending the fair catch rule
to prohibit the man signallingfor
a fair catch to let someone else
catch it or let it go by and in instead
stead instead become a blocker. Under
the fair catch rule, a player mak mak,
, mak, ing the signal cannot be touched
by the defense.;

We want to give the fresh freshmen
men freshmen a chance to make the trans transition
ition transition from high school to college
play. We usually schedule the
freshman team to play a junior
college in the area. We have to
do this because so few schools
in the South have the frosh
teams.
This year, Bishops freshman
lineup includes Kim Schwencke
of Palm Beach, Lee Edwards of
Jacksonville and Lad Larson,
from Tulsa, Oklahoma.
The varsitys first home meet
will be a three-way match against
USF and Rollins, Feb. 10. The
following week, the Florida In Intercollegiate
tercollegiate Intercollegiate Tournament will be
held here.

I 1 pint of slaw
I 1 pint of mashed potatoes

I when you pick the bucket !l

mWe fix Sunday dinner
I seven days a week

n 1
- f S; "'' :
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical, aeronautical,
ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL,
CIVIL, MARINE,
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING,
PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY,
METALLURGY, CERAMICS,
MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS,
COMPUTER SCIENCE,
ENGINEERING SCIENCE,
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
*
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
1 MON. & TUES., JAN. 22 &23
%
I . tr*
Appointments should be made
in advance thrpugh your
7 College Placement Office
Pratt & y
\ A i + # DIVISION OF UNITED AIRCRAFT CORP.
wniiney n
Aircraft ; t.- y
j An Equal Opportunity Employtr
' SPECIALISTS IN POWER. . POWER FOR PROPULSION- POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CUR Aft NT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES, MARINE AND, INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS.

Friday, January 19, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Lambda Chi And Pi Lam
Win Bowling Matches

Lambda Chi Alpha and Pi Lam Lambda
bda Lambda Phi established themselves
as possible league leaders Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday as both continued on their
winning ways at the Reitz Union
bowling lanes. Lambda Chi, cur currently
rently currently in second place in the Or Orange
ange Orange League swept by current
leader Sigma Nu, 1612 to 1555.
Third place Pi Lam led by Mike
Segals 404 set swept by Kappa
Sig, 1738 to 1676.
The most impressive victory of
the day was recorded by Delta
Tau Delta over KA as Bill Kil Killingsworth
lingsworth Killingsworth had a 220-403 and
Harry Bopp recorded a 398. Fi Final
nal Final score in that match was 1801
to 1402. Sigma Phi Epsilon de defeated
feated defeated the Betas in the other quar quarter
ter quarter final game.
In Blue League action, second
and third place Chi Phi and Theta


We really hope you pick the bucket so we can give you one I
pint of slaw and one pint of mashed potatoes FREE. What 8
a bargain!, You'll get 15 pieces of Colonel Sander's Recipe
Kentucky Fried Chicken, 1 pint cracklin' gravy and pipin'
hot biscuits. All for just $3.95. Offer good seven days a S
week in January.
Kentucky Fried Aickenl

free!

214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 I
114 NW 34th St. 372-3649 1
207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959 I

Chi respectively took their
lumps. Pi Kappa Phi defeated
Theta Chi 1683 to 1588 and Del Delta
ta Delta Chi knocked off Chi Phi 1635
to 1419. Phi Kappa Psi defeated
Delta Sigma Phi 1453 to 1427.
Rally Slated
The Gainesville Sports Car
Club will hold a scat pack fun
rally this Sunday at the Sears
parking lot in the Gainesville
Mall.
Any type of car may enter
provided it has a driver and
navigator. Entry fee is two dol dollars.
lars. dollars. Registration will take place
from 11:30 to 1 Sunday morning.
For further information call
Jeanne Lewis at 372-7816 after
6 p.m.

Page 23



J I mm ''J'^^^B
, M^tjH
:~" 1 f
* Milt
But Sir, We Know
How To Cut Hair
In The FLORIDA
UNION BARBER SHOP
Located IN The Student
UniOn. MonSat 85:30
Razor Hair
Cuts Styling
v
Mens. Ladies
,.
I OFF
'y

TdonigansT
Mil 11A -r
f
H 23 W. UNIV. 372-4702
i ~

Page 24

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 19, 1968

I
Prof. Barber

, __
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
- ?
v^a
jjSP*' hihh ws*w
vX.' v.-.w.w;;,''^HHg

B r
' 9k ? ;
9 P
%& 'M
t "r f* *
?* \W-. i C X
* v fi
IBIm |l f * :.. -M
*" >. v mmrn%mmmmmmm
-i
MIKE LEAIHERWOOD
The honors this week go to Mike Leatherwood, who has beer,
building up to this special position for several games.
Kentucky knows Leatherwood, because in that game he scored
18 points l6 above his average. That sent them runnint.
Against L.S.U., Leatherwood was the man of the hour by holding
speedy Maravich to 32 points l5 below his average.
We haven't heard much about Leatherwood before this year
because he is a transfer student from Pensacola.
Earlier, he led his high school team under Marvin Beck to
43 straight victories and a state championship.
He is a small man only 5-11 but thats no stopper for
Mike. He has been a winner as long as he has played the sport,
making all-state in high school and in junior college.
Now that Number 15's feet are well again, we should be hearing
a lot more from this weeks Player of the Week.

Youre old enough
- to know this ...

HOME OF THE ORIGINAL
IZ DOUBLE-DECK HAMBURGER
GAINESVILLE 2035 N.W. 13th STREET
i TELEPHONE 578-2304

..and not
too old to
know it now!
You are in a buyers position
. . for life insurance . when
you are voung. Dont be sorrv
ten years front now . act
now
College men are preferred risks . and
College Life is the original and only
life insurance company serving college
men only.
Thats why you should talk to your College
Life representative about the BENE BENEFACTOR;
FACTOR; BENEFACTOR; the policy that gives you more
for your money.
It has so many benefits we want you to
hear about them; not read about them.
Get the full story.
. 5 ;;
Youll be glad you did.
Your Don Wiggins
CLICA Hugh Brooker
Representatives Gary Nichols
In Mike Wayda
Gainesville Breece McCray
Sam Darby
The
College Life
Insurance
Company of America
Vic McKenzie and Assoc.
4115 X. W. 13th SL
378-2476
8
FRIED
CHICKEN
Old Fashioned golden brown
FRIED CHICKEN. Four tender
plump pieces of Grade A chicken,
complete with golden brown Idaho
potatoes, salad, roll and honey.
$1.35