Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Students Dangle On Tight Purse Strings

By RITCHIE TIDWELL
Alligator Copy Editor
The College of Arts and Sciences, with a 10
per cent enrollment increase each year for the
past 15 years, holds the purse strings of grad graduation
uation graduation for three groups of students.
Two of these groups are the same as in any
other college undergraduates majoring in that
particular college and those doing graduate work.
However, 60 per cent of the work done in the
College of Arts and Sciences is service work, that
is, courses that students need for majoring in
other fields.
With a 25 or 30 per cent faculty cut for the fourth
quarter, this poses a major problem for Dean
Ralph E. Page.
He will have to decide whether to gear his
summer program to those majoring in the Arts
and Sciences, the graduate studies, or to the ser service
vice service courses needed.
The college will have 110 faculty reappointed for
the summer quarter as compared with 156 the pre previous

Weather
Clear and Cold
High 60-65
Low 32-38
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Vol. 60, No. 46

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MENS INTERHALL MEETING

UF President Stephen C. OCon OConnell,
nell, OConnell, left, talks with members of the
Mens Interhall Council at a re reception

1945 Education Studies
Cite Current Problems

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
An education study committee
has recommended higher sal salaries
aries salaries for Florida teachers and
university faculty members, an
appointed state education com commissioner,
missioner, commissioner, and year round edu education
cation education programs.
The committee found that
Florida citizens want schools
and colleges that are among the
best in the nation."
These are topics under dis discussion
cussion discussion currently by Gov. Claude'
Kirks Quality Education Com Commission,
mission, Commission, but the recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations were made 20 years ago.

The
<
Florida Alligator

. A 15-member Florida Citizens
Committee on Education made a
two year study authorized by the
1945 legislature. A pamphlet giv giving
ing giving a summary of the committee's
findings is being circulated
among current education com commission
mission commission members.
Many of the committees rec recommendations
ommendations recommendations were enacted into
law by the 1947 and 1949 legis legislatures.
latures. legislatures. These included the mini minimum
mum minimum foundation program, elimi elimination
nation elimination of most of the 717 school
districts by consolidating them
into 67 countywide districts, and
the beginning of the junior coll ege
system.

vious previous summer.
In relating the budget situation to his college,
Page had two conclusions.
First, that there would be a deterioration in
the structure of the college and secondly, that the
college would lose momentum in its operation.
UFS BUDGET
CRISIS
Page explained that the cost of material and sup supplies
plies supplies alone would call for more money even with
no additional operations.
Page added that there would be no money for
badly needed additional space and the renovation
of old space. We wont be able to add graduate
assistantships and will have to reduce the number
of graduate assistants and graduates with fellow fellowships.
ships. fellowships.
- i
Page cited a serious" problem in the area

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

ception reception sponsored by the group
Monday night.
(PHOTO BY NICK ARROYO)

But other recommendations
have been discussed for years
and are being rehashed now.
Florida has made little real
effort to support education," the
committee said 20 years ago.
It advocated kindergartens to
help give children a better foun foundation."
dation." foundation." Free public kindergar kindergartens
tens kindergartens are available only in a
few counties today.
To improve teaching the com committee
mittee committee recommended more in interest
terest interest and support on the part
of every citizen; more challeng challenging
ing challenging leadership-and better Work Working
ing Working conditions; and greatly in increased
creased increased salaries."

of non-academic staff.
The college would like to have professional
people in the non-academic personnel department
women who would make this a career and plan
to stay with us," he said. But we wont have the
money.
Moving to the operation of the college, Page said
the College could only hold the line."
The situation will probably result in the delay
of graduation for some students who wont be able
to get the courses they need," the dean added.
Various departments will be affected differently
by the cut in funds. Page said that chemistry,
physics, English, psychology and speech would
all be affected to a great degree because of the
materials used for instruction.
In combating the problem, Page said he wanted
to cut down the quantity and maintain the quality
as much as possible."
If I have to restrict, it will be the course
offerings," he said.

IN TENURE report
Jones Fears
Indecisiveness

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Marshall Jones warned an
audience in Broward Hall Mon Monday
day Monday night the results of the fac faculty
ulty faculty committe hearing about his
tenure case could very possibly
be indecisive.
The Faculty Committee for
Academic Freedom and Tenure
will investigate the case and re report
port report its findings and recommend recommendations
ations recommendations to President OConnell,
Jones said. However, the com committee
mittee committee is subordinate to O'Con O'Connell;
nell; O'Connell; it cant override him.
The committee has no
subpoena power, he noted. Its
only heard one other case like
this, and witnesses walked out.
Its possible the committee could
hear only one side.*
Jones, who addressed about 30
students in the Broward recrea recreation
tion recreation room, said he submitted his
case about a week ago.
Jones said this action is not
technically an appeal.Anappeal
is a plea to a higher committee
or court, he said. The com committee
mittee committee can only make recommen recommendations
dations recommendations to OConnell.
The committee will meet Thur Thursday
sday Thursday for preliminary considera consideration.
tion. consideration. A three man subcommittee
will probably be appointed to set
up the investigation at that time.
The meeting will be closed to the
public, and, according to a re reliable
liable reliable source, a senate by-law
prohibits committee members
from giving information to the
press about the proceedings.
Pick Em Up
Students who plan to attend
Friday nights basketball
game against Jacksonville
University should pick up their
tickets today from 2:30p.m. to
9 p.m. at the East Side ticket
booth of the stadium.

Wednesday, November 29, 1967

Regular members are Dr. John
F. Baxter, professor of chemis chemistry,
try, chemistry, Dr. Archie Carr, professor
of zoology, Vernon W. Clark,
professor of law, John R.Green R.Greenman,
man, R.Greenman, professor of agricultural
economics, and Dr. Paul L. Han Hanna,
na, Hanna, professor of social sciences.
Alternate members are Dr.
Richard J. Anderson, professor
of psychology, Arthur Broyles,
(SEE JONES PAGE 2)
Conference
To Discuss
2 Countries
By DIANNE MIMS
Alligator Correspondent
Africa and Latin America will
be explored in areas from art
to medicine Nov. 29-Dec. 2 at
the Reitz Union.
Experts will represent univer university
sity university departments of sociology,
anthropology, agriculture, art,
political science and medicine,
as far south as the Republic#of
South Africa and north to Engl England.
and. England.
This experimental and unique
program will emphasize human
mobility and social change in
six sessions, culminating in a
summary conference Dec. 2.
The organization of this con conference
ference conference took place last year when
the University of Florida Center
for Latin American Studies, Af African
rican African Studies Program and
Center for Tropical Agriculture
met in a committee.
Com mittee members Dr. David
Niddrie of geography, Dr. Brian
Dutoit of anthropology, Dr. Ar Archie
chie Archie Carr of biology, Dr. Roy
Craven of art, Dr. Rene Lemar Lemarchand
chand Lemarchand of political science, and Dr.
W.W. McPherson of agricultural
(SEE CONFERENCE PAGE 2)

Inside
3 Gators Named
To All-SEC Team
See Page 19



Page 2

2, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November z&, 1967

Bulletin News
State National International News

Kirk Rejects Agency Cars
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The Cabinet agreed with objections by the
absent Gov. Claude Kirk today and refused to approve the purchase
of three prestige cars for state agency heads.
Kirk, who was on a New England speaking tour, relayed his ob objections
jections objections to the Cabinet via Purchasing Director A1 Day.
The governor is unalterably opposed to any agency head or
director using any type of car other than a standard state vehicle,
Day said.
American Agents Drugged
MOSCOW (UPI) -- Two military attaches of the United States
and Britain were drugged, stripped and robbed by Russians during
a visit to Soviet Moldavia, it was disclosed Tuesday.
The American and British embassies left no doubt they felt the
Soviet government organized the attack on U.S. Army Col. William
J. Spahr and Brig. C A. Des N. Harper last Nov. 17. Both have
rejected as unsatisfactory Soviet replies to formal protests.
The U.S. government filed two protests and the British one. Texts
of the protests and the Soviet reply were not released, but a British
statement called it a serious violation of diplomatic immunity
involving the use of force.
McNamara May Quit
WASHINGTON (UPI) Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara was
reported in official quarters Monday night to be preparing to leave
the cabinet, possibly for a new position as president of the World Bank.
Officials in a position to know said that McNamara, who for some
months has wanted to step out of the defense post, was not leaving
because of any disagreement with President Johnson, but primarily
because he feels he has more than contributed his services to the
executive branch of government.
His departure from the cabinet has been the subject of friendly
discussion with the Chief Executive from time to time, they said.
Johnson repeatedly has told friends he holds no man in government
in higher esteem than McNamara, who has been defense secretary
since the start of the Kennedy administration in 1961.
Peking Fails In U. N. Bid
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) The General Assembly today refused for
the 18th time to hand over Chinas U.N. seat to Peking. It voted
45-58, with 17 abstentions, against a 12-power proposal submitted by
Albania to unseat Nationalist China in favor of the Communist Chinese
regime. The 13-vote margin was 2 votes wider than last year. The
United States and Nationalist China also had the votes to impose a
two- thirds majority voting rule on the Albanian proposal, and to
defeat an Italian proposal for a special study committee between
assembly sessions.
ItTCAK/itHAKC

utk l a lrua£
FEA TURING-QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
DINING ROOM
COUNTER
CARRY OUT
Open Til 1 AM
1610 S.W. 13th St.
FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES!!
es_. I I I
The Florida Alligator reserves, the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GI'ARANTF FT), though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The F lorida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not tie responsible for mor than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must t*> given t>efore next insertion.
THh FI.OKI DA AI.I.IGATOH is the official student newspaper of the L nlverslty of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, dune, and July when
It is published semi-weekly, only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The l,lurlda Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
' 6f FWfSa-,' Gainesville, fftr, Tfr-fll. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter.
at the I'nited States Post office at Gainesville. _____

Tree Lighting, Carols
Begin Christmas Season

Christmas will come to UFs
campus Sunday at 10:30 p.m.
with the annual Mortar Board
Christmas Tree Lighting cere ceremony
mony ceremony in front of University
Auditorium.
President Stephen C. OCon OConnell
nell OConnell will deliver his first Christ Christmas
mas Christmas message to UF students,
faculty, staff and public following
the ceremony. The message will
be sponsored by the University
Religious Association.
Professor Willis Bodine, Uni University
versity University Organist, will play the
carillon and organ preceding the
tree lighting. A brass ensemble
will be directed by Robert E.
Foster of UFs Music Depart Department.
ment. Department. Janie Wanless, vice-presi vice-president
dent vice-president of Mortar Board and chair chairman
man chairman of the tree lighting, will give
the welcome.
Before President OConnells
message carols will be sung by
the University Choir and a wel welcome
come welcome will be given by Drex
Dobson, co-chairman of the
event.
. The program is held at this
time of night so the program
Conference
economics managed to get the
federal government to finance
transportation and living costs
for the visiting experts.
Each session will present four
field representatives, two of
which will discuss Africa and the
other two will discuss Latin Am America.
erica. America. The lectures will be fol followed
lowed followed by discussion and debate
on the comparisons.
The guest speakers are top
in their field, commented Dr.
Dutoit, assistant professor of
anthropology. Also attending the
conference will be about 125
persons associated with anthro anthropological
pological anthropological and related fields.
It is necessary to specialize
in this day, said Dutoit, but
the tendency is to become en engrossed
grossed engrossed in ones own area, blind
to the interrelationships pre present.
sent. present.

mm ii'ivmHif l v L g
Power
:;ir 16 star Christmas
STEREO ALBUM A
Mike Douglas / \
ives f \
Andre Kosfelanetz jmm II \ Comp, value / I
ctioir, .y
Eugene Orrnand> igk i \'
Philadelphia Orch cJs£ T ,7J? J %.JHfc W. Illlk
ynU 3HE IBi
Patt, Page

nil A M^-JStT * Mtn> ..m y /ji^Hrl,, JXtlnAiiM JLii.l, imlt:
Andre Prevn
Jimmy Rodgers iiiWb' >; ''''%s: Hi
Simon and Garfunkel
o
Bobby Vinton
9 CHRISTMAS CAROLS 4 CHRISTMAS CLASSICS
3 POPULAR HOLIDAY NUMBERS
m * r? Golriisvllle Shopping OHtef { *;

doesnt interfere with studying
before finals so more people can

I Marshall Jones
irom pege o&4)

professor of physics, Dr. Arthur
W. Combs, professor of edu education,
cation, education, Dr. Raymond W. Fahien,
professor of chemical engin engineering,
eering, engineering, and Dr. Robert O. Strip Stripling,
ling, Stripling, professor of education.
Jones, an assistant professor
of psychology in the College of
Medicine, was denied tenure
early last summer by former
President J. Wayne Reitz. Reitz
and UF Vice-President Fred Frederick
erick Frederick Conner said tenure was
withheld because of Jones belief
in open resistance to authority
as a proper way of implementing
change.
OConnell has said repeated repeatedly
ly repeatedly he will reopen the case only
if an error in procedure can
be found.
OConnell says he doesnt
want to override Reitzs de decision,

CHRISTMAS IDEAS
so r
The Music Lover
Ukes starting at $1.65
Student Guitars including case,
instruction book, instruction record,
strap and pick $24 95
Borgas Bongos starting at $3.75
Tamborines starting at $3.75
Maracas starting at $1.35
Gift Certificates
Lipham Music
1004 N. Main

come, said Dobson, co-chair co-chairman,
man, co-chairman, Everyone is welcome.

cision, decision, Jones said. But he
didn't mind overriding the de decision
cision decision about drinking on cam campus.
pus. campus.
I know my case has been
closed from the outset, Jones
continued. It was a gradual pro process
cess process of deciding I was unac unacceptable.
ceptable. unacceptable. The Board of Regents
came to that conclusion two years
ago. This is just a protest --
its no skin off my nose.
He said he might take his case
to cou. 1 if and when all campus
resources are exhausted. Some
law professors have told me a
federal court possibly would
issue an injunction charging the
UF to find fault, he said. We
have a good case in principle, but
wed < need to take it another
district.



GATOR GIRL
Football injuries seem to be the current
fad on campus and todays Gator Girl, Cheri
Weihl, 2UC, is one of the latest casualties.
Cheri, a KD majoring in nursing, broke her
ankle practicing for a football game.

We, members of the faculty of the University of Florida, call upon President Stephen O'Connell to grant tenure to Professor
Marshall B. Jones in accord with the request of the College of Medicine.
We believe that the denial of tenure to Professor Jones because of lawfully expressed views undermines the function, nature
and purposes of the University, and is destructive of the American tradition of free speech.

David N. Aspy Asst. Prof. Found,
of Ed.
Donald L. Avila Assoc. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Philip Bacon Asst. Prof. Mathe Mathematics
matics Mathematics
Lauada Baggett Asst. Prof. Dlv.
of Guidance P.K. Yo nge
Raymond M. Beirne Asst. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Larry E. Bennett Asst. Prof.
Chemistry
Forest J. Berghorn Asst. Prof.
Social Science
Robert C. Berry Assoc. Prof.
Law
Frieda S. Brown Visiting Assoc.
Prof. Foreign Language
Stanly D. Brunn Asst. Prof. Geo Geography
graphy Geography
Augustus M. Burns, m Asst.
Prof. Social Science
Nona Burress Asst. Prof. Elem.
Ed.
David Chalmers Professor
History
Edwin Clark Asst. Prof. Mathe Mathematics
matics Mathematics
Alfred B. Clubok Assoc. Prof.
Pol. Sci.
Frederick Columbus Asst. Prof.
Foreign Languages
Stephen S. Conroy Asst. Prof.
Social Sciences
Philip Costanzo Asst. Prof. Psy Psychology
chology Psychology
Austin B. Creel Assoc. Prof. Re Religion
ligion Religion
Carroll F. Cumbee Assoc. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Myron Cunningham Professor
Personnel Services
Robert L. Curran Assoc. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Ronald J. Cutler Assoc. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Hunt Davis, Jr. Asst. Prof.
History
Don W. Der Instructor Comp.
Logic
D. B. Dove Assoc. Prof. Met.
and Mat. Eng.

We have not canvassed the Faculty. Anyone who concurs In any or all of our beliefs is urged to call Mrs. Paul L. Adams at 372-5021
(paid advertisement)

J. E. Dovell Professor Social
Sciences and History
R. A. Dwyer Asst. Prof. Eng.
Martin A. Eisenberg Asst. Prof.
Eng. Sci. and Mech
Herschell Elliott Assoc. Prof.
Phil.
Marvin L. Entner Asst. Prof.
History
R.W. Fahien Professor Chem.
Eng.
Edward N. Ferguson Asst. Prof.
Mathematics
Joyce E. Frakes Asst. Prof.
Foreign Languages
Winifred L. Frazer Assoc. Prof.
Comp. English
David T. Geithman Asst. Prof.
Economics
Patrick M.GeogbeganAsst. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Frederick Goddard Asst. Prof.
Economics
I.J. Goffman Assoc. Prof. Eco Economics
nomics Economics
R.W. Gould Asst. Prof. Met. and
Mat. Eng.
Gordon E. Greenwod Asst. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Carolyn S. Griffis Instructor of
Social Sciences
K. Gubbins Asst. Prof. Chem.
Eng.
Albert G. Guy Professor Met.
and Mat. Eng.
Craig S. Hartley Asst. Prof.
Eng. Sci. and Mech and Met.
and Mat. Eng.
Francis C. Hayes Assoc. Prof.
Foreign Languages
Richard P. Haynes Assoc. Prof.
Phil.
E. E. Hegen Asst. Prof. Geo Geography
graphy Geography
G.H. Hemp Asst. Prof. Eng. Sci.
and Mech.
Thomas A. Henderson Asst. Prof.
Political Science
Richard H. Hiers Assoc. Prof.
Religion

Tuition Increase Fails
To Ease Financial Pinch

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Increases in tuition haven't eased
the financial pinch of Floridas
higher education institutions, but
they apparently have discouraged
enrollment, especially at the
junior college level.
Those conclusions are drawn
from surveys by a legislative
committee of the presidents of
the seven state universities and
26 junior colleges.
In general, the presidents said
they had to make sharp cut-oacKs

UF Students Faculty
Surveyed By AAHE

The UF is one of 19 institutions throughout the country participat participating
ing participating this month in a campus governance study by the American Associat Association
ion Association of Higher Education.
The AAHE survey of colleges and universities of varying sizes
is designed to identify patterns of decision making, influence and
communication which are in effect. Key procedures will be the analysis
of relevant documents, the use of questionnaires and extensive
interviews involving all segments of the academic community.
Nearly 1,000 selected faculty members, administrators and stu students
dents students from throughout the UF campus will participate in the question questionnaire
naire questionnaire phase. The faculty and students will be chosen from the Colleges
of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education and En Engineering.
gineering. Engineering.
Some questionnaires were distributed and answered last week;
the balance will be completed Wednesday and Thursday.
An AAHE representative already has visited the campus and a
larger group will return early next spring for the interview portion
of the study.
Other institutions similar to Florida to be included are the Univer University
sity University of lowa and the University of Texas.

John J. Hren Assoc. Prof. Met.
and Mat. Eng.
Johanna Ibarguen Instructor For.
Lang.
Robert E. Jester Asst. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
John Kaiser Prof. Mathematics
Gladys M. Kammerer Professor
Political Science
Sanford N. Katz Professor Law
Norman G. Keig Assoc. Prof.
Economics
Max H. Kele Asst. Prof. History
Daniel L. Kelly Asst. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Sol Kramer Professor Biological
Sciences and Psychiatry
David R. Kurtzman Asst. Prof.
Phllosphy and Mathematics
Leoy L. Lam born Asst. Prof.
Law
Ted Landsman Professor Dept,
of Personnel Services
David Lane Assoc. Prof. Dept,
of Personnel Services
Allle G. Langford Assoc. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Stanley K. Laughlln, Jr. Assoc.
Prof. Law
Clifford R. Lelanc Asst. Prof.
Dept, of Personnel Services
Keith R. Legg Asst. Prof. Pol.
Science
Herman M. Levy, Jr. Asst. Prof.
Humanities
Hal G. Lewis Professor Found,
of Education
Peter Lisca Assoc. Prof. English
John K. Mahon Professor History
Ruth McQuown Assoc. Prof. Pol.
Science
Neill W. Macaulay Asst. Prof.
History
A. Marinetti Grad. Asst. Foreign
Languages
Kenneth A. Megill Asst. Prof.
Phil.
James Millikan Asst. Prof. Phil.
Robert C.L. Moffat Asst. Prof.
Law

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

in many programs and cancel
plans to begin new ones be because
cause because of the financial squeeze.
They predicted the situation will
be even worse next year if the
legislature and Gov. Claude Kirk
dont authorize more money.
Most of the emphasis this year
has been on public school fin financing,
ancing, financing, but the presidents were
almost unanimous in the opinion
that their institutions also were
hurting badly because of the
shortage of state money.

James F. Morrison Asst. Prof.
Pol. Sci.
John H. Mugar Asst. Prof.
History
O.E. Myers Assoc. Prof. Aero Aerospace
space Aerospace Eng.
Philip Nauzetta Asst. Prof.
Mathematics
Wallace M. Nelson Asst. Prof.
Social Science
John M. Newell Assoc. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Louis G. Nuernberger Asst. Prof.
Psychiatry
Edwin F. Ochester Asst. Prof.
English
J. P. OConnell Asst. Prof. Chem.
Eng.
Joel L. OConner Asst. Prof.
Mathematics
Thomas L. Page Asst. Prof. Pol.
Science
Philip E. Pastore Instructor
Comprehensive Logic
Harry W. Paul Assoc. Prof.
History
Joseph M. Perry Asst. Prof.
Economics
Donald A. Petsch Asst. Prof.
English
John B. Pickard Assoc. Prof.
English
F.E. Poirier Asst. Prof. Psy Psychiatry
chiatry Psychiatry and Anthropology
Robert Primack Asst. Prof.
Foundations of Education
Walter Probert Professor Law
William W. Purkey, Sr. Assoc.
Prof. Found, of Ed.
Joel Rabinovitz Asst. Prof. Law
Alan D. Randolph Assoc. Prof.
Chem. Eng.
X.B. Reed Asst. Prof. Chem. Eng.
Richard R. Renner Assoc. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Cora L. Robey Asst. Prof. Com Comprehensive
prehensive Comprehensive English
W.J. Roscelli Asst. Prof. English
W.A. Rosenbaum Asst. Prof. Pol.
Science
Frank O. Sadler Instructor Com Comprehensive
prehensive Comprehensive English

Junior colleges were hit hard hardest
est hardest in the appropriations battle
between the Republican gover governor
nor governor and the predominantly Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic legislature this year.
Seventeen of the junior col colleges
leges colleges reported they increased
student fees this year, and 12
of the presidents said this had
an adverse effect on enrollment.
At least nine of the junior
colleges expect to raise tuition
again next year, when the across
the board holdback of appropriat appropriations
ions appropriations is expected to rise from 3
to 5 per cent.
Currently, the highest se semester
mester semester tuition charge is $125
at Brevard County. The lowest
is S6O in Jackson County.
Six other junior colleges ex expect
pect expect to raise tuition to $125
per semester next year and six
others hadnt settled on a fig figure
ure figure at the time the surveys
were made.
In the state universies, tu tuition
ition tuition was raised to $125
per quarter in all except pre predominantly
dominantly predominantly Negro Florida A & M
University, where tuition was set
at slls.
The university presidents, with
two exceptions, objected to Kirks
proposal that tuition be hiked to
$l5O per quarter, although they
said it wouldnt be quite so bad
if scholarship and loan funds
were increased enough to head
off any resulting curtailment of
enrollment.

Selden Henry Asst. Prof. History
Charles V. Shaffer Professor
Elec. Eng.
Clair Sharpless Interim In Instructor
structor Instructor Personnel Services
Dept, of Speech
Robert R. Sherman Asst. Prof.
Found, of Ed.
Wayne Shlrbroun Inst. Philosophy
J.H. Shofner Asst. Prof. Social
Sciences
Betty L. Siegel Asst. Prof. Found,
of Education
Joel H. Siegel Asst. Prof. Com Comprehensive
prehensive Comprehensive English
Kermit N. Sigmon Asst. Prof.
Mathematics
Albert B. Smith Asst. Prof.
Foreign Languages
J.R. Smith Assoc. Prof. Elec.
Eng.
Paul H. Smith Assoc. Prof. 9*-
tory
Morris Storer Prof. Humanities
George Strecker Asst. Prof.
Mathematics
Irene S. Thompson Asst. Prof.
Comprehensive English
Mack Tyner Professor Chem.
Eng.
Hard Van De Riet Asst. Prof.
Psychology
Joseph S. Vandiver Professor
Sociology
Charles J. Vierck Asst. Prof.
Surgery, Psychiatry and Psy Psychology
chology Psychology
John E. Waler Asst. Prof. Social
Science
B.H. Waugh Assoc. Prof. English
Gerald B. Webster Asst. Prof.
Dept, of Personnel Services
Arthur W. Westerberg Asst.
Prof. Chem. Eng.
Norman Wilensky Asst Prof.
Social Sciences
Harold A. Wilson Asst. Prof.
Social Sciences
R.N. Wisan Asst. Prof. Human Humanities
ities Humanities and Phil.
J. Jay Zeman Asst. Prof. Phil,
and Mathematics

Page 3



Page 4

: The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

Present Sale
In Ballroom
Os Union
UF students will have the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to do their Christmas
shopping early, with articles
from around the world to choose
from.
The International Committee
of the Florida Union Board is
sponsoring a Christmas sale in
the ballroom of the Reitz Union,
Dec. 5-7, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The committee will sell wood
carvings, ceramics, porcelain
items, Christmas cards, and im imported
ported imported foods.
The Christmas cards will be
sold for below retail value, said
George Vinas, chairman of the
committee. All of the other items
will be sold at list prices.
ROTC Test
Scheduled
For Dec. 2
Air Force ROTC officials have
announced that the Air Force
Officer Qualification Test will
be administered in room 208 of
the military building, 8:00A.M.,
December 2, 1967.
The test is a prerequisite to
acceptance in the advanced pro program
gram program or award of a Financial
Assistance Grant. Since Finan Financial
cial Financial Assistance Grant selections
will be made in early 1968 it is
necessary that all freshman and
sophomore applicants take the
exam not later than the Decem December
ber December 1967 testing cycle.
All sophomores who plan to
apply for the advanced program
are encouraged to take the
AFOQT at that time.

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TUMBLEWEEDS By TOM RYAN
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Adams Advocates
Exemption Removal
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
We don't need new taxes, Florida Secretary of State Tom Adams
told a Young Democrats audience recently.
If we eliminate exemptions in our tax system, well have enough
funds to do without new forms of taxation or raising money.
Adams, speaking before a sparse Thanksgiving eve crowd in the
Reitz Union, answered questions on such diverging topics as the re revision
vision revision of the state tax system, the office of the secretary of state, and
a second term for Florida governors.
We by statute have circumvented the constitution and exempted
property by ownership and not by use, Adams said, citing the fact
that churches and other religious and service organizations pay no
property taxes on property that they own.
This system of ours will not work until everyone pays his fair
share. For some a fair share is zero, but for others a fair share is a
little and theyre paying nothing at all.
Inanswer to a question from the floor, Adams stated that he was in
favor of permitting a Florida governor to succeed himself one time.
Today, he said, the governor is a lame duck as soon as he is
inaugurated. He does not have to go back to the people for a vote of
support and can do almost whatever he wants to do.
Two terms could provide continuity, make the governor respon responsible,
sible, responsible, and still not provide a chance for forming a machine.
In response to a question on the bounds of his office and whether
he expected it to remain an elective post, Adams said, Its very
hard to get good government by appointment. Its hard enough to get
it by election.
*"W- UF S REPRESENTATIVES
\--l. / Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sapp David Wilson
P | George Corl Arlle Watkinson
1636 W. Univ. Ave.
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 3761208
NO WAR CLAUSE
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
(Until Your Earnings Increase)
Tlit Plm Tin Tlit Moa

University Press Publishes
The History Os Florida

An updated edition of the his history
tory history of Florida by Dr. Rembert
W. Patrick, former UF history
professor who died recently in
Athens, Ga., has been published
by the University of Florida
Press.
Florida Under Five Flags,
a concise narrative history of
more than 450 years of Floridas
history, is in its fourth edition,
updated to include the state elect elections
ions elections of 1966.
Dr. Patrick, who was head of
UFs Department of HL'tory, left
Gainesville last year after 26
years with the university to be become
come become graduate research pro-

ROBBIES I
Meal Q cl
COLOR T.V. & BILLIARDS
1718 W. University Ave.
*On The Gold Coast'-

fessor of history at the Univer University
sity University of Georgia.
A recognized authority on Civil
War and Reconstruction history,
Dr. Patrick was the author of
The Reconstruction of the Nat Nation,
ion, Nation, and co-author of The Chit Chitwood
wood Chitwood History of the United
States.
Florida Under Five Flags,
with updating by Dr. Patrick and
Allen Morris, is available from
the UF Press at $5 per copy.
Morris, author of Our Florida
Government and editor of The
Florida Handbook, is presently
clerk of the Florida House of
Representatives.



Rocket Developed At UF
To Be Launched Dec. 14

The UF will begin active par participation
ticipation participation in the space flight ex experiment
periment experiment field on Dec. 4 with
the launching of a 20-foot rocket
designed to probe the existence
of oxygen on the planet Venus.
Launching will be from the
White Sands Missile Range in
New Mexico under a scientific
program directed by Dr. Roland
C. Anderson, University aero aerospace
space aerospace engineer.
Measurements of wave lengths
of light reflected from Venus
will be made with the aid of a

Bar Owner Arrested
In Gang Crackdown

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.
(UPI) A tall blonde who ran
the saloon where the Outlaws"
motorcycle gang gathered was
arrested Monday night and
charged with turning her ware warehouse
house warehouse into a bawdy house
for them.
The arrest was another in
Gov. Claude Kirks crackdown
on the gang, begun when they
nailed a teen-aged girl to a tree.
Sheriff William Heidtmannsaid
Mrs. Bertha Kitty" Randall was
charged with keeping a house
of ill fame, maintaining a house
for prostitution and procuring for
money."
Earlier three members of the
Outlaws" pleaded innocent to
charges of crucifying the girl
and possessing marijuana. Their
trials were set for August
courts are so crowded here that
they could not be scheduled
earlier.
Mrs. Randall ran Kittys
Saloon," which was padlocked
several weeks ago in a raid led
personally by Governor Kirk. She
told UPI that none of the gang
misbehaved in her bar or in
the warehouse behind her bar

WEDNESDAY
DEU =' ous AQt
Veal Parmigiana "X M V
LARGE
Club Steak and
French Fries V
THURSDAY
Baked Meat Loaf
with onions and £
white rice
LARGE
T-Bone Steak and "7 A
French Fries
I NO TIPPING
WgHjM SELF-SERVICE
//CAFETERIA I
313 W. Univ. Ave.
free parking
>KUKSiiUwIIB O n Our Paved Lot
- ~~~~ -

custom-built, fine-tuned automa automatic
tic automatic spectrometer and a 13-inch
telescope flown in the forward
section of an Aerobee 150 rocket.
The rockets six-minute flight
will take it 100 miles above
the earths surface and permit
about four minutes of observing
time.
During the flight data will be
telemetered back to ground
tracking stations at the White
Sands Missile Range. After the
flight Dr. Anderson will return
to the university and analyze

where she let them hold their
meetings.
Most of the guys were well
behaved in my place and I served
as much coffee and soft drinks
as I did booze. A lot of them
wore No. 13s on their colors,
which means they smoke pot,
but they never did it in my place.
But they stole $75 worth of
beer and wine from my place after
it was closed down," she added.
Mrs. Randall, 38, and the
mother of three children, was
to appear in Magistrates Court
Dec. 12 to answer the charges.

Display Os African Art
Part Os Confab At UF

One of the features of the first
Africa-Latin American Confer Conference
ence Conference at the UF Nov. 29-Dec. 2
will be a unique display of Af African
rican African art.
More than 60 items will be
included in the exhibit of shields
and weapons, masks, a door and
lock from an African house, a
bronze bell and a bronze cast casting
ing casting of a head.
Roy Craven Jr., director of

the data over a period of six
months.
Dr. Anderson has been design designing
ing designing and constructing instruments
for the flight since last Aug.
1 at the Space Division of the
Kitt Peak National Observatory
in Tucson, Ariz., under the sup support
port support of the National Science Foun Foundation.
dation. Foundation.
During the flight, a portion of
the Venus ultraviolet spectrum
will be analyzed for traces of
ozone and molecular oxygen.
The fine-tuned instruments of
Dr. Anderson will permit the
separation of wave lengths of
light so that each can be meas measured
ured measured independently.
According to Dr. Anderson,
objectives of the probe are:
to establish the existence
of oxygen on Venus.
to provide data on Venus
in the unknown spectral r^eion.
to obtain additional informa information
tion information relating to the. possibility
of extra-terrestrial life.
to provide data, such ns
signal levels, for use in plan planning
ning planning future orbital, fly-by and
landing missions on the planet.
to develop an instrument that
can be used in the future for ad additional
ditional additional astronomical work.

the University Gallery, is coor coordinating
dinating coordinating the exhibit for the con conference.
ference. conference.
The exhibit opens Nov. 29 at
8:30 p.m. with a lecture by Dr.
Philip Dark of Southern Illinois
University, a specialist in Af African
rican African anthropology and art.
The display will continue
through Dec. 20 in the Univer University
sity University Gallery on campus.
HP
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Bill Olinger
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Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Musical Groups Combine
To Perform 'Messiah

Five music groups will com combine
bine combine forces to present Handel's
Messiah at 4 p.m. Sunday
in the UF Gymnasium.
Sponsored by the universitys
Department of Music, the bien biennial
nial biennial presentation of Handels
masterpiece will feature these
combined groups--the Univer University
sity University Choir, Choral Union, Mens
Glee Club, Womens Glee Club
and the University Symphony Or Orchestra.
chestra. Orchestra.
Dr. Elwood Keister, director

E BEEF HAMBURGERS
(U.S. GOVERNMENT INSPECTED)
Breakfast I
Served Anytime!
WOW WHEEH
WHAT A SALE!
DONT MISS THESE
-> AND MANY MORE
NOT LISTED!
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62 F'Lane 4-Dr. V-8 Automatic $695
64 Chev. 4-Dr. V-8 3-Speed $995
64 Ford Wagon V-8 fir Air $1295
63 Buick Electro 4-Door $1495
63 Cad. 4-Dr. And Loaded $1895
67 Cher. H.T. and Loaded $2895
64 Chevelle Wag. 6 Auto. $1095
62 Rambler 4-Dr. Automatic $595
63 Ford Gal. 4-Dr. V-8 Auto. $995
66 Dodge 4-Dr. and Loaded $2195
66 Chev. 4-Dr. Auto, fir Air. $1995
65 Chev. N.T. Auto fir Air $1895
67 Comoro H.T. V-8 fir Air $2795
64 El Camino V-8 Automatic $1295
64 Ford Vi-Ton V-S 3-Spt.d $795
62 Chev. II H.T. 6-Cyl. Automatic $795
64 Malibu 9 Pass. Wag. Loaded $1495
67 Caprice Cpe. New $4569 NOW $3295
66 F'Lane H.T. V-8 Automatic $1795
63 Chev. II 4-Dr. Automatic fir Air $895
61 Chev. Wag. Automatic $695
65
Corvair Cpe. 3-Speed $895
56 M.G. Convertible $495
61 Falcon Ranchero 3-Speed $595
__ a-
- 3 IHIIMIBHL
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of the University Choir, will con conduct.
duct. conduct.
Featured soloists will be Joy
Davidson of the Metropolitan Op Opera
era Opera Co., contralto; Evelyn Tay Taylor
lor Taylor of the music department fac faculty,
ulty, faculty, soprano; Richard Shadley
of New York, tenor, and Oscar
McCullough who was soloist with
the Robert Shaw Chorale presen presentation
tation presentation of Beethovens Ninth
Symphony, bass.
Handel first presented his
masterpiece in Dublin in 1742.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

The
Florida Alligator
mgm To Let The People Know* 9
mi lit!?
J[(l Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
ManagingTEdltor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
Tb Florida Alllfttor's official poalUoo on Imum la axpraanod
' only In the oolumna below. Other material in tide laaue may
reflect the opinion at the writer or cartoonlat and not neceeaarlly
ttataf the Florida Alligator onleaa apndfloally Indicated.

The First Step

A bill was scheduled to be
introduced to the Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative Council last night call calling
ing calling for temporary auton autonomy
omy autonomy for Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications.
The Bill called for the
BSP to assume control
January 1, 1968, provided
that periodical statements
of financial condition --
based on an accrual sys system
tem system --be submitted to the
student body treasurer.
We appreciate the efforts
of some sincere student
leaders to allow the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator to become a truly
free newspaper. And we
understand that the bill was
proposed at this time to
prevent undue pressure on
the Alligator during the
coming campaign.
But we would much
prefer that autonomy be
granted by the proper
authority namely, UF
President Stephen OCon OConnell.
nell. OConnell. We would also prefer
permanent autonomy, not
something which could be
removed by a change in
whim of Student Govern Government.
ment. Government.
Autonomy by president presidential
ial presidential directive has such
permanency.
Furthermore, autonomy
granted by the President
makes good sense.
He is, in effect, the rep reppresentative
presentative reppresentative of the Alli Alligators
gators Alligators publisher, the
Board of Regents. The
President is charged with
the responsibility for the
publication of a student
newspaper and yearbook.
Obviously, he cannot
personally oversee daily
publication. He delegates
this responsibility to the
BSP and its employees.
If the BSP has the re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility to publish a
newspaper and yearbook,
then it should have the
authority to accomplish the
job as efficiently as
possible.
In our opinion, autonomy
from Student Government
and _'s line-item contro 1
over the but i, would ex expedite
pedite expedite this el. ioncy.
The grantir ; of auton autonomy,

omy, autonomy, therefore, should be
by the President.
Student Government, by
state law, must appropriate
student funds to student
activities, but line item
budget control over Stu Student
dent Student Publications budgets
should and must be re removed
moved removed from SGs control.
We hope that United
Partys proposed tem temporary
porary temporary autonomy is but
the first step towards this
goal.
Xmas Bells
Thanksgiving has barely
left us and December is
still around the corner.
Christmas is almost a
month away from us.
Driving down Gainesville
streets in 75 degree heat
in November, you see
Christmas decorations lin lining
ing lining the street. Carols blast
out from the shopping cen centers,
ters, centers, and Christmas lights
flash in store windows.
When Christmas itself
finally arrives, we will be
so sick and tired of buy buying
ing buying presents, mailing
cards, hearing carols, and
seeing Santa Claus, that
there will hardly be aay joy
left in the holiday.
Children will be so ac accustomed
customed accustomed to seeing toys
and candy and Santa Claus,
that they will think it is a
normal part of the year.
This should not be.
What is the hurry?
Christmas should be a joy joyous
ous joyous occasion, a time for
reverence, for visiting with
friends, a time for good goodwill.
will. goodwill. It is a holiday sea season;
son; season; brief, but happy and
Christmas should thrust it itself
self itself upon us about two
weeks before the holiday,
and be completely and fully
enjoyed by one and all.
Children should be allowed
to know that Christmas is
a special time of the year,
with a special meaning.
Christmas should not be
exploited for its commer commercialism.
cialism. commercialism.

PHOENIX WATCHES^__
Gosh, Gee Whiz
BY IRA BRUKNER

I get the biggest kick out of watching
freshman in action. Fresh out of the Dean
of Men's and Women's offices they are
transformed into men and women after
twelve weeks of summer maturation.
Thrown into a new environment they grope
for security in the Dorm, the House, the
Bent Card etc. Entangled in academic
computerism they find various outlets in
creative expression and water fights.
Believing that a Florida boy-man needs
no introduction, the frosh walk around
campus with that O'Connell hello on their
lips so find out that they need no intro introduction
duction introduction because nobody wants to meet them.
Remember those first few weeks when
you could walk right up to her in the Cl
or some other campus hot spot and say
hello my name is and would you like to
go out with me, etc.
And what about that first day when you
met your roommate and then you buy your
books at the local conveyor belt bookstore
and then you become oriented and then you
are rushed and then you swear to uphold
the tenets of the honor court in that ridic ridiculous
ulous ridiculous right hand up mouth open and close in
that hot gym. Remember.
Remember that first class when the
professor cant pronounce your name so he
calls out your number and you hold up
your spindled and torn and bent hand and
timidly answer hear the cheerleaders
teaching you to be proud of your football
team so 2-4-6-8 who do we appreciate
the countless pairs of boots being shined
or the lacquer being removed and then
the first day is over and the first week of
academics and the first weekend comes and
there happens to be a game so you decide
to go with that guy you cant remember his
name but you gave him your ID card when
he paid for your limeade in the Cl or your
Shandy in the laundromat but you cant
remember because youre becoming a

Alligator Staff
The Florida Alligator is a student newspaper
RICHIE TIDWELL DAVE DOUCETTE
Copy Editor Assistant News Editor
LORI STEtfLE JOE TORCHIA
Campus Living Editor Feature Editor

Florida woman and the Rush but you go
with him when he picks you up his flask
bulging out of his otherwise flabby behind
which is hidden by his tailored Crlcketeer
which he borrowed from one of the brothers
or one of the guys or somebody at the
dorm., and here come the Gators and you
stand up and cheer and sit down and
drink and catch those blue footballs being
thrown by those kewpie dolls who led the
cheers in that hot gym right after you
pledged to uphold the honor code .
remember. Remember.
And then that newspaper comes out and
people are discussing the most important
news of the day and then you learn that
few circles have corners and your progress
is tested while you exist during your first
all nighter and the pains in the back some somebody
body somebody is telling you your dress is unhooked
and you reach for the snap while Black
Label goes down your gullet and thoughts
of a glaring 22 players down below playing
that game accompany the ice being de deposited
posited deposited all over your clothes along with
that Black Label you like so much almost
as much as that Cherry Kijafa Wine you
had the other night at the Ramada.
Then there was Sunday. Remember the
harsh sound of the telephone. Remember
last night when you didn't go out but rather
booked it not because it was even inter interesting
esting interesting but because you had to . Remem Remember.
ber. Remember.
And there was evening and there was
morning Monday. Back to the intel intellectual
lectual intellectual challenges or back to the grind
or rather just back.
I
Yes, I get the biggest kick out of watch watching
ing watching the goshgeewhiz geewillikers of fresh freshmen
men freshmen and the reservations of freshman
and the naivete of freshman. But what
about the once upon a time freshman? Do
you remember or do you still participate?



YU) ONE HUNDRED Percent
AMERICAS ARE AT iT
A6Alb\. JUST CAN'T LEAVE US
HIPPIES AND PKOTFSTU2S frLCbJBj
CAN VA? Wl*/, 'iOli DON'T E\)EN
knm/ way you bewpue in the
?R.oT£ST hUT £THI c AS A l/AUUE
INSTEAD OF OUR HtPP/E jUTePNATIVE)
00 y ou ? ALL you DO IS LISTEN TO IS
XeD6AR ytoousd AnO WALT D/SNei! 1
BST you THINK it TAKES 6uts> to
love AMERICA } ANt) TO ST*\/ CLEAN AND
7 WEAR SANT SHIRTS (WH STRIPES) END
WEETMS AND WAATN^r ; J>o/0 T /A?
tfOSKff&IDM'T' KHOW ir
Too* suts To Be A I
RWtftH, j
v y
INSTANT RYHMO
Riot Time Novelties
BY JOHN KEASLER
Everywhere you look, newspapers and television screens show
picture after picture of riots, or demonstrations. One disturbing
aspect has been overlooked.
There dont seem to be any vendors hawking specialized wares
for demonstrators, or rioters.
Does this indicate some weakening in our system of free enter enterprise?
prise? enterprise? I hesitate to think so, and yet in all the pictures showing
thousands of folks milling around demonstrating about something,
you never see a good, old-fashioned vendor waving his pennants
and shouting his wares.
Oh, theres an occasional character peddling a few Hate or Love
buttons. This is a feeble substitute for the atmosphere created by
good, professional, enthusiastic vendors at every other crowd scene.
If were going to riot, I say, lets do it correctly. Surely, there
are many demand items which would go like hotcakes at any dem demonstration
onstration demonstration worthy of the name.
I dont mean just the usual hotdog and popcorn peddlers, either --
although its strange they are so conspicuous by their absence. We
can manage without them.
By vendor, I mean the real pros, such as the ones at football
games: The ones who know the needs of their special clientele and
cater to them.
Certainly, for instance, there is good money to be made in a
novelty idea I have, now in the development stage.
Its a trick draft card. When somebody lights it, it explodes.
Franchises are open.
Judging by the quality of the prose on picket signs, a pocket pocketsize
size pocketsize thesaurus should sell well -a rhyming dictionary, perhaps,
with the colors of your team on the cover, would go eten better.
I saw two picket signs in pictures, this week alone, which tried
to rhyme war with scar, and one poor, tormented protestor
who doubtless had sat up all night composing ended up so tangled
with lacist and fascist that, frankly, his poesy just didnt sing.
What kind of an intellectual revolution is this? Where are our
traditional vendors when we need them?
I can hear them now.
Hey, hey, hey, get your Instant-rhymo here! Come on, man,
lets scan!
Literate picket signs would do a lot for the image. So would the
Hit-Kit. (Or Wonder-Wound my merchandising analystsareeven
now running a field test on the name.) This would be a crowd-pleas crowd-pleasing
ing crowd-pleasing item designed for demonstrators who are too shy or awkward
ever to really get in on police brutality complaints.
There are so many obvious needs at any good-sized riot that I
can only think the absence of their huckstering shows some weaken weakening
ing weakening in the thought processes of the business community.
Wig possibilities are unlimited. You buy a wig which makes you
look like a hippie and if the going gets rough, you turn it inside
out and have a service-about helmet, or hard hat. (The Hairmut?
Hel-Wig? Wig-mut?)
Do-it-yourself effigy kits could fit every occasion, rope included
in purchase price. But enough of these hints, riot-time vendors .
I can't do everything for you. Now get out there and sell!

OPEN FORUM: j
jAcbjutt CtW. 'DIMMt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

DOCTORS AGREE

Psychedelic Drugs
Pose Real Threat

MR. EDITOR:
I spoke with Dr. Larson, who
confirmed this impression and
gave the following correction.
First, systematic studies have
yet to be done on LSD, Mari Marijuana,
juana, Marijuana, and the like. However, the
essential chemical in LSD is
known to affect other biochemical
substrates in the central ner nervous
vous nervous system such as serotonin
and the catecholomines.
This is not thought to be the
case with the constituents of al alcohol,
cohol, alcohol, and hence there is reason
to believe hallucinogens should

r Vietnam Junkies

MR. EDITOR:
In connection with the recent
discussion in the Alligator about
the use of marijuana by U.S.
troops in Vietnam, I thought you
might be interested in the fol following
lowing following excerpt from a letter
written by one of my close
friends, commander of a Marine
artillery battery near Da Nang:
has .
six junkies now. Marijuana is
readily available and one of my
brother officers had a group in
his battery that held a series of
pot parties.
His unit is moving out and all
the hop-heads were transferred
to me for safekeeping (my work working
ing working hours run from 0730 2300
so they are kept fairly busy).
I have a letter from one mother

Tenure Denial Prompts
Bad Academic Atmosphere
MR. EDITOR:
What to do about the denial of tenure for Marshall Jones lias
not been publicly considered in terms of a direct criterion of good
education. This is improper. We are a university. What we do must
shape education, ours, at all levels, for good or bad.
Education is good only insofar as by students and teachers alike
it is this behavior. As reasonably as you can in a trouble-situation,
figure out, commit yourself and espouse commitment to trying
whatever way for dealing with the situation that your reasoning
requires.
If the way strikes those who embody the usual ways as wrong or
intolerable, stick to your commitment and espousal to the degree
that your reasoning finds the usual ways either futile or actually
generative of the trouble.
The denial of tenure commands students and teachers alike to
engage in bad education. This is the command. If your reasoning
cannot commit you to trying what the powers that be and their sup supporters
porters supporters indicate is alright or at least tolerable, either commit
yourself to their way and against your reasoning or try to do the
impossible nothing.
To try to do nothing is to support the denial and deniers by de default.
fault. default. This widespread response to the denial is bad education in
both the support-by-omission sense and the sense of being the ob obverse
verse obverse of good education. Some want and urge Jones to try all of
the channels. This response is bad education because it ignores
or refuses to face up to the central source of the trouble.
No available channel can reallocate power such that President
O'Connell or someone above him in the hierarchy of power can even
say in response to future instances of good education; I simply
haven't the power to stop it.
ROBERT L. CURRAN
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

be placed in a class of potent potentially
ially potentially more dangerous drugs.
f.
Secondly, it is not known why
a person who has taken LSD trips
becomes able to flip-out with without
out without the drug, but this fact im implies
plies implies organic brain changes which
can produce uncontrolled flip flipouts
outs flipouts or psychotic-like states.
Finally, the psychological danger
needs better emphasis. People
will tend to take seriously physio physiological
logical physiological dangers and alter their
behavior accordingly, but they
do not act in the same way to toward
ward toward the psychological.
Instead, they think they are

on my desk asking for informat information
ion information as to what trouble her son
is in He was rather vague
in saying what he had done wrong.
You may imagine what my letter
will say Dear Mrs.
Your son is a junkie. *
BEN L. MOON

Student: Weimer
;
Is J-School Genius

MR. EDITOR:
No headline could have struck
me with more sadness than the
one in the Nov. 16th Alligator

Page 7

in full control of themselves,
that by an act of will can quit
when they see they are becom becoming
ing becoming psychologically dependent on
it when the drug is causing emot emotional
ional emotional problems or decreased aca academic
demic academic efficiency. Both clinical
experiences and controlled ex experiments
periments experiments indicate increased
probability of mental illness in
persons with subacute psycholo psychological
gical psychological weakness.
Your article also gave very
short shrift to Dr. OConnells
contribution, which emphasized
the motives of drug takers. One
of these was that drugs are in increasingly
creasingly increasingly the route which col college
lege college students are now taking to
find a direction for living, but
that this solution is tentative and
impermanent, there was no in indication
dication indication that they provided an
adequate alternative to social
action, or philosophical and re religious
ligious religious thought.
For both physiological and psy psychological
chological psychological reasons, therefore,
many professionals in the fields
of medicine and psychology are
strongly against the indiscrimin indiscriminate
ate indiscriminate way psychedelic drugs are
now used by the general populat population.
ion. population.
BLAIR TURNER,7AS

announcing Mr. Rae Weimers
resignation as Dean of the College
of Journalism and Communi Communications.
cations. Communications.
Those who have been around the
school for any length of time,
either as student or employee,
will know what I mean when I
say "hat it is unlikely iha.' iiy me,
no matter how capable, can qui'e
take Mr. Weimers place.
For the mans genius in getting
along with and understanding
people pervades the halls, the
classrooms and offices. One feels
the warmth and friendliness im immediately
mediately immediately upon entering the
Dean's outer offices.
No rudeness, shortness or in indifference
difference indifference there. Everyone is a
very important person to be
treated with equality and unusual
consideration. (And the employ employees
ees employees are just as busy as in other
departments. ) Mr. Weimer
drives himself and everyone a aaround
around aaround him and they like it!
While other parts of the uni university
versity university may lament great staff
turnover, it is almost non-exist non-existent
ent non-existent in Journalism. Why?
Let those among the unwashed
aitfi unproductive beware when
they beat their breasts and cry
for more love in the world. Those
who really love their fellow man
do not have to cry about loving
him nor do they, like leeches,
stand in stew-lines for hand-outs
from him.
The radiance of a humanitar humanitarian's
ian's humanitarian's love is so obvious that the
words need never be spoken.
PATRICIA WILKINSON, 7 JM



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 for sale ~
40 x 8 TRAILER for sale with
large 9 x 22 cabana, carpeted,
pot bellied stove. $1,500. Call
Betty 378-4578. (A-42-st-p)
FOR SALE: U. of F. Concession.
Great profit potential. S3OO cash,
balance may be financed. Final
price open. Call 378-8867, 6:30-
7:30 p.m. (A-43-st-p)
*64 BMW motorcycle R-50 in ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. Must sell be before
fore before Christmas. Call 481-2307!
(A-42- st-p)
1966 TRIUMPH 650, 4400 miles,
S7OO in extras. S9OO Call 378-
3448. (A-43-3t-p)
2 bedroom 45 x 10 almost new
trailer, air conditioned, TV, fur furnished.
nished. furnished. $3,500.00 terms to re reliable
liable reliable party, discount for cash.
Lot 18 Paradise Trailer Park,
4546 NW 13th St. If owner not
home, see Schlagcheck across
street. (A-45-2t-p)
WHITE GERMAN SHEPHERD
Puppies. AKC registered, excel excellent
lent excellent blook line, 9 weeks old.
SIOO each. Call 376-0084. (A (A---
--- (A---
WEDDING GOWN AND accessor accessories,
ies, accessories, S7O. Bridesmade dress, $25.
White formal and accessories,
SSO. All size 5. Half price. 378-
7463 anytime. (A-45-3t-p)
8 x 37 TRAILER FOR SALE:
2 bedrooms, new appliances and
many new furnishings. Excellent
condition. $1,400. Call Jerry.
372-5848. (A-45-3t-p)
YAMAHA 1965, 55 cc, complete completely
ly completely overhauled. $125. Phone 376-
2875 after 5. (A-45-3t-p)
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale. 2
purebred sealpoint, 5 weeks old.
$25 each. Call 378-5677. (A (A---
--- (A---
PIERCED AND UNPIERCED ear-
Made to order. Wonder Wonderful
ful Wonderful Christmas gifts. $2.00. Call
378-8130 for more information.
(A-45- lt-p)
MUST SELL my 1966 Triumph
TR-6. Only 2745 miles. Mint
condition. Bates windshield, lug luggage
gage luggage carrier. Has never been
abused, S9OO. Call 378-7819. (A (A---
--- (A--- 3t-p)
STUDENT GOING HOME must
sell: PERSIAN RUG, hand made
Silver Items, jewelry, etc. Mens
bicycle. Call 378-1024. 5-10p.m.
(A-40-st-p)
for rent
THREE NEW MODERN two bed bedroom
room bedroom furnished apartments.
Available immediately. Owner
will rent for S7O per month un until
til until January 1. Rent after Janu January,
ary, January, $l4O per month. Call Ernest
Tew Realty, Inc. 376-6461. (B (B---41-st-c)
--41-st-c) (B---41-st-c)
SPLIT LEVEL Large one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment to sublet. Air
conditioned, furnitured, washer
inside apartment. Close to cam campus.
pus. campus. Call anytime, 378-3025. (B (B---41-st-p)
--41-st-p) (B---41-st-p)
TO SUBLET, near campus, large
two bedroom, fully air condit conditioned
ioned conditioned plus heated, furnished
apartment. Phone 376-1802,1616
NW 3rd. Avenue. (B-43-3t-p)

| for rent
WHERE IS HOME NEXT QUAR QUARTER?
TER? QUARTER? Just a short distance off
campus is Georgia Seagle Hall
Mens Cooperative (1002 West
University Avenue). Three good
meals a day, shared duties, or organized
ganized organized discussions, and a stress
on academic achievement. (Grad
Students Welcome). Opportun Opportunities
ities Opportunities for social and leadership
experience s22o per quarter
terms arranged. Call Resident
Director for information and per personal
sonal personal interview at 376-2476. (B (B---43-st-p)
--43-st-p) (B---43-st-p)
APARTMENT TO SUBLET.
Immediate occupancy. One bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, University Gardens in Un Undergraduate
dergraduate Undergraduate section. $l2O per
month. Call 378-7546, nights. (B (B---46-2t-p)
--46-2t-p) (B---46-2t-p)
i'
WILLING TO SUBLET apartment
for winter qtr or longer. slls
per month, 1130 SW 16th Avenue
after 5 p.m. (B-45-3t-p)
FOR RENT: Two bedroom dup duplex
lex duplex apartment close to campus.
Furnished. Phone 378-7754, 1003
SW 7th Avenue. (B-45-3t-c)
AVAILABLE December 15, com comfortable
fortable comfortable and convenient efficiency
apartment for one or two quiet
people. May also have lovely
corner room. Across from cam campus.
pus. campus. No car needed. Apply 321
SW 13th Street. (B-45-lt-c)
RENT: One bedroom apt.
starting January June in Fred Frederick
erick Frederick Garden Apts. Call 378-
8407. (B-43-st-p)
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted.
Williamsberg Apts. Prefer med medical
ical medical or nursing student. Laundry
room and pool. SSO per month.
378-6748. (C-43-3t-p)
ONE FEMALE coed wanted to
live at Landmark Apartments
preferably between January,6B January,6B
- January,6B 6B. Call 378-6494. (C (C---42-st-p)
--42-st-p) (C---42-st-p)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted air
conditioned apartment near Med
Center. S4O/month. Available
January 7. 376-8133. (C-42-5t-
P)
fyALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share quiet, comfortable trailer
for winter and spring quarters.
Must be reasonably serious seriousminded
minded seriousminded and sober, and have
transportation. $26/month plus
1/2 groceries and utilities. In Inquire
quire Inquire any evening at lot 36,
Shady Nook Trailer Park, 3101
SW 34th Street. (C-43-3t-p)
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES. Sen Seniors
iors Seniors preferred. Village Park on
back pool. 378-6934. (C-45-3t-p)

TONIGHT
By Popular Demand
TWO SPECIAL SHOWINGS OF
* J w IU."
An actual Nazi Documentary made In 1936
to Introduce Hitler to the World.
", i
SHOWINGS AT 7 AND 9:15 UNION AUD.

Page 8

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted:
Winter Quarter, S3B per month,
Spring Quarter S3O per month.
Two blocks from campus. Call
378-7140. (C-45-st-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted:
for apartment behind VA. Move
in December 15 or next quar quarter.
ter. quarter. $39.75/month plus utilities.
378-8604, Yvette. (C-43-st-p)
WANTED: One or two male room roommates
mates roommates to share new Gator Town
pad. Two bedrooms & baths. Call
after 5 p.m. and ask for Sean.
378-3924. (C-46-st-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share Olympia Apt. beginning
winter quarter. $37.50 per month
plus utilities. Call 372-8728. (C (C---46-3t-p)
--46-3t-p) (C---46-3t-p)
POETRY WANTED for coopera cooperative
tive cooperative Antholgy. Include stamped
self-addressed envelope. Idle Idlewild
wild Idlewild Publisners, Frederick, San
Francisco, California 94117. (C (C---
--- (C--- 12t-p)
WANTED: Male roommate fox
winter quarter or rest of year
in Summit House apartment. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, and centrally heat heated.
ed. heated. $38.25/month plus utilities.
378-8806. (C-45-9t-p)
WANTED: Studious, energetic
upperclass female roommate for
remainder of school year in
French Quarter. Call NOW, 376-
4908. (C-45-st-p)
WANTED: One roommate to
share large, beautiful two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. $47 per month
plus utilities. TV equipped. Call
378-6070, John. (C-45-st-p)
GIRL WANTED to share apt.,
prefer grad student near campus,
own room $45 per month plus
utilities. 909 SW 6th Ave. 372-
6259. (C-46-2t-p)
WANTED: Two coeds to share
Village Park apartment for Win Winter
ter Winter and Spring terms. Seniors
or upperclassmen preferred.
Call 378-6934. (C-45-st-p)

l mu wm M
/winner of grand prize\ 10:45
CTJ/AIIV >*£ anhes film usmncom
1 cofhu \ lin
I 6:3a J
I NItY "DONT MAKE WAVES
I STARTING PUTt Tl
I
I MARGARET BLYE I

wanted
3EG STUDENT wants to share
3 or 4 man apartment starting
January 1. Call Sam, 378-8968.
(C-45-3t-p)
WANTED: Four riders to north
New Jersey, Xmas, leave 12/14,
return 1/3, 66 GTO, S3O round
trip, Con Kozich, 378-1863. (C (C---46-3t-p)
--46-3t-p) (C---46-3t-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
(prefer engineering student). Air
conditioned two bedroom trailer.
$37.50/month. Move in for winter
quarter. 372-6265. (C-45-3t-p)
THREE MALE GRADUATE stu students
dents students need a fourth roommate
for their Village Park apartment.
Call 378-1153 about 6 p.m. (C (C---
--- (C---
lost-found
LOST: 1 Black wallet. Keep
money. Return identification.
Doug Firestone. 376-9235. (L (L---
--- (L--- lt-p)
FOUND: pair of prescription sun sunglasses
glasses sunglasses with black frames and
case in Student Publications Of Office.
fice. Office. Owner may claim in room
330 J. Wayne Reitz Union. (L (L---
--- (L--- 3t-nrj
REWARD: Two, ugly, oriental
temple dogs, one foot high, gray
concrete. Stolen Nov. 15. Reward
for info. Call Ext. 5326. (L (L---
--- (L--- 3t-p)
FOUND: male dog resembling
miniature greyhound. Call 378-
3484. (L-43-3t-nc)
services
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested repairs. Auto Electric
Service 603 SE Second St.
378-7330. (N-36-ts-c)

/Vt cooking up
Itlil a storm of
entertainment! V
iEIAIVIBAKEj
I TECHNICOLOR TECHNISCOPE
| 1:10-3:15-5:20-7:30-9:30 J
Gaior Ads Sell!
CALL UF EX: 2832

help wanted
PART TIME Secretary Wanted,
presentable, unmarried young
lady (may be student). Speed
typing. Shorthand preferred, but
not required. Contact Brad Cul Culverhouse.
verhouse. Culverhouse. 372-2211. (E-37-13t-
WANTED: Bookkeeper. Due to
transfer of husband, we will lose
our bookkeeper on Dec. 3. This
position is open. Interested per persons
sons persons shall apply in person to
Scruggs, Carmichael and Tom Tomlinson.
linson. Tomlinson. 3 SE First Ave., Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Telephone 376-5242. Age,
experience and permanency wil
be factors in making this appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. (E-45-4t-c)
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
has vacancies for qualified full fulltime
time fulltime clerks, secretaries and typ typists.
ists. typists. Good starting salaries plus
paid vacations and other fringe
benefits. Equal opportunity
employer. Come to or call the
Central Employment Office,
Building E, Ext. 2645 to sched schedule
ule schedule tests and interview. (E-42-
tf-nc)
Featur^7jl^&lfr3y
| mW. tMvrWy iw. |
at 1:30-4:50-8:15
other days 1:30-
STEVE McQUEEN
AT HIS BEST!
NY. TIMES
2:35-4:51-7:07-9:23
. EASILY ONE
NEWMaiM
as cool
HaiMP LUKE



OrBIII2JG and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
WINTER REGISTRATION: Stu Student
dent Student depository hours for the
winter registration period are
as follows: Regular Registrat Registration
ion Registration Tuesday, Jan. 2, from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wednesday,
Jan. 3, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
'Late Registration -- Thursday,
Jan. 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Friday, Jan. 5, from 10 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. There will be a drop
box at the Gyro during regular
registration and a permanent
drop box is located at the Hub.
Students are urged to use these
drop boxes in making fee pay payments.
ments. payments. Effective Jan. 8, 1968,
Student Depository hours will be
Pom 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
PRIVILEGED REGISTRATION
Winter Quarter bills will be mail mailed
ed mailed to privileged registrants
around Dec. 5 and should be

CLASSIFIEDS

| help wanted
PART-TIME help. Need male
student experienced in fitting and
selling mens suits, slacks,
sports coats, etc. Excellent
working conditions, discount and
other benefits. Apply Wilson De Department
partment Department Stores, Inc. (E-41-st-c)
PART TIME real estate sales salesman
man salesman needed for staffing model
homes. Minim ujp .hours. Max Maximum
imum Maximum pay. Call 376-7971 9a.m.
5 p.m. (E-43-st-p).
personal
ARE YOU TIRED OF YOUR OWN
HOME COOKING? Do you want
to live (room & board) for $220
a quarter? Georgia Seagle Mens
Cooperative is looking for you!
Three good meals a day, shared
duties, stress on academic
achievement, opportunities for
social and leadership experience.
(Grad Students Welcome). Call
Resident Director for informat information
ion information and personal interview at
376-2476. (J-43-st-p)
DRIVE-AWAY-CAR to Chicago
1963 4 dr. Chevrolet Gas ex expense
pense expense reimbursed. During
Christmas Vacation. Call 378-
6402. (J-45-st-p)
THE THRILL COMES SOONER
at the GATOR GROOMER where
friends meet, romance blooms
and LOVE DOES PREVAIL. (J (J---
--- (J--- lOt- p)
TWELFTH NIGHT Cast and
Crew: Much thanks for your kind kindness
ness kindness and cooperation. Keep
breaking those legs. S.M. : B.G.
(J-46-lt-p)

Visit Us At Our New Home
Low InteresMlates On Loans fH SI. ''m jjffijf Ipjl 1
"Serving U F Employees Since 1935"
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS Ave j

paid by Dec. 18. If paid by Dec.
18, privileged registrants will
have the satisfaction of having
completed their registration and
payment of fees prior to Christ Christmas
mas Christmas and will, therefore, avoid
long payment lines during regular
registration at the Hub on Jan.
2 and 3. Privileged registrants
are urged to mail fee payments,
or utilize the drop box at the
Hub. By spreading out the regis registration
tration registration impact, Student De Depository
pository Depository personnel will be able to
provide better service to the stu students.
dents. students.
GENERAL NOTICES
ORANGE AND BLUE DEAD DEADLINES:
LINES: DEADLINES: All notices for the Or Orange
ange Orange and Blue Bulletin must be
received by 9 a.m. of the day prior
to publication. Deadlines are Fri Friday
day Friday for Monday publication, Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday for Wednesday publication and
Thursday for Friday publication.
Notices should be typed and signed

| personal
BAHAMA ISLAND XmasCruise.
The 100 foot luxury yacht VAGA VAGABONDS
BONDS VAGABONDS II is now available for
charter over X'mas Holidays. 10
double staterooms, private baths,
bar facilities, water skiing, fish fishing,
ing, fishing, etc. Cost is approximately
$25 per day per person, meals
included. Will Island Hop'
throughout the Bahamas Islands.
Call 376-4019 to write P.0.80x
139265 Gainesville, Florida. (J (J---_4l-st-p)
--_4l-st-p) (J---_4l-st-p)
UF YOUNG REPUBLICANS have
big plans for 6B dont wait
till then join us at 8, to tonight
night tonight in room 355 Union. (J (J---45-lt-p)
--45-lt-p) (J---45-lt-p)
C.T.F. Please understand your
Child Guidance Counselor
she means well, but shes try trying
ing trying too hard to break the record.
M. (J-45-lt-p)
FIDEL AND DOBS: Mazel-Tov!!
We love you both. Mon and Dad,
Miami. (J-46-lt-p)
YACHT PARTY 100 foot luxury
yacht chartered for UF-UM Game
weekend. 10 double staterooms,
private baths and showers,
stereo, large bar, lots of
Party room. Cost about $25/
person for weekend plus meils.
Call 376-4019. (J-41-st-p)
LAMBCHOP A VERY HAP HAPPY
PY HAPPY BIRTHDAY!! Because hap happiness
piness happiness does exist, and I do Love
you!! Sweetie Pie. (J-45-lt-p)
WOULD THE PERSON or persons
with any information concerning
the fight that occurred at the
football game (East Stands, S.E.
corner, Row 12) Please call 376-
9094 or 376-3505. Your assis assistance
tance assistance will be greatly appreciated.
(J-45-2t-p)

BLUB BULLETIN

by the person submitting the no notice
tice notice and sent to the Division of
Information Services, Building H,
Campus. Items for the Campus
Calendar should be sent to the Pub Public
lic Public Functions Office, J. Wayne
Reitz Union.
PEACE CORPS PLACEMENT
TEST will be given at 1:30 p.m.
on Dec. 4 at the new Federal
Building (Post Office) in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Applications may be picked
up now at the International Cen Center,
ter, Center, south of Walker Auditorium.
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY TRIP:
The Program Staff of the Reitz
Union is sponsoring a trip to
New York, leaving Waldo Dec.
26 and returning Jan. 2, 1968.
The cost is $135 per adult and
$lO5 for children under 12. This
will include round-trip transpor transportation,
tation, transportation, hotel accommodations,
tours (New York, Lincoln Cen Center,
ter, Center, the UN) and three Broad Broadway
way Broadway shows. For further infor-

j autos
BUICK INVICTA, 1959, power
steering, power brakes, radio,
heater, needs paint, $200; two
14-7.50 blackwail tubleless tires,
sls; call 378-7954. (G-45-2t-p)
VW EXCELLENT CONDITION.
6O model with *67 rebuilt en engine.
gine. engine. Must sell quickly. For in information
formation information call 378-4435. (G-46-
3t-p)
1955 or 57 T-BIRD. Excellent
condition, both tops, power
brakes and windows, radio,
SI4OO. Call 378-1202. (G-46-4t-
P)
1964 FALCON. Modified 260, 4
speed. Mags, tac, reverberator
heavy duty suspension, red, black
vinyl top. $1,250 cash. 3524 NW
21 Street. Eveningjs. (G-45-3t-p)
1961 RAMBLER, 4 door, 6 cyl.,
auto trans., very clean. $350.
Call Frank Puckett 376-9420. (G (G---45-2t-p)
--45-2t-p) (G---45-2t-p)
1964 6 cylinder CHEVELLE Mal Malibu
ibu Malibu SS Sport Coupe with factory
air conditioning, power steering,
adjustable wooden steering wheel
and other extras. $999. 372-
7274. (G-45-Bt-p)
1950 WILLYS Overland Wagon,
new tires and paint. Two wheel
drive with overdrive. Good con condition.
dition. condition. $250. 378-6894. (G-43-
3t-p)
1964 CORVETTE Purr-feet
condition, 4 speed, both tops,
power steering, brakes and win windows,
dows, windows, AM-FM radio. $2,350. Call
Ocala 622-3903. (G-42-3t-p)

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

mation call Mrs. Nita Hawkins,
ext. 2741, Program Office, Reitz
Union. Make reservations early
as there is a limited amount
of space available.
FORUMS COMMITTEE: On Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, Nov. 29, at 12 noon,
there will be a luncheon and in informal
formal informal discussion in 150 C, Reitz
Union. Anyone interested is in invited.
vited. invited. Make reservations with
Robert Dawson, Ext. 2741. Don
Meiklejohn, director of State
Beverage Department, will be the
guest speaker.
STUDENT FEA: On Thursday,
Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m. in Nor Norman
man Norman Auditorium, Ray Potorf,
State Director of Teacher Cer Certification,
tification, Certification, will explain the re requirements
quirements requirements and procedure for
certification.
FOREIGN STUDENTS who wish to
accept home hospitality from a
Gainesville family during the
Christmas holidays are request requested
ed requested to sign the list in Internation International
al International Center, Office of Foreign Stu Student
dent Student Advisor.

Campus Calendar

Wednesday, November 29
Fla. Speleogical Society: meeting
346 Union, 7 p.m.
Young Democrats: meeting, 361
Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Cinema Society: Triumph
of the Will, Union Aud., 7 &
9 p.m.
8.E.C.: meeting, 361 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: meeting, film,
Union 150 D, 7:30 p.m.
Pi Mu Epsilon Discussion: Op Opportunities
portunities Opportunities in University Math Mathematics,
ematics, Mathematics, 235 Little, 8 p.m.
Sigma Gamma Epsilon: Mr.
Anthony Randazzo, Structural
and Sedimentological Features
of *the Wadesboro Triassic
Basin, North Carolina, 104
Floyd, 8 p.m.
U of F Young Republicans: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 355 Union, 8 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: audi auditions,
tions, auditions, 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
8 p.m., Talent wanted, come
by or call Bob, 372-9663
Thursday, November 30
Baptist Student Center: Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship Supper, 1604 W. Univ.
Ave., 5:30 p.m. Everyone wel welcome.
come. welcome.
School of Forestry Seminar: Dr.
George M. Jemison, Whats
New in Forestry Research,
44 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Lambda lota Tau: meeting, 357
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Players: Three One Act
Plays, The Tiger, English
Flummery, and A Bad Play
for an Old Lady, Constans
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Football Film: Fla. vs. FSU,
Union Aud., 8 p.m.
Fine Arts Comm.: Mastersand
the Myth, Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

SECRETARIES NEEDED to
work 2 hours per week for var various
ious various Union Board committees.
Contact Bill Levens, Room 310,
Reitz Union, (372-9303).
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Students must be registered with
the Placement Service to inter interview.
view. interview. Sign- up sheets are posted
two weeks in advance of the
interview date at the J. WAYNE
REITZ UNION, ROOM 22. All
companies will be recruiting for
Dec., Mar., June and Aug. grad graduates
uates graduates unless Indicated otherwise.
NOV. 30: NASA LANGLEY RE RESEARCH
SEARCH RESEARCH CENTER. ME, EE,ChE,
AE, Physics. Must be U.S. cit citizen.
izen. citizen.
NOV. 30: WORTHINGTON CORP.
DEC. 1: U.S. BUREAU OF IN INDIAN
DIAN INDIAN AFFAIRS. ElemEdu., Gui Guidance.
dance. Guidance. Must be U.S. citizen.

Friday, December 1
Football Film: Fla. vs. FSU,
Union 150 C, 11:30 a.m.
University Chess Club: chess,
118 Union, 7 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie: Three
on a Couch, Main Cafeteria,
7 & 9 p.m.
Union Movie: She, Union Aud.,
7 & 9:05 p.m.
Basketball: Fla. vs. Jacksonville
Univ., Fla. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Players: Three one act plays
Five Days, Constantinople
Smith, and The Lesson,
Constans Theatre, 8 p.m.
Fine Arts Comm.: Masters and
the Myth, Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movies: Seven
Days in May, 8 p.m., and
A Very Private Affair, 10
p.m., South Hall Rec. Room.
Tolbert Area: Dance, Union Ball Ballroom,
room, Ballroom, 8:30 p.m.
Oneg Shabbat: report on Hillel
Summer Insitute, Hillel Foun Foundation,
dation, Foundation, 8:30 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: folk
entertainment, readings and
discussions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 9 p.m.
Florida Quarterly 2nd Issue: on
sale at Anderson 207 and the
Hub, all day.
Florida Union Box Office: Tickets
now on sale for Masters
and the Myth.
Lock your car.
Take your
mm

Page 9



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and accurate transactions and leave

photos by Dusty Hopkins and Mike Huddleston

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astir' t k t n tUrHe neck l * con.'
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ings stockings are by Rudi knits. All from Doni-
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ride through town on a Solex. Margret Fleming ADPi is
traffic stopper. You can be one too. Life is one g g J
light, gogogo. Go Solex. M
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J, at is wild about this action-packed Pontiac from Tropical Pon- Electric apnif a/1 J *ckso
where service is their business. Drive in today. And get with the Cilri stmas iJ; ances /or nJ' Trl Celt so u FM^^K
D ; C^m e e Z;. >- Ct', mas £ E r ,n? to
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Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

The Campus Shop and Bookstores
Semi Annual
SIDEWALK BOOK SALE
t

v £jggBgggggS3BSSEESESSES£SSSBSEEB&Z£i*&P
99<
TO |
$14.95
Originally Published |
To Sell From |
$2.98 to $25.00 I
r

FAIRY TALE PACKAGES
Translated from Jean Lee
Lathams English versions, these
beautiful childrens classics are
written in easy French and
Spanish especially for beginning
students and are lavishly issus issustrated
trated issustrated in color.
IN FRENCH
The two triple-story volumes
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Hansel and Gretel, & Jack and the
Beanstalk; The Ugly Duckling,
Goldilocks and the Three Bears,
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Four complete books: Hop O
My Thumb; Puss In Boots; Nut Nutcracker;
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IN SPANISH
The two triple-story volumes
contain: The Brave Little Tailor,
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Goldilocks and the Three Bears,
Pub. at $5.90. Both Vols. Only
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Four complete books: Jack the
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THE WARRIOR & THE
PRINCESS AND OTHER SOUTH
AMERICAN FAIRY TALES. Ex Exciting,
citing, Exciting, long opoular tales newly
translated by George Obligado.
Over 50 Full Color Illus. by
G. De Gaspari. Pub. at $3.99.
MELISANDE. By Margery
Sharpe. Illus. by Roy McKie.
A pictorial Memoir of a most
uncommon dog who becomes a
famous opera singer and the
darling of musical society. Pub.
at $4.95. Only SI.OO.
JUNIOR SCIENCE LIBRARY
5 volumes of this highly suc successful
cessful successful library and school ap approved
proved approved series, each book by a
recognized authority, and each
illustrated with 100 drawings,
vividly described and scientif scientifically
ically scientifically accurate -- Its Fun to
Know Why; Research Ideas for
Young Scientists; Electronics for
Young Pople; Everyday Weather
& How It Works; Atoms Today
& Tomorrow. Softbound. Ages
9-15. Pub. at $4.75. The 5 Vols.
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JUNIOR CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BOOK PKG. Ed. by Margaret
Farrar, Crossword Puzzle
Editor of N.Y. Times; and E. T.
Maleska, N.Y. Board of Educat Education.
ion. Education. 2 volumes, each with 30

Nov. 29, 30 & Dec. 1
)

fascinating new puzzles specially
designed for young people, spiral
binding, sos cover. Pub. at $2.00
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TALES FROM THE ARABIAN
NIGHTS. Illus. in full color by
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838 WAYS TO AMUSE A
CHILD: Crafts, Hobbies & Crea Creative
tive Creative Ideas for the Child from
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for boys and girls to make, to
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ANGRY KATE. By Elizabeth
Janeway. Illus. by Chas. B.Slack B.Slackman.
man. B.Slackman. Delightful little tale in verse
about a little girl who hated
everyone, with delectable il illustrations
lustrations illustrations in the spirit of long
ago. Pub. at $1.95. Only SI.OO.
THE GREEN SLIPPERS. By
Saint-Marcoux. Enchanting story
of a young girl who fell in love
with life at the opera in Paris
and the thrills, heartaches and
experiences attached to her rise
to prima ballerina. Ages 12 up.
Pub. at $2.95. Only SI.OO.
LEARNING HOW . FOOT FOOTBALL.
BALL. FOOTBALL. By J. R. Bob" Otto.
Hundreds of self-teaching photos
and drawings. A complete in instruction
struction instruction book on football for
every position written by a
college coach. Soft cover. Pub.
at $1.95. Only SI.OO.
SECRET CIRCLE MYSTERIES
FOUR volumes from the famous
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thrills, action and enjoyment.
Ages 10-14. Pub. at $1.95 ea.
CLUE OF THE DEAD DUCK.
By Scott Young. Only SI.OO.
RIDDLE OF THE HAUNTED
RIVER. By Lawrence Earl. Only
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MYSTERY.OF THE MUFFLED
MAN. By Max Braithwaite. Only
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SECRET TUNNEL TREAS_
URE. By Arthur Hammond. Only
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THE ILLUSTRATED BOOK
ABOUT THE FAR EAST. Written
and Illus. by Martha Sawyers
and William Reusswig. Introd.
by Lowell Thomas. Over 85 illus.
in color, 40 in black and white.
Included are colorful accounts of
China, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea,
Japan, Formosa, Manchuria, Si Siberia,
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9 a.m. 4 p.m.
RECORDS TOO

WILLYS SILLY GLASSES. A
big picture-story for the read readaloud
aloud readaloud set about the little boy
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Huge, brilliantly colored il illustrations.
lustrations. illustrations. Size 9 1/2 x 13.
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THE CHILDRENS VERSION
OF THE HOLY BIBLE. Reader
tested by thousands of children,
based on King James Version.
Over 1500 pages, large clear
type, color frontispices, hand handsome
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TO READ AND TELL. Ed. by
Norah Montgomerie. An anthol anthology
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HP
SPACE SCIENCE. By Lloyd
Malian. Filled with photographs.
The thrilling story of space ex exploration
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KING ARTHUR & 12S KNIGHTS
OF THE ROUND TABLE. 100
Paintings in rich color by Gus Gustaf
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THE JUNGLE BOOKS. By Rud Rudyard
yard Rudyard Kipling. Profusely illustrat illustrated
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Only $2.98.
DOCTORS, DOCTORS, DOC DOCTORS.
TORS. DOCTORS. Selected by Helen Hoke.
Illuminating stories of the trials,
achievements, inspirations, im-

provisations, etc., of doctors
work by MacKinlay Kantor, Dr.
Tom Dooley, Pearl Buck, A. J.
Cronin, Sir Wilfred Grenfell,
Pjiul Horgan, Sinclair Lewis,
'many others. Ages 10-14. Pub.
at $3.95. Only $1.98.
THE CHILDREN IN THE
JUNGLE: A Golden Picture Book.
3 children and a troll take an
exciting trip to India. Beautiful
full-color illus. Ages 4-10. Pub.
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LOVE, LOVE, LOVE. Selected
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of stories of many kinds of love
young couples, husband for wife,
parent for child, son for father,
grandparents for the new gener generation,
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his dogy, etc., including some
poems. Ages 10-14. Pub. at $3.95.
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THE HORNBLOWER COM COMPANION.
PANION. COMPANION. By C. S. Forester.
Profusely Illus. with Drawings
& 30 Maps by S. H. Bryant,
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ploits exploits of theis legendary figure.
Fascinating guide to the wander wanderings
ings wanderings of Foresters with carto cartographer
grapher cartographer Bryant drawings of the
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APACHE GOLD AND YAQUI
SILVER. By J. Frank Dobie.
Illus. by Tom Lea. Fascinating
account of prospecting and buried
treasure in our own Southwest
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$2.98.
THE COOK IS IN THE PAR PARLOR.
LOR. PARLOR. By M. G. McCarthy. You
can be a guest at your own din dinner
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Sunday breakfasts, dessert
bridge, buffet and formal dinners,
cocktail parties, egc. Orig. Pub.
at $3.95. New, complete ed. Only
$1.69.
REX BRASHERS BIRDS AND
TREES OF NORTH AMERICA.
Text by the Artist. Edited &
Annotated by Lisa McGraw. 4
volume set, 875 full-color plates,
1094 species and sub-species of
birds, 383 of trees. John Bur Burroughs
roughs Burroughs said of Rex Brasher,
He is the greatest bird painter
of all time! This is a monu monumental
mental monumental publishing achievement,
superbly created, the reproduc reproductions
tions reproductions are in full-color facsimile
from the original paintings now
in Harkness Memorial Museum,
Waterford, Conn. The mag magnificent
nificent magnificent plates are 10 x 14, print printed
ed printed on Permalife paper guaranteed
to last a century, easily removed
for framing. Overall size of each

Handsome editions
you'll be proud
to own or give.
All new books
Savings up to
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folume 16 p/2 x 12 1/4. Pub.
at $200.00. The 4 Volume set
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FLOWER ARRANGING. By
Joyce Rogers. Lavishly illus.
with 300 pictures including 32
pages dn Full Color. Beautiful,
helpful, entertaining book cov covering
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HORSES, HORSES, HORSES,
HORSES. Over 300 illus., 32
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horse in word and picture in
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THE FAMILY BOOK OF FUN.
By S. & M. Paxman. Profusely
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can enjoy together. Orib. Pub.
at $3.95. New, complete ed., Only
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THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR.
By Earol Schenck Miers. The
full sweep of the war from the
firing on Sumter to Appomattox
and the death of Lincoln, told
in expert narrative by the noted
historian and Illustrated with 342
drawings, paintings, engravings
and maps many in Full Color
by the great contemporary
artists including Winslow Homer
and Thomas Nash. 10 1/4 x
13 3/4. Pub. at $15.00. Only $7.95.
THE NEW EDITION OF THE
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JAZZ. By
Leonard Feather. Completely re revised,
vised, revised, enlarged and brought up
to date. Over 2000 biographies,
over 200 photographs with bib bibliography,
liography, bibliography, critics, social as aspects,
pects, aspects, jazz overseas, booking
agencies, organizations, tech techniques
niques techniques of play, records, etc. Orig.
Pub. at $15.00. New, complete
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BIRDS OF PREY OF THE
WORLD. By Mary L. Grossman
& John Jamlet. Photographed by
Shelly Grossman. 70 full color
illus., 283 duotones, 646
silhouettes, 425 range maps. The
most complete, authoritative and
exciting book ever produced on
the worlds most dramatic birds
-- their history, habitats, migra migration,
tion, migration, modes of flight, how they
catch their prey, methods of
training by man, etc. with mat material
erial material on their involvement in
religion, mythology and folklore.
Nearly 500 pages, 9 1/2 x 13.
Pub. at $25.00. Only $12.95.
BULLFIGHT. Photographs &
Text by Peter Buckley. All the
action, drama, beauty and cour courage
age courage of the Spanish bull rung is
portrayed in the public and pri-



jvate lives of 3 matadors, beauti beautifully
fully beautifully depicted in large photos,
volume size 9 x 12 1/4. Orig.
i pub. at SIO.OO. New, complete
I ad. Only $3.95.
I THE BUTTON SAMPLER. By
, Lillian Smith Albert & Jane Ford
' Adams. Profusely illus. with
(Specimen buttons. A delightful
| handbook of button lore showing
many types: flower, animal, por portraits,
traits, portraits, coin, military, lithos &
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. Pub. at $2.00. New complete
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[ EASY WAYS TO GOOD
(FLOWER ARRANGEMENT. By
Mary Badham Kittel. With lovely
illustrations in black & white
and in color. A practical, easy easyto-read
to-read easyto-read book of instructions for
arranging flowers tastefully in
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eye to exhibiting in flower shows.
| Orig. Pub. at $4.50. New, com complete
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t THIS IS THE HOLY LAND.
* A Pilgrimage in Words & Pic-
Itures Conducted by Fulton J.
Sheen. Described by H. V. Mor Morton.
ton. Morton. Photographed by Yousuf
| Karsh. 6 in full color, 63 in
black & white. A beautiful vol vols
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* THOREAU 3 vol. set: WAL WALIDEN,
IDEN, WALIDEN, Introd. by Basil Willey;
CAPE COD, Introd. by Henry
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Notes by Donald C. Lunt. A
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o. at $16.50. New, comp. ed.
1 3 vols. only $5.94.
I
ymm c a
r
THE STORY OF MAPS. By
Lloyd A. Brown. With 83 pages
lof illustrations. The history and
fascinating story of mapmaking,
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with narrative skill; notes, bib bibliography
liography bibliography & index. 7 3/4 x 10 1/4.
Orig. Pub. at $12.50. New, com complete
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' THE OUTDOOR-INDOOR FUN
,BOOK: A Treasury of Games for
Children from 6 to 12. By June
Johnson. With 80 illus. Here are
700 varieties of games and fun
for the individual and group: men mental

The Campus Shop and Bookstore
Semi Annual
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tal mental and physical, active and quiet
for everyday, holiday, party,
creative, dramatic, etc. Orig.
pub. at $3.95. New, complete ed.
Only SI.OO.
PROVERBS AND EPIGRAMS.
Over 2500 of the best sayings
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a cross index of sources and
alphabetical index of categories.
Special SI.OO.
ANTIQUE FIREARMS: Their
Care, Repair & Restoration. By
Ronald Lister. 61 Photos and 22
illus. Descibes methods of strip stripping,
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firearms as well as making tools
no longer available com commercially.
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THE BIBLE IN PICTURES.
De Luxe Great Masters Edition.
Ed. by the Rev. Ralph Kirby.
Over 1000 illus., 57 reproduct reproductions
ions reproductions of art masterpieces in Rich
Full Color. Authorized King
James Version, so designed that
the Bible lives. The pictures
are packed with action, and flow
into one another in such a man manner
ner manner that the movement of the
story is clearly seen. Slightly
imperfect binding. Pub. at SIO.OO.
De Luxe Edition, Only $2.98.
CHINESE FOLK MEDICINE.
By J. Wallnofer and A. Von
Rottauscher. Fascinating history
and information on care and cur curious
ious curious centuries-old health-re health-restoring
storing health-restoring treatments and remedies
-- the discoveries of medical
men and laymen handed down
through thousands of years.
Herbs, love philters, all other
areas of folk medicine. 74 Illus.
Pub. at $3.95. Only $1.98.
EARLY CHRISTIAN ART. By
V. F. Volbach, 250 Full-Page
Illus., 34 in Full Color. Hand Handsome
some Handsome volume, 9 1/2 x 12 1/4.
containing penetrating authorita authoritative
tive authoritative discussions of individual
works of the late Roman and
Byzantine Empires from 3rd to
7th centuries. The striking colors
of illuminated manuscripts and
textiles never have been more
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this an important book for all
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EXOTIC TROPICAL FISHES.
By Dr. Herbert R. Axelrod &
others. Nearly 1000 photos, about
600 of them in full volor. The
most complete book ever writ written
ten written on tropical fishes -- aquar aquariums,
iums, aquariums, plants, breeding, etc. Pub.
at $20.00. Only $9.95.
400 Jokes: HOW DO YOU LIKE
ME SO FAR? By Henny Young Youngman.
man. Youngman. Illus. 400 jokes by
Americas master humorist that
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all over the country. Orig. Pub.
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THE JAPANESE WAY WITH
FLOWERS. By R. E. Carr. 118
drawings in this illustrated, step stepby-step
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most foremost floral art, its simplicity
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containers, etc. 9x7 1/4. Pub.
at $4.95. Only $2.49.

LINCLON: His Words and His
World. By the Editors of Country
Beautiful. With 85 beautiful pic pictures,
tures, pictures, 56 in' full color. One of
the handsomest memorials of
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ing containing his most notable words of
wisdom, inspiration and humor
with great pictures of the scenes
and dramatic action of his times.
Pub. at $4.95. Only $1.49.
LINCOLN CENTENNIAL LI LIBRARY.
BRARY. LIBRARY. 4 Volume set commem commemorating
orating commemorating the 100th anniversary of
Lincolns assassination, this at attractively
tractively attractively bound, slip-cased set
includes Herndons Life of Lin Lincoln;
coln; Lincoln; The Man Who Killed Lin Lincoln,
coln, Lincoln, by Philip Van Doren Stern;
The Military Genius of Abraham
Lincoln, by Collin R. Ballard;
The Wit and Wisdom of Abra Abraham
ham Abraham Lincoln, By H. Jack Lnag.
5 3/8 x 8. Pub. at $22.95. Com Complete
plete Complete 4 Vol. Set, Slip-cased,Only
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MAKE THINGS WITH RAFFIA.
By J. Lammer. With 56 Illus.
How to make attractive house household
hold household and figt items with straw,
raffia and canebowls, baskets,
bags, mats, shades, footstools,
etc. Pub. at $3.50. Only $1.98.
TEA KETTLE COTTAGE AND
THE HURRICANE. By Franke
Rogers. Illus. in Color. The won wonderful
derful wonderful excitement occassioned by
a hurricane and what happened
to the robins who lived in a tea
kettle. Pub. at $2.50. Ages 4-8.
Only SI.OO.
JAMES BEARDS TREASURY
OF OUTDOOR COOKING. With
hundreds of special, brilliant
color photos, painting and other
illustrations. The most lavish,
exciting cook book ever published
(good for indoors, Too); from
simple grilling to gourmet sauces
and dressings; from a simple
picnic to the most sophisticated
feast: Size: 8 1/2 x 11 3/4.
Orig. Pub. at $12.50. New, com complete
plete complete ed., Only $6.95.
FINE POINTS OF FUR FURNITURE:
NITURE: FURNITURE: Early America. By Al Albert
bert Albert Sack. Intro. By J.M. Gra Graham
ham Graham 11, Curator, Colonial Wil Williamsburg.
liamsburg. Williamsburg. Over 88 illus.
Thorough analysis through pic picture
ture picture and text of elements of de design,
sign, design, decoration, construction
and finish of Early American
furniture. Only $3.95.
HONOR YOUR PARTNER: 81
American Square Dances with
Complete Instructions. By Ed

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Durlacher. A tremendous volume
with traditional square, contra
and circle dances; the actual
calls synchronized with specially
arranged music and 64 pages of
photos to flip for movie action.
Size 9 1/2 x 12 1/4. Orig. Pub.
at SIO.OO. New complete ed.,
Only $3.95.
AMERICAN PEWTER. By J. B.
Kerfoot. A history of every known
pewterer with dates, types of
work, scarcity factors with 500
illustrations of natable examples
and tables of marks. Orig. Pub.
at $7.50. New, complete ed., Only
$3.95.
GHOSTS ALONG THE MISS MISSISSIPPI:
ISSIPPI: MISSISSIPPI: The Magic of the Old
Houses of Louisiana. By Clarence
Hojn Laughlin. With 100 superb
photographs. A vivid history in
words and pictures of a gracious
way of life: the architecture,
landscaping, decoration and nos nostalgic
talgic nostalgic atmosphere. Size: 10 3/4 x
12 1/2. Orig. Pub. at $12.50.
New, complete ed., Only $5.95.
SEABIRDS IN SOUTHERN
WATERS. By J.R.J. The Prince
Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Over
80 handsome photographs by The
Duke of Edinburgh & 8 bird paint paintings
ings paintings by Cmdr. A.M. Hughes, R.N.
with a glossary. A lovely vol volume
ume volume of descriptions of tropical
seas, remote islands and beau beautiful
tiful beautiful birds. Pub. at $3.95. Only
SI.OO.
THE GREAT AMERICAN
WEST: A Pictorial History from
Coronado to the Last Frontier.
By James D. Horan. 650 illus illustrations
trations illustrations with many in color with
text comprising a comprehensive
account of the West as it act actually
ually actually was. Orig. Pub. at SIO.OO.
New, complete ed., Only $5.95.
THE LIVING PAST OF
AMERICA. By Cornelius Vander Vanderbilt.
bilt. Vanderbilt. Jr. Pictorial treasury of our
historic houses and villages. Sev Several
eral Several hundred photos covering 350
years of American history in
every part of the nation. Orig.
Pub. at $5.95. New, complete
ed., Only $2.98.
Near East Cook Book:
SCHEHERAZADE COOKS! By
Wadeeha Atiyeh. Illus. Tantaliz Tantalizing
ing Tantalizing recipes for Shis-Kebabs, hors
doeuvres, exotic entrees and
desserts, drinks, meat and meat meatless
less meatless dishes from the lands of
the Mediterranan with shopping
directory for the country. Orig.
Pub. at $3.00. New, complete ed.,
Only $1.49.
THOSE WONDERFUL OLD
AUTOMOBILES. By Floyd Cly Clymer.
mer. Clymer. Foreword by Eddie Ricken Rickenbacker.
backer. Rickenbacker. Over 500 photos. A color colorful
ful colorful picture history of the pioneer
automobile companies and their
unforgettable early cars. Filled
with rare and unusual photos,
jokes, cartoons, songs, fact and
figures. Orig. Pub. at $5.95.
New, complete ed., Only $2.98.
THE WORLD OF NAMKIND.
By the Writers, Editors & Photo Photographers
graphers Photographers of Holiday magazine.
With 286 magnificent photographs
of which 240 are in full color.
A portrait of the peoples and
places of our time throughout
the world as described by 35
distinguished writes like Joyce

Cary, Irwin Shaw. Bruce Catton,
John Steinbeck, B. De Voto, E.G.
White and 76 outstanding photo photographers.
graphers. photographers. Handsomely printed
and bound volume, size 10 1/4 x
11 1/2. Pub. at $20.00. Only
$9.95.
OLD VIRGINIA HOUSES: Along
the James. By Emmie Ferguson
Farrar. Beautiful and historic
houses, the histories and legends
of the families, information on
architectural features, details of
interiors, and the priceless an antiques
tiques antiques with which they were fur furnished.
nished. furnished. 160 photos. Orig. Pub.
at $12.50. New, complete ed.,
Only $3.95.
THE BOOK OF THE THOU THOUSAND
SAND THOUSAND NIGHTS AND A NIGHT.
Translated and Annotated by
Richard F. Burton. Famous ed edition
ition edition of Burtons Arabian Nights,
privately printed by the Burton
Club, regarded as the only com complete
plete complete edition. 16 magnificent vol volumes,
umes, volumes, 5,000 pages. 6 1/4x9 1/4.
Privately Printed $112.00. The
16 Volume Set, Only $44.95.
PRINT YOUR OWN FABRICS.
By J. Lammer. With 57 illus.,
8 in full color. Design and print
beautiful fabrics at home or in
school by stenciling, painting and
block printing scarves, stoles,
kerchiefs, blouses, aprons, etc.
Pub. at $3.50. Only $1.98.
HIGHBALL: A Pageant of
Trains. By Lucius Beebe. Agen Ageniune
iune Ageniune collectors book, featuring
more than 190 superb photo photographs
graphs photographs of famous locomotives
with expert text and the whistle
code. Pub. at $6.00. Only $2.98.
HAND BOOKBINDING. By A. A.
Watson. With 225 illus. Stip-by Stip-bystep
step Stip-bystep descriptions with exception exceptionally
ally exceptionally clear pictures showing the
techniques of fine binding from
simple tolios to heavy volumes.
Orig. Pub. st $6.50. New, com complete
plete complete ed. Only $2.49.
AMERICAN SILVER. By M.
Stow. With 83 photos. Works
of the craftsmen in plated r and
sterling silver from Colonial
Days to modern. Porringers] tan tankards,
kards, tankards, teapots and sets, boxes,
spoons, knives and forks with
information on reproductions and
marks. Orig. Pub. at $2.00. Only
SI.OO.

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

Dean Weimer Has Many Reflections

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Feature Writer
The portly man with the twink twinkling
ling twinkling lively eyes leaned back in his
revolving chair and placed both
feet on top of his desk. His grey greying
ing greying hair showed traces of the red
hair that he had in younger years.
The man placed his folded hands
on his 'stomach, stared vacantly
at the wall and laughed in his
reminiscences.
Rae O. Weimer, dean of the
College of Journalism and Com Communications,
munications, Communications, must certainly find
plenty to laugh about in his re reflections
flections reflections of his past 18 years at
the UF.
Founded School
Dean Weimer came to UF in
1949 and founded the School of
Journalism, which then had only
29 enrolled students. As of last
July 1 the school earned the rat rating
ing rating of a college, and enrolls
644 students this year.
Dean Weimer, who is soon re resigning
signing resigning his position as head of
the college because of his age,
talked about his experiences with
UF since 1949 in an interview
last week.
No other school in the US
has grown as fast as this one
has, he said, his bow tie jug juggling
gling juggling on his neck with each word.
This is the largest college of
journalism in the country if you
dont count grad students.
If you want to count grad
students then we're about the
second largest. Were only the
second school in the nation to be
given the rating of a college,
he said.
He paused and gazed out the
window, carefully selecting what
he would say next. The wall to
his right was literally covered
with citations and certificates of
achievement."
I founded the School of Journ Journalism
alism Journalism started it, began it
whatever you want to call it.

'Masters/Myth
Here Thursday

Philip Lawrence, well known
Shakespearian actor, and Laura
Stuart, widely known for her roles
in the theatre, TV and radio will
appear in University Auditorium
8 p.m. Thursday and Friday in
Masters and the Myth. A re reception
ception reception will follow at the Reitz
Union, Rm. 121.
Masters and the Myth is
a collection of scenes contrasting
the approach of great dramatists,
ancient and modern, to the same
Hitler Film
Rescheduled
Because of student reaction to
Triumph of the Will/' the film
will be shown again tonight at
7 and 9:15 in the Reitz Union
Auditorium.
Triumph of the Will was
made by the Nazi Party to in introduce
troduce introduce Hitler to the world.
Alligator Reviewer Dan Ber Berman
man Berman said in his review, Every Everyone
one Everyone has heard of the use made of
propaganda by th Nazis to man manipulate
ipulate manipulate the German people; few
have seen examples of it. Tri Triumph
umph Triumph of the Will* is an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity not to be missed.

When I came here in 1949 they
had a Department of Journal Journalism,
ism, Journalism, he said.
They had two or three pro professors
fessors professors out in Building E, and a
combination lab and classroom.
They had only one dictionary and
a few old typewriters that they
had picked up from the Army.
He shook his head and chuckled
to himself. In 49 we moved in into
to into Building K. There they had
a classroom, reporting labs and
offices. We expanded that and got
a typography lab and another
classroom, he continued.
In September of 1955 we
moved to the stadium, where wfe
added radio and TV to the school.
Since then weve grown at an
unbelievable rate, until now we're
one of the biggest and the best,
he said.
When the stadium classrooms
and offices were first built we
had no blinds, hardly any doors
and no air conditioning. That west
sun would come chining in here
and it got hot! In those days the
university wouldn't even allow
you to buy your own air con conditioner.
ditioner. conditioner.
Problems
One of the early problems was
that the school was treated as
a stepchild' and wasn't fully rec recognized,
ognized, recognized, he said. Since those
early years Ive had excellent
support, by and large. At first
our growth was slow. After we
began to grow the university
didnt realize how fast we were
growing and at that time we lacked
support.
We were frustrated by red
tape then. What was so frust frustrating
rating frustrating was the slowness with
which decisions were made.
Things have gotten better since
then, though, he said.
When asked if he had under undergone
gone undergone any unusual experiences
in his career at UF, Dean Wei Weimer
mer Weimer laughed loudly and rubbed
his hands together.

legend: Aeschylus Agamem Agamemnon
non Agamemnon and William Alfred's A
Pride of Lions; the An Antigones
tigones Antigones of Sophocles and An Anouilh;
ouilh; Anouilh; Euripides Electra and
Sartres The Flies.
Philip Lawrences busy career
includes position of resident di director
rector director at Shakespearewrights
Company of New York and teacher
of acting at the Julliard School
of Music. He has appeared in
a variety of plays such as Mac Macbeth,
beth, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, Ham Hamlet
let Hamlet and Julius Caesar. In
1960, Mr. Lawrence was one of
six directors in the country to
receive a special Ford Foun Foundation
dation Foundation Grant in recognition of
his directorial work in the pro professional
fessional professional theatre.
Laura Stuart has appeared in
such popular plays as A Funny
Thing Happened On The Way To
The Forum, Streetcar Named
Desire, Philadelphia Story,
Electra, and Shakespeares
Hamlet and Taming of the
Shrew. Her radio credits in include
clude include ABCs Theatre Five series
and Radio Rarities Theatre. 4
Tickets on sale at Reitz Union
Box Office. Admission is $1 for
students, $1.50 for faculty and
staff, and $2.50 for general
public.

PERSONALITY PROFILE

Building K was quite an ex experience,
perience, experience, he said. God, Id
never go through it again. Build Building
ing Building K is an old Army barracks
that we originally used. Many
nights at 9 or 10 o'clock it would
be 90 degrees down there. You
damn near froze out there in the
winter. Its about as uneduca uneducational
tional uneducational a place as you might see,
Dean Weimer concluded.
M isses Students
He shook his head again and
stopped laughing. He let out a
sigh and became serious once
again.
You know, one of the things
Ive missed most as administra administrator
tor administrator of this college is the close
contact with students. I like stu students
dents students and I like to counsel them,
he said.
Plenty of times students from
other schools and colleges come
over to talk to me about their
courses. Sometimes students
come in to see me just to have
a chat about personal problems.
Yes I miss the classroom.
When asked who would be a
candidate to replace him as head
of the department, Dean Weimer
said that he had no idea.
Im conducting a ballot right
now, the dean said. Thefacul Thefaculty
ty Thefaculty is voting on the committee
who will choose the candidates
for the position which I am leav leaving.
ing. leaving. Their choice or choices will
be submitted to the president.
But I have no real direct par participation
ticipation participation in choosing my suc successor.
cessor. successor.
But, you know, I think the
College of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications is a sound organiza organization.
tion. organization. Its an active and well wellfounded
founded wellfounded college. But, then again,
he said, winking and giving his
characteristic broad grin. I
guess you could say that Im
DreuwUf'*'*

V £ SBRRk
Nfr V vWUBHW vWUBHW-&
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PHILIP LAWRENCE
jp 5 jjpi
LAURA STUART

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RAE O. WEIMER RESIGNS
. . after 25 years

25 Yrs. Experience
a-
The Nebraska-born dean said
that he spent 25 years working
for newspapers in Nebraska,
lowa, Illinois, Ohio, upstate New
York, New York City and Indi Indiana.
ana. Indiana. Although Dean Weimer said
that he had never received a
university degree, he attended
Nebraska State Teachers Col College
lege College in Kearney, and has done
work at Ohio State and Syracuse
Universities.
In his years of newspaper ex experience
perience experience he has held the pos positions
itions positions of reporter, state editor,
sports editor, telegraph editor,

Gville Little Theatre
To Show One Acts
Two one-act tragic comedies by British playwright Peter Shaffer
will be presented Thursday through Saturday and Dec. 7-9 by the
Gainesville Little Theatre.
Kyle Sterling, University of Florida instructor in the College of
Journalism and Communications, will direct The Public Eye and
Private Ear.
Sterling described Private Ear as bittersweet, a tragic comedy.
He said The Public Eye, also a comedy based on the authors
theme of the general inability of his characters to communicate,
is more farcical than The Private Ear.
Members of The Private Ear cast are Matthew Faison, Stephen
Becker and Michelle Johnson.
Faison and Becker are broadcasting students of the U. of F. Miss
Johnson is a student of Gainesville High School.
Both Faison and Becker have experience with Florida Players
and Gainesville Little Theatre productions and Miss Johnson per performed
formed performed with a theater group in Illinois and in GLT presentations.
Scene of the one-act play is London in the mid-19605. The movie
version of Private Ear was The Pad and How to Use It.
Members of The Private Ear cast are Matthew Faison, Stephen
Becker and Michelle Johnson.
Faison and Becker are broadcasting students of the U. of F. Miss
Johnson is a student of Gainesville High School.
Both Faison and Becker have experience with Florida Players
and Gainesville Little Theatre productions and Miss Johnson per performed
formed performed with a theater group in Illinois and in GLT presentations.
Scene of the one-act play is London in the mid-1960*5. The movie
version of Private Ear was The Pad and How to Use It.
Members of the The Public Eye cast include Faison, Rev. Gene
Ruyle and Kristine Dempster.
Tickets for the six performances are $1.50 general admission
and SI.OO for students. Reservations must be made by calling the
Gainesville Little Theatre answering service. Tickets must be called
for by 8:15 prior to the 8:30 p.m. curtain.
Performances are held at the Little Theatre building 4039 NW
16th Blvd.

assistant city editor, city editor,
news editor, assistant managing
editor and managing editor. He
has also held the positions of
vice-president and president of
the Weimer Organization, a pub public
lic public relations concern in Colum Columbus,
bus, Columbus, Ohio.
The dean has been listed in
Whos Who In American Edu Education
cation Education for the past 30 years,
and boasts at least a dozen hon honorary
orary honorary titles and memberships
in various organizations.
He is also a member of Sigma
Delta Chi, Alpha Delta Sigma,
Alpha Epsilon Rho and Kappa
Tau Alpha fraternities.



My Son, The Protestor:
An Open Letter

Bv JOHN PARKER
Alligator Feature Writer
SCRIPT FOR RECORDING: AN
OPEN LETTER TO MY SON
WHAT IS IN COLLEGE.
(Open with the soft lulling notes
of My Old Kentucky Home.)
Son, what I have to say is
going to be difficult.
You are no longer a child. At
23, you are rapidly approaching
manhood. There are some things
that we should get straight in
a typically American man-to man-torn
rn man-torn an way. (Distant blast of Bugles)
I have heard reports that you
have disagreed violently with the
policy of our Country in Viet Vietnam.
nam. Vietnam. (Drum roll in background)
That is fine.
This country is built on the
principle that you have the right
to say these things. That is what
makes our nation great. (A chorus
of Hallelujas from the Mormon
Tabernacle Choir)
I have only one thing to say
about your protests.
Don't.
As an American, you should
realize that it is our responsibil responsibility
ity responsibility to protect other nations from
the dread diseased monster,
Communism.
Russia, China, North Vietnam
and Hugh Hefner are all part of
a gigantic scheme to weaken
and destroy this powerful and
wonderful nation of ours.
(Ominous first four notes of Beet Beethoven's
hoven's Beethoven's Fifth Symphony)

/\J n L_i r \j r \j r Yj r \n
fljL Ir7 trunk
Hit SHOWING
TODAY
10:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.
Ramada Inn
I Tr V I ;(j V I SHOES TO ORDER
jjr ;! 3958 ST. JOHNS* AVE. I
I, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. I Local Representative
KAY SIMPSON 378-4233

What I'm saying, son, is that
if we have to wipe out every
damned chink in that overgrown
rice paddy, then, by God, we'll
do it! Who else have they got
to protect them?
You should remember our
proud Heritage, son, and the gal gallant
lant gallant fighting men of the past
like General Custer who fought
so that this country might be safe
from bands of invading Indians.
Protesting is fine, son, as long
as you dont protest against any anything.
thing. anything. That kind of activity is
harmful and reflects poorly on
the upstanding reputation of this
great country. (Paper-Comb
chorus with Sweet Georgia
Brown)
As an alternative for your
youthful energies, might I suggest
that you protest in favor of some
of the following more respectable
movements?
1) Robert Shelton and his cam campaign
paign campaign to maintain the integrity
and respectability of the Old
South. (A Few notes of Dixie
on the ol' banjo)
2) The various Committees
for decent literature through
whose efforts this country may
eventually be rid of all those
evil elements which threaten the
Moral Fiber of the Community.
3) General Westmoreland and
hi! huge battalions of troups,
tanks, and artillery pieces gal gallantly
lantly gallantly stomping through the fields
and villages of Vietnam, diligent diligently
ly diligently searching and destroying

gigantic platoons of four or five
guerrilla warriors.
Yes, son, protesting is fine.
But as I sit here writing this
letter to you, wearing my old
WWI sword around my upper uppermiddle
middle uppermiddle class waist, and as your
mother gallantly spreads the red,
white, and blue tablecloth on the
table for our evening repast of
Southern fried chicken and all-
American mashed potatoes, I
cant help but wonder where we
went wrong.
We did everything we could to
get you to join your local church
youth group, to learn how to play
sports well and get in with the
other guys, to hate niggers and
carpetbaggers, to be suspicious
of foreigners and commies, to
tune out and drop in. We tried
son, we really did. But where
did we fail to instill in you the
Great American Heritage?
How did we ever produce a
child that could think?
(Gradual Crescendo of Ballad
of the Green Beret sung by the
Smoky Mountain Quartet)
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
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Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Institutions Course
To Study Freedom

A new Institutions course deal dealing
ing dealing with political change, is be being
ing being offered for the first time in
the University College, starting
with the winter quarter.
The course, entitled Freedom
versus Authority: Changing Pat Patterns
terns Patterns in American Institutions,
will treat changing patterns in
the balance of freedom and au authority
thority authority in political, economic,
and religious institutions. It will
also cover Freedom versus Au Authority:
thority: Authority: Crisis in the American
University.
Specific problems to be stud studied
ied studied include the civil rights move movement,
ment, movement, freedom of speech and
press, and economic problems
from affluence to poverty. Under
the topic of religion, study will
include the various ecumenical
movements, the question of free freedom
dom freedom for clergy and congrega congregations,
tions, congregations, new ethics, and the

)& H CHUCK WAGON MEALS jj
OPEN 11 AM-9PM
ipEROSA 1
JUL i TKAKHOUCT*
In Gainesville at the Westgate Shopping Ctr. !|
3321 W. University Ave. at 34th St. !|
ALSO IN ORLANDO AND TITUSVILLE
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church's social and political ac activism.
tivism. activism.
The course, which will be
taught by Mrs. Carolyn Griffis,
will meet Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday during fourth period.
As an elective in the Depart Department
ment Department of Social Sciences, CSS
113 will offer three credits.
There will be no departmental
progress test. If the course is
successful in the winter quar quarter,
ter, quarter, it may be made a part of
the permanent curriculum. The
course is open to anyone.
Many students seem to have
only vague notions of how insti institutional
tutional institutional change occurs, said
Mrs. Griffis. By using the case
study approach, it is hoped that
the students will be able to iden identify
tify identify and clarify the very complex
political, social, and economic
forces that make for change and
continuity in contemporary
American Institutions.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

f Are You Here For The Party?

By DAN HOGAN
Alligator Correspondent
This girl answers the dooi ;
grabs me, kisses me, and says,
Are you here for the party?
I hold up this bag and say,
No, but I brought the food for
it.
This was the situation late
Saturday u (Homecoming) night
when a delivery boy from the
Pore-Boy Sandwich Shop arrived
at an apartment with a food
order.
C*
From the doorway, I can see
into the room. There are a lot
of couples on the floor and sev several
eral several on the couch.
0
A girl sitting on the couch
with her boyfriend looks at me
and says Who the hell are you?
lm from Larrys and I
hold up the bag again to indi indicate
cate indicate that before she gets violent.
About that time in the corner
of the room at a little round
table with a light hanging over
it a gentleman yells to me, Come
back here and I'll pay you.
Well, this in itself is dif difficult
ficult difficult because I have to climb
over about 15 couples. I edge
my way through, though, and the
guy says, Do you mind if I pay
for these things individually?
I have no choice in the matter,
because he doesnt have $7.17
himself.
me
smashing
after
shave.
BRITISH
STERLING
So fine a gift,
its even sold
in jewelry stores.
After shave
from $3.50.
Cologne
from $5.00.
Essential oils imported from Great Britain.
Compounded in U.S.A.

So, he starts calling these
drunks up one by one and ac acquiring
quiring acquiring money from them, while
I stand there wondering if all
this is really worth the $1 an
hour salary Im getting.
Another guy comes up be behind
hind behind me. He talks like his throat
is burning up from drinking
something hard. Breathing all
over me, he says, Will you
take a check?

does he think he is,
Patrick Henry?
: : : : : vfcxx
J; \
J HH
.Mr
jjj^^
You'd better believe it.
If only because he does. That's enough
For his countrymen: belief in him
And in Liberty.
The Spirifcof 76... in '67
It won't take him as long as it took us
To be heard;
To be listened to.
The United Nations will see to that.
His vote, as big as ours
Or Russia's or Holland's will see to that.
Which was the whole idea in San Francisco
Wasn't it?
You, of all people, must believe it.
You are our life insurance.
_. i .
Phoenix §|
l Mutual |i
\ LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY BBS /
1 HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT gjj #

THE DELIVERY BOYS DILEMA

Well, I figure I will never
be able to read what he would
write on it. So, I say, No, Im
sorry, I cant.
He says, You gotta take a
check, I dont have any money!
I tell him Im not allowed
to take checks.
So, then he looks at me with
sort of an enlightened expression
and through that liquor haze of
his he is able to exhibit a little
bit of intelligence and says, Hey,

I just thought of something .
I cant pay you by check, anyway
... I dont have any checks .
as a matter of fact, I dont even
think I have a checking account,
and then he walks away.
In the meantime, the origi original
nal original fellow that I had talked to
has managed to collect about
$5 and he and I start the long
process of going over the regis register,
ter, register, tape and marking off each
individual sandwich. We even-

tually collect the entire $7.17.
I then begin to make my way
back through the crowd and just
as I get to the door, a guy looks
up at me from the couch and
says, Hey, buddy, you gotta ex extra
tra extra sandwich?
No, this is my last delivery
and were closing up for the
night.
You sure you dont have an
extra one out there?*
No, Im sorry,



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STANDING (L-R): Ted Gottfried, Mike Rollyson,
Harry Winkler, David Miller, Neal Walk, Gary
McElroy, Andy Owens, Kurt Feazel, Boyd Welsch.
SEATED (L-R): Asst. Coach Dick Davis, Asst. Coach

By PAUL KAPLAN
Assistant Sports Editor
The 1968 UF basketball team
will play the toughest schedule in
its lengthy history and will do
it with two starters who have
never worn a Gator uniform, ac according
cording according to head coach Tommy
Bartlett.
The Gators will play every
team in the SEC twice as is
customary, and are scheduled to
meet some of the toughest teams
in the nation in non-conference
matches.
Almost every team in the
SEC has improved over last sea season,"
son," season," Bartlett said Monday. Any
team will have the talent to beat
the top teams on any given night.
We also scheduled Wisconsin,
probably the best team in the Big
10. St. Josephs, who are national nationally
ly nationally ranked every season, will also
play us."
Bartlett singled out Tennessee
and Vanderbilt as two of the
SECs pre-season powers. He
also noted that Kentucky, who was
surprisingly weak last season,
should be back on their winning
ways. And then there are the
Gators.
With no surprise to anyone,
Bartlett named Captain David
Miller, Center Neal Walk and
forward Gary McElroy as three
of the starters.
Andy Owens, a 6-5 sophomore
forward from Tampa, will be an another
other another starter.
Mich. State Record
EAST LANSING, Mich.
(UPI) The longest rushing
play and the longest forward
pass play by an opponent in
Notre Dames football history
were made by Michigan State
players. Spartan Dick Panin
ran 88 yards against the Irish
:n 1951, and Gene Glick passed
to Lynn Chandnois for an 83-
yard gain in 1949.

Gator Cagers Face Tough Schedule

Andy had a tough time in the
intra-squad game, Bartlett not noted,
ed, noted, but you can't forget that
he was playing against our big biggest
gest biggest man, Neal Walk.
He'll get some experience
and confidence and will help us
a lot.
The all important fifth spot,
the control guard position vaca vacated
ted vacated by Skip Higley, has boiled
down to a two-man struggle.
Mike Leatherwood, a 6-1 jun junior
ior junior college transfer from Pen Pensacola
sacola Pensacola and Richard Vasquez, 6-0
and a junior college transfer from
Houston, Texas are both exper experienced
ienced experienced players that Bartlett is
confident can lead the squad.
One will be designated as the
starter by'December 1, when the
Gators open the season at home
against Jacksonville, but both will
see a lot of action throughout
the season.
Here, then, are the starters
with comments, on them made
by head coach Tommy Bartlett:
Neal Walk Hes one of
the youngest boys on the team.
Hes shown amazing improve improvement
ment improvement in each of his two seasons.
Neal is running a.nd shooting bet better;
ter; better; hes got more experience,
and were counting on him to have
a big year.
David Miller As our cap captain,
tain, captain, Dave is the tallest guard
in the United States. He does
everything well hes good on
offense, on defense, and is a
strong rebounder. Hell be our
wing-guard (will not control the
ball), and were looking to him
for team leadership.
t Gary McElroy Gary has got
as much talent as any man on the
team. Hes strong on offense and
is a good rebounder. With his
jumping ability, hell be one of

THE 1967-68 GATOR BASKETBALL TEAM

the keys to our success. If Gary
plays like he did in the intra intrasquad
squad intrasquad game, hell be a definite
All-America prospect.
Andy Owens Although hes
in his first year with the team,
Andy is no stranger to our method
of playing. He was red-shirted
last season and traveled with the
team for al' the games. Hell
give us strength on the boards.
Hes a fine shooter, and need
only improve on his defensive
play.
Richard Vasquez Richard
is a hustling, active player. He
has fast hands and feet.
Mike Leatherwood Hes a
very disciplined player. He con controls
trols controls the action of the game and
picks his moves before execu execution.
tion. execution. Im not worried about the
guard situation.
Bartlett added that his exper experience
ience experience in depth could be a prime
factor in the teams success this
year.
Kurt Feazel, Mike Rollyson
and Boyd Welsch are all exper experienced
ienced experienced guards who could step into
the lineup at any time, he said.
Well be looking to them to help
the team all year.
Harry Winkler, a 6-3 senior
forward, will see a lot of action
in reserve. Winkler was an of offensive
fensive offensive and defensive spark in
the intra-squad contest. He has
two years of cage experience
behind him and has shown fine
talent as a Gator reserve.
On offense well run a con controlled
trolled controlled fast break, Bartlett said.
Oscar Winner
Rose Bowl Star
LOS ANGELES Irvine (Cotton) Warburton,
an all-American quarterback
at the University of Southern
California in the 19305, is the
only man ever to star in the
Rose Bowl and also win a mo motion
tion motion picture industry Oscar.
Warburton, now one of Holly Hollywoods
woods Hollywoods finest film editors, won
the industry award in 1965.

Jim McCachren, Nick Fotiou, Tony Duva, Mike
Leatherwood, Head Coach Tommy Bartlett, Richard
Vasquez, Mike McGinnis, Ed Lukco, Freshman Coach
Skip Higley, Trainer Owen Weber.

That will keep the action mov moving.
ing. moving.
We wont fast break all the
time, but if we outnumber the
opponents defense, we wont hes hesitate.
itate. hesitate. The defense will dictate
how to play.
Bartlett added that the Gator
defense will have a large gap
to fill through the absence of
Gary Keller, last years leading

| yX X Ik m J[\'
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. it m JI
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/ \ /
I

m <
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GARY McELROY
. . Plays Big Partin GatorsBasketball Plans

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

rebounder for the Gators.
Walk has Improved on his re rebounding,
bounding, rebounding, and the team looked
good in practice, he said. But
we must improve our defense;
it's usually the difference in close
games.
Overall, Bartlett expects the
Gators To give every team a
strong, competitive game.
We're going to have a fine
team."

Page 17



Lambdas Top Sigma Chi

A 50-yard touchdown pass from
quarterback Bill Parker to end
Bill Hancock provided the win winning
ning winning margin Monday afternoon
as Lambda Chi Alpha defeated
Sigma Chi, 18-13. Lambda Chi
thus gained a semifinal berth in
the Orange League Football
championships.
Semifinal games will feature
Lambda Chi meeting Phi Delta
Theta and Pi Lambda Phi vs.
Tau Epsilon Phi, Wednesday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon on the upper drill field.
Men's dormitory basketball
has also gotten underway with
two area winners to be decided
Thursday night at Florida Gym.
Yocum section will meet Yea Yeaton
ton Yeaton section for the Hume Area
championship while Bless sec section
tion section will battle Staff section for
Graham Area honors.
In Tolbert Area action, East
IV will meet Tolbert IV in a
semifinal match Wednesday night
with the area champion to be
decided next week.

Grid Coaches Name
All-America Team

CHICAGO (UPI) The Am American
erican American Football Coaches Asso Association
ciation Association Monday named a 24-man
All-America team, including
three offensive ends and three
defensive ends.
The nearly 700 coaches chose
three offensive ends because the
emphasis placed on tight and
split ends and flankers.
The team is selected by bal balloting
loting balloting of the head coach of every
major college. Arkansas coach
Frank Broyles is general chair chairman
man chairman of the selections committee.
The team:
Offense
Ends: Ted Kwalick, Penn State,
Ron Sellers, Florida State and
Dennis Homan, Alabama.
Tackles: Ron Yary, Southern
California and Edger Chandler,
Georgia.
Guards: Harry Olszewski,
Clemson and Rich Stotter, Hous Houston.
ton. Houston.
Center: Bob Johnson, Tennes Tennessee.
see. Tennessee.
Quarterback: Gary Beban,
UCLA.
Halfbacks: O. J. Simpson, Sou Southern
thern Southern California and Leroy
Keyes, Purdue.

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FRATERNITY FOOTBALL W L
STANDINGS
Orange League
Bracket I
PDT 3 0
KA 2 1
AEP 1 2
SAE 0 3
Bracket II
TEP 3 0
SPE 2 1
ATO 1 2
PKT 0 3
Bracket 111
LXA 3 0
DTD 1 2
PKA 1 2
SX 1 2
Bracket IV
PLP 3 0
SN 2 1
BTP 1 2
KS 0 3

Fullback: Larry Csonka, Syr Syracuse.
acuse. Syracuse.
Defense
Ends: Ted Hendricks, Miami
Fla., Tim Rossovich, Southern
California and John Garlington,
LSU.
Tackles: Jon Sandstrom, Ore Oregon
gon Oregon State and Dennis Byrd, North
Carolina State.
Guards: Greg Pipes, Baylor
and Granville Liggins,Oklahoma.
Linebackers: Wayne Meylan,
Nebraska and Adrian Young, Sou Southern
thern Southern California.
Defensive backs: Tom Schoen,
Notre Dame, Frank Loria, Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Tech and Bobby Johns,
Alabama.
Kwalick, Sellers, Simpson,
Keyes, Hendricks and Sandstrom
are juniors. The others are sen seniors.
iors. seniors.

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Murphree Area W L
Bracket I
Sledd H 20
Fletcher N 2 1
Fletcher J 11
Thomas F 12
Thomas E 0 2
Bracket II
Murphree L 3 0
Thomas J 2 0
Thomas H 12
Sledd B 0 2
Murphree H 0 2
Bracket ni
Sledd G 4 0
Fletcher L 3 1
Murphree E 2 2
Thomas D 1 3
Murphree D 0 4
Bracket IV
Yon 3 0
Sledd F 20
Fletcher S 11
Fletcher P 12
Fletcher O 1 2
Sledd C 03
Graham Area
Bracket I
Staff* 3 0
Newins 1 2
Crandall 1 2
Atkins 1 2
Bracket II
Bless* 4 0
Maclachlan 3 1
Cooper 2 2
Glunt 1 3
Henderson 0 4
Hume Area
Bracket I
Yocum* 3 0
Gaddum 2 1
Little J 2
Keppel 0 3
Bracket n
Yeaton* 3 0
Bristol 2 1
Farrah 1 2
Cockrell 0 3

Page 18, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

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Three Gators On All-SEC Team

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) Alabama,
which relocated its misplaced
defense at midseason and earn earned
ed earned a bowl bid for the ninth
straight year, landed five play players
ers players on the 22-man All-South All-Southeastern
eastern All-Southeastern Conference foSt'kiall team
announced Tuesday by United
Press International.
The Crimson tide placed
quarterback Ken Stabler, split
end Dennis Homan and guard
Bruce Stephens on the offensive
unit and linebacker Mike Hall
and cornerback Bobby Johns on
the defensive Unit.
Orange Bowl-bound Tennes Tennessee,
see, Tennessee, Liberty Bowl-bound Geor Georgia
gia Georgia and UF each had three play players
ers players on the team selected by
sportswriters and sportscasters
from throughout the seven-state
region.
Representing Tennessee, the
probable SEC champion, are of offensive
fensive offensive tackle John Boynton, cen center
ter center Bob Johnson and corner cornerback
back cornerback Albert Dorsey. Georgias
Aft
RICHARD TRAPP
contributions are offensive tackle
Ed Chandler, defense end Larry
Kohn and defensive tackle Bill
Stanfill.
The three players from UF,
wjiich lost a Gator Bowl bid
when beaten by Florida State,
are all offensive performers
tailback Larry Smith, flanker
Richard Trapp and 248-pound
guard Guy Dennis.

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In Reitz Union. Todays Hours Are 9;30 12, 1-5

Record setting end Bob Good Goodridge
ridge Goodridge of Vandervilt and versatile
back Dicky Lyons of Kentucky
completed the offensive team.
Other defensive players were
end John Garlington of Louisi-
GUY DENNIS
ana State, tackle Jim Urbanek
of Mississippi, middle guard
Gusty Yearout of Auburn, line linebackers
backers linebackers D. D. Lewis of Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi State and Jimmy Keyes
of Mississippi and defensive back
Sammy Grezaffi of LSU.
With most other top SEC
quarterbacks layed up with in injuries,
juries, injuries, Stabler, the conference
passing leader with 100 comple completions
tions completions and 1,202 yards, won by a
whopping margin. Stabler was
kicked off the Alabama squad last
spring for nonconformity but
reinstated just before fall drills
began.
Goodridge, Trapp and Homan
make up what is probably the
finest pass-catching trio the All-
SEC team has ever had. Good Goodridge
ridge Goodridge holds the record for most
receptions 66 and yardage 1,009.
Trapp, who set the previous re record
cord record last year with 63-872, is
56-692 and Homan 52-809. All
three still have one regular
season game to play.
Smith led the SEC in rushing
last season and, with 713 yards,
is only 29 yards shy of his 1966
mark. But hell need a banner
day against Miami Dec. 9 to
overtake Steve Hindman of Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi who took a 53-yard lead
with a 215-yard performance

TRAPP, DENNIS SMITH

against Vanderbilt.
Hindman and Georgia fullback
Ron Jenkins, an All-SEC choice
last year, were both beaten out
by Lyons who leads the league
in scoring 73 points and punt
and kickoff returns and who is
among the leaders in rushing and
punting.
There are seven repeaters
from the 1966 team: Chandler,
Smith, Trapp, Urbanek, Year Yearout,"
out," Yearout," Lewis and Johns. All but
five of this years group are
seniors and there are no sopho sophomores.
mores. sophomores. The juniors are Smith,
Lyons, Hall, Stanfill and Dennis.
ATLANTA, (UPI) -- The 1967
United Press International All
Southeastern Conference football
team:
OFFENSE
Pos. Name School
SE Dennis Homan Alabama
TE Bob Goodridge Vanderbilt
LT Ed Chandler Georgia
RT John Boynton Tennessee
LG Guy Dennis Florida
RG Bruce Stephens Alabama
C Bob Johnson Tennessee
QB Ken Stabler Alabama
TB Larry Smith Florida
FI Richard Trapp Florida
FB Dicky Lyons Kentucky *
DEFENSE
Pos. Name School
E John Garlington LSU
E Larry Kohn Georgia
T Bill Stanfill Georgia
T Jim Urbanek Mississippi
MG Gusty Yearout Auburn
LB D. D. Lewis Miss. State
LB Jimmy Keyes Mississippi
LB Mike Hall Alabama
HB Albert Dorsey Tennessee
HB Bobby Johns Alabama
S Sammy Grezaffi LSU

Wednesday, November 29, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

mmmff BnhSL
On iSjt f **a v
< J| fP
BHV &
*"
*$ ': LARRY SMITH
The Gators All-SEC tailback latches on to a
pass against Kentucky.
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Page 19



Page 20

j The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 29, 1967

f New Library At UF
A Change From Past

Whatever happened to the old,
dreary, dark libraries, shroud in
silence and filled with musty
odors?
Like other relics of the past,
they are fast disappearing from
the American scene.
An example of the new li library
brary library that has risen up in its
place is the UF's Research Li Library.
brary. Library. Less than a year old,
the library represents a totally
new concept in college libraries.
The six-story Research Li Library
brary Library is a bright, airy structure
that gives an almost luxurious
appearance. Carpeted halls and
rooms muffle foot steps and the
cheerfully painted surroundings
seem to invite studying.
The Research Library, like
those at Cornell University and
UCLA, is new in that it is de designed
signed designed primarily for research
study by graduate students and
faculty members.
Since its use is more for

Flint Hall Anchors
Old And Forgotten

By DIANE MIMS
Alligator Correspondent
Somewhere on the sprawling
grounds of the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida are two 19th century ship
anchors, about which even the
old timers know nothing.
Located behind Flint Hall fa facing
cing facing University Ave., the twin
anchors are situated on stone
slabs, hidden by wild growing
bushes and ivy, apparently for forgotten
gotten forgotten with the passing of time.
The 193 C Seminole pictures
one of the rusted relics next to
the old entrance of Science Hall
(now Flint Hall).
The one-time Gothic entrance
to Flint Hall lias since been
bricked in.
Huge bushes on either side of
the old entrance conceal the mas massive
sive massive nine foot anchors.
The half ton, cast iron relics
were re-discovered last week
by a couple after Frolics.
Thousands of students walk by
the ancient structures everyday,
unaware that they even exist.
The apparent origin of this
oddity dates back to the time
when Florida State Museum was
located on the second floor of
Science Hall.
The museum lost contact with
the huge duo when it moved
downtown to the Seagle Building
in the 19405.
Those now in charge of the
museum were surprised when
asked about the anchors. Even
professors who are housed in
Flint and who have been at the
university numbers of years knew
little or lothing about the where whereabouts
abouts whereabouts of two anchors.

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research than studying, some
80 per cent of the 907-seat ca capacity
pacity capacity is in individual carrels
and cubicles which are assigned
to students and faculty. They are
located beside windows designed
to filter out a large amount
of direct sunlight.
Dr. Margaret Goggin, acting
head of University Libraries,
explained that the undergraduate
usually goes to the library for
studying. Therefore he needs ta tables
bles tables and easy chairs. The grad graduate
uate graduate student or faculty member
uses the library for" research
and requires a desk where he
can leave research books.
In the College Library or un undergraduate
dergraduate undergraduate section, there are
five reading rooms which allow
for more studying than actual
research work.
By studying our past re records,
cords, records, Mrs. Goggin said, We
found that the majority of under undergraduates
graduates undergraduates use a few books and

Research into the back files
by Dr. J.C. Dickinson, director
of the museum, revealed the
origin of the anchors, but failed
to give reasons for their place placement.
ment. placement.
The largest anchor, found in
1931, was raised from 22 feet of
water, 2,000 feet south of Gus
Baths in Palm Beach.
Capt. Gus Jordan found the
1,600 lb. sea relic, which mea measures
sures measures 97 high and 610 across
the fluke. Jordan, otherwise
known as the Cowboy of the
Sea, was one of the first to
spot the Spanish ship wrecks off
the coast of Florida.
The second anchor was dis discovered
covered discovered while workmen were
dreging sea walls at the mouth
of the St. Johns River in 1932.
Weighing approximately 1,000
lbs., the mass of rusted iron is
9* high and 9'3 across the
fluke.
Concerning the placement of
the anchors, Dr. Dickinson could
only say, They probably could
not be brought into the building,
so were left on the front steps.

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journals intensively. By separ separating
ating separating the libraries we have given
both undergraduates and grad graduates
uates graduates freer and easier access
to materials.
There are few books which
can be successfully tagged gra graduate
duate graduate or undergraduate so
most of the titles are in both
buildings.
The two buildings house more
than a million copies of books
and journals. Connected by a
breezeway, they form a part
of what will be the University
Library Center. The Research
Library is the first half of a
library which will eventually pro provide
vide provide for more than 2,000,000
volumes.
The Latin American and the
business administration collec collections
tions collections are still housed in the
College Library.
Among the collections in the
Research Library is the P.K.
Yonge Library of Florida His History.
tory. History. This is the most complete
collection of Florida history in
the world.
Also for the first time the
University of Florida Archives
has a section devoted to the
history of the University. This
collection includes papers of
University professors and docu documents
ments documents concerning the school.
The University Library sys system
tem system also includes 10 branch li libraries
braries libraries located in the various
colleges and schools on campus.
Material in these libraries and
reading rooms are devoted to
one particular field of study and
are usually not duplicated in the
main library complex.
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37 Students Named
To Phi Beta Kappa
UFs chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nations oldest scholastic
honorary society, has elected 37 students and graduates into member membersip.
sip. membersip.
New members include 12 seniors, 11 who will receive degrees
in December and one in March. Nineteen graduated during the spring
or summer trimesters and six of the new members are doctoral
graduates or candidates for doctoral degrees.
New members are:
Edna Louise Caruso, 4AS; Jaipes Allen Byrd, 4AS; Rickey Charles
Seid, 4AS; Richard Oliver Hire, 7AS; Bonnie Lynn Ragge, IMD;
Harold Vernon Davids, 4AS; Mrs. Karolyn R. J. Maslin, 4AS; Helen
Ann Weimer, 4AS.
Warren L. Bertner, 7HP; Roberta Ann Rankin, 7AS; Judith Ann
Smith,, 4AS; Sharon Cynthia Cohen; Alida Dorothy Wattles, 4AS;
Patricia Ruth King, 4AS; Mus. Susan M. Keirn, 4AS; David Franklin
Noble, 7AS.
Marilyn Elizabeth Maze, Martha Lee Sigvartsen, Ray Kaplan,
Peter Richard Stahnke, Mary Margaret Long, Mrs. Margot C.
Norris, Johnny M. Walbrick, Mrs. Ella Penn Scott Nayar, Mrs.
Jean E. Denbleyker, David Wendall Robson, Albert R. Marsico.
Gary Steven Corseri, Paula Lynne Rappoport, William Magnus
Cornette Jr., Robert Whitney Curry Jr., Jon Craig Spearman, Richard
F. Atnally, Stanley G. Deever, James C. Lundquist, Arthur W.
Herriott and Walter E. Meyers.

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