Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Millage Election Scheduled Tuesday

Alachua County voters will decide Tuesday on a pro proposal
posal proposal to increase millage for education from 13 to 14
mills.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has urged passage
of the millage request. The money spent by Alachua County
on its schools has a direct bearing upon UFs ability to
compete for quality faculty members and administrators,
he has said repeatedly.
OConnell pointed out that the quality of higher
education is dependent upon public support of the second secondary
ary secondary educational system.
Dr. Sam Martin, provost of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, has stated that he had three prospective nation nationally
ally nationally recognized faculty members refuse jobs with the
UF because of the school situation.
He reported that these men would have brought thou thousands
sands thousands of dollars in research grants had they come here,
thus creating new jobs and stimulating the educational
and economic vitality of the Gainesville and university
area.
Martin reported that one had resigned after accepting
the position here.

Weather
General ly Fair
High 60-65
Winds 10-20 MPH

Vol. 60, No. 30

1;# TICKETS ON SALEil||
Fall Frolics
Us All Soul l
By DIANE MIMS
Alligator Staff Writer
Tickets for the IFC sponsored Fall Frolics fea featuring
turing featuring Wilson Pickett, Carla Thomas, and the
Staple Singers go on sale today.
Tickets will be sold from 12-4:30 p.m. at the
Reitz Union box office for $3 per person.
The show will begin at 8 p.m. Friday in the Florida
gym.
This will probably be the biggest soul show
ever to hit the State of Florida, said Ira Lees Leesfield,
field, Leesfield, social chairman of the Inter-Fraternity
Council.
There will be 1,200 tickets available this year
for the general public, while 6,000 are reserved
for fraternity blocks.
LaSt year 1,200 Fall Frolics tickets were sold
in the first two hours.
Pickett; who is famous in the rhythm and blues
field, has sold over a million copies of In the
Midnight Hour 634-5789 and Land of 1000
Dances.
Miss Thomas has been singing for 17 of her
25 years, and is now represented on the record
charts by her duo with Otis Redding called Knock
on Wood.
Amen was the first hit by the Stapel Singers,
a gospel family group of four.
JgShR
fIIHL^ M jfrT raH
y' Wfw
WILSON PICKETT

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

All of the Alachua County School Board members ap approve
prove approve of the one mill increase.
School Superintendent W JS. (Tiny) Talbot said that the
increase is a make-do as far as he was concerned.
It will not give us the monies needed to establish
the quality educational program we desire, Talbot
said. However, if we had asked for the full 10 mills,
instead of the increase from three to four, it still would
not have done the job we really need. I feel that this is
adequate at this time, pending other state-wide develop developments,
ments, developments, he added.
Those who are allowed to vote in millage elections
include any property owners who have paid or will pay
a tax assessed for the current year, provided that the
property owner is qualified and registered to vote.
Voters can vote for any amount of mills from zero
to 10. The school board has recommended four.
Florida law authorizes school boards to levy up to
10 mills in ad valorem taxes for school support without
approval of the freeholders. Another law authorizes
school districts to hold referendums every two years

University of Florida, Gainesville

THE STAPLE SINGERS
CARLA THOMAS
... f
Wfk mL£

Fate Os Open Court Trials
To Be Determined Today

The Board of Masters, the direc directorate
torate directorate and policy-making body for the
Honor Court, meets today to determine
whether future Honor Court trials will
be open to the public and the press.
Honor Court Chancellor David Welch
announced last Wednesday that he would
open trials to the public starting Sunday,
but a petition for temporary relief filed
Thursday with the Board closed Sun Sundays

Leaders View
UF Problems
At Retreat
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Managing Editor
President Stephen C. OConnell and scores of student, adminis administration
tration administration and faculty leaders grappled with problems facing the univer university
sity university at the 10th annual Presidents Retreat held in Silver Springs this
past weekend.
Meeting with about 80 people, OConnell made an obvious effort
to learn more about the complex issues facing this institution.
The new president expressed particular interest in the problems
of counseling, mental health, parking, dormitory facilities, building
conditions and the new code of student conducts provisions for drinking.
OConnell, who came to the meeting to work out solutions to prob problems
lems problems and attack them if not solve them said the UF has many areas
of deficiency.
At a Saturday night banquet in Ocalas Braman Restaurant he called
for support and understanding at the university if these problems
are to be solved without a loss of state support for the UF.
The president stated the university community must pull together
or it will be torn asunder.
He emphasized that during his years here he will attempt to attack
the problems and find answers based upon reason.
Before broaching this topic OConnell attended a Saturday morning
meeting at the Silver Springs Convention Center where implementation
of the code of conduct and teacher evaluation were discussed.
Although no final measures were taken the possibilities of fratern fraternities
ities fraternities giving away free liquor at parties, food service vending liquor
and several other contingencies were discussed. The general attitude
toward the university getting actively involved in the sale of liquor
was cold and consensus seemed almost unanimous that fraternities
neither afford nor desire to dispense free alcohol.
Bob Imholte, presiding at the teacher evaluation session, heard
remarks calling for a concrete program to not only evaluate teachers
and courses but use this information to improve both.
At a Sunday morning meeting retreat participants discussed plans to
improve Lake Wauberg, end campus parking and auto congestion
problems, open honor court proceedings and fight the use of drugs such
as LSD and speed.

days Sundays trial so that the Board of Masters
could call a meeting before the trials
were opened.
In its meeting the Board of Masters
will make the decision on the value
and procedures of releasing names and
information on Honor Court cases,
which have in the past been kept
secret.
Welch, who indicated he still hoped

in which voters may be asked to tax themselves up to a
maximum of a second 10 mills.
Approximately 1,000 children arrive in Alachua County
each year. This adds up to 30 new teachers, 30 new
classrooms, a newprincipalandspecialstaffunits.lt also
means more school buses and drivers, maintenance men,
library books and miscellaneous expenses.
The school board does not always use all the millage
at its disposal. For example, in the first year of the 1965-
67 biennium, the board had 13 mills available yet spent
only 12.1 mills. In the second year it was forced to use
the full 13.
The amount of the millage to be levied will be decided
by a majority vote, or 50 per cent of the total votes cast
plus one.
If no single number receives a majority, beginning with
the highest millage (10) on the ballot votes are totaled
and carried down to the next lower figure (9) and added.
The process is continued until a figure is arrived at where
the cummulative total equals a majority.

Monday November 6, 1967

Inside
Jinx Still Unbroken,
Gators Fall, 26-21
See Details, P. 14

#
for open trials, nevertheless called the
action to close Sundays court cases
a correct decision.
*l think the action was rightly taken
because formal action was not taken
by the Board of Masters, Welch said.
I am satisfied that this was a correct
decision by the Board of Masters, and
I have honored it.



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

Page 2

sp OFFICIALS SAY 'NO
Honor Court-
A Law Lab?
By FRED McNEESE
The Honor Court, in its present operational structure,
depends on law students to function it. Thus it is open
to criticism that it is primarily a lab for law students.
There is a portion of the UF student body that con considers
siders considers the Honor Court as mainly a law school train training
ing training ground.
Robert Villa, 3BA, is typical-of students who voice
this thought. He does not consider the honor court
as really affecting him.
As far as I can see, Villa said. Its a place where
the law students can get good experience at the stu students
dents students expense.
Predictably, university administrators jump to the de defense
fense defense of the law students.
Robert Mautz, vice president for academic affairs,
said training law students is only a by-product of the
system.
I think the court accomplishes its primary function
of enforcing the honor system, Mautz commented. If
it also produces a side effect of training law students,
then I believe thats good.
SYSTEM DEFENDED
Lester Hale, vice president for student affairs, said
the law students played a vital and central role in the
functioning of the Honor System.
I certainly am very much angered by any rumor rumormongering
mongering rumormongering that the court is a lab for law students.
*' After a person is first reported to the court, he is
sent a letter of investigation and defense and prosecut prosecuting
ing prosecuting counsels are assigned. All members of the defense
and Attorney Generals staff are required to be law
students.
The Attorney General then conducts a preliminary
investigation and advises the chancellor of the court
by filing an information if the student should be formally
arraigned. The defendant then appears in person, re represented
presented represented by counsel, to plead to the formal charges.
SUMMARY TRIAL
If an information is filed and the student, on advice
of counsel, enters a plea of guilty, the chancellor
sets a date for a summary trial. At that time, the
defendant presents character witnesses and the Attorney
General presents pertinent facts about the case.
The Chancellor may at any time ask questions of
the counsel, witnesses, or the defendent. Determination
of penalty is made by the chancellor and two vice chan chancellors.
cellors. chancellors.
When the defendant elects to plead not guilty, the
Chancellor set a date for a formal trial. Prior to the
trial, a conference is held for the purpose of defining
the issues.
At the conclusion of the trial, the chancellor and two
judges will determine the penalty of the accused.

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The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator win not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for mor than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must tie given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALI.IGATOK is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
It ispublished semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla 32G01. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

ON JONES' TENURE CASE

Students Claim OConnell
I
'Has Evaded The Issue

By DEE DEE HORN
and JERRY SILBERBERG
Alligator Staff Writer
Thirty students who met with
UF President Stephen C. OCon OConnell
nell OConnell Friday afternoon said that
OConnell seemed to evade the
issue of the Marshall B. Jones
tenure case by claiming he had
no prior knowledge of the matter.
A second group of 20 students
waited in vain outside the Presi Presidents
dents Presidents office hoping to see OCon OConnell.
nell. OConnell. One member said he had
proof of a procedural error
concerning the Jones case.
OConnell ended his meeting
with the first group at 4 p.m.
There was no meeting with mem members
bers members of the second group.
The press was not permitted
to hear the discussion, however
Vice president Frederick W.
Conner explained the problem of
granting tenure.
Tenure is recommended to
the Board of Regents after a
series of recommendations has
been issued by the personnel staff
and from the president, Conner
said.
The Board of Regents never
acted on the case because there
was no recommendation from
former President J. Wayne Reitz.
In the case with Jones, the dis disadvantages
advantages disadvantages outweighed the advan advantages.
tages. advantages. Jones can appeal to the
Board of Regents for a review of
his case.
The second group of students
waiting to see OConnell were
hoping to use a charge of pro procedural
cedural procedural error in order to re reopen
open reopen the Jones case.
The AAUP fought to have the
records of the tenure trial cen censured
sured censured and OConnell has refused
to let students, or anyone else,

m

I Beverly Basick,
Dept, of Anthropology
Archetypical.
II The ritual of the Midnight Pudding Snack is
|| well established in primitive societies. Since
!| Shake-A Puddn does not require refrigeration,
|| it lends itself to use in dormitories (surely one
p of the most primitive societies), thereby
fulfilling this basic, instinctual human drive
I! at the precise moment it arises.
|f Harry Holesome,
px'J> Dept, of Health Education
The American Dream come true.
Shake-A Puddn combines healthful nutrition,
bracing exercise and, above all, Good Clean Fun.
|| An essential part of the Physical Fitness Program.
|| Sylvia Cimbill,
Dept, of Psychology
u. el Truly Freudian.
Powder and water are mixed in a cup, an
obviously mammalian formation, seen on a
H deeper level as Mother. One shakes the cup, in a
desperate but futile attempt to shake off the
||l inhibiting Superego and free the primitive Id.
|| Michael Media,
Dept, of Sociology
H II H A true product of the Electric Age.
Shake-A Puddn has transformed a fragmented,
pi time-consuming, mechanical task into
|| an almost instantaneous, totally involving
|| experience. Definitely "cool. Although

see a copy of Jones trial.
One student who left the meet meeting
ing meeting early gave the following state statement:
ment: statement: President OConnell will
be predicated only on questions
of procedural error. There is no
way to force him to let us see a
copy of the trial.
Sam Greenlaw, an economics
major who attended the meeting,
said, OConnell thinks he is
doing right by the school by
doing what the state wants; other otherwise,
wise, otherwise, theyll be down on his
neck. Students are powerless to

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Francine Factor,
w* 'll Dept, of History
Os tremendous historical significance.
Had Shake-A Puddn been discovered in the j i
18th Century, the French Revolution would I
probably never have taken place when it did. \ j
Marie Antoinettes famous remark, Let 'em eat |||
cake, would no doubt have been transformed | j
to Letem eat puddn, thereby appeasing 1 j
the masses for at least another century.
Shake-A I
the new instant
dessert mix from Royal.
Just put water and powder in the cup, snap I ;
the lid, shake'for 30 seconds and let it set. I |
In Chocolate, Vanilla, Butterscotch or Banana. I |
Each package complete with four puddings, | j

do anything about the issues at
hand and OConnells objective
isnt to please the students, but
rather the state.
The committee gave a press
release which stated: . . If
Dr. Jones leaves, it ydll anques anquestionably
tionably anquestionably be only to move on to a
better position with a better uni university.
versity. university. However, as students we
will be left with a faculty clearly
under the fear of dismissal if they
speak the truth as they see it,
in a university facing censure
from the AAUP. .



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Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

HC Weekend
Car Accident
Kills Miamian
Barry Leonard Caplan, 17, died
Friday of injuries suffered eight
days ago in an auto accident near
Fort Pierce.
Caplan, the brother of Alli Alligator
gator Alligator staff writer Arlene Cap Caplan,
lan, Caplan, had spent Homecoming
Weekend in Gainesville visiting
his sister and was returning
home to Miami with two pas passengers,
sengers, passengers, when he lost control of
his car.
The vehicle flipped over twice
and Caplan was thrown from the
car.
One passenger, Sherri Jo Men Mendel,
del, Mendel, 19, North Miami Beach is
in serious condition at Fort
Pierce Hospital, while the other
passenger, Catherine Amy Stein,
Miami, was released from the
hospital after four days.
Caplan, a senior at Miami
Norlan High School, was a prize prizewinning
winning prizewinning debator. He had planned
to attend the UF after graduation
from high school.
Jones Rally
Set For Wed.
A rally in support of tenure
for Dr. Marshall Jones will be
held Wednesday at 2 p.m. at
Tigert Hall. The rally will oc occur
cur occur one hour before the Execu Executive
tive Executive Committee of the American
Association of University Pro Professors
fessors Professors meets with UF President
Stephen C. O'Connell to discuss
the Jones case.
Standley K. Laughlin Jr., a
member of the executive com committee,
mittee, committee, said the AAUP will ask
O'Connell to grant tenure to
Jones.

jn- IQ's

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SNEAKY WEEK!..

SPEAKER TELLS STUDENT FEA== =======
'Few Problems From Integration

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor
Integration has not fostered any serious
racial problems in education, said William
Dandy, member of the Broward County School
Board, in a speech at Norman Hall Thursday
night.
Brought to the campus by the Florida
Education Association, Dandy advocated aca academic
demic academic freedom in elementary and secondary
schools.
If a high school wants to teach Black
Muslim philosophy, it should have the right
to do so,"said Dandy, a member of the Nat National
ional National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People."
Dandy emphasized the 1964 Civil Rights

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Law has not brought about any new race
problems in education.
For the first time, Broward County in integrated
tegrated integrated athletic contests this year," said
Dandy, and I have gone to seven integrated
football games and have yet to see a flare flareup.'
up.' flareup.' Dandy said problems exist but they
are in the classroom and not out in the
street. Dandy mentioned the white teacher and
Negro pupil relationship as one situation
that slows down Negro academic ad advancement.
vancement. advancement.
The Negro pupil feels he is not part
of the school. He is not allowed to mix'
into the white social club. He feels inferior
on the basis of academics many Negroes
have a tough time making the grades. Dandy
said.

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Thewhite teacher, on the other hand, has
a communication problem. The teacher has
trouble understanding the Negro dialect
his drawl.
Dandy said many experienced white
teachers are afraid to discipline the Negro
student for fear of being called a segre segretionist*.
tionist*. segretionist*. Dandy added lack of finances and
white parents pressure are other factors
that retard the normal advancement of the
Negro.
Dandy attributed the smooth transition from
total segregation to desegregation in part
to the social class of society. Upper Upperclass
class Upperclass Negroes and whites have the same
problems, he concluded.

dwiche



I ANTINORI CHARGES=
America Needs
Moral Renewal
State Atty. Paul Antinori of Tampa told UF law students
Friday that America desperately needs a moral renais renaissance.
sance. renaissance.
Condemning widespread riots and lawlessness which he
said has made 1967 a year of social upheaval, Antinori
laid much of the blame on families and schools which
spare discipline and foster agnostical thinking.
Said Antinori: We are in one hell of a mess and I
personally have always been an optimist. Our economy is
in a mess . government is in a mess . there are
hippies . LSD . marijuana parties ... a fast fastgrowing
growing fastgrowing crime rate.
The answer is we need a moral renaissance in this
generation. We need to get away from the teaching in
some of these universities that condone free love, free
behavior, child psychology which mocks stern discipline,
he remarked.
This encourages the youngsters to become hippies.
It makes for a mediocre society of nothings. Government
plays a significant role here! Domestic policies and do domestic
mestic domestic programs, depending on their pitch, depending on
their integrity, depending on their social soundness can
foster a nation of individually proud and sturdy people,
or a nation of mediocre equals . .
'EDUCATORS HAVE FAILED
Educators, in teaching students to think for themselves,
have failed to teach them values. He said there is nothing
civil about civil disobedience it is criminal behavior
when property is destroyed and people assualted.
Referring to the need for a moral renaissance, Antinori
called for stern discipline in the family and classroom
and emphasis of orthodox principles in class and life.
We must have the guts and foresight to put the brakes
on government spending . stand up to the rioters .
those who disrespect the sanctity of law and private pro property.
perty. property.
The Tampa state attorney reminded law students that
society cannot be made over with law. You cannot make
men equal with laws and there are politicians who think
they can make it so.
And, he warned them: Free men are not equal and
equal men are not free.
'HIS OWN DESTINY
In a free society man must and should to the greater
extent be left alone to work out his own destiny,, in a
free environment, exercising his free will, talent, amoition
and stamina, he added.
On the rising rate of crime, he had this to say: A
striking fact borne out by statistical studies is that most
crimes are committed by boys and young men. In my
humble opinion this puts the responsibility for mounting
delinquency squarely on the parents' shoulders lack of
parental control is the precipitating factor.
Fall Placement Day
Set For Educators

Representatives from elemen elementary
tary elementary and secondary schools
throughout the nation as well as
government representatives will
be on campus Dec. 12 for Annual
Fall Education Placement Day.

I pH
\ NOVEAABER 11, 1967 Q
g the university of florida
g alumni club of Jacksonville
g invites you to a roman feast
g . '. (well almost) ... at M
g the coliseum next to the M
g gator bowl before the flo- U
g rlda georgia football U
g bame. Please come. $2.25 Q
g per person. U
[ FLORIDA-GEORGIA
BARBECUE

The representatives will be
available to talk with seniors or
any other interested students in
the Norman gymnasium. Govern Government
ment Government representatives will be here
to discuss the overseas possi possibilities
bilities possibilities available.

Grad. A Fresh Fla. ar Ga.
FRYER BREAST QUARTERS
i|oV\ FRYER LEG or.
QUARTtRS ib.aJ Jy
HtW wm I^ u P er Delicious Fresh
\Sm3m GROUND 3*l oq
1 nrrr idc x
YEARS YOUNG | DLIT
'.-FIB
EXTRA SPECIAL A & P
BBBHB MAYONNAISE
I * lij 1 k w mV* I Jar
IM Lilli 49<
Extra Special All Varieties Betty Crocker Layer
CAKE MIXES 3 n.no
White Beauty A&P Brand Inst. Bright Sail
SHORTENING BREAKFAST BLEACH
SAVE 14< 22< r\r\
Olb. Cr> 6 PK 59i G., 39d
JcanJjV jug v

A & P Pure Cane Save 6<
SUGAR L l a b 49c
Our Own
TEA BAGS 64 b.t 49C
Ann Pagel2 ozottleSave 6<
CHIU! SAUCE 29c
A & P Canned Save 30<
EGG NOG 69C
A & P Pure 2 oz Can
BLACK PEPPER S l< '2SC
Soft Ply 10 Roll Pkg.
BATHROOM TISSUE 89C
4 Seasons Save 5<
SALT 26 oz Bo*
Coffee Save 4<
CREAMER 8 J ' 45C
Whitehouse 12 qt Pk.
INST. MILK 1.69
A & P 100 Save 39<
ASPIRIN tablets 19d

Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Luscious Golden Ripe
BANANAS Lb. 10c
Fresh Sweet Yellow
CORN 10 For 59c
f
Garden Fresh Long Green
CUCUMBERS 3/19c
US #One Russet Baking
POTATOES To 59c
At A St P we do care...
friendlier service
-/convenient to campus
-/better values
We appreciate your business...come
on in and let us prove it.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

The
Florida Alligator
UjwMjgSl§Sfj To Let The People Know
Steve Hull
?M
Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
a Managing Editor Executive Editor
Jawjmm
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor

The Florida Alligator's official position on Issues Is expressed
only In the columns below, other material In this issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist and not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically indicated.

\olr For Mills

Tuesday, Nov. 7, Alachua
Countys freeholders will
vote in a very important
millage election. Their
votes will determine the
future of local schools and
affect the future of the UF
On Oct. 25, Dr. Samuel
Martin, Provost of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Cen Center,
ter, Center, stated before a Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Area Chamber of
Commerce meeting that he
had three prospective nat nationally
ionally nationally recognized faculty
members refuse jobs here
because of the school sit situation.
uation. situation. Martin said these
men would have brought
thousands of dollars in re research
search research grants here had they
accepted jobs. He added
that one prospective mem member
ber member resigned after accept accepting
ing accepting the position here and
seeing the schools first
hand.
Neither a progressive
Gainesville, nor a grow growing
ing growing UF, can tolerate school
conditions as they are.
Gainesville High School,
Howard Bishop, Westwood,
Alachua Elementary and
many other area schools
are operating with severe
deficiencies. At Alachua
Elementary, for instance,
students are attending
classes in a canning plant
and at Howard Bishop
classes are being held in
the hallway and cafetorium.
The school board needs
more money to remedy the
situation. And, in the mill millage
age millage election, only the
voters, not the governor,
can veto better schools.
The mill is equal to one onetenth
tenth onetenth of a cent, or one
1000th of a dollar. Under
this system for every
SIOOO of property tax val valuation
uation valuation freeholders will pay
$1 of tax per mill.
The total millage rate in
Alachua County for the
1967-68 school year is 13
mills. This includes the
10 mills allowed by law
plus the three mills voted
in the last area millage
election.
The Alachua County
School Board is asking for
a vote of four mills. This

means that instead of a total
of 13 mills voters would
pay taxes at the rate of
14 mills. It is important to
note that four mills will
not be added to the current
tax rate. But, because of
constitutional stipulations,
voters must vote for four
mills if they wish to
increase educational reve revenues
nues revenues one mill.
Total cost of four m ills
to the voter would be $1
more per year for each
SIOOO of assessed property
value.
Four mills will just allow
Alachua County to keep up
with inflation and pupil
growth. Each year this
county adds 900 students
and 30 teachers to its eco economic
nomic economic burden. The addi additional
tional additional mill will barely ac accomodate
comodate accomodate this growth.
Four mills will not re reduce
duce reduce teacher-pupil ratios,
nor provide enough new
texts, nor decrease indi individual
vidual individual schools fees nor help
in many other areas.
But four mills will keep
the schools from sinking to
lower levels.
We urge university per personnel
sonnel personnel to vote for 10 mills
to offset the Kirk-type Re Republicans
publicans Republicans and others who
will be voting for zero
mills.
Millage is ascertained by
starting at the 10 mill point
on the ballot and counting
down. The mill in which the
majority of votes come is
the millage used. That
means that if 8000 free freeholders
holders freeholders go to the polls
(as they did in last years
bond issue) and then the
4001st vote down from 10
is in the four mill category
four finills will be used.
The constitution is
written that way.
So if you want better
schools for your children
and the children of all Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County get out and vote
for as many mills as you
can possibly justify. But,
please dont vote for less
than four mills or your vote
could be the one to set
education back in Alachua
County when it must move
forward.

~i^
>: 2 . fC.£ *'* v
'
- Ut
v k^bSKKom^s^
Now, Sir, In Your Opinion, What Was The Cause,
Last Summer, Os The Commie Riots?
PHOENIX WATCHES
Tenure For Jones?
BY IRA BRUKNER

The Sunday New York Times of Oct.
29, 1967 ran a story on the views of Yale
President Kingman Brewster regarding the
universitys chaplain and his strident efforts
in urging draft resistance.
According to the Times Mr. Brewsters
remarks were his first public response
to attacks from Yale alumni and faculty
members who disapprove of the Rev.
William Coffins encouragement of civil
disobedience as a protest against the war
in Vietnam. An outspoken advocate of
draft resistance, Coffin, 43, and a veteran
of WWII last week collected scores of
draft cards and turned them over to the
Justice Department during the anti-war
demonstration in Washington.
Mr. Brewsters following words are from
a speech he gave in New Haven Oct. 28,
at an assembly of fathers and mothers
gathered for Yales annual parents week weekend:
end: weekend:
I disagree with the chaplains position
on draft resistance and in this instance
deplore his style ... the chaplains effort
to gain spot news coverage seems to be
unworthy of the true trial of conscience
which touches most of your sons and pre preoccupies
occupies preoccupies so many . But we must not
supress or soft pedal the toughest moral
problems of our times out of timidity or
in the name of public or alumni relations..

WE APOLOGIZE
The Florida Alligator apologizes to the
women of Broward Hall for the column Ca Campus
mpus Campus Garbage, by P.J. Gladnick, which appear appeared
ed appeared in this space last Thursday. The column
was written in jest and was not intended
to be an insult We are sorry if the column
seemed insulting instead of funny. There is
no malice on the part of the Florida Alli Alligator
gator Alligator toward the women of Broward. We
hope they will forgive us.

the chaplain MUST BE ALLOWED TO DIS DISSENT
SENT DISSENT in the interest of maintaining a FREE
UNIVERSITY.
Mr. Coffin who happened to be in the
audience during the speech said to Times Timesmen
men Timesmen afterwards I am grateful for a presi president
dent president with whom one can disagree profoundly
and still remain friends.
Although New Haven isnt Gainesville this
writer asks President OConnell if he can
agree with President Brewster. Are you
interested in the diversity of opinion re represented
presented represented by Dr. Jones or are you in interested
terested interested in stifling dissent and narrowing
the outlook of this campus?
Isnt President Brewster just echoing
Voltaires statement that I may not agree
with the content of your remarks, but I
will defend to the death your right to say
them.
Enough philosophy. Facts. Can the leaders
of this university afford to ignore the re remarks
marks remarks of this Yale President speaking to
that Universitys 80,000 Alumni? Can this
university ignore his emphatic statement
that the chaplain must be allowed to dissent
in the interest of maintaining a Free Univ University?
ersity? University? In the name of academic excellence
and freedom it seems that we cant afford
to ignore these facts unless we want to
close the UF doors to the constitutional
right of freedom of speech.



OUT OFTHE~FRYING PAN...'

______
|rA 6ETTIN' OUODA Dlf/

OPEN FORUM:
J\(Liuml ViMwt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

Georgia Game Ticket
Hypocrisy Irks Him

MR. EDITOR:
Once again the Great Gods That
Be in the athletic office have
given the students the shaft. Its
not bad enough that we have to
turn cartwheels to get our foot football
ball football tickets, and then give a prayer
of thanks if this happens, but
now I find that after turning my
cartwheels, following all the
rules, and showing up at the ap appropriate
propriate appropriate time, my ticket to the
Georgia game has been sold.
This is the ticket that I was
required to pay for at the be begining
gining begining of the school year. Think
of the possibilities of this sit situation.
uation. situation. By selling one football
ticket two times, one could easily
be classified a financial whiz in
no time at all.
The thing that really irks me,
though, is the fact that I like
to watch football games, espec especially
ially especially those played by my
school. And the athletic depart department
ment department has done a wonderful job
of seeing to it that I cant watch
this game live.

Public Trial Cant
Replace Punishment

MR. EDITOR:
If Honor Court Chancellor
David Welch says the excess excessive"
ive" excessive" penalties handed down to
guilty students will be eased by
the addition of public spectators
during Honor Court trials, he
infers that since the inception
of the Court in 1914 that it has
been operating unfairly.
If the penalties have been as
Honor Court Chancellor Welch
says excessive," then they
should have been revised long
ago.
If he has mistakenly used the
word excessive in referring to the
handing down of penalties then the

Somewhere along the way it
was forgotten that college foot football
ball football is basically a game between
the students of one school and the
students of another, with out outsiders
siders outsiders possibly having the pri privilege
vilege privilege of joining those of us not
playing to watch the game. Some Somehow,
how, Somehow, we STUDENTS at the UF
have now become the ones who
have to feel grateful for the
privilege of sitting in with the
outsiders to watch OUR games.
Being a transfer student from
the University of Miami, I cant
help thinking how ridiculous the
whole ticket system is here. At
Miami you flash your ID only
as you walk in the night of the
game and it is immediately re recognized
cognized recognized that your admission was
payed for in full at the beginning
of the year. One time an attempt
was made to change their system
slightly and student uproar cur curtailed
tailed curtailed that idea immediately.
The Orange Bowl is the Orange
Bowl and Florida Field is Florida
Field, but no financial excuses
can make up for the fact that

just penalties should not be
lessened by the trials being made
public.
I have never heard of a judge
in a court being more lenient on
a guilty party in the passing of a
sentence just because his fellow
townspeople were present.
If this was done in those courts,
or in our own Honor Court, then
we are defeating the purpose of
public trials and we might as well
close them up again to see that
the right penalty is at least given
in private, rather than the wrong
one in public.
JUDITH R. FIELDS, 2UC

we students arent treated as we
should be, as number one cus customers
tomers customers and the reason for a foot football
ball football game in the first palce. All
we get are explanations about how
its even worse somewhere else.
Thats not much of a consolation.
If the athletic department
insists on continuing as they do
now, why be hypocritical about it?
Why dont they come right out
and tell the students to go to
hell and professionalize the foot football
ball football team?
STEVE KAHN, 4JM
Promises
Action
MR. EDITOR:
No one has felt the burden
of poor food and vending ser service
vice service more than the dormitory
student. The blame for such
inadequate service lies in
many places, including those
of us how have not found
time to investigate. There Therefore,
fore, Therefore, in order to explore the
complexities of the present
food and vending situation in
the mens resicence halls and
to alleviate existing diffecul diffeculties,
ties, diffeculties, the Mens Interhall Coun Council
cil Council has formed a Food Inquiry
Board consisting of repre representatives
sentatives representatives from Hume, Tol
bert, Graham, and Murphree.
In the coming year, this
Board expects to be very ac active
tive active in working with students,
administrators, and company
representatives toward a
more responsive system of
service.
LOU TALLY
CHAIRMAN, MIC FOOD IN INQUIRY
QUIRY INQUIRY BOARD

Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

CAMPUS COMEDY
The Prog Test
BY DUFFY
* This exam consists of 45 questions to be answered on the magic
scoring paper and use of an IBM machine scoring pencil. Skip
questions 27-30 since they have no relevent meaning to the exam.
Answer these questions at your own risk.
1. Botulism is caused by:
a. The university food service
b. your roomates bad breath
c. none of the above
2. A neutron is:
a. an electron with pituitary trouble
b. one that doesn't get as healthy a charge as the others
c. the man who discovered gravity
3. If grandma had wheels:
a. shed be a wagon
b. shed be the Little Old Lady from Pasadena
c. she owns a Buick
Key list for the following questions:
1. Both statements are true
2. If A is true B is false
3. A and B are both true so ignore answers C and D
4. If C and D are both correct you are in trouble
Questions:
1. Electrons that repell each other are:
a. offensive because one didnt use Zest
b. computerized dates
c. AC/DC
2. The limitations imposed by the Alper-Hull Theory of Probable
Uncertainty Principle forces us to assume and/or conclude that:
a. neither one knows what they are talking about
b. Papas got a brand new bag
c. go directly to question 48-50 since you have lost any
hope of passing this exam.
48. Thirty days has September, April, June and Nowonder. All
the rest have:
a. an inferiority complex
b. a superiority complex
c. no business being on the calendar.
49. This test makes me:
a. want to transfer to another section
b. makes me sick
c. no comment
50. The name of your section instructor is:
a. Little Orphan Annie
b. Betty and Veronica
c. Mugsy
d. cant read the name on the tombstone
GO BACK and read your work over again and.make sure that
there is only one answer to each box on the answer sheet.
Do not forget to fill in your I.D. number in the space provided.
Anyone forgetting to code in the honor pledge will not have
his exam graded.
END (of student and exam). S
Letters to the editor should be limited
to 300 words All letters must be signed;
however upon request the writers name
can be withheld Correspondence will be
subject to standard editing procedures so
that it complies with space limitations
ODE TO THE ALLIGATOR

MR. EDITOR:
Oh, Alligator, dear,
Youve done it now, I fear,
As anguished squeals from
Broward sty
Should make abundant clear.
Your phone has rung; Im
sure
Your answers were too poor
To satisfy the angry cry
Raised by your writing boar.
I feel take it from me
That some psychology
Would benefit the poor nitwit
Who so insulted we.
Perhaps his heart was
broke,

(The poor, demented bloke,)
By some young thing
Whose praise hed sing,
(Thought she thought it a
joke.)
We will not eat all stuff
You throw into our trough
And you have got a lot of
nerve
V
To feed us all this guff.
A wish for you were makin
For the offense weve taken:
May that Big Pig of
Happiness
Slap you with a side of bacon.
MELANIE RAY COOK, 2UC

Page 7



for sale
SCHWINN BIKE, like new, call
or come by and see any day
after 1:30, 376-0490. Apt. 229 U
Flavett HI (A-28-3t-p)
1966 HONDA 65cc FOR SALE.
$275 in excellent condition. Must
sell. Call after 7 p.m. 372-9128.
(A-28-3t-p)
DODGE, 1957, $125. Color TV,
$250. Full house air conditioner,
$l5O. May be seen at 1702 SW
Williston Road. (A-28-3t-p)
SUPER SABRE 1966 50cc, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, helmet in included.
cluded. included. May be seen at S.S.
next to Greyhound Sta. or call
372-6610 after 3 p.m. (A-20-5t-
P)
HOME HANDYMAN. 29 1/2 x
54 wide, walnut finished wood
fronts with 4 sliding doors. Many
uses. Super cheap $lO. each.
Have 18. Call 378-2825 after 4
PM. (A-29-3t-p)
35mm VOIGTLANDER camera,
A-i condition, with matching
case, lens adapter ring, green
filter only S3B. Call John at
2219 between 1:30-4 PM or 372-
3191 after 5. PM. (A-29-3t-p)
1965 HONDA 305 c.c. Electric
start, many extras. Can be seen
at the Post Office. Mint condit condition
ion condition $365. Firm. (A-28-a*-p>
for rent
ECONOMICAL LIVING one block
off campus; S6O per month room
and board; Collegiate Living Or Organization;
ganization; Organization; Apply 117 NW 15th
St. or call secretary 376-9420.
(B-29-llt-p)
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
4 bedroom house. Walking dis distance
tance distance to campus. $31.25 a month.
Call 372-3940. (C-29-3t-p)
MATURE STUDIOUS FEMALE
roommate wanted to share4bed share4bedroom
room share4bedroom home. Come by any time.
$45 per month. 1903 NW 45th
Avenue (C-29-3t-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share University Gardens Apt.
with 3. Others for remainder of
Fall Quarter. Move in immed immediately.
iately. immediately. $41.25 per month. Call
378-7763. (C-28-st-p)
WANTED: Spanish speaking stu student
dent student to teach beginning Spanish
to two children -- girl 9, boy
11 on campus of off. Fee open.
Call 372-1764. (C-30-st-p)
j help wanted j
NEED SALES LADY for ladies
department. Full time employ employment,
ment, employment, experience prefered but
not necessary. Apply in person
Silvermans, 225 West Univer University
sity University Avenue. (E-28-3t-c)
m* i>
WANTED: Student for approxi approximately
mately approximately 24 hours a week. Male,
21 years or over, mature. Apply
in person, Woodys Sandwich Shop,
3458 West University Avenue.
(E-28-ts-c)

CLASSIFIEDS

Page 8

help wanted
WANTED GO-GO GIRLS. Must
be 18 and over. Apply in per person.
son. person. Lamplighter Lounge, l NW
10th Ave. after 5 P.M. (E-28-
st-c)
HELP WANTED: WAITRESSES
needed from 5-12 p.m. Meals
and uniform supplied. Apply in
person at 2310 SW 13th St. No
calls Please (E-25-st-c)
STUDENT (Full or Part time)
Experienced in offset paste-up,
willing to work eveings, hourly
wage. Contact Sern Sekora, Stu Student
dent Student Publications, third Floor,
Union Bldg., after 6:30 P.M. to tonight.
night. tonight. (E-9-tf-nc)
| outos
CORVAIR MONZA SPYDER (150
hp) engine parts. Will sell from
turbo charger complete with ex exhaust,
haust, exhaust, to spyder crank or cam,
chrome gas lines, etc. (G-29-
3t-p)
1964 IMPALA 4 door sedan,
full power, air conditioned, radio
$1395. Call 378-5238. (G-28-5t-
P)
1961 FORD
Need cash, must sell. Will con consider
sider consider trade for small mobile
ome or lOOcc motorcycle plus
cash. 378-5460. (G-3t-p)
VW BUS 1965 Camper equip equipped.
ped. equipped. SIOO and take over payments
or best offer. Call John Funk,
378-4482 or Ext. 2737. (G-28-
4t-p)
CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE,
IMMACULATE, 378-1733 for ap appointment
pointment appointment after 5 p.m. (G-28-
st-c)
1961 CHEVROLET Impala Sport
Coupe. 348, three speed Hurst
shift, Sun tachometer, gauges.
$495 cash. FIRM! Gary Brown,
376-1737. (G-28-3t-p)
1963 CHEVROLET 2 door Bel
Air, 6 cylinder, radio and heat heater,
er, heater, power steering, original own owner,
er, owner, good condition S7OO. 11 lINW
First Place, Apt 4, or 481-2604.
(G-28-st-p)
1964 VW. Average appearance,
made up by warm, friendly per personality,
sonality, personality, good health. 372-3698
after 6 PM. $895 to responsible
party. (G-29-2t-p)
i 960 VOLKS WAGON VAN, con converted
verted converted into camper. Wood panel,
twin bunks, carpet floor, new
paint in and out $495. Call Dave
Rm 106, 372-9128. (G-29-6t-p)
VOLKSWAGEN 1966, Radio, very
clean. $1295. Call Daniel 376-
2967 or 376-8266. (G-29-3t-p)
| porsonol |
DEMOLAY CHEVALIERS-OB CHEVALIERS-OBSERVANCE
SERVANCE CHEVALIERS-OBSERVANCE DAY is November Bth
Call Dick Connell 378-3161 for
dinner plans. (J-28-6t-p)
StlPfflC 3 5
7-9
Out 10:35
if BRILLIANT!
fly The New Yorker
3L
PLUS "THE BIG SURF"!

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

j personal |
WILL CARE FOR CHILDREN
in my home Mon.-Friday. Ages
2-5 years old. Fenced yard and
play area. NE section. Good
references. 376-8523. (J-30-lt-
P)
CONGRATS PINNED LOOMIE LOOMIEARLENE.
ARLENE. LOOMIEARLENE. Love BOOP, EILEEN
& MARSHA. (J-lt-30-p)
Dear Great Pamkin: Thanks a
bunch from the bottom of our
stoumachs. Jim, Jim & Red. (J (J---30-lt-p)
--30-lt-p) (J---30-lt-p)
FOR A CHRISTMAS GIFT that
will be most appreciated and last lasting
ing lasting try a fine professional por portrait
trait portrait by Johnston Photography.
372-2512. Plan ahead, remem remember
ber remember the quarter ends Dec. 9,
1967. (J-25-lot-c)
PRE-WINTER SPECIAL. Free
battery load test and gravity
check. Auto Electric Service.
603 SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (J-25-
6t-c)
PAINT FOR FUN! General Oils
with Mrs. Hilda Elson. Eight
classes beginning November 7.
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7:30-
9:30 p.m. $8 fee. Call Univer University
sity University Extension 2741 for regis registration.
tration. registration. (J-28-3t-c)
JERI ESTES FOR LIMITED time
only will give S2O permanent wave
for $12.50. 372-5549. (J-28-st-c)

THRU FRIDAY-
j Telephone 378-2434 J | | j D. MJ MIJ H
I B 1 i-1 i -I - 1 I J II
I SuggetttdVorMaturetudiencti 11; IQ-. 3:15-5:20-7:30-9:40
r WhoVSulking? NOTTIs!
1 Just Because Some Booker In BIG JAX Made An Honest
Error And Booked This Pic In Another Theatre Ahead
Os Our Set Run Doesn't Mean We're Not Going To Play
| It As Advertised: starting Nov 15th
(Just call us the last of the BIG sports) It's A Great
Flick...We Hope You See It And Like It So Well You'll
| 1 i- AM II Ag.li It |j i> Al Tl.
I ESI 1
TIME 7 PM TECHNICOLOR PLUS
I Dean George Jean ;% I
Iraartin pepmrd Simmons
FLORIDA UNION
WAD Miff
Comes Alive On The Screen In I TechnicolorT] 1
AUDREY HEPBURN-HENRY FONDA-MEL FERRER :WAR PEACE
?BSS Hert ertLom -;^ H^; An,,aEkbef9 l*""Kuw
6'SUAN ...'SarSSa.w I MILLS vor woucin Rt msLHiED by pwukmii
FRIDAY 7:00

lost-found
REWARD FOR RETURN of silver
mug, lost at Vandy game, init initials
ials initials PRB. Call University Ext.
2771. (L-28-3t-p)
LOST NEAR KA HOUSE during
Homecoming game, small brown
pocket book belonging to Linda
Hooper. Reward of $lO. offered
for return with credentials. Call
Lamar 376- 1 188. (L-27-st-p)
T - 1 "" 1 1 11 '
LOST: Pair of Reading glasses
somewhere between Little Hall
and 106 NW 10th St. on Weds.
(Nov l), Theyre Ben Frank Franklin
lin Franklin type half glasses, call 376-
2476 anytime. (L-29-3t-p)
services ~j
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up and delivery on
and near campus. Call M & R
Tennis Services 378-2489. (M (M---160-10t-p)
--160-10t-p) (M---160-10t-p)
i
ALTERNATORSGENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical sys systems
tems systems tested -- repairs. Auto
Electric Service 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-8-Bt-c)

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or less, why you would Hj
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atras Sinatras Star Chair,
that was used during
the filming of .
tony I
rome I
Entries must be re received
ceived received by Tuesday,
Nov. 14tn. H
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Announcement of the
winner will be made
in the Friday, Nov. 17
issue of the Florida
Alligator.
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Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are expect expected
ed expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
CEH 131: Tuesday, Nov. 7
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with (A) report to
Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D) to Little
121 or 125; (E) to Little 113;
(F) to Little 227, 233 or 235;
(G) to Peabody 101, 102, 112
or 114; (H) to Peabody 201, 202,
205, 208 or 209; £i-J) to Flint
110 or 112; (K) to Walker 301,
303, 307 or 308; (L) to Little
201, 203, 205 or 207; (M) to
Little 213, 215, 217, 2i9, 221,
223 or 225; (N) to Little 237;
(O) to Little 239; (P-Q) to Flint
101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V)
to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CEH 132: Tuesday, Nov. 7
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 102, 105, 108, H 2, H 3,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.
MS 101: Thursday, Nov. 9,7
p.m. All MS 101 students report
to Little 121.
MS 102: Thursday, Nov. 9,7
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-F) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (G-L) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, H 2, H 3,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
i(M-R) to Little 101, 109, 113 or
125; (S-Z) to Little 213, 215, 217,
219, 221, 223, 225 or 227.
MS 204: Thursday, Nov. 9,7
p.m. All MS 204 students report
to Walker Auditorium.

Monday, November 6
Univ. Medical Guild: Antique
Fair, 441 South and Williston
Rd., all day
Hillel and S.E. Region Conference
of American Rabis: The Col Collegian
legian Collegian Asks, 16 N.W. 18th
Street, 6:30p.m. Reservations,
372-2900
Program Office: dance lessons,
245 Union, 7 p.m.
Swim Fins and Aqua Gators:
practice session, Fla. Pool,
7 p.m.
Union Movie: War and Peace,"
Union Aud., 7 p.m.
Soils and Agronomy Club: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 206 McC, 7 p.m.
Dairy Science Club: John Nord
and Sam Sweat, Federal Milk

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Administrative Notices

SPEECH SCREENING TESTS:
All teacher education majors, re regardless
gardless regardless of College enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or en enrolling
rolling enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE
30C 301, and 302). English and
speech majors do not take the
test as SCH 201 is required in
all of their programs. Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in
Room 214 Norman Hall. The test
will be for a two-week period
only.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID:
Applications for student financial
aid for the academic year 1968-
1969 in the form of scholar scholarships,
ships, scholarships, loans, grar.ts and student
employment, may be obtained in
Room 182, Bldg. E. Deadline date
for filing applications is Feb.
28, 1968.
THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS:
Thursday and Friday, Nov. 23-24,
will be official holidays for
students, staff and faculty. The
holiday will begin after classes
on Wednesday, Nov. 22 and
classes will resume Monday,
Nov. 28. All offices will be closed
except those essential units which
will operate with a minimum
staff. Employees in these units
will be authorized to receive
equal time off as convenient.
GENERAL
NOTICES
SEMINOLE PICTURES: Pic Pictures
tures Pictures for the SEMINOLE of the
graduating seniors in the colleges
of health related professions,
journalism and communications
and forestry will be taken Nov.
6-10 in Room 346 of the Reitz
Union from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
and 6 to 9 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Cost is $1.50 per person.
Boys are requested to wear coat
and tie, and girls should wear
collarless tops with round neck necklines
lines necklines that will photograph in a
dark color.

Marketing Orders in Florida,"
201 Dairy Sci. Bldg., 7:30p.m.
Student Physical Therapy Assn.:
meeting, A-91 MSB, 7:30 p.m.
All interested lower classmen
urged to attend.
Society of Automotive Engineers:
program on auto safety, 211
MEB, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 525 E&I, 8 p.m. All per persons
sons persons interested in amateur
radio are welcome.
Tuesday, November 7
Univ. Medical Guild: Antique
Fair, 441 South and Williston
Road, all day
MSC 260-261: placement exam,
108 Bldg. R, 2:30 p.m.

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

THE ALACHUA COUNTY AS ASSOCIATION
SOCIATION ASSOCIATION FOR MENTAL
HEALTH and the DEPARTMENT
OF PSYCHIATRY will hold the
annual awards banquet, Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Nov. 9, at 6:45 p.m. in the
J. Wayne Reitz Union Ball room A.
The cost is $3 per person. For
reservations call 372-9809.
Floyd Christian, State Superin Superintendent
tendent Superintendent of Education, will speak
on Relationship of Education to
Good Mental Health."
VETERANS: There are now
over 1,100 former Gls enrolled
as full-time students. Join and
support the University of Florida
Veterans Club, the only group
on campus working to help vet veterans
erans veterans with GI Benefit problems.
Contact Ron McFaddin, presi president,
dent, president, at next meeting, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 8, in the Reitz
Union.
ATTENTION COEDS: Nov. 10
is the deadline for getting ap applications
plications applications in for the Florida
Coed staff. Florida Coed is
the WSA freshman booklet ex explaining
plaining explaining campus activities and
policies. Applications may be
obtained from a WSA represent representative,
ative, representative, dorm counselor or at the
Dean of Womens office.
ATTENTION GIRLS: Anyone
interested in working as a pin pinstriper
striper pinstriper should contact the dir director
ector director of nursing at the infirmary.
Girls should be signed up by next
week.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at the J.
WAYNE REITZ UNION, ROOM
22. All companies will be re recruiting
cruiting recruiting for Dec., Mar., June and
Aug. graduates unless indicated
otherwise.

Discussions on India: Music
of India" 123 Union, 3:30 p.m.
Anyone interested is welcome
Education Lecture: Dr. Edwin
Kurth, Vocational Technical
Education," 137 NRN, 4:40
p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
social hour and dinner, Holi Holiday
day Holiday Inn, 6:30 p.m. All those
single and over 21 invited.
Union Movie: War and Peace,"
Union Aud., 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: chapter meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun: oil painting,
118 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Socialist Union Movie: The
War in Viet Nam," MSB Aud.,
8 p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

NOV. 6: DEPARTMENT OF THE
NAVY. EE, ME, CE, AE, SE,
Met.E., Physics, Math. Must be
U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6: OWENS CORNING
FIBERGLAS XORP. Ch.E., CE,
Cer.E., EE, ME, Bus. Ad. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6: HERCULES INCORPOR INCORPORATED.
ATED. INCORPORATED. Ch.E., Chem., ME, IE,
EE.
NOV. 6: GENERAL ELECTRIC
CO. Chem, Physics, Math, Eng Engineering.
ineering. Engineering.
NOV. 6: U.S. Phosphoric Pro Products.
ducts. Products.
NOV. 6: COLLEGE LIFE INSUR INSURANCE
ANCE INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA.
All majors. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6: FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI. Fin., Bus. Ad., Econ.,
Lib. Arts. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6: LEVER BROTHERS CO.
Mktg., Bus. Ad. Must be U.S.
citizen.
NOV. 6,7: EASTERN AIRLINES:
Bus., Lib. Arts, Science Engi Engineering.
neering. Engineering. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6,7: SHELL COMPANIES.
Chem. and Ch. E. Doctorates
only. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6,7: UNION BAG CAMP
CORP. Bus. Ad., Acctg., Ind.
Mgt., Journ., ME, Forestry, Ch.
E, EE. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 6,7, 8: IBM CORP.
All majors.
NOV. 7: THE UPJOHN CO. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 7: U.S. NAVY MINE DE DEFENSE
FENSE DEFENSE LABORATORY. ME, EE,
Physics. Must be U.S*

Concert: Univ. Symphony Or Orchestra,
chestra, Orchestra, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, November 8
Univ. Medical Guild: Antique
Fair, 441 South and Williston
Road, all day
MSC 260-261: placement exam,
108 Bldg. R, 2:30 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Buried Cit Cities,"
ies," Cities," and Rembrandt: Poet
of the Light," 105 AFA, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: meeting, 363
Union, 7:30 p.m. Everyone
welcome, no experience neces necessary
sary necessary

Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

NOV. 7: THE PROCTOR &
GAMBLE CO. Doctorate and Post
Doctorate in Chemistry.
NOV. 7: CONTINENTAL OIL
COMPANY. Ch.E., ME, CE,
Chem., Math, Physics, EE. Must
be UJS. citizen.
NOV. 7: SOUTHWIRE CO. EE,
ME, IE.
NOV. 7: INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NORTH AMERICA. Bus. Ad.,
Lib. Arts, Tech.
NOV. 7: TENNESSEE CORP.
Chem, Ch.E., CE, ME. Must be
UjS. citizen.
NOV. 7,8: FORD MOTOR CO.
ME, EE, IE, Met.E. Ch.E. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 7,8: NORTHROP CORP.
AE, EE, ME, Math.
NOV. 7, .8: CHICAGO BRIDGE &
IRON CO. CE, ME.
NOV. 7,8; REPUBLIC STEEL
CORP. EE, ME,Ch.E.,Ind. Mgt.,
Met.E.
NOV. 7,8: EASTERN ENGINEER ENGINEERING
ING ENGINEERING CO. ME, EE, ChE, CE
WARNER ROBINS AIR MAT MATERIAL
ERIAL MATERIAL AREA. CE, EE, IE, AE,
ME. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 7,8: U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE. Acctg., Law.
Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 7,8: UNITED AIRCRAFT.
Acctg. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 8,9: DEPARTMENT OF
THE NAVY: CE, EE, IE, ME,
Sanit.E., AE, Acctg, Bus. Stat.,
Gen. Bus., Ind. Rel., Ind.Mgt.,
Econ., Mktg, Fin. Must be U.S.
citizen.
NOV. 8,9: WESTING HOUSE. ChE,
EE, IE, ME, NE, Eng. Sci.,
Met.E., Eng.Mech. Must be U.S.
citizen.
UF Veterans Club: general meet meeting,
ing, meeting, and nomination of officers,
355 Union, 8 p,m.
Union Forums Comm.: Andy
Warhol, Pop Art, Univ.
Aud., 8 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing
Union Terrace, 8 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: aud auditions,
itions, auditions, 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
8 p.m. Talent wanted come by
or call Bob, 372-9663.
v
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for ANDY
WARHOL, FROLICS AND
JACK & SALLY JENKINS.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

-JL I!fw^^y^NsPKg^rtpiTVS^Pe6^^ <;: ; *.WMf .I*' AmW Y 4
THE GRAVEYARD
The University Police have a fine collection
of antique relics, formerly bicycles, decorating
the back yard of the station. The lost bikes are
periodically auctioned for sale.
2 Students Burned
In Dormitory Fire

Two UFfreshmeft were slightly
burned extinguishing a fire which
severely damaged Room 405 in
Weaver Hall Sunday afternoon.
Wolfgane Iwanski and Ted Me
Kercher were treated for first
and second degree burns which
they received while trying to put
out the spreading fire.
The campus police department
said they did not know the precise
cause of the fire, but that it
apparently started on the north
side of the room and was fed
by burlap bags which Iwanski had
constructed into a false ceiling
and walls.
McKercher and Iwanski were

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assisted by other residents of the
floor who fought the flames with
three fire extinguishers and an
emergency fire hose.

S Hobie Surfboards
ONeill Wet Suits
Kanvas by Katin
baggies
The Shore
Surf Shop

Dialogue Group Reviews
Teacher Evaluation Plan

Teacher evaluation by students
started by the student govern government
ment government on a trial basis in Decem December,
ber, December, 1966, and repeated in April
1967, received favorable com comment
ment comment from faculty and adminis administration
tration administration at last weeks Dialogue
meeting in the Reitz Union.
One speaker called the pro program
gram program a helpful and constructive
thing to have happen.
Speakers at the program were
Robert B. Mautz, vice president
of academic affairs; Dr. Lester
L. Hale, vice president of student
affairs; and Dr. Austin B. Creel,
associate professor of religion.
Bob Imholte, who headed the
evaluation program in December,
1966, said that problems such
as programming of the comput computers
ers computers and lack of SG personnel
had delayed results from being
delivered to participating faculty
members at an earlier date, but
said it could be a successful
program.
I thought it could be a very
helpful and constructive thing to
have happen, that is, to have
students evaluate faculty, said
Mautz. I would not say it was
the only way of indeed always the
valid way, but a helpful way.
Hale then commented that some
evaluation by students is now
taking place, due to students
taking a course or not taking
a course depending on who was
teaching it.
The panelists then noted that
the administration has no sys-
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tematic way to evaluate the teach teaching
ing teaching ability of its faculty mem members.
bers. members.
There is nothing except the
word and judgment of coll colleagues,
eagues, colleagues, said Creel.
According to Mautz, faculty
members can often get an idea
of how organizedor how verbose
a professor is in class by watch watching
ing watching him perform in faculty meet meetings.
ings. meetings.
You cannot generalize that
a person who is poor on one
level is poor on all levels,
said Hale. For example, a man

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CAREERS IN STEEL
BETH&
jJ-
Our representative will be on campus
NOVEMBER 9
to interview candidates for Bethlehems 1968
Loop Course trainihg program.
THE LOOP COURSE trains selected col college
lege college graduates with management potential for
careers with Bethlehem Steel. The Course begins
in early July and consists of three phases:
(1) orientation at our headquarters in Bethlehem,
Pa.; (2) specialized training in the activity or
field for which the Looper was selected; and
(3) on-the-job training which prepares him for
more important responsibilities.
OPPORTUNITIES are available for men in interested
terested interested in steel plant operations, sales, research,
mining, accounting, finance, and other activities.
DEGREES required are mechanical, metal metallurgical,
lurgical, metallurgical, electrical, chemical, industrial, civil,
mining, and other engineering specialties; also
chemistry, physics, mathematics, business ad administration,
ministration, administration, and liberal arts.
If you expect to be graduated before July, 1968,
and would like to discuss your career interests
with a Bethlehem representative, see your
placement officer to arrange for an interview
appointmentand be sure to pick up a copy of
our booklet Careers with Bethlehem Steel and
the Loop Course. Further information can be
obtained by writing to our Manager of Person Personnel,
nel, Personnel, Bethlehem, Pa. 18016.
BETHLEHEM STEEL
An Equal Opportunity Employer
in the Plans for Progress Program

can be a good graduate teacher
but be poor in sections of the
fundamentals.
Hale said he felt a professor
with long standing and experience
with students and subject matter
should consider it a high priv privilege
ilege privilege to be able to teach sev several
eral several sections of fundamental
courses if he is qualified to do
it.
A fundamental course offers
the best opportunity to work with
the individual student, Hale con continued.
tinued. continued.



UFs Libraries Facing
Space, Money Problems

Every UF library is running out
of space, the budget for new books
and periodicals has been cut, and
the overall budget increase has
not compensated for the growth
of the library system.
These are some of the prob problems
lems problems facing UF libraries system,
which circulates books world worldwide,
wide, worldwide, according to Dr. Margaret
K. Goggin, acting director of the
library.
Space, according to Mrs. Gog Goggin,
gin, Goggin, is the biggest problem.
Whereas most library systems
of this size spend $6-8 million
for research library facilities,
the UF has spent only $2.25
million for the new Graduate
Research Library.
The basic standard for a
library system is based on pro providing
viding providing seating space for 25% of
the students and faculty. We do
not meet this standard.
The new research library has
only 34 cubicles for individual
work, added Mrs. Goggin, we
had requests for 68.
These cubicles are used by
faculty members who are writing
books or doing individual re research
search research work.
A subcommittee of the Li Library
brary Library Committee has been work working
ing working for a year to find the best
approach to meeting building
needs," Mrs. Goggin said.
Plans now call for enlargement
of the research library and addi additions
tions additions to the College Library to
bring its total number of vol volumes
umes volumes up to 500,000 from the
pressnt 100,000.
The Board of Regents is
aware of our needs," said Mrs.

ATTENTION
SOCIAL CHAIRMEN
PRESTON
ENTERPRISES
PRODUCTIONS.
is Now taking bookings for the Winter
and Spring Quarters on the following
groups:
9 H 3|C GENTRYS
RON & STARFIRES
4C THE EPICS
NATION ROCKING SHADOWS
-J 4C CERTAIN AMOUNT
4c J-K & J-U-G
4? WHITFIELD UNION
NIGHTCRAWLERS
jjC HAIRY FOOTSTOMPERS
(from Doogie, Miss.)
Don't let your fraternity get left out In the cold
without that special group again next quarter. For
bookings call Preston at 378-4318 or Woody at
376-4756 now. For those hurtin* social budgets,
special group package deals are available from
Preston Enterprises Productions. Don't wait until
its too late to book any or all of these groups
for your Winter Social Calendar. Special assistance
available for that special fraternity or sorority
weekend.
In addition to above for The Birdwatchers, Billy
Joe Royal, The Other Side, Candymen, The Kords,
The Swingin' Medallions and many more can all
be "booked by calling Preston at 378-4318 or Woody
at 376-4756 now. The best is always available
from Preston Enterprises Productions.
.V. W. .T. t*VV\ *.**. i ill

Goggin. However, no immediate
construction is planned.
The library budget came in for
criticism by Mrs. Goggin. She
noted that the budget for books
and periodicals for this year was
slashed $34,750 from last years
budget, which she described as
also inadequate.
The total budget for books,
periodicals and binding work for
all campus libraries except Law,
Health, and Food and Agricul Agricultures
tures Agricultures libraries is $362,000,
she said, we buy 9,000 period periodicals
icals periodicals alone. The Board of Regents
proposed a more adequate budget,
but it was vetoed by the govern governor.
or. governor.
How does the UF library sys system
tem system compare with other li libraries?
braries? libraries?
The UF library belongs to the
Association of Research Libra Libraries.
ries. Libraries. This is a national organi organization
zation organization which various libraries
compete to belong to. Among
other members are Duke, Yale
and Harvard, said Goggin.
The average number of vol volumes
umes volumes in these libraries is
1,612,000 compared to the UFs
1,140,000. These libraries add
an average of 93,000 volumes
each year compared to the
UFs 65,000.
Operating expenses for the en entire
tire entire system for this year are
$1,759,381 compared with $1,580,
048 for the 1965-66 budget. Al Although
though Although there is a modest in increase,
crease, increase, Mrs. Goggin pointed out
that since 1965-66 the research
library has been added and that
the budget has not allowed for
the addition of any new employ employees.
ees. employees.

We are operating two li libraries
braries libraries with the same budget
and personnel as when there was
just the one.
Do these inadequacies mean
that the UF library system does
not meet standards for accredi accreditation?
tation? accreditation?
The UF is far above the min minimum
imum minimum for accreditation by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Secondary schools, said
Mrs. Goggin. We are pretty
respectable in the Southeast and
have gained a good national rep reputation.
utation. reputation.

11 ~
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jfy§|| mKmr
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BaHI I
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The Nottingham odd jacket. .unpadded tailoring
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unique colors and texture, woven on the finest
domestic and imported woolens. We cordially
invite you to look them over.
from $55.00
Norman Hilton odd jackets from S9O
Number 6 Main Street South

Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

I Symphony Concert Tuesday
The UF Symphony Orchestra will play in concert Tuesday at
8:15 p.m. in the University Auditorium.
Directed by Edward Troupin, the orchestra will present the over overture
ture overture to The Flying Dutchman by Wagner, the suite to the ballet,
The Incredible Flutist," by Piston and Beethovens Fourth Sym Symphony.
phony. Symphony.
The Council of Concerned Graduate Students in the
Foundations of Education advocate a review of the
denial of tenure for Dr. Marshall Jones.
Curtis Hamrick
Chairman

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

BY-LINE: ~|jp^
JOE TORCH IA
> J§|
r-4
S
Features Editor
We met at the ofallplaces airport. Were he just. And I just. So
we just met at the airport.
Because he was going and I was gone -- but only to different
places.
Christmas: time to go home, to relax, to get away from the ugly
routine of classes, to wish you were back before you get there..
Last time I came back I flewl remember the airport was crowded,
crowded with servicemen and nuns and women-with-short-aresses
and happy-crying-people and unhappy-crying-people and sighing-people
and buying-people and yes, even dying-people. And him.
I never did get his name. Nor his rank and serial number for that
matter. All I got was that he was 18, had recently finished boot bootcamp
camp bootcamp and was returning from a Christmas visit with his family.
Its funny how you meet people when youre travelling people
you dont remember yet people you never forget. It was at the ticket
counter when he asked me for a light and he started talking and found
out we had the same flight and decided to get a cup of coffee since
we had an hour until take-off.
We were on our second cup before I found out he was going to
Vietnam.
Why? was my stupid reply. But Jesus, what do you say when
someone tells you hes going to Vietnam? Have a nice trip (or)
wish I were going with you (or) send me a postcard when you get
there.

Who knows why, was the
reply. Yea, who knows why.
He told me about Mary-back Mary-backhome
home Mary-backhome and Mother being upset and
Christmas dinner and the whole
home-family-mother bit every
American is supposed to cher cherish.
ish. cherish. He told me a lot of things,
a lot of things I dont remem remember,
ber, remember, a lot of things I wish I
could remember, a lot of things
I wish I could forget, a lot
of things.
Then he asked the inevitable:
Where you going?
Then I told him a few things,
trying not to say too much.
then FLIGHT 263 IS NOW
LOADING AT GATE 10
then we left a tip
then we argued over whod pay
the check
then we were in the line: the
scattered-goodbyes line, the
noisy line, the pushing line
then we were separated before
I realized what had happened be before
fore before I could say goodbye before
we could shake hands before it
hit me that I was going first firstclass
class firstclass and he wasnt and we
couldnt sit together
And that was the last I saw
of him.
We were high above the clouds
and the sun was hot, termend termendously
ously termendously hot in spite of the snow
we left on the ground, and the
woman beside me looked ill as
she fanned herself with emerg emergency
ency emergency instructions and held her
left hand to her stomach.
And I thought: yes, we shared
for whatwasit? a century
on my new, second-hand-from second-hand-frommy
my- second-hand-frommy brother- Timex intimacies;
yes, we shared differences until
it was time when we would. And
we did. But he was ging away
to die, and I to cry and why,
why did it take so long -- why
wasnt it until he went to the
front and I to the rear that
I realized we were one.
Then we hit an air-pocket and
the woman beside me jumped up
and ran to the restroom with
her hand over her mouth.

NOW OPEN!
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
1 T GAINES VILLE MALL SHOPPING CENTER
"V--
|

Come and discover how you can now enjoy
delicious food in beautiful surroundings at mod moderate
erate moderate cost!
At the new Morrisons, with its turn-of-the-cen turn-of-the-century,
tury, turn-of-the-century, village green decor, you'll think youre
dining out of doors in a handsome walled and
tree-lined garden.
Visit Morrison's twenty-seventh Florida cafeteria
soon and enjoy the wonderful food and the
speedy, courteous service which have made

SERVING HOURS
Lurtch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Dinner 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
t i -
AMPLE FREE PARKING!
'

Gainesville Movie Rating

* good
** very good
*** excellent
**** superior
IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT.
Sidney Poitier, Rod Steiger. Phil Philadelphia
adelphia Philadelphia Negro cop helps Missi Mississippi
ssippi Mississippi sheriff solve murder.
Typical Poitier, sensational Stei Steiger.
ger. Steiger. Now at the Plaza. **
ENDLESS SUMMER. Two
surfers search the world for the
perfect wave. Unless youre a
surfer, you hope theyll find it
so the flick will end. Excellent
photography saves this one. Now
at the State.
ULYSSES. Literal, unbleached
Joyce from beginning to end
a great attempt at capturing his
stream of conscioisnes.. Now
at the Florida. ***
POINT BLANK. Lee Marvin

Talent Agency
for Gainesville
The Complete Booking Agency
Call TAG 378-4314

wages a mysterious vendetta
against the underworld, aided by
Angie Dickinson. Now at the Cen Center.
ter. Center.
WAR AND PEACE. The film
version of Tolstoys masterpiece
opens at the Reitz Union tonight.
Stars Audrey Hepburn, Henry
Fonda, Mel Ferrer. Not reviewed
at press time.
The Alligator review staff was
asked, Dont you see any bad
flicks?
Although good is the lowest
rating they have, they will give
no star to a movie that deserves
none meaning it is not even
good.

,* me \
y fve \
PRINTS Ml FOSTERS
New Different Exciting Wild Cool Calm and Ttj
All this and more at 1634 W. University. Next to Carolyn Plain.

Morrisons Cafeterias famous throughout the
Southeast for almost half a century.
At lunch or dinner any day youll find all the
ingredients of happy eating JJ/
so stop in scon and . .BGnSpPy*
MORRISON'S
CAFETERIAS
GAINESVILLE MALL SHOPPING CENTER

However, the staff believes
that usually there is something
good in the worst flick, and some something
thing something bad in the best.
In rating Gainesville movies,
the staff tries to be as object objective
ive objective as possible: a family flick
is rated as a family flick and
art flick as art flick, each in
its own catagory.
In other words, someone may
consider a good" (*) art flick
better than a very good (**)
family flick but since the
family flick has succeeded better
in its catagory, it gets a higher
rating.



'...The Smoke I
Is Still Thick
By STEVE ROBITAILLE
Alligator Feature Writer
(EDITOR'S NOTE: A fire caused much destruction to Room 403
Weaver Hall when it accidentally started early Sunday afternoon.
Alligator Feature Writer Steve Robitaille, who lives down the hall
from the scene of the fire, was thereat the time here is his story.)
I can't read my writing from crying. The smoke is still so thick
its even difficult to see across the room.
I was studying for my English Prog when I heard the sound of
breaking glass and furniture being thrown against the wall of a room
down the hall. At first I thought it was a fight or somebody was drunk,
but as the sounds increased I knew that something was wrong.
The minute I stepped out of my door I could see the flames and
smoke filling the hall. Mattresses, clothing, personal belongings
of all shapes, sizes and values were being battered and destroyed
by residents of the floor in order that the fire would not spread.
I wasn't really scared at first, everybody was standing there looking
for something to do, and it didn't occur to me that the whole floor
might go up.
But then I saw the flames. I saw Wolfgang tearing down the burlap
walls and ceiling he had constructed in his room. I heard the glass
door of the fire-hose being shattered down the hall and I was scared.
Hell, my room was only two doors down.
The two roommates were in a state of shock, their beds were in
flames, the floor was covered with broken glass and black sooty
puddles and the fire still refused to go out.
At one point we thought we had put the fire out completely, but we
failed to notice that the bottom of one of the beds was still burning
with red intensity.
More hoses, more fire extinguishers, more screaming.
Funny that right in the middle of a fire I woijld be listening to the
comments of the observers, but at the time I found them ironically
nteresting.
Hey, anybody got any marshmallows. (And somebody races in the
room and pulls out a burning mattress.) I gotta prog to study for,
would you please cut out the racket. (Wolfgang falls from exhaustion
on a soaking wet mattress) This is really neat, we should do this more
often. (Someone tries to collect water in a pathetically small plastic

container.)

The fire alarm started ringing
just as the last sparks faded into
the heavy smoke. Someone (1 can't
even remember who it was) told
me I would have to leave the build building.
ing. building. I turned around to ask him if
the fire had somehow started up
again but he had disappeared.
Down stairs the residents of
Weaver stood watching, most of
them unaware of what had hap happened.
pened. happened.
The fire was out. A room full
of personal possessions was al almost
most almost completely destroyed. A
dozen or so guys were catching
their breath and wiping the ashes
and soot from their clothes.
I could still hear the warnings
of some of the guys on the floor
as they prepared to heave burn burning
ing burning items into the hall. My eyes
were still stinging from the bitter
smoke.
And then some guy remarks:
Hey, how come things like that
never happen on our floor.

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v

Andy Warhol
To Lecture
Wednesday
Andy Warhol, dubbed the Peter
Pan of the current art scene, will
lecture Wednesday at 8 p.m. in
University Auditorium.
Warhol, at 37, has become
somewhat of a legend in pop art
with his paintings of Campbell's
Soup cans, Marilyn Monroe tab tabloid
loid tabloid front pages and American
ways of dying.
He has produced four short
films centered around everyday
phenomena. His first film,
Sleep, was a real sleeper
six hours of camera watch watching
ing watching a sleeping man.
His other filmsall oddities odditiesare
are odditiesare Eat, Kiss and Em Empire,
pire, Empire, a zoological study of the
Empire State Building.
Warhol's lecture will be comp complemented
lemented complemented by films of his pop art
factory at work, and a reception
will be held in the Reitz Union
lounge following the lecture.
Admission is $1 for students,
faculty and staff and $1.50 for the
general public.

Monday, November 6, 1967. The Florida Alligator.

x .. ;*;:;>&*'<,
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.' Sh|Pl
XOwb6MC\ >WWawwWp J*MMMwOOOWMfIfIBy JW3p.' XWSMHrra^lKy^Tgfe
dHSH^HIHHK'v%oc 'WAR AND PEACE
...John Mills and Henry Fonda
a "Check Our Prices
Before You Buy"
For Um eat It* Family:
Boots *l-1818 Be Its
Jackets Levi's
Saddlery & Vaccines
Gainesville Stockman Supply Company
Located Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 NWI3 St Phooe: 372-8916
: .'!^HHHHBHH|HHH[H||
-
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- &*v v, x. '~\ ::,; ::' .*<-; &.$ ) v 1 ;> v f W
v *% "v'r xt f> v4ii' > ><*. -^lk'
v- v, .> x.s^*cr v v>>>
>>> v>>> :< ' W*'"- gs'VS >.., **' .**£>:
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:- ygSSgm v/B|. BH
§§T'
1, ~M BP B BEI
2(//uri/ /ut/2/2enfr... 88
After you've met
the challenge?
If you're the kind of Civil Engineer
we're looking for, you'll start search searching
ing searching for another one to conquer. Here
at the Pennsylvania Department of
Highways, we offer a host of chal challenges
lenges challenges to the right man. But, to be
that right man, you've got to be pretty
special.
You see, we search out and encour encourage
age encourage Civil Engineers whom we consider
capable of grasping a challenge;
skilled men, comparable to the great
Engineers who are "building Tomor Tomorrow
row Tomorrow today in Pennsylvania." If you
can measure up to the standards
necessary to fulfill Pennsylvania's $lO
billion plan to lead the nation in high highways,
ways, highways, we'd consider it a challenge just
to get to know you.
A Pennsylvania Department of
Highways Career Representative will
visit your campus. To arrange for an
appointment, or if you desire
additional infor- t==|
mation, contact the Ju '*^
placement office. \\ £ t
INTERVIEW DA TE: WiWvHrVj//
. NOVEMBER 15 \ If
Pennsylvania
Departmei. of Highways
Bureau of Personnel
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120

Page 13



Page 14

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 6, 1967

> is 3 jj| j|jrj IJUL
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The football took many bounces for the UF Saturday. LEFT,
Gator Paul Maliska (22) finds the ball next to his ear. Linebacker
Dave Mann (55), RIGHT, gets ready to leap upon the pigskin. But
the offense has its problems as Larry Rentz, LOWER RIGHT,
has his punt blocked to set up Auburns third touchdown. (Photos
by Nick Arroyo)

ON TWO BLOCKED PUNTS

Auburn 'Kicks UF

AUBUtui, Ala. Fioiida did it again. They won
everything but the football game.
Split end Dick Trapp had more yards catching (148;
the football than Auburn did throwing it (145). Tail Tailback
back Tailback Larry Smith gained more yardage running (102)
than Auburn did as a team (81). UF kept the ball 60
percent of the time. The Gators had almost twice
as many first downs.
But Florida lost, 26-21 here Saturday afternoon,
because it didn't play a 60-minutes of good football.
It played 57,
With the Gators leading 7-6 in the third quarter,
Auburn scored three times in three minutes. Two of
the touchdowns, which UF coach Ray Graves called
the game's turning point, were set up by blocked
UF punts.
Auburn, never a loser to a Florida team at Cliff
Hare Stadium, scored its first of the three touchdowns
by simply passing the Gators senseless. The Tigers,
before 42,000 fans, moved 52 yards in eight plays for
the score. All the yards but the final one, a center
sneak by quarterback Loran Carter, was gained
through the air.
But the Gators only trailed 12-7 with the fourth
quarter and 7:24 or the third period remaining. But
then the dam broke.
UFs offense was stymied and Larry Rentz was
forced to kick at his 27. Rentz took the snap, took
two steps and kicked the ball into the belly of Tiger
linebacker Mike Holtzclaw. The ball was recovered
by Florida but Auburn took over on possession.
It took Carter just a minute and four plays from
the 21. Carter carried it in from the three.
Then the crusher hold was applied. Rentz was
forced to kick again after failing to move his Gators.
This time it was a different belly, defensive end
Jim Bouchillon. Auburn recovered it this time at
the 14.

k v fn llrlTi \
k

By 808 PADECKY
Alligator Sports Editor

Carter made it quick this time. He hit split
end Freddie Hyatt on the first play and now in
three minutes the score was 26-7 instead of 12-7.
Graves said the first blocked kick was a missed
assignment and the second resulted simply because
they were too concerned about the inside of the line
and missed Bouchillon outside.
UF bounced right back. The Gators took the ball
after the quick touchdown and moved 80 yards in
nine plays to narrow the score to 26-14. Tailback
Larry Smith pranced the final 16 around right end.
Auburn gave up the ball on downs and Florida
again mounted another touchdown drive. This one
took 77 yards in 12 plays. Rentz did the final leg legwork.
work. legwork. On a good inside fake to Smith, Rentz took it
in standing up from the one. Wayne Barfield added
his 44th straight PAT and the score board read 26-21.
Florida had two more chances to move again to pay paydirt,
dirt, paydirt, but both times they failed. The last came Just
before the game's end on their 43.
Auburn can beat any or all of the teams we have
left to play," said Graves. We certainly aren't going
to hang our heads.''
Auburn coach Ralph (Shug) Jordan said the game
wasn't one of his teams better offensive games but the
blocked punts really helped."
Coach Paul Davis really worked on blocking punts
all week," said Jordan, "because we noticed Vander Vanderbuilt
built Vanderbuilt had success against Floridas punting also."
The first half didn't produce much of an offensive
show. The first first down came with three minutes
left in tV first quarter as Smith sprinted 10 yards.
The 'he c 5 best offensive show in the
first quai.... t .o produce a score.
Smith did most of the moving on the ground but
missed the touchdown march. His sub, Tom my Glenn
carried the mail the rest of the way and dug his way
the final yard to score on third down.

1 iWm .JL JM§m3
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Auburn Coach Had
It All Planned
By MORTY ANDREWS
Alligator Sports Writer
AUBURN, Ala. If you listen to Ralph Jordan talk long enough,
you begin to believe he planned it all.
**We worked hard all week on blocking kicks, he said, shortly
after his team had ruined a pair of Larry Rentz punts to preserve
the psychosis Cliff Hare Stadium has over the Florida Gators.
This was the key to our victory, Jordan added, philosophi philosophically.
cally. philosophically.
Had the blocked punt in the Vanderbilt game led him to pursue
such a course to victory?
Did Vanay block one too? the winning coacu asked himself
aloud. Catching himself before he went further, Jordan added:
Yes that did give us an idea.
We just felt like we could block kicks, he added.
Admitting his team didn't set the world afire in the first quarter,
Jordan off-handedly justified the poor performance by explaining
that his Tigers got the whip hand in the third quarter.
We got some good performances from several boys, especially
Carter (quarterback Loran), Holtzclaw (linebacker Mike), Christian
(wingback Ted) and Bouchillon (defensive end Jim).
Holtzclaw and Bouchillon were the dynamic duo who put the
bad hurt on Rentz punting average and gave Auburn the two
touchdowns it needed to win.
Jordan didnt remember afterwards which one blocked the first
kick (it was Holtzclaw) or whether the same rush technique w,>s
imployed on both blocked punts. But he did remember that when
Holtzclaw (a linebacker) blocked his that we rushed our line linebackers.
backers. linebackers.
Trying not to give the Gators anything to tack on their locker
room bulletin board next year, Jordan had nothing but praise
for Larry Rentz, Larry Smith, Richard Trapp and Don Giordano.
Giordano impressed him so much, Jordan called him one hell
of a football player.
He even went so far as to point out how much more successful
the Gators offense was as compared to that of the Miami Hurri Hurricanes.
canes. Hurricanes.
We had trouble with the Gators, Jordan admitted. But
Miamis offense couldnt have scored on us in a week.
Auburn lost to Miami, 7-0, last week when an intercepted
pitchout became the games only score.
Late in his press conference, Jordans thoughts turned to Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi State his teams next opponent.
Although he feels like his team ought to be favored, he
didnt say a word about kicks.
Or how many his team would block.



Gators Were Sad, But Proud
0 \
After Comeback Just Missed

By MICHAEL ABRAMS
Alligator Correspondent
AUBURN, Ala On a clear
day you can see forever.
Forever was only 57 yards
away with a minute left to play.
Rentz, Trapp, Smith and Co.
left the golden Alabama Indian
summer this year with the mem memory
ory memory of a clear day, a cold wind,
and a bitter loss. And a last-min last-minute
ute last-minute drive that failed on their 43.
These boys made mistakes
which hurt them but it didnt af affect
fect affect their morale a lick, said
~oach Ray Graves.
He stood in the midst of a locker
room strewn with cups emptied of
Gatorade and a room quietly and
sadly filled with his dejected
squad. Graves put the pieces to together.
gether. together.
Youve got to be proud of these
Only 3 Os
Top 20 Lose
NEW YORK (UPI) How the
top 20 major colleges football
teams fared this weekend.
1. Southern California beat Cali California
fornia California 31-12.
2. UCLA tiedOregonState 16-16.
3. Tennessee beat Tampa 38-0.
4. North Carolina State beat Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia 30-8.
5. Georgia lost to Houston 15-14.
6. Purdue beat Illinois 42-9.
7. Wyoming beat San Jose State
28-7.
8. Indiana beat Wisconsin 14-9.
9. Colorado lost to Oklahoma
23-0.
10. Notre Dame beat Navy 43-14.
11. Minnesota beat lowa 10-0.
12. Oklahoma beat Colorado
23-0.
13. Alabama beat Mississippi
State 13-0
14. Texas beat Southern Metho Methodist
dist Methodist 35-28.
15. Oregon State tied UCLA
16-16.
16. Mississippi tied Louisiana
State 13-13.
17. Louisiana State tied Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi 13-13.
18. Miami, Fla. beat Virginia
Tech 14-7.
19. Virginia Tech lost to Miami
Fla. 14-7.
20. Auburn beat Florida 26-21.
Why be
fenced in?
A truly spiritual view of
life can open up unlimited
possibilities for you.
Come hear how a better
understanding of God can
bring you guidance, purpose,
and ability. Charles M. Carr,
C. 5.8., a member of The
Christian Science Board of
Lectureship, is giving a lecture
for the whole community.
Everyone is invited. Bring
your friends. The purpose of
the lecture is to show that no
boundary can separate us from
the goodness of God.
Christian Science lecture
Monday November 6, 1967
at 8:00 p.m. in room 349
of new J. W. Reitz Union

boys, he said smiling thinly.
He repeated himself. Then he said
he was proud of them. Damned
proud.
Larry Smith glumly reflected
the fact he had a cold. Then he
said it was a bad cold. But Larry
didnt have a cold if you asked
Auburn. This day Larry Smith
netted 97 big yards and scored
six points. But the score still
read Auburn 26, Florida 21.
The man who almost came back
was there too. Larry Rent/, stood
slim. They shook his hand and
said how good a game it was and
they told him too bad and patted
him on the back. But Larry was
thinking about two blocked punts.
He said that it never happened in
high school.

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I LTV Aerospace Corporation makes products, of
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sciences high mobility ground vehicles mis*
0- sile systems military and commercial aircraft,
jpf % V/STOL launch vehicles extra vehicular
j|Hp ljly. \ \ activity research and development. These are
HP '' jj|; \ l They are the frontiers of tomorrow. A rep rep.
. rep. Wm resentative of LTV Aerospace Corporation
m mm 1 will visit your campus soon. Talk to him.
jjl \ Talk specifics about programs, assignments,
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Rentz didnt play like a loser.
He completed 22 of 35 passes for
242 yards. But the score still read
Auburn 26, Florida 21.
Rentz was magnificent, said
assistant coach Gene Ellenson.
However, weve got to block
better on punts. This is number
one a must.
Even with two blocked punts
Rentz averaged 36.2 yards in
eight attempts.
They threw the orange and blue
duffle bags in a pile. The locker
room became hot with shower
steam. The bus came. One by one
the team left the room for the
bus. Larry Rentz was the last to
leave.
It was fitting.

Monday, November 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

UF, FSU Run Cross Country

GAINESVILLE, The
UF cross country team led by
Frank Lagotic will host state
rival FSU in a Monday at
3:30.
Lagotic, a senior from Miami
is undefeated this fall. He has
beaten two of the finest distance
stars in the nation and will be
vying for his 12th consecutive
victory which spans over a two twoyear
year twoyear period.
Running with Lagotic for the
Gators will be Wayne Carroll,

Sitting fiiA
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Marvin Chavis, Jimmy Fred Fredrich,
rich, Fredrich, Dan Flynn, Don Hale, Greg
Henderson, Bob Lang, Bob Mil Mildrum,
drum, Mildrum, Steve Keller and Mike
Teipel.
Carroll and Keller, both fresh freshmen,
men, freshmen, have looked outstanding in
previous meets. The Gators who
have been plagued by injuries
were victorious in the Georgia
Tech I nvitational but dropped de decisions
cisions decisions to Eastern Kentucky and
Auburn University.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator. Monday, November 6, 1967

Page 16

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