Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Weather
Showers
High 75-80
Low In 60s

Vol. 60, No. 27

*f f J W rm
. jp'- thh
TRICK OR TREAT (Photo by Nick Arroyo,
phi Mu sororitytook local children trick or treating Tuesday night
to celebrate Halloween,,
MARSALL JONES SAYS
UF Not A University

Bv KATHY KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF is not organized like
a true university but like an au authoritarian
thoritarian authoritarian business enterprise,
Dr. Marshall B. Jones charged in
a prepared statement read Mon Monday
day Monday night at an open meeting in
the Reitz Union Auditorium.
Kirk Lists
Chancellor
Stipulations
The selection of State Univer University
sity University Chancellor .1. Broward Cul Culpeppers
peppers Culpeppers successor will be made
competently and noncontrov noncontroversially
ersially noncontroversially if two high state oftic ofticials
ials ofticials liave their way.
Acting to quell cries of po political
litical political interference with higher
education, Gov. Claude Kirk said
Monday in a letter to the Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Selection Committee
Chairman. Henry D. Kramer, that
lie would make no recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations as Culpeppers successor.
Kirk ;iui. however, list in the
letter qualifications ho felt the
new chancellor should have.
Most important, the chancellor
should be able to communicate
easilv with students, administra administrators,
tors, administrators, regents, and legislators,
Kirk said.
Kirk thought a man should ha\e
experience as a state university
president in a state utilizing a
board of regents.
Any man considered should
have top business executive qual qualifications
ifications qualifications to enable him operate
the multimillion dollar structure
of state higher education, Kirk
commented.
Kramer told the Alligator re recently
cently recently his committee probably
would not complete its work un until
til until the first of the year.
Furthermore, Kramer says he
intends to invite two people from
each state university, including
the president, to serve on the se selection
lection selection committee.

The
Florida Alligator

The UF is. . organized
like a business, with a board
of directors at the top, a pre president
sident president and lesser officers to man manage
age manage the shop, employees to do
the work (faculty) andacommod andacommodidy
idy andacommodidy to be produced (students),
Jones said.
This structure, like business
organization generally, is thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly authoritarian, he con continued.
tinued. continued.
All power resides in the
Board of Regents, which dele delegates
gates delegates plenary authority on cam campus
pus campus to the president, who can do
anything he likes as long as he
does not offend the Regents to
whom he is responsible for his
job.
Faculty and student have
only those residual powers of re resistance
sistance resistance which are common to
all human beings. The president,
for example, exercises an abs absolute
olute absolute veto over all actions of the
Academic Senate.
In his statement Jones re recommended
commended recommended autonomy and in independence
dependence independence foi the university,
with the president and other ad administrative
ministrative administrative officers chosen by
faculty and students. He also
called for the replacement of the
Board of Regents with a Coun Council
cil Council of University Presidents, each
responsible to his oxx n institute m.
Jones, who was denied tenure
b\ the UFadn lnistration and not notified
ified notified that he would be disn issed
from the university effectix e June
30. 1008, was one of three speak speakers
ers speakers at the open n eeting spons sponsored
ored sponsored by the student Con n ittee
for Academic Freedom
The other speakers were Dr.
Phil Constans, executive sec secretar}
retar} secretar} of the Florida 'Education
Association, and Star l.audd:
UF professor of law.
Jor.es avoided discussing aca academic
demic academic freedom at great lei-gth,
while Constans elected to dis discuss
cuss discuss conditions that must ex exist
ist exist if acaden ic freedom is to
exist. Laugh!in spoke on re recourses
courses recourses he considered available
for achieving academic freedom.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Teachers dont see them themselves
selves themselves the way they used to,
Constans said. There is a
changing attitude that insists that
teachers participate in decision decisionmaking
making decisionmaking and are heard.
I dont mean to picture this
as an irresponsible attitude, he
continued.

(See JONES Page 5)

Honor Court Critics
A Tradition At UF

by FRED McNEESE
Alligator Staff Writer
Criticism of the Honor Sys System
tem System has been a popular campus
tradition for years at the UP.
However, specific suggestions to
improve the object of criticism
have been few.
Students criticize the court be because
cause because they consider penalties too
strict. The court is censured by
various administrators because
of light penalties. Persons have
charged that the present honor
operational procedure is not ef effective.
fective. effective.
Law Professor Vernon A.
Clark quipped that there haxe
been cries to change the Honor
System almost fron its bee inning
in 1014 but very few persons
sax ho'.x thex ant to change it.
Dean of Men Frank Adan s-does
offei cm.crete i lea*.
L :.e of Adan* m< reextrene
suggestion* i* that the Hanoi
Court chant.e fron present court
proc-edii.-s to ? student a it: ::
istrauv e-boar prcc.ee ii: This
suggestion i* met ith sev-ie
opposition fron :: er: Rers and
friends f the court.
The ccan presently operates
much like state a:.-i feeler a.
Courts. A:, accused person is sup supposed
posed supposed to t e considered-innocent
until the attorney general and his
staff prove otherwise to six ;ur ;urists.
ists. ;urists.

Shepherd
Says Students
Are Frustrated

in Kiciai: TiinvFi f
Alligator Ci.y Editcc
Charles Shepherd declared
Tuesday night that this univers university
ity university lias for too loan been concer concerned
ned concerned with dollars and cents, bur bureaucratic
eaucratic bureaucratic nonsense, and making
excuses for its inadequacies than
with the student.
In an advance copy of the state
of the campus address given to
the Alligator Tuesday, Shepherd
expressed the sense of frustra frustration
tion frustration of our student body.
Never in all my five years
here at the university have I
felt among the students a greater
sense of frustration and unrest/'
he said.
Frustration at the farce which
passes for academic counseling,
frustration at the rudeness and
indifference of university per personnel
sonnel personnel which passes as admin administration
istration administration of a large bureaucratic
machine, the double-talk, bou bouble-think
ble-think bouble-think attitude which passes
as policies and regulations --
all add up to frustration.
Shepherd said that he was con convinced
vinced convinced that the only solution to
the problem was a student first
attitude coupled with a lit little
tle little understanding.

The purposes of the system
might not be served by trial triallike
like triallike proceedings, Adams stated,,
Maybe we should set aside the
adversary type of proceedings,
Clark is a critic of Adams'
administrative board honor
court. He agrees with Honoi
Court members that one of the
stronger aspects of the present
system is its policy of bending
over backwards to protect the
rights of the student. Clark sta stated
ted stated the current court system
grants the student due process
of law, informs him of the- char charges
ges charges against him, safeguards his
right to counsel, protects his
right against self-incrin matioi.
and grants presumption of in innocence
nocence innocence
(See LCUM Page r

p Hilsman Speaks Tonight Tonight:
: Tonight: 0 er Hi! sir ar., former assistant secretary of state for Far
-a-ter: affairs and now professor of government at Columbia
I'm vers it;, -.vill address UF students Wednesday at 8 p.m. in
the Felt/ Union Auditorium or. American Foreign Policy: Past
Present and Future.
Hi-rra' is one of the nations leading authorities on foreign
affairs and international politics, with personal experience in
dealing with such problems as Vietnam, Cuba and Communist
China. His address is sponsored by the Forums Committee of
the Peitz Union Board and is open to_the_public^^_^^^^^^^^

\Wd;iesdax, November l, 1967

Inside
Food Sen/ice
Needs Improvement
See Page 14

Four proposals m the area of
academics were made b\ Shejs Shejsherd
herd Shejsherd as the speech progressed:
1) the formation of a graift*ap graift*appeals
peals graift*appeals board to protect students
from the p possible arbitrary
treatment b\ the facult\.
2) the placement of more stud students
ents students on more committees deal dealing
ing dealing with academic policies.
3) expansion of course and
teacher evaluation; and
4) lend all assistance possible
to the university college stud student
ent student council program adopted In
Dean Franklin A. Doty.
Shepherd called the area of nat national
ional national affiliations a complete
failure and asked the legislative
council to reconsider SGs af affiliation
filiation affiliation with the Associated Stud Student
ent Student Government of the I'.S.
This organization (ASG) has
proven itself to be of little use
to its member student govern governments,
ments, governments, according to Shepherd.
They offer no services foi
their member SGs, renounce in involvement
volvement involvement in politics, and gener generally
ally generally decry the role of students
in American society today, while
doing absolutely nothing to offer
an alternative course, he added.
The other national organization
that the FF belonged to was the
Southern Universities Student
Government Association. Shej>-
herd withdrew the UF from that
organization earlier m his term.
Shepherd explained that the
philosophy on the UF campus has
been that the student as a ma mature
ture mature and responsible person is
still a full citizen.
As such lie is entitled to the
right to the fullest extent of
substantive and procedural due
process, he should have freedom
from concurrent penalties and
prosecution for off-campus mis misconduct,
conduct, misconduct, plus the right to be un unhampered
hampered unhampered in his pursuit of know knowledge
ledge knowledge and the ailing of his views
either on or off-campus, he-ad he-added.
ded. he-added.
The SG president said that the
code of student conduct was a fru fruition
ition fruition of student government's ef efforts
forts efforts in this ai ea.
Shepherd listed other pro programs
grams programs and problems to be dealt
with in coming months which v.if!
supposedly- conform to the phil philosophy
osophy philosophy mentioned above. I hey
ai e;
fSee .STATE'' Page 2



, xhf Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November i, 1967

Page 2

Bulletin News
State National International News
Humphrey Nearly Shelled
SAIGON (UPI) Viet Corig mortarmen shelled the grounds of Saigons
Independence Palace Tuesday night while Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey arid dignitaries from 23 nations gathered inside toasted
the inauguration of South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu.
Only a rainstorm may have averted a disaster.
Two persons outside the palace were killed and one wounded.
But Humphrey and all the hundreds of guests assembled for the
glittering reception escaped injury as four GOmrn mortar shells
exploded atxjut 200 yards from them on the palace grounds.
The rainstorm may have saved many guests irom death or injury.
The party was orgirially to have been held in a garden outside the
palace but the sudden storm chased the guests and the band rnside
the palace lialls and along the broad verandas.
Changing Cigarette Ads?
WASHINGTON (UPI) The nation's cigarette makers came out of
a two-hour meeting with Sen. Robert 1-. Kennedy, D-N.Y., and agreed
to take another look at their advertising on smoking.
They also said they would work closer with the U.Sb. Surgeon Gen General
eral General in research on the harmful effects of smoking.
I expressed my concern about the fact that thousands of young
people begin smoking every day, Kennedy told .newsmen!
Historic Sputnik Returns
MOSCOW (UPI) Russia returned a sputnik to earth Tuesday
24 hours after it achieved historys first automatic docking in orbit.
A Soviet scientist said the maneuver solved a major step in building
a space platform.
A West German scientist, Hein/ Kaninski, director of the Bochum
Space Observatory, said the coupling, plus Mondays launching of
another sputnik, indicated the possibility that the construction of
a launch platform has begun.
He said the docking would put the Soviets on the moon at least
one year, if not two, before the Americans.
GM To Be Broken Up?
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Justice Department lias drawn up an
antitrust suit against General Motors but has not decided whether
to file it in court in an attempt to break up the worlds largest
industrial corporation, it was learned Tuesday.
One source told UPI that the suit had been gathering dust for
many months and that is was up to President Johnson to decide
what to do with it.
A Justice Department spokesman, not mentioning GMs name, con conceded
ceded conceded that the automobile industry has been under investigation
and study for many years by the antitrust division, but lie added
that this did not mean were going to tie running into court soon.
! SPECIAL NOTICE |
To all students and university personnel
i DISCOUNT 5

t Off Our Low-Low Prices H
5Mr 4-*f. [
| CAFETERIAS ISgr'jj
J GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER i
gp 1212 North Main Street fl
j.Just Four Minutes From Campus!
Bill BIBS B! II
The Florhla Alligator reserve.' the rtfht r. f jUu :( e : iv. raj. te e.f al aJ\rr:-
lsements and to revise or turn aav eej > uj-.t.-h i: ,\>. suers oSjectj.raKe.
NO POSITION IS GLARANTI tr, tho icL tesireJ posltlcr 1i tv f.ver 'r e'.et
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adju>tn er.t> of pa> n ajverti'c" r t
involving typographical errors or erronev'us tr.sertior unless once t> c:\e; to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within O' one da> after advertisement appear?. The r :c::la A/igatcr
will not be responsible for mor than one incorrect lnseruoi of ar ad-.e.-tlserrer t sche T-lei
to run several times. Notices for correction rr ..>t tv cl\r-: tvfcre :.e\t r serthr..
THE FI.OHIDA ALI IGATOH is the official -tudent ivwspaper of ihe L nlver?it> of
Florida and Is published five times weeklv exi ept durir*' Ma\, Tune, and Jul\ whe:
It is published semi-weekl>. Unlyedltonals represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Morlda Alligator, Florida l nlon Building, Lnlversit)
of Florida, Gainesville, fla 32C01. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the l'idled states Post office at Gainesville.

State Os Campus Address

from page
1) a Womens Equal Opport Opportunity
unity Opportunity Study Commission to look
into the role and scope of wo women
men women leadership or. campus and
offer suggestions for improve improvement.
ment. improvement.
2) an olf campus Housing
Corporation designed to take le legal
gal legal action where necessary to
protect students. This corp corporation
oration corporation would maintain a listing
of landlords which have not dealt
in good faith with students.

Hull Declines Offer
To Drive New Car
By 808 PADECKY
Assistant Sports Editoi
Alligator editor Steve Hull has declined an offer to drive a $4,500
Chevrolet from General Motors Corporation. Before school began,
Hull attended a press review in Detroit for Chevys 1968 model.
Hull tentatively accepted GMs offer to drive a Camaro convertible
on the UF campus for two weeks.
Hull, 4BA from St. Petersburg, was to take the car from Univer University
sity University Chevrolet Co. in a week. But he changed his mind Tuesday.
I have written both GM and Lathan Davis of University Chev Chevrolet,
rolet, Chevrolet, said Hull, and informed them of my refusal. GM invited
25 college newspaper editors from around the nation to view its
new models. Just before the 25 left, GM said it would give them new
cars to drive on their campuses for a few weeks for display pur purposes.
poses. purposes.
I think free advertising for anybody is a breach of good jour journalistic
nalistic journalistic standards, said Hull, and I wont do it.
As of the moment, Hull is the only editor of the 25 who will not
drive a Chevrolet. Some editors have had their cars since school
began five weeks ago.

This Weeks
SPECIALS
r
at Greshams 16th Drugs
Xerox Copies
Cosmetics
Registered Pharmacist
Greeting Cards
Gleem Toothpaste
reg 95<
Spray-a-Wave
Hair Spray
re 85< now 75$
Rexall Shaving Creme
re 9 99<
now 49$
Alka Seltzer
\ s
reg 69< HOW 49$
'
Secret Spray Deodorant
reg $149 HOW 99$
CX 126 12 Kodacolor Film-reg $1.25 NOW 95 OPEN A CHARGE ACCOUNT!
1605 S.W. 13th Street Gainesville, Fla. |

a Ratskeller to be opened
in November in the basement of
the old cafeteria. He said plans
are complete and Food Service
has begun the required conver conversion
sion conversion of the facilities. Limited
food will be offered plus nightly
entertainment from the coffee
house circuits.
4) a Governing Board for the
Day Care Center for married stu students
dents students children.
5) letting bids on auto insur insurance
ance insurance program for students.

6) the 70 acre tract of land at
Lake Wauburg should be opened
for student use by next spring.
7) establishment of a study
group to look into the quarter sys system
tem system and its problems strictly
from a student point of view.
8) student government should
formulate its own statement con concerning
cerning concerning expected student be behavior.
havior. behavior.
Shepherd outlined the pro programs
grams programs involved with his admin administration.
istration. administration. They include: code of
student conduct, tuition increase
controversy, $30,000 campus im improvements
provements improvements program (under con construction),
struction), construction), student loan program,
utilization of commissions to in infuse
fuse infuse imagination and talent into
SG, teacher evaluation, commun communications
ications communications increased codaphone,
open forum revised, and inter internal
nal internal changes in student govern government.
ment. government.
In dealing with other problems,
Shepherd suggested that the Dol Dollars
lars Dollars for Scholars program be
surrendered by SG to some other
organization having a more sta stable
ble stable membership. He also sug suggested
gested suggested greater improvement in
the codaphone program.



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dill chips on our own 8 french bread.
Side orders of Potato Salad or Cole Slaw 30$
Large COKE SPRITE ORANGE 20$

Wednesday, November i, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 1, 1967

CAMPUS
EVENTS
By DAVID CHAFIN
Alligator Staff Writer
IN AMERICA AND THE FUR FURRINERS:
RINERS: FURRINERS: Roger Hilsman will
speak on American Foreign
Policy: Past, Present, Future
in the Reitz Union Auditorium
at 8 tonight. Hilsman is a for former
mer former Assistant Secretary of State.
(For our side.)
IN DOWN HOME HOOFING:
Folks in the Florida Folk Dan Dancers
cers Dancers will folk dance on the Union
Terrace tonight at 8.
IN MINORITY GROUPS: The
Young Republicans Club will have
Charles Cowles, head of the
Gainesville Community Action
Agency, address their organiza organization
tion organization at 8 tonight in room 355
of the Union.
IN LARGE EMPTY SPACES:
These large empty spaces are
caves, and the people inside them
are the members of the Florida
Speleological Society. They meet
tonight, at 7, room 347 Union.
Bill Dandy
To Discuss
Integration
Integration in Public
Schools will be discussed by
William Dandy, Broward County
civil rights official, Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. at Norman Hall
Auditorium.
He Is sponsored by the stu student
dent student Florida Teachers Associa Association.
tion. Association.
Dandy, administrator of the
Broward County civil rights pro program,
gram, program, will speak from his ex experience
perience experience with problems jn Brow Broward
ard Broward County and as a member
of the Broward Board of Public
Instruction.
Following the talk, the audi audience
ence audience will have an opportunity
to ask questions. There will be
no charge for admission and it
is open to the public.

T.V. LOG -^1

2 4 9 12 5
NBC CSS ABC NBC NET
-7 r\n Wells Fargo Honeymooners MOVIE Rifleman Whats New
/:UU
7:30 Virginian Lost In Space National irginian International
Geographic Magazine
8:00 Virginian Lost In Space Virginian
8:30 Virginian Beverly Hillbillies Virginian Hubert Humphrey
9:00 Kraft Music Hall Green Acres MOVIE Kraft Music Hall MOVIE
O.'iO Kraft Music Hall He & She Kraft Music Hall
Tbe Bedford j^ er panneled Door
Run For Dundee and Incident p un p or y our pife
10:00 Your Life the Culhane
Run For Dundee and
in o n Run For Vour Life
,U:OU Your Life the Culhane
11. 00 News News News News
n,on Johnny Carson MOVIE Joey Bishop Johnny Carson
1 Man In The
Dark
Fearless Forecast
The Bedford Incident a first run on Television, is tonights best bet. Richara
Widmark stars as a Destroyer Captain who chases a Russian submarine, hopping to
mak6 it surface.

TUMBLEWEEDS *Y TOM RYAN
l AN' MAMMA SAIR IF YOU WANT TO IF!
vniwF SfW-tu S' ER HIMi AN MAMMA SAIpIF YOU WONPERFOL MAMMA! Y 6LESS \
_JOU Vfc GOTTA CATCH A T 0 OUTSMART A MAN, YOU GOTTA JV HER BLACK,
y FOR p IT REACHEROus
TT iHAMHOCKfcR'SMONLYMOQNHAVINi I Y Y T-*- T

UF Prof Presents Approach
Toward Solving Herpes Virus

Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman, a
medical scientist at the UF, pre presented
sented presented a new approach toward
solving the mysteries of the
herpes virus before Tuesdays
meeting of the American Aca Academy
demy Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto Otolaryngology
laryngology Otolaryngology in Chicago.
Herpes virus is a disease con conspicuous
spicuous conspicuous only through the pre presence
sence presence of irritating lesions, com commonly
monly commonly known as cold sores or
fever blisters. The same virus
is responsible for corneal ulcers
and blindness.
It has generally been assumed
that the virus remained latent
within the infected tissue, until
triggered by sunlight, colds or
a variety of bodily strains and
stresses.
Dr. Kaufman and a Florida
team of researchers presented
evidence that the virus is con constantly
stantly constantly multiplying within the tis tissue
sue tissue of the salivary and tear
glands--and by bathing the tis tissue
sue tissue with virus is responsible for
recurrent herpes.

- if #ator {Eoton
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They hope to inactivate the
virus before it reaches the tis tissue,
sue, tissue, infects it and starts the
disease.
Once the* herpes virus has
manifested itself, chances are
the symptoms will recur in fol following
lowing following years with greater fre frequency.
quency. frequency. The disease iS" not u usually
sually usually disabling until it strikes
the eye. One infection may not
be damaging, but recurring le lesions,
sions, lesions, leaving' an accumulation
of scar tissue, can cause blind blindness.
ness. blindness.
Ninety per cent of the adult
population may have been ex exposed
posed exposed to the herpes virus, al-
A Winner
The College of Architecture
and Fine Arts won first place
in the Academic Division for
their display in the University
of Florida Showcase during the
Homecoming weekend. The col college
lege college received a trophy for their
exhibit in the Reitz Union.

though most are not aware of
any lesions produced by the
virus.
In recent studies at the Uni University
versity University of Floridas College of
Medicine, a number of indivi individuals
duals individuals tested by the investigators
periodically excreted the virus
in tears and saliva, although
some, individuals carrying the
herpes virus had no symptoms.
In spite of the virus in secre secretions,
tions, secretions, only certain individuals
were predisposed to get the
symptomatic disease.
Among questions the scientists
hope to answer are: Why is one
individual susceptible and ano another
ther another resistant to the disease?
How does one person catch it
from another?

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This research opens up to totally
tally totally new possibilities for treat treatment,
ment, treatment, Dr. Kaufman told his
colleagues.
Dr. Kaufman's earlier discov discovery
ery discovery of an effective antiviral a agent
gent agent against herpes- virus
presented a cure for the visi visible
ble visible eye infection, but his pre present
sent present concern is prevention of
recurrences of the disease.
The virus studies are being
conducted at the Universitys J.
Hillis Miller Health Center by
Dr. Kaufman, professor and
chairman of the Department of
Ophthmalogy, and Dr. David C.
Brown of the Universitys De Department
partment Department of Ophthmalogy.



from page one
It isn't. It is a responsible
attitude, a mature attitude, an
attitude of adults. It is from this
that academic freedom springs.
The degree to which academic
freedom exists depends on the de degree
gree degree that teachers practice it.
Laughlin, a member of the

from page one
Adams maintained an adminis administrative
trative administrative board did riot automat automatically
ically automatically cancel student rights. He
pointed out that the student con conduct
duct conduct committee and faculty dis disciplinary
ciplinary disciplinary committee, both admin administrative
istrative administrative boards, attempted to
preserve the rights of the ac accused.
cused. accused.
Due process can t>e brought
in and the individuals rights cari
be protected in an administrative
board,Adams said.
Clark said a freshman or new
student accused of violating the
honor system certainly needed
the help of a defense counsel
familiar with the system. The
present court system maintains
a personal instead of a bureau bureaucratic
cratic bureaucratic relationship between the
student and the honor system,
Clark commented.
Clark, Honor Court Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor David Welch and Chuck Shad,
president of the Honor Court
Bar Association, agreed that an
administrative type of procedure
would tend to develop profes professional
sional professional jurists.
Welch said persons hearing
case after case would tend to
become case hardened. An ac accused
cused accused student might be judged
guilty because his case sounded
similar to 10 previous cases. It
would be difficult for anyone to
sit tin a panel day after day and
still give a fair judgement, Welch
declared.

I 1
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/ Tor 1 II orld (IJ Taste-Tempting m
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Advertise
ITS GOOD BUSINESS
I

Jones 1 Statement

Honor Court Criticism

executive board of the American
Association of University Pro Professors
fessors Professors (AAUP), listed the court
system and professional organ organizations
izations organizations such as the AAUP as
recourses for gaining freedom
academically for faculty mem members.
bers. members.
We have to show administra administrators
tors administrators that they are not above the
law, Laughlin said, and I think
the courts are about to do that.

The presence of new jurists
at each trial insures the student
a fair trial. Welch stated. Under
the current system. a student may
serve on the )ury only once.
Adams believes, however, that
the honor system is never going
to work in a large state suppor supported
ted supported university as it works in the
military schools or in smaller
private schools, because of the
more cosmopolitan student body
of the state school.
Turning to another subject,
Adams said one of the problems
of the UF Honor system might
be the lightness of penalty. At
schools where the honor system
is extremely efficient, a person
who is judged guilty of a vio violation
lation violation is suspended. But ac according
cording according to Adams, a person us usually
ually usually has to come before the UF
honor court twice before suspen suspension
sion suspension is considered.
Dont get the idea that Im
saying heavier penalties will
solve all honor court problems,
Adams said. I am merely say-

t UF REPRESENTATIVES I
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oslCf Don Sapp David Wilson
George Corl Arlie Watkinson
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Laughlin called censure an in influential
fluential influential weapon that could be
used by professional organ organizations.
izations. organizations.
I have avoided talking about
academic freedom, said Jones.
It is a thorny question -- its
really talking about something
that does not exist.
c
If you talk about it too much,
it becomes destructive,a mere
slogan.

ing we should consider the feas feasibility
ibility feasibility of such penalties.
Welch, in reply to the idea of
harsher penalties, said current
penalties were severe enough.
The Honor Court now assigns
penalty hours to all convicted
students. A sentence of in hours
means a person will have to take
ID more hours to graduate. Fif Fifteen
teen Fifteen hours is considered a nor normal
mal normal quarter load. The student al also
so also receives a failing grade in the
course for which he was convic convicted
ted convicted of cheating.
Tomorrow: The Honor Courts
policy of Secrecy.
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Dance Crashing Car
Identified By License
By STEVE HULSEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The car which crashed through a Flavet 111 street dance Saturday
night has been traced by its tag number to a Gainesville resident,
Flavet Mayor John McDermott reported Tuesday.
McDermott declined to reveal the owners name but, police report
the car is registered in the name of Harlow H. Land. Sr., who has
a post office address.
McDermott said the car was apparently being driven by the owners
son, a serviceman who was here for Homecoming weekend, when the
incident occurred. The service man has since returned to his duty
station.
McDermott said in his report that since no bodily injuries were
incurred, the re is little reason for civil suit. He said the driver
could, however, be punished criminally.
However, since the driver has left town, the report said, a warrant
would not be sworn out for the drivers arrest at this time. He said
a letter would be sent to Land, informing him of the incident and
advising him that suit could be brought against him.
McDermott said that smce ( the alleged driver was a serviceman,
he could be punished by. the military as well as by civil authorities
if he were convicted of the incident.
He said that this could ruin the man's career, and would be quite
a burden to bear for a moment of careless judgement.
McDermott said that any further action would have to be recommend recommended
ed recommended by the villages commission when it meets November 0.
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Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The
Florida Alligator
To Let The People Know
VM SteV E l
J{(l Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
jAwi/ItCM Managing Editor Executive Editor
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
News Editor Sports Editor
Tb Florida Alligator's official position on Issues is expressed
only in the columns below. Other material In th< issue may
reflect the opinion of the writer or cartoonist and not necessarily
that of the Florida Alligator unless specifically Indicated.

Regrettable Death

The Alligator learned with
regret Monday that First
Lieutenant David E. Wieland,
a former honor cadet in the
UKs Air Force ROTC pro program,
gram, program, died in action in Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam recently.
Wieland, son of Mrs. Jan
Wieland, 1318 SW 13th Ave
Gainesville, was buried with
full military honors in Arling Arlington
ton Arlington National Cemetary.
He, and others like him de deserved
served deserved the honors which came
too late.
The war in V ietnam is a
dirty business. Many of us
have become bitter at the
prospect of fighting in South Southeast
east Southeast Asia until doomsday.
Many of us give the war our
un-qualified support and
simply accept the fact that
no war is pleasant.
But the politics of war have
little to do with the personal

The Homecoming week weekend
end weekend highlighted a common
problem in America and
mocked it home to the
V F earn pus.
Too many people drive
recklessly and too many
people are getting killed
on the roads.
Ronald W ayne Ayers, I F
education graduate student,
was killed Saturday morn morning
ing morning when he lost control of
his late model sports ear
aml hit an oak tree at a
high rate of speed.
Ayers ear was literally
split iu half.
He died shortly after the
accident at J. Hillis Miller
Health Center.
Saturday night a ear
knocked down three street
barricades and drove
through a street dance
being held at the Fla vet
111 married studentshous studentshousing
ing studentshousing unit.
The car, whose driver
remains unidentified,
drove through a crowd of

The Driver-

tragedy of battle.
Lt. Wieland died for his
country, whether his country
is right or wrong, and in doing
so he died honorably.
No, war is not a pretty
business. But, to die for ones
country, on the field of battle,
is a noble death.
Many UF graduates gave
their lives in World Wars One
and Two. Others died in Korea.
Today, as a product of their
sacrifices, we attend a free
university in a free nation.
Perhaps the war in Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam is wrong. Perhaps not.
The question of right or
wrong is not the soldiers, it
is the nations. This is a truth
in a democracy.
Lt. Wieland died for his nat nation
ion nation and therefore, in a sense,
he died for us. We appreciate
the sacrifice which can never
be repaid.

about 200 dancing people,
scattering chairs and tab tables
les tables in its path.
The driver ignored
residents pleas that he
slow down and consider
what he was doing.
Regardless of this, how however,
ever, however, his automobile be became
came became a dangerous w'eapon.
All automobiles are dan dangerous
gerous dangerous w eapons when driv driven
en driven at excessive speeds or
challenged by road haz hazards.
ards. hazards.
Drivers must adjust
their pace to road condit conditions.
ions. conditions.
Driving isnt' a game.
We urge our readers to
drive w ith caution. You may
not tie paying for the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator everyday, but wed
hate to lose you as a read reader.
er. reader.
And, remember, if you
must drive recklessly, do
it where no one else will
be endangered by your act actions
ions actions -- especially child children.
ren. children.

/\ o Ifw
SE. ASIA POLICY j

.* .* *-.' r ~ _- A _*. .- ..**
| KK ', /stak ytff /
Anybody Bought One, Dean?
The Phoenix Watehes ""' ll
IFfeo Can Judge?
===================== By Ira Brukner

Page four of my United States passport
reads, this passport is not valid for tra travel
vel travel to or in Communist controlled por portions
tions portions of China, Korea, Vietnam, or to or
in Albania and Cuba. A person who tra travels
vels travels to or in the listed countries or areas
may be liable for prosecution under sec section
tion section 1185, Title 8, U.S. Code, and Sec Section
tion Section 1544, Title 18, U.S. Code. In Decem December
ber December 1965 Staughton Lynd, Assistant Pro Professor
fessor Professor of History at Vale defied this State
Department ban and via London, Prague,
and Moscow flew to Peking and then the
forbidden of forbiddens, North Vietnam.
My interest in the above is relevant to
an issue of major concern on this campus.
Last Tuesday night at Dialogue concerning
professor evaluations, the denial of
tenure to Dr. Marshall Jones because of an
article he had written in which he has
publicly urged in speech and print a
principle of action which is contrary to
and potentially destructive pf, the principles
on which true universities must be or organized
ganized organized was questioned by the members of
the panel and the audience.
Vice President of Academic Affairs Rob Robert
ert Robert Mautz stated that he was pleased to
read the statements of Yale President King Kingman
man Kingman Brewster concerning that man (Lynd)
who went to North Vietnam. What is the
substance of these statements and to
what do they pertain?
According to Vice President Mautz Dr.
Lynd did not have tenure at Yale but he
was not removed from his position as an
assistant professor of history because of
his action which may be liable for pro prosecution
secution prosecution under United States law.
Is there a connection between the battles
of these two men? This writer believes
so. They are parallel on the question

Alligator Staff
The Florida Alligator is a student newspaper-

LORI STEELE
Campus Living Editor

-sij^pr
MID-EAST POUCY
hmmmamaasmsa t m W

of academic freedom in expression and
action vis a vis university reprecussions.
In short it seems that Yale retained and
didnt officially shut the tenure door to a
man whose actions far overshadow the
written and oral expressions of UFs Dr.
Jones.
Now Yale seems to be an institution poss possessing
essing possessing the principles on which true
universities must be organized. Is the
University of Florida?
Suppose a similar incident had occurred
at this university. Would this university
handle the incident with the maturity and
candor that Yale used? The point is though
that Dr. Jones didn't even defy a Dept,
ban, but he merely exercised his freedom
of speech.
Keeping m mind Yales candor can we
afford to deny one his freedom of speech
thus losing a competent professor?
I realize that I may be making false
assumptions in comparing the string pul pullers
lers pullers of this campus with those of Yale.
I hope not. However in the realm of aca academic
demic academic diversity, excellence, and tolerance
no one body can afford to ignore the other.
In this case I believe Yale represents the
vanguard to which we should attach our ourselves.
selves. ourselves.
Does a UF Professor's passport read,
this passport is not valid for travel to
or in portions of Free Expression; In print,
or in portions of Free Expression; Inprint,
Oral, Active or to or in Leftistville, Pight Pightistown..
istown.. Pightistown.. A person who travels to or in the
listed areas may be liable for prosecution
under the Denial of Tenure Act? If so,
Pres. OConnell, make this the greatest
university second to none (even Yale) by
protecting the freedom of expression here
by granting tenure to Dr. Jones.

RITCHIE TIDWELL
City Editor

JOE TORCKA
Feature Editor



Emory Quarter Load Much Heavier Than UFs

MR. EDITOR:
As a junior transfer from Emory University here
at UF for the first time, I felt compelled to answer
your editorial of October 26th.
Your comparison of the newly initiated quarter
system here at UF with that at Emory is not an
accurate one. At a distance, Emory seems to be
the ideal school. After all, it has Wonderful Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday (no classes or required activities on Wed Wednesdays
nesdays Wednesdays classes only 4 days a week), drinking
permitted all over campus and in a!! dorms with
little restriction or intensified law enforcement,
women permitted in mens dorms, late womens
curfews (anyone over Freshman status has 2 AM
Sunday-Thursday and 3:30 AM on Friday and Sat Saturday),
urday), Saturday), and unlimited cuts. However, I believe that
any Emory student will gladly tell you Emory is
no heaven.
All Emory students must take no more and no
less than 3 five credit courses per quarter (15
credits). Can you imagine what happens when an

Confirms
Pot Used
In Vietnam

MR. EDITOR:
As a veteran of the Vietnam
war, I can attest to the wide widespread
spread widespread use of marijuana by the
individuals engaged in that con conflict.
flict. conflict. In my unit, the vast ma majority
jority majority of personnel were frequent
users. Most of the non-users
were officers or NCOs.
Though it is illegal for Amer American
ican American personnel to have the drug
in tneir possession, the enforce enforcement
ment enforcement of this infraction was very
lax. If a surprise shakedown
inspection was to be held, the
word would leak out and every everybody
body everybody would secrete their supply.
The availability of inexpensive
high quality pot combined with
the pressures of war made the
practice not only inevitable, but
in my opinion highly desireable.
GEORGE CUNNINGHAM

Relatively Unbiased
MR. EDITOR:
I must admit that when I read the first paper of the year with your
story alKnit hippies spoiling the American image abroad, I was
rather dismayed. Having worked on passenger ships for years,
I am well aware of the ugly American. Incidentally, the term
is much older than hippie and the image was evoked by good
middle and upper class Americans being what they are. .
However, either I was unfairly harsh in my early critical at attitude
titude attitude toward your writing, or else you have improved--perhaps
it is both-- in any event, I want to say that having listened to the
TV and radio programs, following it in the press, and talking with
students who were there, I feel that you did a very good and rela relatively
tively relatively unbiased jot'.
1 mean to t>e sarcastic. I think any person who thinks has
bias-- all we can do is recogni/e it and try to be fair. It is this
that I think you did on the Washington storv.
808 SHETTERLY

OPEN FORUM:
~-~V v r
J\(Liaml ViMmt
There is no hope for the complacent man.

Alligator Should Mind
Its Own Damn Business

MR. EDITOR:
A car accident gives a juiced
up junior journalist an idea.
A tormented young mans at attempted
tempted attempted suicide is good for
several column inches. Deeply
personal, tragic incidents which
should be treated with sympathy
and understanding. But the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator has always been short
on understanding and per perspective
spective perspective and propriety.
Last year, a freshman accid accidentally
entally accidentally shot another student. The
Alligator, with its usual lack of
consideration for those involved,
saw only a big story, saw only
an opportunity to give UF its

Emory student fails a course? He either petitions
the Dean to carry 20 hrs. one quarter, which is
nearly impossible to either get permission to do
or to carry and pass. Or he stays in school an
extra quarter at a tuition rate of $530.00 per quar quarter
ter quarter (there are no part time students permitted).
You say, There is a vast difference in the
work and study time required at UF and at Emory.
Yes, with this statement I definitely agree. I have
not seen one Fla. student approach the amount of
study the least studious Emory student does. To
document this, I have requested the Editor of THE
WHEEL send you documented reports of study time
and work load at Emory. Now I can offer my per personal
sonal personal experience. I studied about 5 hrs. a day 7
days a week at Emory and here, with the same
credit load, I study about 10 hrs. a week total,
and my grades are thus far at least one full point
higher. From my observations at Emory and UF,
I would say, with rare exception, that any Emory
student studies longer, harder, and has more work
to do than any UF student carrying a similar load.

own Charles Whitman. I know that
freshman and his family, and I
know how much they suffered due
to the Alligators yellow journ journalism.
alism. journalism.
Improve
WR UF-FM
MR. EDITOR:
While we appreciate that
Station WRUF-FM is managed
by amateurs, why must it be
so amateurishly managed?
Programming is pedestrian,
except at such times when the
quality is elevated to cliche.
The turntables are neglec neglected,
ted, neglected, as evidenced by the in inordinately
ordinately inordinately long pauses be between
tween between selections, on numerous
occasions, and by intermina interminable
ble interminable delays in changing cracked
records, in changing cracked
records, in changing cracked
records.
Transmission too, isofpoor
quality and erratic. If, in fact,
WRUF-FM is the voice of
the University of Florida,
then its throat needs clearing.
Ahem!
M.M. EISENBERG, M.D.
DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY
W.PRGBERT
LAW SCHOOL

Critics Are For Criticizing

MR. EDITOR:
RE: REVIEWERS SLIGHTED
MISS MOFFO (0CT.30) ~
Imagine my surprise wher. I
looked at the seventh page of
todays ALLIGATOR (0CT.30)
and. read that a reviewer had
attended an opera premier (sic)
on our campus. Who was he, I
asked myself: y ;

Wednesday, November 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Joe Torchias article on Ronald
Ayers accident was in disgust disgustingly
ingly disgustingly poor taste. Hes dead, Joe!
Get it! Thats all there is, there
aint no more. Keep your philo philosophical
sophical philosophical speculations to yourself.
He cant use them now. Have a
little respect for him. He was
a human being as you profess
to be.
Its high time the Alligator
realized that it is only a college
daily and not a combination of
the N. Y. Times and the Nation National
al National Inquirer. It is time for all
Alligator staffers to think before
they print. Its time for the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator to focus on football, frat fraternities,
ernities, fraternities, and Happiness i 5.,..
Its time for the Alligator to
learn something of journalistic
courtesy. In short, to mind its
own damn business.
THCROUGHLY DISGUSTED

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Please Limif Letters To The Editor To 250
Words And Make Sure They're Signed.
We Will Omit Names At Writer's Request.

I know that, specifically, a
reviewer is "a professional cri critic
tic critic of books -- I refer, of
course, to my Webster's, New-
Collegiate Dictionary, in its
handsome presence, and suggest
that Mr. Altman investigate the
meaning of "reviewer.
I would like to suggest that
the critic has the personal right
to critize.
Indeed, I would suspect that

The Emory student, since he must study his 3
subjects every night often gets bored with the re repetition
petition repetition and has nothing else to turn to. The UF
student can generally choose which course he wants
to study which night. In addition to being more
interesting (variety is the spice of. .), it is psy psychologically
chologically psychologically a much more efficient method of learn learning.
ing. learning. If Emory turns out better educated people
(the only reason I can find for your unqualified
statement Emorys learning process is more ef efficient.)
ficient.) efficient.) perhaps it is because of the original
quality of Emory students and the school itself.
You would also be interested to know that Emory
administration has found the 3-5 system lacking
and has plans to change the entire University to
a 4--1 system in the near future. The grass isnt
always greener!
Lastly, you wrote Emory students even find
time to go to their homecoming." I hate to dis disillusion
illusion disillusion you further, but to put it rather bluntly
Emory does not even have a football team!
JANET L. KATZ 3AS

Students
Call Meet
Back Jones
MR. EDITOR:
We, the undersigned students,
in support of tenure for Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Jones, hereby call for a
mass meeting of students for the
purpose of hearing Dr. Jones
explain his position and planning
action in his l>ehalf. We feel
that more students would like to
be informed about this case.
Kenneth Alonso 4MI)
Ed Freeman 3AS
Judith Brown 7AS
Susan Edwards 3AS
Jim Mandell 2MD
Tom Sharpless 7AS
Anita Marie Perry 4AS
George Lawrence 3AS
Dana Swan 3AS
B. Ross Ashley 4AS
Robert S. Gla/er 2UC
Gary Geiserman 2UC
Isabel Barten 4AS
Karen Taylor 7AG
Kit S. Taylor 7AG
Bette Peterson 2UC
The Student Committee for A Academic
cademic Academic Freedom concurs with
this call and calls for such a
meeting Thursday night at 8 o-
clock in McCarty Auditorium.
B.R. ASHLEY
PRESIDENT, SCAF

the public has the right to crit criticise
icise criticise the critic.
But, it is rare indeed that
a critic gets such a distinguishe" 1
visitor from the musical world
to cover, and with this sort of
ridiculous and petty criticism of
the critic, it should in the future
become rarer still I
LEWIS ROTHLEIN, 2UC

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Nmendv: 1, 1907

Page 8

- r


... A
... *.'- ;
.' . > ;- ~

\j||/)ainesville
" t UTILmES
1.
Gainesville l T tilities
Fingertip control thcrmosta i heating is featured
in all modern electrically-he.oed apartments. Simply
dial-a-temperature. The Vi< k twins, KAT, thought
it was going to he a compli* ,ted process when they
went to turn the heat on. instead they found they
c ould enjoy lazy living bv dialing their way to com comfort.
fort. comfort. Why tiother with needles mechanics? The heats
on with a simple flick of a finger.
2.
Sil vernia ns
Susan Silverman takes her cue for a real ball! This
gold Dacron and cotton slack set by Patty Woodard
is a show stopper. The double breasted trench coat
style jacket makes it daringly different. For those
of you with a little imagination, shes wearing a
Ban Lon gold and black stripe shirt by Bonsetta.
All from Silvermans. Just wait till tier turn to shoot!
3.
Solex
Its a breeze. Bopping along at 19 mph down sorority
row is Jill Berman, L) Phi L. You'll find your yourself
self yourself thinking up places to ride it, says Jill. So'ex
cycles are available at reasonable quarterly rates,
or if you simply -want to take a. Saturday afternoon
and ride into the wind, daily rental rates are available.
Inquire about summer storage and resale policies
at the Solex cycle center, 1104 W. University Avenue.
- m
4.
Donigans
Ttie girl girl-watchers watch wears a black and white
checked wool coat from Donigans. The loose fitting
belt adds accent to the A-line design and its military
overtones will surely cause an about face from all
who see it. The shoes are Villagers Sling Backs and
peek-a-boo fishnet stockings finish off the ensemble.
5.
University City Bank
Just turn to computers for banking efficiency and the
whole banking industry follows. Thats just what will
happen when Gainesville hanks follow the lead of Univ University
ersity University City Bank in computer modernization. IBM
goes to work to make your service faster and more
efficient . just the way your bank should be. With
the speed of light vour banking is done at UCB, the
pace-setter in modern banking.
6.
Tropical
Pam Ohman, A D Pi, wont budge. Shes found her
place on top of this new Pontiac Catalina from Trop Tropical
ical Tropical Pontiac. Friendly, courteous service to the people
of Gainesville is Tropicals goal. Theres no way to
move Pam from this new Catalina, shes sitting on
top of the world. Visit Tropical when youre shopping
for a new car or just come in and browse, youll
thank them cause youre welcome.



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Wednesday, November i, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for tale |
NEW 85cc KAWASAKI cycle-
Turn Signals-Rotary Shift-SIOO
down and assume payments. 1015
NW 39 Ave.-378-2788. (A-26-5t-
P)
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE. 1965
Pacemaker, 10* x 46', opposite
end bedrooms, air conditioned
and central heat. Call 378-3777
after 5:30 p.m. (A-25-st-p)
2 DESK AND SWIVEL CHAIRS.
S2O and $25. Card file $5. Book
case $lB. 372-3096. (A-26-3t-
P)
1966 ALLSTATE CRUISAIRE
Scooter, accessories, 3100
miles, $225., in excellent con condition,
dition, condition, for further call 378-7331.
(A-26-3t-p)
KLH MODEL 15 Compact Stereo,
$l6O. KLH Model 18 FM Tuner,
SBO, both for $220. 372-5283.
(A-26- st-p)
HOFNER Beatle Bass, brand
new, w/case, S3OO. Call Brian
Room 15, 372-9460. (A-26-3t-p)
1965 HONDA, 305 Super Hawk:
Excellent condition, only 6,000
miles, helmet included, $475.
Call 378-4117. (A-28-3t-p)
MAGNAVOX CONSOLE STEREO
$100.00: Beautiful furniture and
good sound. 372-5240. (A-28-2t-
P)
ROLLAWAY AUTOMATIC COM COMPACT
PACT COMPACT DRYER, ilO V; almost
new, ideal for limited space, set
any temperature, no exhaust
needed, SSO. Call 372-0143. (A (A---
--- (A--- lt-p)
1965 HONDA 305 c.c. Electric
start, many extras. Can be seen
at the Post Office. Mint condit condition
ion condition $365. Firm. (A-28-st-p)
services
ALTERNATORSGENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical sys systems
tems systems tested repairs. Auto
Electric Service 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-8-Bt-c)
1 wonted
WANTED: Spanish speaking stu student
dent student to teach beginning Spanish
to two children girl 9, boy
11 on campus of off. Fee open.
Call 372-1764. (C-30-st-p)
TOMBOY WITH TOMCAT needs
roomate for garret efficiency.
2 blocks from stadium. $45/mo.
Includes utilities. Call 372-5451.
(C-24-st-p)

fOPEN 1
I 6:30 I
TO BE RUNNIN^^^I
| nite 3 HALLOWEEN HORROR SHOWS |
I STARTING TOMORROW
I PLUS I
Hi Ltfjl v 091 WUSM-CEMBimE HWfTMdhAH I
ml tyro wh (amwo^oqrowrjWy,, '!.. \
a v
4 . . * JA ..

j outos |
1957 THUNDERBIRD, new top,
new paint job, good tires, com complete
plete complete engine overhaul, need in interior
terior interior work, price $l,lOO. Call
378-3790 after 5 P.M. (G-18-
lOt-p)
MUST SELL 1966 CORVETTE
Convertible, 427, 2 tops, 4 on the
floor, positraction, AM/FM
radio, heater, excellent cond condition,
ition, condition, good gas mileage. Will
'take trade of lesser value. 378-
8276. (G-24-st-p)
1963 TRIUMPH TR-4 BKG, New
top, S9OO. Call 376-5164. (G (G---26-3t-nc)
--26-3t-nc) (G---26-3t-nc)
1964 IMPALA 4 door sedan,
full power, air conditioned, radio
$1395. Call 378-5238. (G-28-5t-
P)
1965 PONTIAC LEMANS: 326
V-8, Hurst shift, wire wheels,
bucket seats, radio, heater,
yellow with black interior,
$1,695. Call 378-4117. (G-28-
3t-p)
VW BUS 1965 Camper equip equipped.
ped. equipped. SIOO and take over payments
or best offer. Call John Funk,
378-4482 or Ext. 2737. (G-28-
4t-p)
1959 TR-3 with 1961 Engine. Good
condition, 372-5132. 1215 NW
9th Avenue. (G-28-2t-p)
1967 AUSTIN HEALY Sprite
$75.00 down-take over payments
$51.02 mo. Low mileage Tonneau
cover. Excellent shape. After
5. 376-9022. (G-28-lt-p)
66 SUZUKI X 6 Hustler $450.
378-6302. (G-28-2t-p)
CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE,
IMMACULATE, 378-1733 for ap appointment
pointment appointment after 5 p.m. (G-28-'
st-c)
1966 AUSTIN HEALY 3000, Im Immaculate
maculate Immaculate condition, overdrive,
Silver grey. Phone 372-0379 904
NW 16th Avenue, Gainesville,
Florida. (G-28-3t-p)
MUSTANG, 1966, 289 cu., 4-
speed, 15,000 miles year left on
warranty, yellow, black interior,
$1895, call 378-8838 after Six.
(G-28-3t-p)
| for rent ~~
APARTMENT FOR SUBLET:
Only $65/mo. 727 SE sth Ave.
Call Elise 378-2194. (B-25-4t-
P)
LARGE FURNISHED apartment,
3 blocks from campus, A.C.,
1824 NW 3rd Place. See apts.
#26 or #i. (B-28-it-p)

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Page 10

| help wanted I
STUDENT (Full or Part time)
Experienced in offset paste-up,
willing to work eveings, hourly
wage. Contact Sern Sekora, Stu Student
dent Student Publications, third Floor,
Union Bldg., after 6:30 P.M. to tonight.
night. tonight. (E-9-tf-nc)
WANT aggressive young men for
Credit Trainee. Outstanding op opportunity
portunity opportunity for future advancement.
Apply in person Personell Of Office
fice Office Sears, Gainesville Mall. (E (E---26-3t-c)
--26-3t-c) (E---26-3t-c)
HELP WANTED: WAITRESSES
needed from 5-12 p.m. Meals
and uniform supplied. Apply in
person at 2310 SW 13th St. -No
calls Please (E-25-st-c)
HAVE FULL AND PART TIME
waitresses openings. Good hourly
pay, no experience necessary.
Apply either location, Kings Food
Host. (E-28-3t-c)
MALE HELP WANTED Var Various
ious Various part time openings. Good
hourly pay. Arrange to your sche schedule.
dule. schedule. Apply either Location Kings
Food Host, afternoons only. (E (E---28-3t-c)
--28-3t-c) (E---28-3t-c)
WANTED GO-GO GIRLS. Must
be 18 and over. Apply in per person.
son. person. Lamplighter Lounge, i NW
10th Ave. after 5 P.M. (E-28-
st-c)
personal
PRE-WINTER SPECIAL. Free
battery load test and gravity
check. Auto Electric Service.
603 SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (J-25-
6t-c)
FOR A CHRISTMAS GIFT that
will be most appreciated and last lasting
ing lasting try a fine professional por portrait
trait portrait by Johnston Photography.
372-2512. Plan ahead, remem remember
ber remember the quarter ends Dec. 9,
1967. (J-25-lot-c)
YOURE INVITED to hear Mr.
Charles Cowles, Head of the
Community Action Agency of
Gainesville, address the Young
Republicans Club. Tonight, 8
P.M., room 355 Florida Union.
(J-28-lt-p)
DEMOLAY CHEVALIERS-OB CHEVALIERS-OBSERVANCE
SERVANCE CHEVALIERS-OBSERVANCE DAY is November Bth
Call Dick Connell 378-3161 for
dinner plans. (J-28-6t-p)

STARTS TODAY! 1
ANN-MARGRET VITTORIO GASSMAN
mm .pp^n
WjMM limited I
ISilsf(M ENGAGEMENT V
DAYS ONLY ASP I
r 1
Suggested for Mature IN ROARINGC&OR^^^^^^

personal
FREE! Cute black male puppy.
Call 378-7763. (J-30-2t-p)
THE BNAI BRITH Hillel Found Foundation,
ation, Foundation, Rabbi Max Lipschutz, Con Congregation
gregation Congregation Beth Torah. Dinner
Wed. Evening 6 P.M. L.S.V.P.
372-2900. Rabbi Lipschutz will
be availible for interviews and
counciling. (J-28-lt-c)
lost-found
LOST Mans new black wallet con containing
taining containing all IDs Lost on campus
two weeks ago. Reward 376-
9236 Dave Fosenzweig. (L-28-
2t-p)
LOST Gold ID Bracelet. Name
on bracelet is FOREST. Under Underside
side Underside says 19 October. Please re return.
turn. return. Great sentimental value.
Reward. NE Broward, room 235
Naomi, 372-9269. (L-28-lt-p)
.
fLORIdA
AIIIQAtOR
For Best Ad Results
UNIV. EX: 2832
"THE ANCESTOR OF SUPERMAN
AND BATMAN, THE 'SUPER
DETECTIVE'! 1/2*'!
KATHLEEN CAKKOLI NY. DAILY NEWS
Last TOMORROW
asT ENDLESS
WAITER READ* STERLING
juDex
A FILM BY GEORGES FRANJU
CHANNING POLLOCK I
3-S-7-9'
v

lost-found
LOST on 13th Street Just before
Growl, Brownish Plaid sports
coat, Black Overcoat. Call ext.
2370 or 3235 8 to 5 p.m. (L-27-
2t-nc)
I 233 W. Unlvtnit y iw. "|
||l||Mf 8 M|HW| dM
Suggested
twii Audiences
i.-A-.v
ST. 371513^8
I Features at 7:15 j
I OFAILTHE I
I CREATURES I
I ON EARTH I
I ONLY MAN I
I HUNTS HIS I
I OWN KIND I
-Hif' >
'&s?, HHU
I MotmPKOMtmm I
I
SeLVIS"



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus Calendar
Administrative Notices

PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are expect expected
ed expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
&
CHN 251: Wednesday, Nov. 1,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,
2. 4. 5,7, 10 or 11; (C) to Leigh
207; (D) to Little 121 or 125;
(E) to Little 113; (F) to Little
227, 233 or 235; (G) to Peabody
101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209;
(I-J) to Flint 110 or 112; (K) to
Walker 301, 303, 307, or 308;
(L) to Little 201, 203, 2050r207;
(M) to Little 2*3, 215, 217, 219,
221, 223 or 225; (N) to Little
237; (O) to Little 239; (P-Q) to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) to Floyd
108; (S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z)
to Walker Auditorium,
CHN 252: Wednesday, Nov. 1,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Ma Matherly
therly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-
Z) to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117,
118, or 119.
CLC 141: Thursday, Nov. 2,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with (A) report to
Floyd 104 or 109; (B) to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D) to Little
121 or 125; (E) to Little 113;
(F) to Little 227, 233 or 235;
(G) to Peabody 101, 102, 112
or 114; (H) to Peabody 201, 202,
205, 208 or 209; (I-J) to Flint
110 or 1 12; (K) to Walker 301,
303, 307 or 308; (L) to Little
201, *'2o3, 205 or 207: (M) to
Little 213, 215, 217, 219, 221,
223 or 225; (N) to Little 237;
(O) to Little 239; (P-Q) to Flint
101 or 102; (R) to Floyd 108;
(S) to Walker Auditorium; (T-V)
to Little 101 or iO9; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CLC 142: Thursday, Nov. 2,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, or x 6; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, x 12,
1 13, 114, 115, il6, 1 17, 118 or
119.
CEH 1 31: Tuesday, Nov. 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or iO9; (B) to Peabody 1,
2,4, 5,7, 10 or 11; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D) to Little 121
or 125; (E) to Little 113; (F)
to Little 227, 233 or 235; (G)
to Peabody 101, 102, xi 2 or
114; (H) to Peabody 201, 202,
205, 208 or 209; (I-J) to Flint

Visit Us At Our New Home
Low Interest Rates On Loans 'Cf nnli Mr ill 1 fli HS M BEmIP
"Serving*U F Employees Since 1935"
i GAINESVIU6.ftORtC>A (;AMR.US;.r:£pERAL CUMWwSStBpS*-.

110 or 112; (K) to Walker 301,
303, 307 or 308; (L) to Little
201, 203, 205 or 207; (M) to Little
213, 215, 2i7, 221, 223 or 225;
(N) to Little 237; (O) to Little
239; (P-Q) to Flint 101 or 102;
(R) to Floyd 108; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) to Walker Aud Auditorium.
itorium. Auditorium.

CEH 132: Tuesday, Nov. 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, i 3, l 4 or 16; (M-Z)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, il2,
il3, 114, 115, 116, il7, 118 or
119.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS:
All teacher education majors, re regardless
gardless regardless of College enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or en enrolling
rolling enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE
300, 301 and 302). English and
speech majors do not take the
test as SCH 201 is required in
all of their programs. Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in
Room i 24 Norman Hall. The tests
will be for a two-week period
only.
INVESTMENT SEMINAR: On
Nov. 1, at 8 p.m., an Invest Investment
ment Investment Seminar on Convertible
Bonds and Variable Annuities will
be held in the Law School Aud Auditorium.
itorium. Auditorium. Speakers will be James
G. Richardson, associate pro professor
fessor professor of finance, and William M.
Howard, professor of insurance.
University faculty and other in interested
terested interested persons are invited to
attned.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EX EXAMINATION:
AMINATION: EXAMINATION: All foreign Lan Language
guage Language functional examinations
will be given an Saturday, Nov.
4, 18 Anderson Hall, 10 a.m.-
12 noon.
CAMPUS CALENDAR
Wednesday, November l
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
Union Forums: Roger Hilsman,
American Foreign Policy:
Past, Present and Future,"
Union Aud., 8 p.m. Reception
following in i 22 Union
UF Young Republicans: meeting,
355 Union 8 p.m. Everyone
invited
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing,
Union Terrace, 8 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: aud auditions,
itions, auditions, 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
8 p.m. Talent wanted, come
by or call Bob, 372-9663

blue: bulletin

Thursday, November 2
Baptist Student Center: Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship Supper, 1604 W. Univ. Ave.
5:30 p.m. Everyone welcome
Student Assn, for Childhood Edu Education:
cation: Education: Dr. Ira J. Gordon,
Early Child Stimulation
Through Parent Education,"
/
Med Center Cafeteria, supper
6:30, meeting 7:15 p.m.
Student FEA: Mr. William Dandy,
Integration in the Public
Schools," NRN, 7:30 p.m.
Football Film: Fla. vs. Vander Vanderbilt,
bilt, Vanderbilt, Union Aud., 8 p.m.
Friday, November 3
UF Veterans Club: collect fee
cards for Kentucky Game, Ser Service
vice Service Booth, 3-5 p.m.
Univ. Chess Club: chess, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Union Movie: Life at the Top,"
Union Aud., 7 & 9:15 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: folk
entertainment, readings and
discussions, 1826 W. Unive.
Ave., 9 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for:
ROGER HILSMAN, CARMINA
BURANA & ANDY WARHOL
GENERAL
NOTICES
FACULTY CLUB of the Univ University
ersity University of Florida will hold its
second social event ot the fall
season on Saturday, Nov. 4 at
8 p.m. in the private lounges
(rooms 121, 122, i 23) of the Reitz
Union. Bridge, canasta and other
games will be played. All mem members
bers members are invited. Reservations
can be made by calling either
Mrs. Hazel Reyes (376-3261, Ext.
2019) or Mrs. Harry Warfel (372-
8902).
MENSA: The daily luncheon
meetings will begin Wednesday,
Nov. 1, 12 noon-i p.m. at the
usual table at the south end of
the old west cafeteria. All mem members
bers members and interested persons are
invited to attend. Meeting will
be held at the same time and
same place every weekday here hereafter.
after. hereafter.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT: U Univefsity
nivefsity Univefsity of Florida students
wanted for part-time work on
campus. Must qualify for the
College Work-Study Program.
Please contact Student Financial
Aid, Employment Office, Room
183, Building E.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Students must be registered
with the Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of
the interview date at J. WAYNE
RETIZ UNION, ROOM 22. All
companies will be recruiting for
Dec., Mar., June and Aug. grad graduates
uates graduates unless indicated otherwise.
NOV. 1: ORTHO PHARMAC PHARMACEUTICAL
EUTICAL PHARMACEUTICAL CORP., Jacksonville,
Fla. All majors Must be U.S.
citizen.
NOV. 1: FACTORY INSUR INSURANCE
ANCE INSURANCE COMPANY. Atlanta, Ga.
NOV. 1: HOUDRY LABS of
AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS.
NOV. 1: ATLANTIC RICH RICHFIELD
FIELD RICHFIELD COMPANY, Dallas, Tex.
NOV. 1: BARNETT FIRST
NATIONAL BANK, Jacksonville,
Fla.
NOV. 1: JOSEPH SEAGRAM
& SONS, INC., Louisville, Ky.
Chem., EE, ME, Acctg., Chem,
Bacteriology. Dec. and March
grads.
NOV. 1: ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE SERVICES, Norfolk,
Va. CE, ME, EE, Math, Ps. Must
be UJS. citizen.
NOV. 1: KURT SALMON AS ASSOCIATES,
SOCIATES, ASSOCIATES, INC., New York, N.Y.
IE. Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 1: CITY OF LOS AN ANGELES,
GELES, ANGELES, Los Angeles, Calif. CE.
Must be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 1,2: GENERAL ELEC ELECTRIC.
TRIC. ELECTRIC.
NOV. 1,2: MARTIN COM COMPANY,
PANY, COMPANY, Orlando, Fla.
' r
NOV. 2: ANHEUSER-BUSCH,
INC., St. Louis, Mo. ME, EE,
ChE, IE. Must be UJS. citizen.
Dec. and Maroh grads.
NOV. 2: MARYLAND NAT NATIONAL
IONAL NATIONAL BANK.
NOV. 2: CONTROL DATA
CORP., Minneapolis, Minn. EE,
ME, Math, Ps. Must be U.S.
citizen. Dec. and March grads.

PLACEMENT NOTICES

NOV. 2: TEXACO, INC.,
Houston, Tex. ChE, CE, EE,ME,
Geology, Chem., Bus., Law. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 2: AMERICAN OIL COM COMPANY,
PANY, COMPANY, Whiting, Ind. Eng., Sci.
Computer Eng., Organic, Phys.,
Anly. Chem.
*
NOV. 2,3: PHILLIPS PETRO PETROLEUM.
LEUM. PETROLEUM.
NOV. 2,3: BLOUNT BRO BROTHERS,.
THERS,. BROTHERS,.
NOV. 2,3: AMERICAN OIL
COMPANY, Chicago, 111. Chem.-
E, ME, CE.
NOV. 2,3: AMERICAN CYAN CYANAMID
AMID CYANAMID COMPANY Wayne, N.J.
Chem., CE, IE. Dec. and March
grads.
NOV. 3: GULF OIL CORP.,
Houston, Tex. ChE. ME, EE,
Geol., Geog. Must be UJS. citi citizen.
zen. citizen.
NOV. 3: CROWN ZELLER ZELLERBACH,
BACH, ZELLERBACH, San Francisco, Calif. IE,
ChE, ME, EE. Must be UJS.
citizen.
NOV. 3: PURE OIL CO. Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Fla. Bus., L.A. Must be
UJS. citizen. Dec. and March
grads.
NOV. 3: FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF ORLANDO, Orlando,
Fla. All business majors. Must
be U.S. citizen.
NOV. 3: UNITED AIRCRAFT
RESEARCH LABS.
NOV. 3: INGERSON-RAND,
New York, N.Y.
NOV. 3: FLORIDA POWER
CORP., St. Petersburg, Fla.
NOV. 3: GENERAL FOODS
CORP., Jacksonville, Fla. Fin.,
Acctg., Ind. Rel., EE, CE,' ME,
ChE, IE. Must be UJS. citizen.



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November l, 1967

Page 12

Helpful Household Hints
V Statistics! Statistics! And some helpful hints, too. Look at
what the Florida Agricultural Extension Service has to impart
to you.
One out of every two marriages in 1964 involved a teenager.
The laser beam could well be the garbage disposer of the
future. It wont grind, mulch or burn. It will simply disintegrate
any substance placed in its path.
Bread may be stored up to a week in the refrigerator. After
that, the texture begins to change and it becomes stale. However,
you can keep bread ior longer periods in the freezer.

New Coed Senior Key System
Successful Say Counselors

By JOHN BKUNDACE
Alligator Correspondent
The universitys senior key
program, in its first quarter
of use, seems to be a success,
according to the head counselors
at most of the girls dormitories.
The senior key program allows
senior girls and those 21 years
of age and older to have a per personal
sonal personal key to a selected door of
their dormitory.
Rawlings hall has 26 girls with
senior keys.

Phi Eta Sigma Luncheons
Honor Selected Freshmen
By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer

A new weekly tradition is being
established on Floridas cam campus
pus campus a Dean of Mens lunch. It
is sponsored by Phi Eta Sigma,
the freshman men's honorary,
and the Dean of Mens Office.
Each week Dean of Men Frank
Adams and a member of Phi Eta
Sigma meet with four selected
freshmen boys for lunch in the
Arredondo room in the Reitz
Union.
The boys are selected from
names submitted by section and
resident advisors. They try to
choose a cross section of stu students
dents students on campus so that the
boys don't know one another be before
fore before luncheon.

i i'
' i' wf % II
THAT J\ RANKLIN GIRL
It's leather weather! The ens press of'
Fall is the greatest -compliment to tin
rich, rich suedes by Highland v r non
available at Franklin* s. Colored in l/rely
hues of brass, copper, taupe, teak, and
moss in classic and not so elass/e
styles
franklins
9:00 to 5:30- Daily
2401 SW 13th St. Village Square
(Across from Jerry's Sou

Ive had no problems at all
with the senior keys, said Mrs.
G. M. Beistle, head counselor
at Rawlings.
I really cant foresee any pro problems
blems problems arising the way things are
going now. I know most of the
girls personally. They are ser serious
ious serious minded students who have
proven themselves at the univer university.
sity. university.
-Miss Gail Mrkvicka, head
counselor for Broward hall, made
a similar replv.

The purpose of the luncheon is
to establish, in a small way,
communication between the
administration and the students.
Bruce McCurry, president of
Phi Eta Sigma said, This is the
first time freshmen have had the
opportunity to ask and receive
immediate answers to their many
questions concerning UF in such
a casual atmosphere.
McCurry said, So far the pro program
gram program has been very successful.
Both the boys and Dean Adams
are very excited over the re results.
sults. results.

Library Study Planned
By University Circle

By DENISE O'CONNELL
Alligator Stab Writer
Ever been frustrated while
looting for some current books
at the library? Even in the sep separate
arate separate college libraries, research
is often thwarted because of the

The biggest problem I have
is that occasionally a senior
will go out and forget her key.
Ive had no problems with
key duplication. said Miss
Mrkvicka.
Mrs. Beistle reported that a
few of the girls had been
approached by underclassmen in
an attempt to have duplicate keys
produced.
They reported the incidents
to me as soon as they happened.
Even these problems are very
rare.
Ive had almost all of the girls
come back and tell me they
havent used the key more than
once, said Mrs. Beistle.
And then they used it just
to get the feeling.
Both counselors feel the pro program
gram program is destined for a bright
future.
Its definitely a step in the
right direction. Seniors are re responsible
sponsible responsible enough to realize the
significance of a key, added
Miss Mrkvicka.

It's a
\ HAIR
HAPPENING
Youve let us present you with lavish stylos
\ and .exquisite fashion in hairpieces for a
' / you to take advantage of these marvelous
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lack of up to date books. Unfair
apportioning of funds may make
research more difficult in one
certain field than in others.
This serious find pressing pro problem
blem problem is not being ignored. The
University Circle, a colony of
Omicron Delta Kappa, has taken
up a study of the library facil-"
ities at UF. With four faculty
members in active voting mem membership,
bership, membership, the Circle has a strong
foundation and a definite voice
on the campus.
The University Circle came
to the University of Florida last
October. A year has passed and
the Circle is looking forward to
a charter from ODK, the largest
and oldest college leadership fra fraternity.
ternity. fraternity.
According, to the UC Constitut Constitution,
ion, Constitution, the organization has a three threefold
fold threefold purpose: to recognize men
who have achieved a high stand standard

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ard standard of college leadership; to bring
together these men who represent
all phases of collegiate life; and
to bring together members of the
faculty and student body on a
basis of mutual interest, under understanding,
standing, understanding, and helpfulness/'
The University Circle selects
its members from those who dis distinguish
tinguish distinguish themselves as leaders in
one of five areas; publications,
organizations, athletics, the arts,
or academics. In addition, all
members must have scholastic
averages in the upper 35 per
cent of the student body (last
year a 2.6). Total active mem membership
bership membership consists of; all student
members; four faculty members,
elected by University Circle; and
four alumni members. The fac faculty
ulty faculty members are elected for a
four year term, one new member
each year.
There are 25 active members
ter date; meetings are held once
a month. A swelling of the ranks
is foreseen this year and a tap tapping
ping tapping ceremony will take place on



Personality Profile

A World Os Music

The Rolling Stones and Bach
exist in two different worlds sep separated
arated separated by years and style. But
Dr. Robert Carson of the UF
can span the ages in the time
it takes to put down a viola and
pick up a guitar.
But then Dr. Carson has an
advantage most people dont. Not
only does he play music, but he
lives it along with the oth other
er other arts as a teacher of hu humanities
manities humanities at the University.
In fact, over the past 2i years,
hundreds of Floridians have be become
come become better acquainted with the
humanities under the able dir direction
ection direction of Dr. Carson, who is a
man of many talents and inter interests.
ests. interests.
A concert violinist, he played
the saxophone in dance bands for
17 years. He feels equally at
home with a paintbrush in his
hand. On campus he is known
as a professor, counselor, mu musician
sician musician and faculty advisor to both
a sorority and a fraternity.
His many accomplishments
might be termed a result of being
hard to satisfy and to discourage.
There is a saying, he said,
that easy writing makes hard
reading and hard writing makes
easy reading. This is just as
true for painting or playing an
instrument. Nothing will come in
a day. It takes time.
A person is born with some
innate talent, he said, but the suc success
cess success comes only when it is dev developed.
eloped. developed.
Hunt Here
To Develop
Africa Study
By JOHN DOBAK
Alligator Correspondent
The UF has its first fuliy
trained African historian.
Professor Hunt Davis Jr. was
brought to the university this
quarter to help develop a pro program
gram program of African studies and pro provide
vide provide the history department with
an offering in African history.
A relatively new field of stu study,
dy, study, Davis says tie belongs tothe
first generation of African his historians.
torians. historians. This is the first group
to receive doctorate degrees spe specifically
cifically specifically in African history.
Professor Davis is a gradu graduate
ate graduate of the University of Wis Wisconsin
consin Wisconsin and is finishing up his
Ph.D. He will receive his Ph.D.
in African history from the Un University
iversity University of Wisconsin.
The University of Florida is
starting at approximately the
same time as other universities
in beginning African studies,
Davis said.
Ten years ago only a hand handful
ful handful of schools offered courses in
African history, he said.
Since World War II there has
been a greater interest in the non nonwestern
western nonwestern world, said Davis.
The rise of independent nations
in Africa brought growth of dip diplomatic
lomatic diplomatic relations with the U.S.
and increased trade, according to
Davis.
A survey course is now being
taught in African history. Soon
there will be two more courses
offered, including history of mo modern
dern modern Africa.
An African history course
makes use of many non-written
sources, Davis said.
Archeology plays an import important
ant important role, as do oral traditions,
(what people remember of their
past)/ he said.
A Certificate of African Stud Studies
ies Studies will be offered to those who
complete the African studies pro program.
gram. program.

I first began painting in 1938
at Stephens College when I was
asked to teach humanities, he
explained. And for the first
three years my work was horri horrible.
ble. horrible. It is only in the last five
years that I think I have come
into my own where I have dev developed
eloped developed my own individual style.
The same is true with mu music.
sic. music. I began playing the violin
when I was four. In the last year
and a half, I have noticed some something
thing something in my music that has moved
me to tears. I feel it grip my
entire ..being in away that art
never has.
Dr. Carson devotes regular
hours daily to painting and play playing
ing playing the viola. He estimates that he
spends nine to 12 hours a week
playing and practicing.
I would say, with my water
colors, that only one out of 50

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is any good. But that doesn't mean
I have to do 49 bad ones first.
I may do 10 good paintings in
a row and not do one that sat satisfies
isfies satisfies me for weeks. But I keep
trying because if I ever quit,
I'll never be able to start again.
The hardest painting for Dr.
Carson is the commissioned one.
When I am asked to do a draw drawing
ing drawing of a certain thing, he ex explained,
plained, explained, I find it almost impos impossible.
sible. impossible.
Although Dr. Carson can play
a wide variety of music, he finds
the different styles worlds apart.
In popular music, he ex explained,
plained, explained, you assert yourself.
The musician puts his whole body
into it. In classical music you
must keep your emotions control controlled
led controlled because you are interpreting
another persons idea. But the
tone is your own.

Wednesday, November l, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

- 'f 'WKtRmKmKI.
-"'* 1 ''-VvJvsL-, f *
/
I
DR. ROBERT CARSON
. . lives his music.
COLLEGE LIFE
(Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ)
Sunday Night
9:13 P.M.

_A. A H House

Page 13



Page 14

t, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November i

UF Food Service Needs Improvement

By ALLEN PIERLEONI
Alligator Feature Writer
All week long Ive heard nothing but complaints
about the poor over-all quality of UFs food service.
A student in line at the main cafeteria looks at the
offerings, points to a tray full of something, and asks
the girl behind the counter, What the hell is that
supposed to be? She sighs disgustedly and doesn't
answer.
At the Tolbert Area snack bar, a student sits at
a table looking at a paper plate full of french-fries.
He picks up the plate and throws the potatoes against
the wall and walks out.
At the Reitz Union cafeteria students complain
about having to bus their own trays. I paid enough
for this slop, and I aint gonna take my tray up.
What the hell do they get paid for?
Rather disturbing, not funny. I went to the top to find
the source of the problem. Robert W. Overton, the
director for University Food Service (alias Ser Servomation
vomation Servomation Mathias Inc. of Gville) and I had a pleas pleasant
ant pleasant talk about some of the food service problems.
There was a recent survey concerned with the
quality and quantity of food served, the attitude of
employees, and space for comments. Overton told
me the results of the survey were not yet completed,
but that he did have a general picture of the consensus
in a few areas.
In general, the outcome of tne survey was good,
he said. He told me that the complaints were mostly
about employee attitude, dirty silverware, and bus-

Sgt. Pepper Pacesetter
Noted 'Rock Reception

By RAY McKEE
Special From the Trinity Tripod
Hartford, Conn.
Over the last few years Rock
has been coming into its own as
a musical form. The road to re respectability
spectability respectability started (in America)
when MEET THE BEATLES came
out in 1964. Since the Beatles
had gained so much publicity on
both sides of the Atlantic, many
popular reviewers felt compelled
to give it at least some space
in their columns.
Probably to their surprise,
many of these reviewers liked
what they heard. Here was a group
that was actually doing something
new and different. Their sound
was new, they used new chord
patterns, and they sang on key
in three-part harmony. Few re reviewers
viewers reviewers would go so far as to
say that the album was good, but
they had to admit that at least
there was potential.
The second big phase in the theshift
shift theshift occurred about a year later
when the pride of the folk world r
Bob Dylan, discovered how elec electronics
tronics electronics and folk music could be
mixed. Despite accusations of
sellout, all but the most de devoted
voted devoted folk-fans converted rather
quickly.
The change became even more
entrenched with the Beatles
RUBBER SOUL, an album con containing
taining containing a rather mild form of
folk-rock, and later with RE REVOLVER,
VOLVER, REVOLVER, a rather mild form of
psychedelia. Dylan released
BLONDE ON BLONDE,which, if
it proved nothing else, at least

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proved that he could be just as
commercial as the next man.
The clincher occurred on June
2, 1967, a date that will always
be remembered by Rock (note
that the n RoU has been lost
over the last two years) trivia triviaphiles.
philes. triviaphiles. On that day SERGEANT
PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS
CLUB BAND was released in the
United States.
The Christian Science Moni Monitor
tor Monitor had never before reviewed a
record; they didnt feel that it
fit their image. It is needless
to point out what the first record
was they reviewed. LIFE and
TIME each had special articles
on it. It was instantly number
one on the best seller list and
is still there fifteen weeks later.
What is important about this
record is not that it contains
anybodys philosophy on life, or
that it is a complete and total
experience, or even that it is
probably going to be the largest
selling record of all time. Re Records
cords Records have done that before. What
is important about this record
is that it has changed the attit attitude
ude attitude of literally millions of pe people.
ople. people. People with highly critical
musical taste in jazz, classical,
or folk music have found some something
thing something likeable and interesting in
this popular record.
People are discovering that
good doesnt have to mean
classical or jazz or folk. Good
can also mean fun, and fun doesnt
necessarily mean low-brow.
This is not to say that Rock
is better than any of the other

FEATURE OPINION

siiig. Its impossible to guarantee clean silverware
because of the volume of utensils washed daily,
he said.
Which is true. I was grossed out recently when I
discovered some food stuck to my sterile shiny fork
in the main cafeteria.
As far as poor employee attitude is concerned,
Overton told me that managers are urged to keep
employee spirit high, to convince them that students
are paying customers and not just people, and to
instill a sense of pride into these dedicated workers.
Someone failed somewhere along the line. MOST
of the employees try to do their jobs well, joke with
the students, and earn what theyre paid. Then there
are those who just dont care. And theres plenty
of them around.
Then again, what can you expect from people who
start at $1.15 an hour? That is an improvement over
last year, though, when the starting salary was only
$.90 an hour.
Perhaps things would improve if the University
Food Service raised the starting salary to $1.25
an hour and held pep rallies for the more sullen
employees.
Overton told me that there are three rating boards
that periodically inspect the 10 units on campus.
They are the Service Activities Board (three in inspections
spections inspections a week); the Alachua County Health Dep Department
artment Department (once a month); and the Florida State Com Commission
mission Commission of Restaurants and Hotels (several times
a year).
We have fared good with the local health boards,

forms, or even to demonstrate
that it can be compared to them.
(You cant compare Rock to clas classical
sical classical any more than you can com compare
pare compare folk to jazz. It depends
ultimately on personal prefer preference.)
ence.) preference.) This summer has proved
to be the time when this point
has been made evident; so evi evident
dent evident in fact that articles about
Rock now can take their place
beside film, drama, and literary
articles on arts pages.

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in general,'he said. Good. Not excellent. Just good."
I asked him about health cards. He checked on it
and told me that all employees have health cards
that are checked once a year. Once a year.
Nice. I wonder if the County Health Department
knows that syphilis can be transmitted through the
handling of food two months after its initial con contraction.
traction. contraction.
The head technician at the Infirmary Laboratory
assured me that chances of this occuring are less
than iO percent."
I asked Overton why, for example, an item is 45
cents at lunch and then is 50 cents at dinner. He
told me that it is a mistake and is the fault of the
human element in any business. That human ele element
ment element has already cost me money which I dont
have.
Why are there price differences in some items from
one cafeteria to another? Another mistake, accord according
ing according to Overton. Somebody sure makes a lot of mis mistakes
takes mistakes in that business.
Now, dont get me wrong. Ive nothing against Mr.
Overton. In fact, I think he is a very fine and honest
man. But I DO have plenty of gripes about the or organization
ganization organization he represents.
I think its about time the University Food Ser Service
vice Service got on the ball and began to improve conditions.
T think its about time to start feeding UF students
something that at least resembles food' and to start
treating them as people and not as a bother. Uni University
versity University Food Service, lets have some action to all
the griping, or take your business elsewhere.

Date Ticket Solution

Student end zone seats for fut future
ure future Homecoming football games
were suggested as a solution to
the present date ticket problem
by Charles Goodyear, assistant
athletic department business
manager.
The idea was noted following
a comment that every conceivable
date ticket request could not
be satisfied this year.
Charles Shepherd, student gov government
ernment government president, said that he
too could not guarantee to fulfill
every date ticket request.
My obligation is to the stu student
dent student first. Their dates are not
guaranteed a ticket, the pres-

ident said. Students are guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed a ticket.
The athletic department pro provides
vides provides one ticket per student for
a game, Shepherd explained. The
number of date tickets depends
on the amount of students who
the Faculty-Student Ticket Com Committee
mittee Committee determines by a mathe mathematical
matical mathematical formula will not attend
the contest. The formula is based
on students past attendance.
DICK FOWLER
BSME, U. of California,
joined Bethlehems
1964 Loop Course.
Assigned to the
maintenance and
engineering departments
of our South San Francisco I
Plant, Dick handles
assignments throughout
the plant. A typical project
was designing and
supervising installation
of a complex hydraulic J
mechanical transfer
system.
MANAGEMENT
MINDED?
Career prospects are
better than ever at
Bethlehem Steel. We need
on-the-ball engineering,
technical, and liberal arts
graduates for the 1968 J
Loop Course. Pick up a j
copy of our booklet at your I
placement office. f
An Equal Opportunity I
Employer in the Plans for
Progress Program
BETHLEHEM
STEEL iSjjtM I



RANKED SECOND

The UF golf team, ranked
second in the nation last year,
should be challenging for the
number one position this year,
according.to coach B. E. Bishop.
Returning from the NCAA
second place team to resume
Graves Cites
Skip Amelung
By GEORGE MEYER
Alligator Sports Writer
The best surprises dont al always
ways always come in small packages.
In fact, for UF head coach Ray
Graves, one of the years most
welcome surprises came in a
223-pund package, tagged Skip
Amelung.
Amelung has looked real good
this year, and has really been
a pleasant surprise for us,
said Graves in practice recently.
Amelung acquired a starting
left offensive tackle spot after
an interior line shake-up caused
by the loss of senior J.D. Pas Pasteris.
teris. Pasteris. Far from resting on his
laurels, the 6l Amelung has
kept his starting position secure
with a first-rate performance in
UFs 35-0 victory over Tulane.
The powerful sophomore has
been a familiar figure to Ft.
SKIP AMELUNG
Lauderdale sports fans. He was
an All-County tight end for Laud Lauderdale
erdale Lauderdale High as a junior and an
All-Conference, All-American
honorable mention senior tackle.
His senior year in i 966, Ame Amelung
lung Amelung was tabbed an All-American
swimmer in the 200-yard free freestyle
style freestyle event.
It was no decision at all for
me to choose to play football
over swimming," said the self selfassured
assured selfassured Amelung. I was offered
scholarships in both sports at
several schools, but the only
thing I really wanted to do was
play football for the Gators.
The team really got into a
groove after the Tulane game,
and I think were going to stay
up for the rest of the season.
Amelung said he was hampered
by a shoulder irritation in the
first three games of the year.
The irritation turned out to be
a faulty set of shoulder pads.
He changed pads, lost the irri irritation,
tation, irritation, and now feels more fit
than ever before
Asked about future plans, Ame Amelung
lung Amelung said he plans to use his
degree in business administra administration
tion administration to go into business with his
father fabricating aluminum rail railings
ings railings upon graduation. That is,
unless he gets a good offer from
the pros.
RentzNamed
SEC Back
UF junior quarterback Larry
Rentz has been chosen South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference back of the
week by the Associated Press
for his performance against Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt last Saturday.
Rentz completed 15 of 20
passes for 244 yards against the
Commodores. He threw for one
touchdown and ran for another.

UF Golfers Sight On Number One

competition in January are jun juniors
iors juniors Richard Spears, Steve Mel Melnyk
nyk Melnyk and John Darr, all tour tournament
nament tournament winners.
Spears won the Florida Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate tournament, Melnyk
captured the Miami Invitational
trophy and was second in the
Cape Coral Invitational and Darr,
present amateur golf champion,
was low man in the Houston
Invitational.
During the first months
workouts I have found a number
of boys that at this time are

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Take a look around any TRW location.
The young faces outnumber the old by
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scientists and engineers youll meet are
under thirty, or forty at least. Why 7
Because we depend on young ideas,
new ideas, fresh ideas. Thats why we
need you.
What kind of a place is TRW? Ask
around. Talk to your professors and
faculty advisors, or your friends who are
already working with TRW. Most of our
professional employees applied to TRW
o n the recommendation of friends.
Here are some of the disciplines where
new graduates may fmd career oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities -V TRW:

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ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS r~r
TRW CAMPUS INTERVIEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1967
SEE rOC/#? PLACEMENT OFFICE
' i

looking very good, said coach
Bishop.
He listed as likely prospects
for the team seniors Ed Hoard
and Mike Toale, juniors John
Sale and DonSayet, junior college
transfer Kemp Gholson and soph sophomores
omores sophomores Jay Horton, Ronald May Mayhood
hood Mayhood and Don Rambo.
Altogether there are 81 boys
on the golf roster.
This will provide a mad
scramble for the top six players
and should give us added depth,
jsaid Bishop.

Computer Sc ience s / A n a ly ti cal
Research / Aerosciences / Informa Information
tion Information Systems / Digital Systems / Com Communications
munications Communications Systems/Reliability/
Guidance A Control / Sensor Systems
/ Microelectronics / Electric Power /
Space Vehicle Design / Antenna Sys Systems
tems Systems Design and Analysis / Mechani Mechanical
cal Mechanical Engineering / Product Assurance /
Integration A Test / Systems Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering / Circuit Design / Electronic Coun Countermeasures
termeasures Countermeasures A Electronic Intelligence
Systems
If youll be receiving /our degree
(Ph D., MS or BS) in Engineering" or
Science this year, check with your
Placemen Director and talk with us

Wednesday, November 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Bishop, who invites every stu student
dent student on the campus to join the
team, feels thatUF has some real
advantages.
UF has the best all-around
setup in America," he said. We
have an outstanding academic
university. We have the climate.
We have our own 18-hole golf
course only a quarter of a mile
from our dormitories. And we
are able to provide an outstand outstanding
ing outstanding schedule that offers a good
golfer good competition.
If last years record is an

while were on campus. If you cant,
make it at that time and would like to
be considered for openings in the Los
Angeles area, Houston or Washington,
send your resume to: W. D. Mclvers,
College Relations, TRW, One Space
Park, Redondo Beach, California 90278.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
TRW

indication, UF should be a force
to reckon with in collegiate golf
in the coming season.
The Gators won 11 dual
matches and lost two, won the
Florida Intercollegiate title and
retired the trophies in the Miami
and Cape Coral Invitationals by
third consecutive wins of each.
The Gator golfers placed
second in the Northern Inter Intercollegiate,
collegiate, Intercollegiate, were the third-place
team in the Houston Invitational
and finished second in SEC com competition.
petition. competition.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday. November 1, 1967

Page 16

I Jeff Denkewalter I
I ALLIGATOR SPORTS WRITER jH| I
An open letter to the UF football team and coaches:
Dear Gators:
As you already know, you have a unique opportunity this com coming
ing coming Saturday. You an do what few other Gator gridiron teams
have done. Beat Auburn at Auburn.
Every sports page in every paper in the state this week has
been filled with stories and columns on how much trouble past
UF teams have had at Cliff Hare Stadium in Auburn. Hardly a
man is now alive who remembers that day and year when the
Gators last beat the Tigers in their den.
Legend has it that about a quarter of a century ago some Gator
team did manage to win in Auburn. But that is ancient history.
However, we do know that the last il times the Gators have gone
to Auburn they have come home the conquered and not the con conquerors.
querors. conquerors.
; TELL ME WHY
- v * f -
Why have there been so many frustrations?
One, Auburn is inevitably high for their game with you. To
call them inspired would be an understatement. They seem to
take out their frustrations for not having beaten Alabama in a
bear's age.
Second, we come to that madtiouse that the travel brochures
call Cliff Hare Stdium. The fans there seem to fee! the only way
to enjoy a football game is to stand on your feet and yell for
60 minutes at the top of your lungs.
Third I have come to the conclusion from personal observation
that some of the referees assigned to Cliff Hare games suffer
from near total loss of hearing. Two years ago at Auburn, Gator
quarterback Steve Spurrier discovered this. At least twice during
the game, Spurrier's pleas for quiet so his team could hear his
signals were met with loud screaming from Auburn fans and com complete
plete complete indifference from several officials. Spurrier found it next
to impossible to change plays at the line of scrimmage.
There are other reasons for past Gator troubles at Auburn.
Their names were Sidle, Frederickson, Cody, Thornton, and others.
YOU CAN WIN
Despite these formidable obstacles, I think you can beat Auburn
this Saturday. Needless to say, it will take a supreme effort
from all of you and a good measure of lick.
The final analysis: UF 28 and Auburn 24.
Pacific Telecast Talent Agency
NBC plans the first live tele telecasts
casts telecasts of a sports event from for Gainesville
Hawaii for Nov. 4 and 5 when
play in the Hawaiian Open The Complete Booking Agency
golf tourney will be transmitted TAG 378-4314
from Honolulu via the Lani
Bird satellite
IDO VOO TRAVEL JUST
TO 6ET TO THE OTHER SIDE?
S
DON'T TRY FOR THE HM
OTHER SIDE HOUSE OF TRAVFL
UNTIL YOU CHECK WITH US. 3415 w.univ. Ave.
378-1601

Bartlett Lauds Miller

Although the UF basketball
season has not officially begun
the Gators already lead the nat nation
ion nation in one statistic.
That statistic is 6-7 guard
Dave Miller. Miller, who is the
Gator captain, played center for
Delray Beach High School, moved
to forward for the Gators as

SPORTS

Muir Leads Gators
To Rifle Victory

By JEFF DENKEWALTEB
Alligator Sports Writer
Led by team captain Toby Muir,
the Florida Rifles defeated rifle
squads from the Citadel and FSU
last Saturday on the UF rifle
range.
Muir fired a 281 out of a
possible 300 to pace all shooters.
Lee Morse of the Gator sharp sharpshooters
shooters sharpshooters placed second in the
match with a 269 mark.
Other Florida Rifle team mem members
bers members competing were Jim Waugh,
Terry Chatham and Lynn Peo Peoples.
ples. Peoples. The final team tally read
UF 1071, Citadel 1037 and FSU
993.
The Gator marksmen currently
sport a 6-1 mark.
It was a very fine team ef effort,
fort, effort, stated Captain Tommy
Smith, advisor to the Rifles.
The Citadel has great front frontline
line frontline shooters and outstanding
depth.

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A*-
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To them, add the cash value of the policy at a given
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The difference is the pure net cost of life insurance.
This is the basis the Courant uses tor its Actual
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For your tree copy of this authoritative report, just
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Representing
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a sophomore and switched to
guard last season.
As far as we know Dave
is the tallest guard in the nation,
and he's a good one, says UF
basketball coach Tommy Bart Bartlett.
lett. Bartlett. He has an excellent long
shot and can handle the ball as
if he were a 5-11 playmaker.

Weve tried to beat the Cit Citadel
adel Citadel for the last three years,
said Muir. They beat us once
last year and twice the year
before. This victory was cer certainly
tainly certainly sweet revenge.
Although pleased with their
score, team members were un unhappy
happy unhappy with conditions at the UF
shooting range.
Firing on an outdoor range
leaves us at the mercy of the
weather, stated Muir. Any
wind or rain will adversely af affect
fect affect our shooting and thus lower
our score.
Being right next to the sew sewage
age sewage plant doesn't help concen concentration
tration concentration any, commented Waugh.
This Saturday the Rifles will
journey to Auburn to battle the
Tiger rifle squad.
Im confident we will break
the 1100 mark and come home
with a victory, predicted Sgt.
Carman McClellan, coach of the
Rifles.

Miller fractured his neck last
spring and had to wear a cast
that reached from his hips to
the top of his head. The like likeable
able likeable senior had to wear the
odd-looking contraption for three
months.
It probably has made Dave
taller, declares Bartlett. It
forced him to stand straight as
an arrow for three months.
Miller has healed completely
and looks better than ever. Last
season he averaged 13.8 points
for the season and scored at a
15.6 clip against SEC opponents.
His height advantage enabled him
to pull in an average of five re rebounds
bounds rebounds per game from his guard
post.
He is a valuable man to
have, says Bartlett. He can
handle the ball well, score from
the outside and still get his
share of-<£sbounds.
One of Millers biggest assets
is his ability to play defense. In
Bartletts style of defense, Miller
plays the wing position. Last sea sea;
; sea; son he constantly put the pres pressure
sure pressure on his opponents.
He is the best defensive
player we have, commented
Bartlett. He has good speed
and reacts well.
Besides his playing ability,
Miller adds real spark to the
Gator squad. The desire and
hustle of the physical education
major is an inspiration to the
whole team.
Dave is a real take-charge
boy, says Bartlett. His spirit
couldn't be better and the boys
really respect his leadership.
Because of his height, pro
scouts have shown quite an in interest
terest interest in Miller. A tall guard
with good hands, speed, defensive
ability and a good shooter is
what the scouts are looking for.
808 SIMS
BSEE, Tenn. A & I,
joined Bethlehems 1965
Loop Course, is now an
; engineer in the
Department at our
Lackawanna Plant, near
Buffalo, which consumes
1 billion kwh yearly, and
generates about 250
million kwh. Bob works
! on engineering and
installation of new
equipment, and
supervises maintenance.
MANAGEMENT
MINDED?
Career prospects are
better than ever at
Bethlehem Steel. We need
on-the-ball engineering,
J technical, and liberal arts
graduates for the 1968
Loop Course. Pick up a
copy of our booklet at your
placement office.
An Equal Opportunity
Employer in the Plans for
Progress Program
BETHLEHEM
STEEL ,Jgr M