Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Peace Declared On Washington

BY STEVE HULL
Alligator Editor
Washington, D.C. More than fifty thousand
persons including 50 students from the UF declared
peace on the Pentagon Saturday in the largest
and most militant war protest ever to be staged in the
UJS.
The march on the Pentagon began early Saturday
as a largely good-natured rally, but degenerated
within a few hours into a violent pitched battle on
the Pentagon steps between protestors and rifle
wielding Army troopers.
According to UF SDS member Steve Horowitz
the UF contigent poured into the nations capitol
early Saturday by car and bus. a
More than 200 persons were arrested and over
30 were injured at the mass anti-war rally. Twenty
five of the injured were demonstraters. Most injuries
were suffered when U.S. deputy marshalls clashed
with militant students.
No UF students were reported injured or arrested
during the melee at the Pentagon.
This reporter saw soldiers using tear gas in a
number of incidents to quell militant it

Weather
Partly Cloudy
High In The 80 1 s
Winds 5-15 MPH

Vol. 60, No. 21

Hr v
pw JHf j J|
W tfikA V A
(Photo by Dusty Hopkins)
WORMY CIGARETTES!
Wormy Cigarettes
Foundln Machine

By DAVE REDDICK
r Alligator Correspondent
3
Harvey Alper, Alligator man managing
aging managing editor, bought a pack of
cigarettes Sunday afternoon from
the vending machine in the Stu Student
dent Student Activities Center of the
Reitz Union. Alper got more
than he bargained for the
pack had apparently been at attacked
tacked attacked by worms.
The Eli Witt Vending Co., own owner
er owner of the machine, was notified
and a man was sent to open it.
The two remaining packs of the
same brand were also found to
be infested. The other brands
were inspected and appeared to
be clean. However, they were not
opened and were only given a
quick visual check.

The
Florida Alligator

Last Wednesday, several candy
bars bought near campus were
found to contain caterpillars. The
candy machine was owned by
Wometco Vending Co., not Eli
Witt. But the situation was the
same, the products had been left
in the machine over a long per period
iod period of time, allowing the bugs
to infest them.
When asked if the cigarettes
were ever checked the route man
said; Unless we get a com complaint,
plaint, complaint, we don't bother. If we do
get a call, we check the mach machine.
ine. machine.
We catft check each pack,
it's just like a store, if you get
a bad product, they refund your
money. If we find a bad pack,
we replace it.
(See CIGARETTES Page 5)

UF STUDENTS ATTEND MASSIVE PROTEST

Alligator Editor
Steve Hull was in
Washington, D C.
to cover the
peace protest at
the Pentagon Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. Here is his
report

was also reported that protestors had dispersed
tear gas cannisters of their own during the march.
The major confrontation of the days march occured
at 5:30 p.m. when several thousand demonstrators
gathered on the front lawn of the Pentagon.
Suddenly a section of the group split from tne
larger crowd. Using Army tactics the splinter group
outflanked the cordon of military police and stormed
the East door of the pentagon. the only one un unlocked
locked unlocked and the one being used by newsmen.
At the same time the marchers on the lawn below

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Education Teach-In
Supported By Most

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The teach-in on the crisis in
state higher education, proposed
by the Alligator for the third
period today, is supported by
most students, many faculty
members and some adminis administrators.
trators. administrators.
i 1
A scientific sampling of the
results of todays teach-in
will be compiled and taken
to. Tallahassee by Alligator
Editor Steve Hull, Managing
Editor Harvey Alper and SG
President Charles Shepherd.
They will speak to Gov. Claude
Kirk or his education aide
Charles Perry about the cur current
rent current status of higher educa education.
tion. education.

Several college deans told the
Alligator they would not oppose
the teach-in. They Intend to leave
the decision in the hands of their
professors, they said. Is not
the UF living up to the standards

Katz Resigns As President
Os Mens Interhall Council
Murphree Area President Ric Katz resigned as president of
Men's Interhall Council Sunday after a reconsideration of a council
election began with heavy discussion and ended with the absence
of a quorum in a council meeting.
Council members brought up reconsideration of Mike Moore as
Council vice president, although Katz said that he felt Moore's
election two weeks ago was valid and should not be a question for
reconsideration.
Moore and two, area representatives later walked out of the meet meeting,
ing, meeting, resulting in an absence of a quorum.
The leaving council members were charged with playing petty
politics by another member, but Katz said politics was not involved.
We did something and we should stick by it (the previous vote
electing Moore)/' said Katz, explaining his resignation as due to
the reconsideration move that afternoon.

s
HULL

Board Criticism
Justified In Areas

of a great university? If not, then
why? is the suggested theme.
The purpose of the teach-in
according to the Alligator Editor
Steve Hull, is to acquaint stu students
dents students with the financial problems
facing the state universities.
SG President Charles Shepherd
said the teach-in can be valuable
because a great many problems
at the UF are based on ignor ignorance.
ance. ignorance.
We should take a hard look
at the University and its place
in education in the United States.

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
In the wdke of charges that the
Reitz Union Board is ineffective
and irresponsible, Union Board
Vice-President Ed Koren said the
criticism is justified in some
areas but not in others.
For instance, he said,Our
programming does not stink. We
had the worlds most famous op-

began to chant storm the bastille and then threw
ropes up the Pentagon wall and climbed over to the
mall.
The thirty youths who were able to get through
the unlocked Pentagon door were immediately con confronted
fronted confronted by troops with rifles at port arms and
Deputy U.S. marshalls brandishing billy clubs, who
pushed the small group down the flight of steps and
back to the front of the mall.
Horowitz along with other UF students were among
the group of protestors that stormed the Pentagon
Mall.
U.S, troops then poured out of the building to join
the battle as it surged violently, protestofs screaming
and shouting.
Deputy marshalls grabbed unruly demonstrators
and subdued them with billy clubs. A number of the
protestors were bleeding heavily from head wounds.
Dozens of the protest group were dragged off into
awaiting paddy wagons. Two deputy marshalls sus sustained
tained sustained head injuries during the melee.
Army troops for the most part were impassive
to taunts by the demonstrators, however, at one
point fighting became so violent that a few soldiers
(See POLICE Page 2)

Monday, October 23.1967

Inside
The So I ex,
Bike Or Cycle?
See Page 5

I think if we can create student
awareness it (the teach-in) will
have been worth the time.,"She time.,"Shepherd
pherd time.,"Shepherd commented.
Shepherd also said there are
some deep rooted problems at
the UF. He said money is just
one of the problems and that
the attitude of the university to towards
wards towards students and students to toward
ward toward the university should be
discussed during the teach-in.
UF President Stephen C. O'-
(See TEACH-IN Page 2)

era star (Anna Moffo) brought to
the union for the premiere of
La Traviata Friday night. No
other student union can boast of
that.
Koren was answering Student
Body President Charles Shep Shepherd's
herd's Shepherd's claim that the activities
that the union are supposedly put putting
ting putting on stink. He made that ac accusation
cusation accusation last week in the after aftermath
math aftermath of a controversy in which
Bill Moore, chairman of the
Board's Films Committee, was
removed from office.
Moore claimed politics played
a part in his removal, but union
officials said he was removed
because he is currently not en enrolled
rolled enrolled as a student.
Koren explained a factor that
he said has held back program programming
ming programming in the new union. We
originally were supposed to move
into the new union in. March or
April of 1966. Well, it wasn't
ready for occupancy until May,
1967. And our full board didn't
assemble until Sept. 25. That's
given us less than a month to
organize the program.
(See BOARD Page 2)



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

Page 2

Police, Demonstrators Clash In Washington

resorted to rifle butts to force back the mob.
After the major assault had been repulsed the
demonstrators lit bonfires on the Pentagon mall
just 20 yards from the door they had just stormed.
Picket signs and leaflets were used as kindling
for the bonfire. More bonfires sprung up and a huge
one was ablaze on the Pentagon lawn. Government
roadslgns were used to stoke that bonfire.
At least 50 students at the bonfires burned their
draft cards.
A rally at the Lincoln Memorial two hours prior
to the storming of the Pentagon included Dr. Benjamin
Spock, who violently denounced Lyndon Johnson and
his policies in Vietnam. The wife of the late Mai com X
who had just returned from Hanoi, alsp denounced
U.S. bombings as inhumane acts.
; More than 600 campuses from 49 states were
reportedly represented at the massive march.

Union Board Criticism

If Shepherd could make that
claim at the beginning of next
term/ Koren continued, it
could be justified. But were just
getting started.
Koren admitted the union board
needs imporvement in several
areas, such as budget, member membership
ship membership procedures, and the re relationship
lationship relationship between the board and
the Union Board of Managers
and Student Government.
Our budget method is inde indecisive,
cisive, indecisive, and needs revising,
Koren said. The way it is now,
each committee chairman, who is
only assured of office one quar quarter,
ter, quarter, writes a budget for an en entire
tire entire fiscal year. So, if a new

Connell said the students should
be aware of the condition this
university is in. OConnell said
many of the faculty members do
not think they are competent
to discuss the problems at UF.
The preside## said the UF has
a contract with its students and
taking away an hour of allotted
academic time would be an
irresponsible act.
Harold C. Clark, UF professor,
member of the faculty-senate and
the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP)
said most faculty members
dont know what to do about the
teach-in.
Clark also said most faculty
members were aware of the pro problems
blems problems facing higher education
and he believed they were quite
competent to discuss these
issues.
I really think the initiative for
the proposed teach-in should
come from the students. Profess Professors
ors Professors should continue with their
curriculum unless the students
take the initiative, Clark stated
Sunday.

PURE BEEF HAMBURGERS 12*
(U.S. GOVERNMENT INSPECTED)
Breakfast
mm Served Anytime! I
1432 W. Univ. Ave.
i tiu him m hwbi m lywwwai w* n wpl
IhmMi mad to rovlao or turn >wty copy which it conoldoro abJoctiomMo.
I NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though dooirgd podttofl will bo glvpn wbonovor
posatblo
The Florid* Alligator will not consider ndjustments of payment tor any advertisement
Involving typograpMcal errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to tbs Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within 0) on* day alter advertisement appears. Tbs Florida Alligator
will not be responsible tor mor* than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices tor correction must bo given before next Insertion.
THE FLO HI DA ALIJGATOH Is tbs official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and la published five time* weekly except during May, June, end July when
II la published semi-weekly. Only edUorials represent the official opinions of their atdhors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fix, NNKN. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter

Teach-In

chairman were appointed during
the year, he would have to work
from the old budget.
Koren said the membership
system is antiquated. Any sut sutdent
dent sutdent can join; all he has to do
is fill out papers. There's no
achievement attached to that.
He suggested a system where whereby
by whereby prospective members would be
interviewed and worked into com committees.
mittees. committees. This method would
weed out people who join just
because their fraternity or so sorority
rority sorority says they have to, he siad.
Koren added a communication
breakdown often prevents people
who want to work for the union
board from knowing how to go
about it.

Many university administrat administrators
ors administrators just dont know what to say
about the proposed teach-in.
I havent given it a thought,
replied Dean of Men Frank T.
Adams when asked what he
thought.
Vice-President of Student Af Affairs,
fairs, Affairs, Lester L. Hale admitted
not knowing too much about
the teach-in.
Im in favor of the idea of
wanting to inform people (about
the problems at UF) but dont
know if a teach-in is the way
to do it, Hale said Sunday.
Among students in favor of the
teach-in is Richard Rick T.
Ryckaert, 3JM, I hope there is
one. A teach-in would allow stu students
dents students to find out whats going
on and it would let me know
what other people think, Ry Ryckaert
ckaert Ryckaert saiik
Most students interviewed
by the Alligator said they thought
the teach-in was a good idea.
I definitely think there is a
crisis in higher education and a
teach-in would adquaint students
with what the problems are,
said Dick Wilson, 3AS.

There were many college students among the pro protestors,
testors, protestors, both hippie and clean cut; middle aged
couples neatly dressed; and bearded black power
militants.
Some of the demonstrators carried North Vietnam
flags and shouted support of the National Liberation
Front (NLF). Che Guevara, recently killed Cuban
revolutionist, acted as a martyr for many of the
protestors. Signs proclaiming Che Lives graced
many placards.
Norman Mailer, author of many Anti-Vietnam
books was arrested on the Pentagon mall for at attempting
tempting attempting to break through police lines. Dave Dell Dellinger
inger Dellinger chairman of the National Mobilization Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, sponsor of the march was also arrested.
The marchers left the Lincoln Memorial at 2:05
singing the Battle Hymn of the Republic. The
massive group of people crossed Memorial Bridge
over the Potomac. Several times the group halted
uncertain of which route to follow. At one point
the march halted because of a group of high school

In reference to the Union Board
of Managers, Koren said, now
can you communicate effectively
with a group that has only met
twice since May?
The roles of the union board
and the Board of Managers need
. to be further defined, he said.
For instance, the Board of Man Managers
agers Managers reviews the union boards
budget and constitution, but not
the programming. It might be a
good idea for them to do that,
he said.
Koren was emphatic in his op opinion
inion opinion that the union board and
student government should be
kept separate. Its been shown
on other compuses that they work
better when separated, he said.

At last!
A flight service
to fit your needs

Have you been hampered by inadequate trans transportation
portation transportation to meet airline connections or bus business
iness business appointments? Four Winds Aviation,
Inc. now serves Gainesville with daily Air
Taxi Service to Jacksonville.
Answering the need for fast, economical
transportation any time of day, Four Winds
will assure you that you will make those
airline connections or business appointments
with time to spare.

" 'h "* ' ;jr v.
\L L OUR. Vvf/Vos Air Taxi
FOR RESERVATIONS, PHONE 376-5326

students displayed signs advocating the Vietnam
war.
There were some Communists and pro-Com pro-Communist
munist pro-Communist sympathizers, however, a Pentagon official
said there were few.
When this reporter left Washington Sunday, 200
protestors were still camped out on the Pentagon
steps. One student who was there, said he plans
to stay until today when Pentagon officals come to
work.
The groups officially listed as participating were:
American Friends Service Committee; Congress of
Racial Equality; W.E.B. Du Bois Club; Inter-Uni Inter-University
versity Inter-University Christian Movement; Catholic and Jewish
Fellowships; National Conference for New politics;
National Lawyers Guild; Returned Volunteers (Peace
Corps Alumni); Southern Christian Leadership Con Conference;
ference; Conference; Students for a Democratic Society; Student
Non-Violent Coordinating Committee; and Women
Strikers for Peace.

COMPLETE BRAKE SERVICE on all JM
American and Foreign Cars fi
10,000 Mile or 1-Yr. Guarantee
on Complete Brake Job
Rebuilt Generators & Starters
HULLS BRAKE SERVICE
& SUPPLY UUUAMdI
1314 S. Main St. Phone 372-1497
Member Independent Garage Owners of
mr %
*** s*e PRINTS AND POSTERS
New Different Exciting Wild Cool Calm and Tasty
All this and more at 1634 W. University. Next to Carolyn Plaza.

Four Winds Air Taxi will speed you to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville in 35 minutes with real airline com comfort.
fort. comfort. Competent, ex-military aviators are
at the controls for a safe and smooth flight
in any weather.
This time-saving air service is offered at
the low rate of $lO per person, one way.
Confirmed reservations can be made through
your local travel agent or by calling Four
Winds Aviation at 376-5326.



Official Election
Results Listed

Presented below are the offi official
cial official results of Thursdays Student
Government elections. Approxi Approximately
mately Approximately 5,000 students, the largest
number for a full election in
years according to election offi officials,
cials, officials, voted.
Hume (two seats): Mike David Davidson,
son, Davidson, First Party, 192 votes; Liz
Gifford, First, 154; Jeanne
Brooke, United, 152; Charlie
Buresch, United, 145.
Yulee(one seat): Bonnie Brown,
United, 113 votes; Barbra Nunn,
First, 92.
Jennings (one seat): Harriet
Halperin, United, 145; Susan
Brown, First 54.
Broward (two seats); Jacque Jacqueline
line Jacqueline Ley, First, 180 votes; Joyce
Miller, First, 161; Nancy Col Collier,
lier, Collier, United, 104; Marcia Platte,
United, 88 votes.
Murphree (three seats): Ric
Katz, United, 319 votes; Roger
Ingley, United, 274; Paul Lunetta,
HC Parade
Should Be
Biggest Ever
Following this years Pea Peanuts
nuts Peanuts theme of Homecoming,
over one hundred pounds of pea peanuts
nuts peanuts and peanut candy will be
thrown to the crowd during the
course of the Homecoming par parade,
ade, parade, according to Parade chair chairman
man chairman Mike Pent, ILW.
Other plans include presenta presentation
tion presentation of the best high schools in
the state, from Coral Gables
to Pensacola. A special attract attraction
ion attraction for the parade will be the
high-stepping Florida A&Mband,
appearing in UFs Homecoming
for the first time.
Tom Dixon, assistant parade
chairman, estimated that 65,000
people would view what should
be the biggest parade ever. In Included
cluded Included in the parades 85-plus
units will be all-girl marching
teams, a Mercury space capsule
and the Florida Whip Crackers.
Besides the 20 fraternity, so sorority
rority sorority and organization floats,
Maas Brothers will provide a
float for the Sweetheart candi candidates.
dates. candidates.
.= **The parade staff this year
has concentrated on not only
quantity but also quality in bands
and units, said Pent. Thestaff
has put in about 1500 hours,
starting last trimester, in secur securing
ing securing parade entries and are to
be highly commended for their
work.
The parade starts at 1 p.m.
Friday afternoon. It will pro proceed
ceed proceed from the drill fields down
University Avenue into downtown
Gainesville.

flight: (flit) it.
1. the act of flying.
2. to travel through
the air.
Whats flying all about? We at Four Winds would
like to show you the exciting world of flight.
Call today for your $5 introductory flight lesson. .
- and watch our ads for more about flying.
, J Too* yjf COIL
y a^avot/ jlv-jjlv

United, 215; Victor Ramey, First,
192; Fred Strom, First, 181,
Douglas Crow, First, 153.
Twin Towers (twoseats): Janis
Mohrbacher, First, 109 votes;
Jeanne Long, United, 88; Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Dauber, United, 75; Pam
Wright, First, 73 votes.
Graham (two seats): Gary
Goodrich, United, 279 votes; Greg
Johnson, United, 265; Cheryll
Smith, First 117 votes; Kurt
Marmar, First, 98.
Tolbert (two seats): David L.
Jackson, United, 251 votes;
Thomas Trezise, United, 181
votes; Lou Tally, First, 167,
Steve Robitaille, First, 117.
Rawlings (one seat): Karen
Johnson, United, 79; MonicaSha MonicaShagrin,
grin, MonicaShagrin, First, 52.
Corry Village (one seat): John
Parks, independent, 110 votes.
Flavet 111 (one seat): Clarence
Selin, independent, 142 votes;
Bob Smith, United, 85.
Diamond Village (one seat):
David Vosloh, United, 109 votes.
Off-campus (11 seats): John
Mike Malone, United, 1,032
votes; Mitchell Martin, United,
1,032; Judy Graham, United,
1,031; Randy Briggs, United,
1,028; Don Goodman, United,
1,028; J.H. Klink, United, 1,024;
Bill Deas, United, 1,018; Mark
Frost, United, 1,017; Michael
Barker, United, 1,005; Bill Sykes,
United, 99; Robert Moore,
United, 992.
Also running from off-campus
were Stirling Close, First, 448;
Nancy Dalton, First, 421; Tommy
Ball, First, 397; Greg Cottin,
First, 397; Roddy Brubbs, First,
387; Bernard Barton, First, 385;
Jack Belcher, First, 385; Jay
Folk, First, 380; Larry Helms,
367; Mike Goettee, First, 380;
and Barbara Sivils, First, 319.
Also, Bob Griffin, independent,
166; Greg Albert, independent,
118; George Franks, Apple Pie
Party, 117 votes; Rick Parker,
Apple Pie, 121; Walt Woodward,
Apple Pie. 112.
Retaining the name Seminole
for the UF yearbook: 2,018 for
retention, 2,442 against.
Alternative Yearbook names:
Gator, i, r r 76; Orange and Blue,
1,576;
Pine, 283; Hulputta, 199.
The card section: 2,958 votes
for retention, 1,712 for abolish abolishment;
ment; abolishment; 2,043 for card section re revision,
vision, revision, 1,263 for keeping the card
section in its present form.
Student financing of coliseum:
3,127 for, 1,721 against.
Compulsory ROTC: 3,053
against, 1,676 for; 3,022 favoring
voluntary ROTC, 161 opposed.

QUIK-SAVE PP
PRICES GOOD THRU i 1 £
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29 9w. u iv a.
MI 1) v: 1 1 1. t.- _
wmm $2.25
Sl! NEW fOUU
3fe|l HAIRCOLORING
FASTER.. .IO MINUTE TIMING
1/ 3§ SPECIAL CREME
j SHAMPOO EASY- ( 1 .49 )
&L- WONT WASH OUT \ /
LISTERINE MOUTHWASH
14 oz. $1.17 value 77$
BAN ROLL-ON 1 oz.
DEODORANT 75c value 49$
BAN AEROSOL 4 oz.
DEODORANT SI.OO value 5 5$
LYSOL SPRAY $1.69 size
DISINFECTANT 14 oz. 99$
STRIDEX MEDICATED PADS
For Acne 42's SI.OO size 79$
FOR THE COLD SEASON
ANACIN TABLETS ofl
- lQQs $1.33 list
DRISTAN NASAL MIST
DRISTAN TABLETS
24's $1.19 list 88$
EXCEDRIN lOOs
r $1.49 list 99$
g; XEROX
1 1f COPY E I
Coupon Good Thru Oct. 22, 1967 ____mmmmm
1960. Reductions Or Enlargements |
p Not Included In Coupon Offer.

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

The Charlatan
May Circulate
Nationwide
Hopefull y the next issue of the
Charlatan will be out before the
end of the quarter, stated Bill
Killeen, editor of the off-campus
humor magazine.
Our circulation is about
35,000 now but we hope to go
nationwide with the next issue
and I'm having 125,000 copies
printed. We have outlets in about
four of the Big Ten schools,
L.S.U., Alabama, Georgia Tech.,
and other schools around the
South and country. Killeen said.
The publication takes about a
month to compile and will be
incorporated.
1
The idea to incorporate came
along before the recent law suit
(libel suit brought by King White,
director of Student Publications
against the Charlatan) and has
nothing to do with it, commented
Killeen.
Pam Brewer, (the much pub publicized
licized publicized model of last springs
Charalatan issue) would not be
in the new edition, Killeen com commented.
mented. commented.
The magazine will continue its
policy of nude posing just as
before. When asked if he feared
more trouble with the Student
Conduct Committee, Killeen re remarked,
marked, remarked, I think there has been
a tremendous liberalization of the
conduct code which we helped to
bring about? I dont think there
will be any trouble. Florida girls
will be used in posing, though
not exclusively.
We wane a more profession professional
al professional job, a little more classy than
before. Well have some color
poses and a little better looking
magazine which will probably be
published in Atlanta, Killeen
added.

T.V. LOG -^1

2 4 9 12 5
NBC CBS ABC NBC NET
7:00 Zane Grey Hogans Heros Dragnet T.B.A. Whats New
7:30 Monkees Gunsnioke Monkees You"?
q /\f\ Cowboy
8:00 Man From Uncle Gunsmoke ln Man from Uncle NET Journal
8:30 Man From Uncle Lucille Ball Bear Bryant- Man from Uncle NET Journal
Profile -
9:00 Bob Hope Andy Griffith Bob Hope Clneposium
' 1 ll '"..1
9 : 30 Danny Thomas True Peyton Place Bob Hope Richard Boone
10:00 Nation of Nation of ABC News I Spy
lmmigrants Immigrants Special
10:30 I Spy
r
11:00 News News News News
11 : 30 Johnny Carson MOVIE joey Bishop Johnny Carson
So Big 1
For the football fans, tonights pick is Bear Bryant Profile. This
focuses on the coach who said, Winning isnt everything...its the onlything.

TUMBLEWEEDS By TOM RYAN
Call auk^-^rty ( (THIRTV DAYsT)^- \/ but, if wo pont pay uF\
PAYS]/ f ( r|^ L ) '( IN THIRTY, I'LL NEVER PEAL )
UF Among Top 25 Universities
Getting Research,Education Funds

For the first time in history,
the UF has been rated among
the 25 distinguished institutions
in the United States that receive
a major share of federal research
and educational grants.
The total federal grants and
contracts for research, facilities
and training held by the Univer University
sity University in 1966 amounted to $25,
202,000, ranking Florida 25th.
The 1967 results will not be avail available
able available until next fall.
The University of Florida
ranked 37th in 1963 and 35th in
both 1964 and 1965. The only
Southern university above Flo Florida
rida Florida was the University of Texas
in 13th place. Florida was pre preceded
ceded preceded in 24th position by Purdue
University and followed by two
Southern institutions the Univ University
ersity University of North Carolina at Cha Chapel
pel Chapel Hill (27th) and Duke Univ University
ersity University (28th).
The list of 100 leading univ universities
ersities universities and colleges was topped
by the University of Michigan
($66,265,000); Massachusetts In Institute
stitute Institute of Technology ($63,232,
000); Stanford University (S6O,
621,000); Columbia University
($60,041,000); and the University
of Illinois ($58,491,000).

, The state of Florida now has
; three universities in the top 100
i for receipt of federal funds. The
i University of Miami and Florida
i State University rank 55th and
77th, respectively.
Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of the
Universitys Graduate School,
expressed satisfaction in place
* ment of Florida among the pres prestige
tige prestige group of universities. How However,
ever, However, he warned that such status
is very difficult to maintain.
Six universities which pre previously
viously previously had been listed in the top
25 in receipt of federal grants
are now below the University of
Florida, Dean Grinter noted.
Federal grants require highly
visible state support, whether
there is a matching fund re requirement
quirement requirement or not, he continued.
The current sharp reduction
of state funds at the University
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 109 ea.
20 & Over, 99
! Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. toll p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

of Florida for purchase of scient scientific
ific scientific equipment will be accompan accompanied
ied accompanied by a similar reduction of fed federal
eral federal aid for the same purpose.
Dean Grinter explained a re reduction
duction reduction of $1 million in state
support of the University could
mean a total loss to the over overall
all overall University budget of $2 million
because of decreased related fed federal
eral federal support.
One reason why the Univ University
ersity University has progressed so rapidly
in the ranking of institutions
was its success in obtaining a
$4,240,000 Center of Excellence

ROBBIES
The Best In Sfalg
COLOR T.V. & BILLIARDa
1718 W. University Ave.
"On The Gold Coast

l/-UC YOUR TAPE RECORDER
tt/Utn O HEADQUARTERS
DIRECT FACTORY DEALER
Wollensak& Revere
Tape Recorder & Accessories
-NO MIDDLEMAN'S PROFIT-
or Cartridge
SEE N. CEN. FLORIDA'S LARGEST
SECLECTION of Wollensake & Revere at
PAI
tuutn m 376 7171
PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED BY
COUCHS Own Wollensak
Factory Warranty Service Department

grant from the National Science
Foundation in 1965-66," Dean
Grinter recalled.
This grant would not have
been obtained if the Florida Board
of Regents had not made a com commitment
mitment commitment of matching and contin continuation
uation continuation funds as required by the
sponsoring agency."
The annual report, Federal
Support to Universities and Col Colleges,
leges, Colleges, Fiscal Years 1963-66,"
is produced by the National Sci Science
ence Science Foundation and published by
the U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.



Bike Or Motorcycle?
Solex, the bicycle with a motor, has been
receiving tickets for parking in areas re restricted
stricted restricted to
Many purchased the motorbike that goes
V*i \' 7 r v \ /Y-B 19 miles per hour on the premise that
woul d be classified as a bicycle when
t!le motor was disengaged. This would allow
PUTTING ALONG AT 19 MPH . Meanwhile the tickets will continue to come I
and the question remains, when is a bi-
LOIS PARKS MANEUVERS HER SOLEX cycle a motorbike?

Club Discusses
Indian Economy
Contradictory to an earlier re report
port report in the Alligator, the topic
of the India Club discussion group
today will be the Economic Sit Situation
uation Situation in India, not Music of In India.
dia. India.
This discussion is sponsored
by the India Club in association
with Dr. Austin B. Creel, asst
prof., department of religion. The
meeting is in Room 123 of the
Reitz Union, from 3:30 to 5 p.m.
.iv

I wBFm mB I
8 I
Sk > lJ aMi yi
|Ki a| Skm^Rl
PS^ 8 Vfl IF^VryfH!
j
NEW FLORIDA UNION BARBERSHOP
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION GROUND FLOOR
6 CHAIRS ALL SERVICES
Monday Friday 8:00 5:30
%
Saturday 8:00 1:00
SHOE SHINE -25 t

I
Half-Block West Os
Florida Theatre
A Short Walk
From Campus

MONDAY NIGHT
Grilled Liver
with Onions
or
i
Fried Chicken
49t

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Machine Problems

.f-
The bugs are not sealed in the
pack, he said, they eat their way
through the wrapper to the to tobacco.
bacco. tobacco.
AAUP Holds
Open Meeting
Wednesday
The American Association of
University Professors (AAUP)
will hold an open meeting to dis discuss
cuss discuss Academic Freedom as a
Current Issue" Wednesday at 8
p.m. in Room 103 (auditorium)
of the Arts and Architecture
Building.
Students and the rest of the
public are invited to participate
in this meeting, because it is
being held on what Prof. Allen
Sievers calls, a town meeting
principle."
Professors Stanley Laughlin
and Walter Probert will lead the
discussion.

I Your Happiness t
3 t
| Homecoming ... |
i i
! I
Begins at Blanchs with Act His modified tent.
Bold diagonal stripes attest to your Homecoming
spirit, while 100% wool double knit keeps on swing-
lying throughout your tuned-in weekend. Happiness hues:
Camel or Brown.
& Sizes 6 16. SIB.OO
* $
Happiness Hairdos at Blanchs Beauty Shop, too. w
I I
[g Specialty Shop Bee / Shop
j& 311 NW 13th Street 311 N- 13th Street
Phone 372-1581 Phone 372-0030
[i £

From where do they come? No
one seems to know, but they
seem to like only older packs.
Unless we find bugsinapack,
it remains in the machine until
sold.
Cigarettes are like other
things they go bad, these things
happen.
Steve Johnson, vending mach machine
ine machine manager for the university,
was contacted by pnone.
I am sorry this happened. We
dont check the machines, and if
a certain brand doesnt move the
packs remain till they sell.
This is when the worms enter
the pack. No one seems to know
where the worms come from,
only that they thrive on old packs.
Except for Johnson, no one
seems to be too concerned with
the problem. That machine has
not been getting much use and
something must be done. I guess
we should replace it with a
smaller one.
This would, of course, speed
the flow of cigarettes but would
not completely solve the pro problem,
blem, problem, he admitted.
As of Sunday night no plans
had been made to systematically
check the machines on campus.
Why not?
Were just not set up to do
it Johnson concluded.

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

Page 6

The
Florida Alligator
"To Let The People Know
m st
J\Hl Harvey Alper Harold Kennedy
a Managing Editor Executive Editor
Amm.
Harold Aldrich Bob Padecky
New* Editor Sports Editor
Ute Plortte Alligator** official posltloa on Imum la axpraaaod
only, la Hw oolnana telow. Otter malarial la tMa laaua may
raflaet tte opinion of tte writer or eartooalat and not naeaaaarlly
that at tte Florida Alligator unions apodfloally Indicated.

Today UF students will
participate in a teach-in
for better higher educat education
ion education in Florida during the
third period.
Although the AAUP and
other groups have spoken
of this action favorably
several administrators re remain
main remain skeptical about the
teach-in concept.
We find this hard to
believe.
Students can, and must,
be able to discuss education
as mature adults. The very
fact that a person is at this
university attests to his
ability to deal with educa education
tion education matters.
Todays teach-in will
provide an opportunity for
students to express their
views and clear their minds
on the education problem.
Gov. Claude Kirk has
moved to reduce the crisis
in primary and secondary
education.
But, he has not yet done
anything which would
assure us that higher edu education,
cation, education, and the UF in par particular,
ticular, particular, will be able to
operate on a foundation of
financial and political
security.
We are angry that the
Board of Regents has been
intimidated. We are angry
that the summer session is
in jeapordy because funds
may run out by the time
summer arrives.
- i

School Plans Now

Legislators Overjoyed
At School Compromise,
read a headline in the
Miami Herald last week.
Governor Kirk has
averted the proposed
teacher walk-out by call calling
ing calling for a special session
of the Legislature in Jan January.
uary. January.
However, Rep. Elton
Gissendanner of North Mi Miami
ami Miami called forth with a cry
of protest, A session in
January at our peak
business period is going
to bankrupt everyone of us.
If it can be delayed until
January, it can be delayed
'ntil 4gril.

Teach-In Today

We are disturbed that
magnificent new buildings
must sit in sand-boxes be because
cause because there are no funds to
pay for the paving of roads
and parking lots.
Today the students and
their professors, in the
true spirit of higher edu education,
cation, education, will discuss these
and other problems.
Although there will be no
solution coming from these
conversations we can be
sure that people will take
notice.
Several weeks ago we
called for a walkout here in
protest to Gov. Kirks call
for the resignation of Re Regents
gents Regents Chairman Chester
Ferguson. After talking
with Kirk and seeing his
obvious concern with
higher education matters
we asked that students
teach-in instead of walk walking
ing walking out.
However, we held the
walk out in abayence with
the possibility of calling for
it again if the governor fails
to act.
We havent changed our
minds about that and we
think most students agree
with us.
So lets talk about edu education
cation education today and learn more
about its problems.
If Mr. Kirk doesnt act
soon we might have to do
more than teach-in, but we
hope' we wont have to.

Aside from this, the
problem Florida will have
to face is some form of tax
increase: land, tobacco,
liquor or sales tax. It is
time our governor over overlooked
looked overlooked his campaign pledge
of no new tax because
it will not work any longer.
The compromise of long longrange
range longrange solutions and this
idle-the-month -away at attitude
titude attitude will only cause the
rift between teachers and
the state to frow stronger.
January isnt that far
away and the legislature
should begin investigating
now what offers it can make
to the FEA.

I \
WHo ARE who m i ? man, im with \t!
/ IM MAT'S HAPPENIN'. I'MOHe
v OfTHE IN* GROUP, DAD I l AM THE
I Dtfci THE *.
IM THE WOdLpkV PROTESTS*;
ORAPT* CART) bbpK
1 T PT
i Do you Dig do
J " do you Know who i AM ?
CRtepuS ftMERICftiJUS?
r 3 ..
Hkh*aL

PHOENIX WATCHES=
Viet Instant Replay
si, =BY IRA BRUKNER

Mr. Joseph Galloway of UPI filed the
following report of field combat during
Operation Utah, in March 1966, from Viet Vietnam.
nam. Vietnam.
We stood on the hill and cheered and
whistled and shouted advice. Kil 1 the son
of a bitch . Get him. . whats the mat matter
ter matter with you jarheads. The lone com communist
munist communist was about fifty yards away from
us, just below the next ridge, running and
dodging, trying to make his way to the
top. About 30 Marines were chasing him
up the scrub covered hill.
It was like watching a ball game from
the upper deck of Yankee Stadium. We
were above the communist and his pur pursuers
suers pursuers and could see every move clearly.
The Marines on the ridge across the way
were below their target and could not
see him well. They fired time and time
again at him.
Kill, Kill, Kill
Suddenly one of the bullets struck. The
communist dropped to the ground. He lost
his rifle as he fell.
They breezed him, they breezed him,
one of the cheering section beside me
shouted. *Naw there he goes, another Mar Marine
ine Marine said. Hes up and running again .
get him ... get him.
Another bullet knocked the communist
off his feet and a second time he got
up. He was moving slower when the third
and fourth bullets slammed into his body
and knocked him down again. But he still
moved, crawling up and over the crest
of the hill.
Nobody could tell whether he lived or
died. The Marines chasing him went no
further than the ridge top.
Granted, war is a dehumanizing (and
in this writers opinion an unnecessary)
evil. But what about the people watching it
from the comfortable grandstand. In their
barca loungers have they lost sight of one
man killing another human being? Or has
television with its instant replay made
this human destruction a drawing board
phenomenon that can be strategically anal analyzed
yzed analyzed and systematically stripped of the
individual agony continually being irrigated
by streams of warm blood in distant rice
patties?

I can remember when Lee Harvey Os Oswald
wald Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby. I along with
much of America's TV addicted public
was watching Oswald's transferral of jails
in Dallas. Then all of a sudden came a
man from out of the crowd as if he were
going to hand something to Oswald. Then
mass media confusion. However, within
a few moments the network provided me
with an instant replay of the action. Not
enough. Within a few more moments the
Twentieth Century exhibited its crown of
creation: Stop Action Replay. I will never
forget the painful expression on Mr. Os Oswalds
walds Oswalds face, his body twisting in agony,
his arms and hands covering his wound.
Twisting Agony
Why don't we have stop action in the
Vietnam flicks? It might be interesting
to see if a communist is a man, and if
he bleeds and agonizes like a Western
human being does. Or closer to home it
might be excruciating to show us and our
Hogan's Heroes influenced children how the
composite rising fatality Vietnam lists are
made.
We have got to stop watching the ball
game from the upper deck of Yankee Sta Stadium
dium Stadium in order to eliminate the channel
completely. Total involvement in the true
pain on both sides, and realizing that the
lone communist about fifty yards away
or twelve thousand miles away is not an
abstract subhuman, are formative steps.
But as Senator W. J. Fulbright states,
do you think the the possibility that he
(the man-a communist) may have regarded
himself as a patriot fighting to free his
country from foreign invaders would ever
of course have occurred to anyone in the
cheering section. Has it ever occurred to
you, the reader? The Vietnam War is not
due to circumstances beyond our control.
Perhaps it takes stop action and instant
replay to bring its pain closer to the un unaffected.
affected. unaffected. If so let's watch the flicks close closely,
ly, closely, and then take immediate steps to de deescalate
escalate deescalate and finally stop the bombing of
North Vietnam or lower their Nielsen rat ratings
ings ratings and take them, their actors, producers
and locales off the air and off of the map
completely.



OPEN FORUM:
j\(b)itl gml .Di&Atof
There is no hope for the complacent man/ 9

Kirks Statements Blasted

MR. EDITOR:
In both Friday and Mondays
Alligator you quote Gov. Kirk
as saying one again the 67 cents
out of every dollar goes for edu education.
cation. education. (Kirk Denies Political
Motivation and Kirk Demands
Regents Plan respectively)

CHARITY BALL-
A Non-Function
BY JOHN KEASLER
The greatest charity ball never to be held is not scheduled for this
month and contributions at $25 per ticket for the privilege of not
attending are pouring in.
The brilliant lady who conceived this idea, Mrs. John Sherman
Cooper, already is receiving deserved applause nationwide. Will this
usher in an era of non-functions? Let us hope so.
Here is how Time magazine explained this stroke of genius:
It is bound to be the most joyous evening that Washington has never
experienced. For $25 a head, 7,000 elegant socialites are being given
an opportunity not to attend a charity ball that will not be given by
Mrs. John Shannon Cooper, wife of the Kentucky Republican Senator.
The notion for the no-ball came as . she brooded over ways
to cut down the expenses that inevitably erode the take at charity
affairs. She sent out embossed non-invitations describing the chari charitable
table charitable work being done by the no-balls beneficiary, the Cooperative
School for Handicapped Children in Springfield, Va.
More than a thousand delighted naysayers have already sent in
checks with their most gracious non-acceptances.
We join the applause for this stroke of genius which is refreshing
after incessant stories about balls attended by the jet and wet set:
These all tell of who wore what diamond-studded dancing who
fell into the pool filled with champagne and how a cool $94.31 eventually
reached the Malnutrition Research Foundation.
Its obvious, from the big early take at the non-ball, non-reser non-reservation
vation non-reservation desk, that the world is filled with folks who have always simply
lusted not to attend one of these affairs.
Imagine the tired tycoon staggering in from the office some evening,
or wherever it is elegant socialites come home from of an evening.
Hes weary, has a dull headache and cant rid himself of the faint
feeling that this particular evening meant something. His wife meets
him at the door.
Dont forget about tonight, she cautions.
What now? he moans.
This is the night were not going to the charity ball. Remember?
We promise** three weeks ago that we definitely wouldnt go? Every Everybody
body Everybody isnt expecting us.
THE PRICE IS RIGHT
Thats worth the price of non-admission right there and the idea
is so splendid it could be adapted to other uses.
Some couples spend periods of time, varying up to a lifetime,
inviting each other back and forth to little parties. The ironclad
reason given by each wife is, of course, the fact you were invited
by the other couple and by this theory owe a return invitation.
This is, admittedly, proper etiquette. It can also, if allowed to run
rampant, eventually drive you batty. Why not make the non-invi non-invitation
tation non-invitation socially acceptable?
Then you wife could say thoughtfully, Were simply going to have
to not have the Dingles over Saturday night.
We are?
Yes, we are. I feel so ashamed! Do you realize they havent invited
us over three weeks in a row? We owe them. What must Sally think?
Well, O.K. but youll have to make it some other night than
this Saturday not to have them over because the first and third
Saturdays of each month are the nights I set aside not to go to my
club meeting.
The club itself it could be either a non-civic or non-social
group will serve a valuable purpose in our society, if unorganized
properly. It would consist solely of members who hate to go to meet meetings.
ings. meetings.
Its purposes would be dedicated, in the main, to not singing songs
of fellowship, not appointing committees and not having an annual
initiation ceremony.
Each year delegates from each local club will not attend a national
convention, preferably not to be held in Atlantic City.
Dues could be real and could be actually contributed to chairty.
I know I would join such a worthwhile unorganization, cash on the
barrelhead. Where else could you get such an ironclad excuse two
nights a month not to go somewhere else because you already had
someplace not to go?
Mrs. Cooper, bless her heart, has taken the lead. Lets all pitch
in and make non-functions work, and not leave everything to the ele elegant
gant elegant socialites.
This, after all, is America -- you dont have to be rich not to go
places.

These statements are wrong
and a blatant misuse of figures.
I hope that you will do some
investigating and correct the
error for the 18,000 plus stu students
dents students who read your paper. You
have championed the cause of
education from kindergarten
through the university and I hope

you will give some space to re refuting
futing refuting this gross error.
The governor is partially
correct in his statement: 67 cents
out of every dollar does go for
education in money that comes
from the GENERAL REVENUE
FUND. However, the General Re Revenue
venue Revenue Fund does not comprise the
entire state budget or earmarked
funds.
Only about 29 cents out
of every dollar spent by the state
goes for education. (These
figures are based on State De Department
partment Department of Education statistics
compiled for the last biennium,
but havent changed much after
the governors devastating vet vetoes.)
oes.) vetoes.)
The governor is still trying to
pull the wool over the eyes of
the public dont you be fooled
too!
I am more than delighted to
help you expose the educational
reasoning.
Keep up the good work.
MRS. JEANNE H. KENASTON,
7AS

SCATTER 0 U RUGS
19 Avocado Royal Blue
* Red Bronte
5 Spice Brown
All these attractive colors in a 36"x60"
rug of 75% cotton and 25% rayon ... an
exceptional blend for long wear and smooth
feel! Fringed tries! Latexed cot< ji becking!

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Viet Objectors
iVot i{( Cowards

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to address myself
to the gentleman who signed him himself
self himself a Veteran, and who is
amazed by the cowards:
You say If one 19 year-old
can die for his country I
cannot conceivably understand
why an obvious coward, who calls
himself a moral objector, should
be exempt from military
service.
You evidently consider each
moral objector (as you call
him) to be an obvious coward
who only calls himself a moral
objector. You discuss neither
women nor veterans who object,
but claim that there are no moral

PLEDGERS PHILOSOPHY
MR. EDITOR:
Contrary to military process; education does not knowingly sus sustain
tain sustain ignorance, intolerance of views, not place ideology and bur bureaucracy
eaucracy bureaucracy over the value of human life as does the military establish establishment.
ment. establishment.
In grade school I naively accepted that the military was an in instrument
strument instrument of the civilian voiced decision. I have found that to be un untrue:
true: untrue: the military has the power, not us, to make calls for men
and supplies while our Great Society Man relays the requests to
the industry and draft boards. 5
War, no matter what cause, ultimately prolongs and intensifies
bigotry, racism, and grappling over ground which never respected
any mortal owner.
My motto: The dead have a chance to love in my body, only if
I have a chance.
KARL PLEDGER, lUC

objectors, only cowards. You o openly
penly openly admit that this coward
...may be right-or wrong-con wrong-concerning
cerning wrong-concerning the so-called morality of
the Vietnam War/ but you call
him a coward for living his
convictions, even in the face of
ridicule.
I believe that you are able to
understand and accept that
truth may be viewed differ differently
ently differently by different people for rea reasons
sons reasons other than simple cowardice
or simple courage. But if you
cannot, you should not be ana analyzing
lyzing analyzing the inner workings of other
peoples minds and hearts in the
paper, you should be writing
comic stripsin black and white.
ARTHUR CRUMMER

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale |
1965 CRUISAIR with helmet,
face shield and book rack. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition $l5O. 378-6317.
(A-13-10t-c)
EXERCYCLE in mint condition.
Never used. Will sell at con considerable
siderable considerable discount. Call Charlie
Mayo, 378-4965. (A-17-st-c)
FACIT DELUXE PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER, all features,
manual, Never used; Best offer,
372-8173. (A- 18-3 t-p)
1962 LAMBRETTA, $l2O or best
offer. Call 378-8959 after 5 P.M.
ask for Bob. (A-19-3t-p)
1965 HONDA 50, nice condition.
Black and white, 3 speed, $95.
Contact Henon at 501 Murphree E
or 372-9426 after 6 P.M. (A (A---19-4t-p)
--19-4t-p) (A---19-4t-p)

NOT FOR SALE, but meant to
be used. Call in person any Sun Sunday
day Sunday 11:00 A. M. University Luth Lutheran
eran Lutheran Church, 1826 W. University
Avenue. (A-19-st-p)
SYMPHONIC TAPE RECORDER RECORDER-2
-2 RECORDER-2 track, 3 speeds, $50.00, 2
built-in speakers, 8 mo. old,
8 tapes & Acc., over SIOO.OO
invested call 378-6231. (A-20-
3t-pd)
1966 TRIUMPH 500 cc. Dual pur-'
pose woods-road bike w/extras.
Barely 1 year old, runs and han handles
dles handles excellently, call 378-7621
after 6 P.M. (A-19-3t-p)
*-- 1 -
DEALS: Brand new Sony 500
tape recorder $395.00 value for
$200.00 or best offer* Also ET-
Unilug mag wheels, never been
on the road, SIOO.OO or best
offer. Call 376-5972 after 6 P.M.
for more info. (B-20-3t-pd)
J 966 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE,
modified, 4,500 miles, like new.
Surfboard, 9B, custom built.
Call 376-8983. (A-20-3t-pd)
66 YAMAHA TRAILMASTER,BO
cc, 8 hp, 50-55 mph and 120
ml/gal. Two sprockets, helmet,
only 3700 miles. Call Mike at
378-2427 after 5:30 p.m. (A (A---21-3t-p)
--21-3t-p) (A---21-3t-p)
1963 TRIUMPH, 650 cc, engine
just rebuilt, in excellent condi condition
tion condition $495. Call Gary, Yon Hall
Room 218. (A-21-st-p)
for rent
NOW RENTING FOR QUARTER
II: Gatortown Apartments, inS.W.
16th Avenue complex, is accept accepting
ing accepting applications now. AVOID the
RUSH. 378-3457. (B-16-10t-c)
AVAILABLE NOW; Large double
room. Suitable for two male stu students
dents students or business men. Including
kitchen and all utilities. $36.50
each. 231 SE Second St. (B-10-
lOt-c)


SIRGY GIRL STARRING \
DGRAVE & JAMBS MASON
AT 7:07 A lj;09 I
IWMICOI'r AT 9:03 J
9TIYRR i iMNKJMTj
jfiggggj

| for rent |
HAVE EXTRA BED to rent in
room with two other girls. $35
month across from SanteFe Col College.
lege. College. 105 NW 7th Terr. 378-
4018. (B-19-3t-p)
3 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS, 1
vacancy in double room for male
student. Private entrance, re refrigerator.
frigerator. refrigerator. 327 N.W. 15th Ter Terrace.
race. Terrace. (B-7-st-c)
SUBLEASE A 1-bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment in the Landmark Apart Apartments.
ments. Apartments. Available now. Call 372-
3318, Dr. Koogler, or manager
of the Landmark Apartments. (B (B---20-2t-pd)
--20-2t-pd) (B---20-2t-pd)
APARTMENT available. Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend. Two beds in
bedroom, Studio couch in bar barliving
living barliving room. Kitchen facilities.
SSO. Prefer parents. Call 378-
5186. (B-19-3t-nc)
wanted
WANTED: Female to share two
bedroom air conditioned apart apartment
ment apartment behind Norman. S4O month,
October rent already paid. Call
378-7674. (C-15-6t-p)
WANTED: Two tickets to home homecoming,
coming, homecoming, FSU & Georgia/Florida
games. Call: Mr. Mason 376-
6461. (C-19-st-c)
WANTED: One bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment near University. Call Var Varsha
sha Varsha Ext. 2455 or 376-1889. (C (C---193tp)
--193tp) (C---193tp)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted.
Two bedroom furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 1/2 block from campus.
$42/month, 1/3 utilities. October
free. 376-3037. (C-20-lt-pd)
WANTED: Appreciation, love and
affection for Kappa Alpha and
Chi Phi pinmates who just hap happen
pen happen to be roommates. (C-21-
lt-p)
help wanted
DELIVERY BOYS WANTED, any
and all hours you want to work.
Transportation furnished. Apply
in person, Little Larrys Res Restaurant,
taurant, Restaurant, 1225 West University
Avenue. (E-18-7t-c)
NEED MONEY? EARN WHILE
LEARNING THROUGH AIR pol pollution
lution pollution co-op program. Tuition and
SBO per month, no obligation
incurred. Junior standing requir required
ed required in chemistry, physics or en engineering.
gineering. engineering. Work period jobs open
in Atlanta and Florida Cities.
Contact Dr. Sholtes, Ext. 2255.
(E-19-3t-c)
PART-TIME HELP. Need male
student experienced in fitting and
selling mens suits, slacks,
sports coats, etc. Excellent
working conditions, discount and
other benefits. Apply Wilson De Department
partment Department Stores, Inc. (E-19-
st-c)

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

Page 8

help wanted |
STUDENT (Full or Part time)
Experienced in offset paste-up,
willing to work eveings, hourly
wage. Contact Sern Sekora, Stu Student
dent Student Publications, third Floor,
Union Bldg., after 6:30 P.M. to tonight.
night. tonight. (E-9-tf-nc)
autos
1959 HILLMAN convertible, re rebuilt
built rebuilt engine, new battery and
starter, good tires, $175.00. Call
378-8643. (G-18-st-p)
SACRIFICE SALE, 65 Volks Volkswagon
wagon Volkswagon $995. Radio, Heater, 65
Chevrolet $1095. Radio, Heater,
Clean, 63 Chevrolet, Automatic
V-8. factory air. 378-7690. (A (A---
--- (A---
1965 CORVAIR CORSA, Convert Convertible,
ible, Convertible, 4 speed, 140 H.P. Tach,
4 carbs, take over payments of
$59.05 mo. call 378-8240. (G (G---18-2t-p)
--18-2t-p) (G---18-2t-p)
1957 THUNDERBIRD, new top,
new paint job, good tires, com complete
plete complete engine overhaul, need in interior
terior interior work, price $l,lOO. Call
378-3790 after 5 P.M. (G-18-
10t-p)
1961 MERCEDES BENZ, 190
Sedan, excellent condition, it
must be driven and fondled to
be appreciated, phone 378-6823
after 5 P.M. or any time on
weekends for appointment, SBSO.
(G-3t-21-p)
1963 IMPALA: 327-300 HP; tac;
4 speed; factory air; radio;
$1,225. Call 372-5772. (G-21-
3t-p)
1966 JUDSON SUPERCHARGER
for 40 hp VW. Used only 13,000
miles. New cost $144, complete
kit only $75. Call 376-7443. (G (G---
--- (G---
personal
CHEROKEE FLYING CLUB is
now offering the lowest possible
rates available in Gainesville.
Anyone interested in joining con contact
tact contact Art 378-7941, or Doug 372-
1039. (J-14-10t-c)
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS
NOW for babysitting for the
Homecoming and FSU game. Ages
3 and up. Planned activities. Call
378-8308. (J-20-2t-c)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
room with 3 others at Landmark
Apts. Two bedroom, 11/2 bath.
Available now. $43.75 per month.
Call 372-1760, Apt 37. (J-21-
2t-p)
FREE KITTENS. Call RICK, 378-
6991 after 8:30 P.M. (J-21-2t-
P)

lofamaT I STHTE I
a GIRL as t \ FROM THE
A DAUGHTER Out 11:05_ DMIIPE
...AND LOVED BKIUbE
HER AS A mi, J
WOMAN!
*
B :mk*
Wag' |
ft'AV VALLQNE i TO|tcn Car6'i~ LAWREfgpF ;5=
JEAN SOREL I S?>MOND SellToWin o.r*ciovS
personal
ORGANIZED BAND looking for
JOBS!!! Call Artie (trumpet) or
Sammie (piano) Arnold 372-5920;
Bill Linderman (bass) 372-7937;
Mike Clarke (saxophone) 378-
2738; Chuck Elliott (drums) 372-
2107 for auditions. We play bal ballads,
lads, ballads, standards, jazz, blues, and
requests for your dances. SIOO
nightly mimimum; S2OO nightly
maximum; $175 2 nights min minimum;
imum; minimum; $350 2 nights maximum.
(J-16-st-p)
FLYING TO FORT LAUDER LAUDERDALE.
DALE. LAUDERDALE. Leave Friday, October
20, return Sunday, October 22,
Experience pilot with Cherokee
180, Don Kozich, 378-1863. (J (J---18-3t-p)
--18-3t-p) (J---18-3t-p)
THE MAGIC CIRCLE: You have
seen them, you craved their
cound. To hear them again call
Terri, 372-9209. (J-21-3t-p)
_.
RUTHIE, I wuv you ... for en enthusiasm
thusiasm enthusiasm and G.P. Love, Irv.
(J-21-lt-p)
real estate
SMALL HOME on lovely wood wooded
ed wooded lot, suitable for married
couple or single student. Living
room, separate dining room,
study, two bedroom, 1 bath. Bi Bicycling
cycling Bicycling neighborhood. SSOO down,
SIOO per month Including taxes
and insurance. Call Anna Hinson
378-2558. (I-15-10t-c)
lost-found
HELP! Have you seen my pre prescription
scription prescription sunglasses (white
frames)? Reward! Call 376-0207.
(L-20-3t-nc)
-STARTS FRl FRlr
r FRlr I
l/ownTuwn vuiHivnra
| 233 W. UifivrsHy Av J
ffiJlFFmmE SHOWN AT I
1 V:00.3:10.5:20.' :30 9:3^

FLORIDA UNION
Colombia Pictures presents
AMMA
MOIK IK O
Starring mVerdlS
La
Traviata
TECHNICOLOR*
SPECIAL LIMITED ENGAGEMENT!
8:15 PM
FIkW. IJHb ST. 371-mil
Open at 7:00 I
Show Starts
Fea t I
CONTEST 5 GIRL
1 ItocMt C hmk Twto 1
2:20-4:49-7:18-9:47
jaMes Coburn
/kWS RHtt§I
L*
j|
IWvinN^w^
rWWTTTj j fj
1:10-3:15-5:20-7:25-9:30
A girL q boy,
a tender, funny,
terrible wedding night.
the
femilY
HAYIEY MILLS JOHN MIU.S HYWEL BEKHETT
r- MwC If
PMlLCertle*) McCMtTHEY
TECHNICOLOR



Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Monday, October 23
Young Republicans Club: mem membership
bership membership drive, Service Booth,
8 a.m.
Student Council for Exceptional
Children: Dr. Coggins,Func Coggins,Functions
tions Coggins,Functions of the Inpatient Bth Floor
Facilities, 337 Nrn., 3:30
p.m. All students in the help-'
ing professions welcome.
Discussions on India: India's
Economic Situation," 123 Un Union,
ion, Union, 3:30 p.m. Anyone inter interested
ested interested is welcome
Swim Fins and Aqua Gators:
practice sessions, Florida
Pool, 7 p.m.
Program Office: dance lessons,
245 Union, 7 p.m.
Real Estate Club: meeting, 357
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Society of Automotive Engineers:
meeting, 211 MEB, 7:30 p.m.
Union Movie: La Traviata,
Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Tuesday, October 24
Young Republicans Club: mem membership
bership membership drive, Service Booth,
8 a.m.
India Club: movie, April Fool,"
MSB Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
social hour and dinner, Holi Holiday
day Holiday Inn, 6:30 p.m. All those
single and over 21 are invit invited.
ed. invited.
Delta Sigma Pi: chapter meeting,
355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun: applied design,
118 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Lyceum Council: Northern Sin Sinfonia
fonia Sinfonia Orchestra, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Union Movie: La Traviata,"
Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS

3 services
ALTERNATORS GENERAT GENERATORS
ORS GENERATORS STARTERS Electrical
systems tested repairs. Auto
Electric Service 603 SE 2nd
St 378-7330. (M-8-Bt-c)
TENNIS RACKET RESTRING RESTRINGING,
ING, RESTRINGING, satisfaction guaranteed.
Free pick up and delivery on
and near campus. Call M & R
Tennis Services 378-2489. (M (M---160-10t-p)
--160-10t-p) (M---160-10t-p)

II Visit Us At Our New Home
Low InteresMlates On Loans i&A jj jjfls| wt'* |Bp
"Serving U F Employees Since 1935" '*
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CR'STID N|QN *2

CAMPUS CALENDAR

Wednesday, October 25
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 346 Union, 7 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Florentine
Architecutre of the Renaiss Renaissance,"
ance," Renaissance," and Willem Dekoon Dekooning,"
ing," Dekooning," 105 AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sail Club: meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m. No experience
necessary
Latin American Colloquium:
Revolutionary Warfare in
Latin America," 2nd floor
Main Library, 8 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: aud auditions,
itions, auditions, 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
8 p.m. Talent wanted, come by
or call Bob, 372-9663
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing, Un Union
ion Union Terrace, 8 p.m.
Union Movie: La Traviata,"
Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for:
LA TRAVIATA, NORTHERN
SINFONIA, CORONATION
BALL, AND LES GATORS
PARISIENNES.
ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
PROGRESS TESTS: Students in
the following courses are expect expected
ed expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2
lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
MS 301: Wednesday, Oct. 25,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Math Matherly
erly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.

services
TENNIS LESSONS BY APPOINT APPOINTMENT.
MENT. APPOINTMENT. Well qualified, experien experienced
ced experienced instructor. Learn to play the
right way. Call Steve at 376-
3558. $lO/month. (M-18-st-p)
FACULTY & STAFF: Let me
explain our Home Building and
repair service. Free Estimates.
Wayne Carroll 4AS 372-7675.
(M-15-10t-)

BLUB BULLETIN

ADMINISTRATIVE
NOTICES
CBS 261: Tuesday, Oct. 24,
7 p.m. biudents whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Walker
Auditorium; (M-R) to Leigh 207;
(S-Z) to Little 101, 109, 113
or 121.
CBS 262: Tuesday, Oct. 24,
7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to Ma Matherly
therly Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108,112,113,
114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CMS 171: Wednesday, Oct. 25,
7 p.m. All CMS 171 students
report to Walker Auditorium.
PRE-MED STUDENTS who
would like to talk to Dr. Lewis
about the University of Miami
Medical School are requested to
make an appointment with the
Pre-Professional Counseling Of Office,
fice, Office, 103 Anderson Hall. Dr.
Lewis will be here Oct. 26, 27,
30 and 31.
CORRECTION: Dates for the
Spanish Reading Knowledge Ex Examinations
aminations Examinations listed in the current
Graduate Catalog are incorrect.
The dates should be Oct. 28,
1967; Feg. 3, 1968; April 20,
1968, and Aug. 3, 1968. These
examinations will be administer administered
ed administered by ETS.
GRE: The Graduate Record
Examination is to be given at
8:45 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 28,
in Walker Auditorium.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM-'
INATIONS: Oct. 27 is the dead deadline
line deadline for applications for all for foreign
eign foreign language functional ex examinations
aminations examinations to be given on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, Nov. 4. Application should
be made in the Department of
Foreign Languages, 3 Anderson
Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS: Examinations
in French, German, Russian and
Spanish will be given at 9:45
a.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, in 207
Leigh Hall.
FLORIDA QUARTERLY: Ap Applications
plications Applications are now being received
for membership on the staff of
the University literary maga magazine.
zine. magazine. Interested students should
leave their names, addresses,
and phone numbers with Beverly
Patterson, Room 207, Anderson
Hall.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAI,
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

LITERARY MAGAZINE: The
first issue of the Florida Quart Quarterly
erly Quarterly is now on sale in front
of the main cafeteria and at the
Hub bookstore. The issue con contains
tains contains articles, poetry, short sto stories,
ries, stories, art, phot > jraphy and re reviews
views reviews by many student writers
as well as such famous authors
as Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and
Ray Bradbury. Copies sell for
$1; one-year subscriptions are
$3.50.

*
I f
I
The last thing
Frank expected was
someone running
the stop sign.
The very fast thing.
Stop signs dont stop cars. Drivers stop cars. Make sure
you do and make sure he has. Theres very little satisfaction
in being dead right when youre dead.
Wherever, whenever you drive .
drive defensively. Watch out for the GjXjSjESf
other guy. He may be the kind wholl
stop at nothing.
wm
to uv Mt m cooptralion wdh Th Advdiin| Counc4 and tht Nationtl SMy Council.. OH uh*

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

GENERAL NOTICES

FACULTY CLUB of the Univ University
ersity University of Florida will
second social event of the fall
season on Saturday, Nov. 4 at
8 p.m. in the private lounges
(rooms 121, 122, 123) of the Reitz
Union. All members, guests and
non-members are invited. Re Reservations
servations Reservations can be made by call calling
ing calling either Mrs. Hazel Reyes
(376-3261, Ext. 2019) or Mrs.
Harry Warfel (372-8902).

Page 9



Reviews

Page 10

f La TraviatcT
By ZHENYA
Alligator Reviewer
(EDITORS NOTE: What follows is a review of opera as ODera
for a review of La Traviata as opera as cinema see page 11.)
In considering the artistic achievement of La Traviata now
showing in the Reitz Union, it seems pointless to include a critique
of opera as an expressive medium and of Verdis treatment of the
Camille motif.
If opera does not evoke a profound emotional response in you,
you will find little merit in the film.
It is a rather exact translation from stage to screen, and it seems
to me that the transfer to cinema was well worth the effort. La
Traviata* was as well sung as anyone could wish, although the sound soundtrack
track soundtrack left something to be desired in clarity. This was my main
complaint against the film.
Another aspect which may be objectionable to some habitual
movie but not opera-goers is the comparative unnattractiveness
of the singer playing Alfredo. To such an objection I might answer
that matinee idols are few and far between among the vocally talented,
and that one might be grateful for Miss Moffos lovely appearance
as Violetta. Her deathbed beauty is especially moving in the last
act.
The set of the opera was traditionally lavish although nothing out
of the ordinary, except in the last act. The outlines of pictures on the
walls of the impoverished courtesans once-sumptuous residence were
particularly evocative. Here it seems that the set designer referred

to the original story as written
by Dumas, rather than to the
fanciful confections that sur surround
round surround Violettas last moments
in other live productions.
The dramatic depiction of Vio Violetta
letta Violetta was more convincingly acted
than many others I have seen.
It was marred in some degree by
the memory of Miss Anna Moffos
embarrassed appearance for a
few moments prior to the screen screening.
ing. screening. I quickly disassociated the
flustered celebrity in cloth-of cloth-ofgold
gold cloth-ofgold from the raven-haired si yph
throbbingly imparting the aria
E Stranl, however, and was
thus able to enjoy the film in
the bastion of my illusions.
This film demonstrated the va validity
lidity validity of the opera in the cinema.
Opera does not have enough aud audience
ience audience in this United States to
prompt the building of opera
houses in such outlying areas
as Gainesville, regrettably
enough. Only through a film,
with its minor technical flaws
and possbile lack of spontaneous
audience reaction, could the art
of Verdi be brought to us with
any quality in its performance.
2 Fine Arts
Shows Set
By DICK REGESTER
Alligator Correspondent
Two University Auditorium
presentations, The Canterbury
Tales and Masters and the
Myth, are slated by the Fine
Arts Committee as part of the
67-6B Sights and Sounds series
this quarter.
Canterbury Tales will be per performed
formed performed in 14th century costume
by Robert Inglis on Tuesday,
Nov. 14 at 8:15 p.m. Inglis will
portray prominent Chaucer char characters
acters characters in his solo dramatic per performance.
formance. performance.
Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 at 8:15p.m.
Masters and the Myth, a scene
study of playwrite styles, win
be presented.
Students subscriptions for the
Sights and Sounds series are
available at the Union Box
Office for $4.50.

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

jfiiii oow"' JHHn %' :
: 'V"W Mernmm
:" x Hk &&&* vaV
I | * W r ::j B
s m A/. B f
ns i ii bbml

If you are contemplating a career in
aerospace, your next ten years are
critical ones. The exposure you get
to major projects, the caliber of your
associates, the quality and availability
of educational institutions for advanced
study, and the recognition you get for
personal achievements will all count
heavily toward building your
reputation and your income.
At Convair you will find management
sensitive to the importance of your
personal development and you
will work in an atmosphere of
achievement side by side with some
of the most capable people in our
industrythe people who developed
Atlas-Centaur and other space age

/hungry? J
/ Jerry's Telephone
I Carry-Out Service. M
/ 2310 S. W. 13th Street 375-2696
/ 1505 N. W. 13th Street 378-2481 /

Atmosphere for Achievement

equipment and systems which are
making headlines the world over. You
will have access to four highly rated
colleges and universities for advanced
study. Your assignments will be
selected from more than one hundred
key study and development projects.
A variety of outstanding career
opportunities are yours at Convair
in the following areas of concentration:
aeronautical, electrical, electronic and
mechanical engineering: engineering
mechanics and engineering physics.
Engineers will be assigned to
the,following areas: advanced systems,
systems analysis, space sciences, life
sciences, information sciences,
scientific data processing, aero-

GENERAL DYNAMICS
Convair Division
San Diego, California
An Equal Opportunity Employer

ballistics, dynamics, thermodynamics,
guidance, structures, mechanical
design, electrical design, reliability,
test engineering and materials
research.
See your placement officer to arrange
a personal on-campus interview with
our representatives, or write to
Mr. J. J. Tan none, Supervisor,
Professional Placement and Personnel,
Convair Division of General Dynamics,
5629 Kearny Villa Road, San Diego,
California 92112.



Opera: Adaptable
To The Cinema?
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is a review of opera as cinema; for a
review pf opera as opera see Zhenys story page 10.)
La Traviata (at the Reitz Onion nigntly through Thursday)
is an exciting presentation of one of Verdis great operas ex exciting
citing exciting both as splendid opera, and as an effort to adapt opera to
the screen.
Anna Moffo is superb as Violetta, the consumptive courtesan
who falls in love with a young Frenchman of good family, renounces
him at his fathers behest to save the family name, and dies tra tragically
gically tragically on the brink of happiness after her lover and his father
belatedly realize the greatness of her love and spirit.
Miss Moffo is very beautiful, and her performance blends all
the depth and power of a lyric voice with the facility of a colora coloratura.
tura. coloratura. Moreover, she is a creditable actress.
Gino Bechi and Franco Bonisolli as Alfredo, Violettas lover
(tenor) and his father (baritone) also give strong performances,
although they tend to fade into the background beside Miss Moffo.
The orchestra and chorus, under the direction of Giuseppe Patane,
are those of the Rome Opera House.
Despite these strengths, the film inevitably falls victim to what
seems to be an inherent lack of adaptability of opera to the cinema.
Director Mario Lanfranchi considerably utilizes the cameras po potential
tential potential and, despite a few notable failures to use the advantages
offered by filming, the result is an interesting interpretation of
opera as cinema, quite different from a theatrical presentation.
But opera, with its mixture of concert and theater, demands a
suspension of disbelief which is often deflated by the unrelenting
eye of the camera. The typed posturing of the singer-actor, pre present
sent present in La Traviatas supporting cast if not in Miss Moffo, is not
as acceptable on the screen as it is on the stage.
A closeup shot by the camera forces us to scrutinize its subject
and to seek out lapses in realism or consistency. We must eval evaluate
uate evaluate Alfredos fathers believability as he persuades Violetta to
give up Alfredo, and not merely his voice as we might in a theater.
The operatic kiss with its mixed singing and physical contact, which
might be perfectly enjoyable on stage, seems a little silly in close closeup.
up. closeup.
In the final balance, though, these minor discomforts do not destroy
Verdis work nor the productions performances. Opera has al always
ways always had its theoretical critics, and perhaps opera-as-cinema is
no more unwieldy a genre than opera-as-theater has been. Both
demand a relaxed sensibility, both reward the effort. And perhaps
as is the case with Verdis casting a consumptive beauty as a singer
we ought not to examine and analyse, but only enjoy.
v. Q
'Operation Kid Brother
See, this Thanatos outfit (One of the most powerful gangs in
the world.) has developed a magnetic ray (This is beginning
to look pretty serious!*) that brings all mechanical movement in
most of the world to a complete halt. But, the local crime-fighters
have pressed into service Neil Connery (You know, the brother
of Secret Agent 00-- Yes, I know a most disagreeable family.).
And Connery, who is among other things a plastic surgeon, a
hypnotist (hes mastered an ancient Tibetan process), and a
lip-reader, happens to be a champion archer. Not only that, but
he has on call a group of champion archers who, like Robin Hoods
gang, storm the Thanatos castle and destroy the malignant magnetic
ray.
Operation Kid Brother is a third-rate spy-science fiction thriller
which occasionally falls into a spoof of overworked big brother Sean.
Neil Connery may or may not be Sean's younger brother, but any anyway
way anyway the high points of the movie belong to old Bond nemesis Adoifo
Celi, cast as the evil chief of Thanatos.
Kid Brothers only good point is a script which consists at
times of unbelievable cliches. What with the posturing of Celi and
his rival Thanatos leader, and the low-key secret agent produced
by the relucant hero Connery (really, he just wants to get back to
his plastic surgery), the result is occasional satire.
But a good spoof takes more to build than some stupid dialogue,
and director Alberto DiMartinis seems unsure whether hes got a
thriller or a spoof on his hands.
THE COLONEL ANNOUNCES
DELIVERY SERVICE
? 29:30p.m. DAILY
GALL 376-6472
KHtudu| W AiglttH
Mdh Qrmads Hospitality Dish...

This Weeks Gainesville Mo vie Rating

By Alligator Review Staff
THE FAMILY WAY. Hayley
Mills, Hywel Bennett, John Mills.
Story of tender love, its pro problems
blems problems maturing in a sex-crazy
society --an American problem
set in England. Now playing at
the Florida. **
WATERHOLE #3. James Co Coburn
burn Coburn and Margaret Blye. Way Wayout
out Wayout western on the slap-stick
side. Playing through Thursday
at the Center. **

*X Mechanical
X Industrial
X Chemical
ENGINEERS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1967
Interviews will be conducted on
to discuss job opportunities with
;. 7 tt
Tampa Electric Company.
You will find good advancement
opportunities with this fast-growing
investor-owned electric utility
located on Florida's West Coast.
See job placement center bulletin
for interview time and place.
te|co
TAMPA, FLORIDA

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE.
Raf Vallone, Carol Lawrence in
Arthur Millers drama of obses obsessed
sed obsessed love. At the State. Not rated
by press time.
LA TRAVIATA. Anna Moffo
stars with the Rome Opera Co Company
mpany Company as Verdis unfortunate
Lady of the Camellias. Weak
cinema, magnificent opera.
Playing nightly through Thursday
at Reitz Union Auditorium. ****

OPERATION KID BROTHER.
Neil Connery, Daniela Bianchi,
Adolfo Celi. Third-rate take-off
on the Bond series which may
or may not have its tongue in
its cheek. Now playing at the
Plaza.
* good
** very good
1 *** excellent
**** superior

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

But Cass Got Pregnant
By DAN HOGAN
g Alligator Correspondent
I The Mamas and the Papas were going to make a guest appear-
I ance on the UF campus this fall.
I But Mama Cass (Elliot) got pregnant.
I The others in the quartet are Michelle Gilliam, John Edmund
1 Andrew Phillips, and Dennis Gerard.
I Phillips used to sell cemetery plots but is now the groups
I spokesman and composer; Gerard is of Canadian descent and sports
I a beard as well as a heavy set of hair; Gilliam is a slender, pretty
I blond with a modish look about her.
I Mama Cass has beeh described as a squat heap of person with
I corn-silk hair pouring over her shapeless shoulders.
I Life Magazine says the sound this foursome puts out is infect-
I ious, funky, heavily orchestrated, and generates the rolling momen-
I tem of the surf.**
I Their rise to fame began with California Dreamin and
I continued with Monday, Monday.
| They met on a month-long hootenanny bus tour in 1963 and later
I won an audition in Los Angeles with record producer Lou Adler
I who was so impressed that he signed them immediately.
The group took its name from the motor-cycling Hells Angels
I lingo for the opposite sexes.
i Thats the story of the group that was.
The group that is will star soul singer Wilson Pickett the night
of November 10 in Florida Gym.
If Pickett should happen to cancel also, you can bet on one thing thingit
it thingit wont be because hes pregnant!

Art Center
Nudes Pose
jk
For Artists
By CHIP O'NEAL
Alligator Correspondent.
Want to paint nudes?
The Center of Modern Art,
Inc., in Historic Micanopy is
looking for members.
We hold art classes for people
who want to paint nudes and so
far we have not had any people
come to just look, said Mrs.
Mazu Hamacher, director of the
center.
The University doesn't allow
nude models and we felt as though
the student needs the practice,
added Mrs. Hamacher.
Mrs. Hamacher said that the
center is presently sending
invitations to 500 people in an
attempt to gain members.
The annual fee is ten dollars
for an individual and S2O. for
a family. This membership en entitles
titles entitles the person to a pre-showing
cocktail party of any upcoming
exhibits.
This away the Art Center is
trying to gain money to continue
its operations.
Mrs. Hamacher commented
that the local public have been
relatively tolerant of the Art
Center and its operation.
The art classes that me center
offers range in price from morn morning
ing morning classes at $55. for a 12-week
course to night classes at one
dollar each.
The art classes bring some
money in but the membership
drive is their hope for the
present.
i
If enough people sign up then
we will be able to operate for
the next year, said Mrs. Ham Hamacher.
acher. Hamacher.

.What
the interviewers
wont tell you
about
General Electric.

They wont tell you about all the job opportunities
we have for college graduates engineers, science,
business and liberal arts majors. Not that they
wouldnt like to. Its just that there are too many
jobs and too little time. In a half-hour interview
our man would barely have time to outline the
scope and diversity of the opportunities we offer.
Thats why we published a brochure called Start Starting
ing Starting Points at General Electric. In plain language

PERSONALITY PROFILE

Prof f A Busy Man

By JOHN BRUNDAGE
Alligator Correspondent
Courtland Collier, a UF pro professor
fessor professor of Civil Engineering, is
a busy man. In addition to his
time consuming role as a college
instructor, Collier occupies one
of five seats on the Gainesville
City Commission.
The prospect of leading this
dual role does not frighten Col Collier,
lier, Collier, however.
I feel my duties as a teacher
and City Commissioner are
interrelated, one has supple supplemented
mented supplemented the other. A good many
of the citys problems are Civil
Engineering proglems. I really
dont feel as though Ive changed
hats, he said.
The soft spoken commissioner
expresses clearly what he feels
the main problems of the city
are. Transportation and beauti beautification
fication beautification are the main problems
facing the city now. The problem
of transportation is obvious to
anyone who drives down any
street in Gainesville.

He continued to explain the
citys role in self-beautification.
In a sense, the city is an
extension of everybodys front
yard. Everyone spends a lot of
time beautifying their yard. The
city has an obligation to spend
at least as much time beautifying
itself. A city street can look
good and also carry a lot of traf traffic.
fic. traffic.
Professor Collier came to the
University in 1961 to work toward
his Masters in engineering, then
remained at the University in the
role of instructor.

"Check Our Prices
ItllSPm Before You Buy
F r the entire Family:
Boots Hats Belts
Jackets Levis
Gainesville Stockman Supply Company
Located Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 NW 13 St.

it will tell you exactly how and where a person with
your qualifications can start a career with General
Electric. Pick up a copy at your Placement Office.
Then arrange for a productive session with our
interviewer. Hell be on your campus soon.
ELECTRIC
An equal opportunity employer

. What are his plans for the
future further political am ambitions?
bitions? ambitions?
Commissioner Collier com comments
ments comments with a grin, I like it right
where I am. Im close to the
people; if someone has a problem
he can call me up and we can
discuss it.
. 1 feel the people in Washington
and Tallahassee are a little
remote, they tend fb lose contact
with their constituents. The main
function of a city commissioner,
or any elected official, is to re reflect
flect reflect the desires and wishes of
the people.



CAMPUS
LIVING

Monday, October 23, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

By LORI STEELE
Alligator Campus Living Editor
Once again, men cooks are making the scene. It is really amazing
what student bachelors come up with.
For instance, Peter Allinson, 2UC, of his own free will has donated
his *kosher tomato sauce recipe for the benefit of mankind, and
womankind, for that matter. For anyone who needs a basic sauce
for spaghetti, maccaroni, pizza, lasagna, manacotti, or veal par parmesan,
mesan, parmesan, to name a few dishes, this is it:
BASIC ITALIAN TOMATO SAUCE
2 can Contadina tomato paste
2 large pound cans peeled Italian tomatoes
(Italian plum tomatoes)
2 cloves garlic
1 t. oregano, or as much as desired
1 t. parsley
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper (fresh ground is cheaper)
Coat a large saucepan with 1/8 inch of olive oil. Add peeled, diced
garlic and spices. Lightly brown the garlic. Add 1 can tomato paste;
mix well over low heat. Add other can paste; mix well. Simmer
2 min.
Add juice from 2 lb. cans of peeled tomatoes. Mix well. Add to tomatoes.
matoes. tomatoes. Simmer for one hour.
For a touch of elegance and sophistication, Lewis Miles, ILW,
has a dessert perfect for dinner or bridge parties. Would you be believe
lieve believe Chocolate Mousse? Terribly rich, this is a foamy, spongy
dessert similar to highest quality ice cream. For those willing to
spend the time creating this delight, the recipe is as follows:
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
5 egg whites, room temp.
1/4 t. cream of tarter
1 C. sugar
5 egg yolks
5 egg yolks
1/8 t. salt
2 t. lemon juice
4 blocks unsweetened chocolate, melted and cooled
1 2/3 C. whipping cream
In large bowl, beat egg whites with cream of tarter, with elect electric,
ric, electric, mixer, until soft peaks are formed. Gradually add 3/4 cup of
sugar in 2 t. amounts, beating well after each addition. Continue
to beat until soft peaks are formed.
In small bowl with same beater, beat egg yolks with salt until
thick and lemon colored. Gradually add remaining sugar, beating
well after each addition. Gradually beat in lemon juice, melted choc chocolate,
olate, chocolate, and 1/3 cup cream until mixture is smooth and thickened.
Beat remaining cream until stiff; fold in with chocolate mixture
into egg whites. Put into two quart serving dish, spread evenly.
Refrigerate for twenty-four hours; serve in sherbert glasses with
whipped cream topping.
Hint: instead of using chocolate blocks, use 4 packets of Nestles
Choco-bake.
Note: fold means to carefully and gently spoon mixture in a
circular motion until well blended.
I EXTRA SPECIAL I
Hilb.BAR-B-O
CHICKEN
I s/ CHOICE OF TWO
I VEGETABLES
I HOT ROLLS A BUTTER
IwONDEBIf
I house: Ti
I RESTAURANT fr
I 14 SW First St. II
I Parking For 200 Cars Within 150 Feet ~aJ

Page 13

A House Is Not A Home
Unless Its A Ouonset Hut

By ALLAN COWAN
Alligator Staff Writer
(Editors Note: Staffer Allan
lives off-campus In a Quonset
Hut. If you think you have prob problems,
lems, problems, take a gander at his liv living
ing living conditions!)
When I first saw my home
for this quarter, I thought of it
as a miniature airplane hangar.
Its not pretty, the corrugated
steel roof bent in a half-circle
to cover the living quarters be below.
low. below. One senses an inner strug struggle
gle struggle of the steel to pop back
into its original shape.
Once inside, the curvature of
the roof becomes extremely
pronounced. The most space is,
quite naturally, in the center
where the roof is the highest.
The kitchen and dining room
are located there. The bedrooms
and bathroom are on the sides.
If youre not careful, youll put
a hole in the roof with your head.
My roommate and I have all
the comforts of a $40,000 house,
a little crude maybe, but there
just the same.
There is only one light switch
in the Hut; it controls the porch
light. The six permanent fixtures
have pull chains. Not inconven inconvenient,
ient, inconvenient, except when the chain pops
back inside the globe.

f I
[TRUNK SHOWING)
IwED. OCT. 25, 9:30-5:00p.m.l
I Ramada Inn I
+
mr mm m .
SHOES TO BUY
SHOES TO ORDER I
I Local Representative I
I KAY SIMPSON 378-42331

To live in a Quonset Hut, one
must be fortunate in the selection
of a roommate. The walls are
made of pasteboard, not very
thick, not built for audio privacy.
The walls are used to create
rooms, nothing more. This pre presents
sents presents problems.
Last week in the bathroom,
my roommate slipped coming out
of the shower. He grabbed the
bathroom sink for support and
ripped it off the wall. We had
to shave in the kitchen for a few
days.
The shower is a small, por portable
table portable cubicle, made of sheet
metal. It is so small that when
I try to wash my back, I scrape
my elbows,
One real inconvenience is the
commode. Although I cant give
the details here I can say it

(gator Coton
CPi OPENINGS
FOR OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER
102 new units in the SW 16th Ave area, wall to wall carpeting,
two pools, central heat and air conditioning, sound conditioning,
furnished and unfurnished, kitchens by:
CALL 378-3457 I lplpfflP~l*

is uncomfortable.
My roommate asked me yes yesterday
terday yesterday if I noticed that the Hut
shakes occasionally. I said yes,
and attributed it to the wooden
frame settling, although I an not
quite sure why it quivers.
When it rains, the noise inside
is similar to the roll of ket kettle
tle kettle drums.
Actually, for a two-bedroom
completely furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, $52/month split two ways
isnt bad.
Oh yes, we do have hot water.
McDAVIDS
Barber Shop
Shoe Repair
1718 W. Untv. Ave
on the Gold Coast



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

b JsyJP 2d
£ -mmsmu^h
.-
Hi
' Vb
A BHB|
wE£L' J''Fe <*-'' * ffiH
* '^u^ t^X?>" ** I
Bk ' *' Afcfcft#* i #**"/* Hj^B
**
pBBfIBBHHM3ISBKnBBBHHBi
I THREW A PLANE INTO THE AIR...
& 1
A plane in the tree is worth two on the ground.
The planes landed everywhere, usually in the
same condition. _. . XTJ A N
(Photo by Nick Arroyo)

Mother Role
HOLLYWOOD (UPl)Bev (UPl)Beverly
erly (UPl)Beverly Garland will play Tuesday
Welds mother in She Let Him
Continue for 20th Century-
Pox.

ran
H ESPECIALLY FO# AUTHENTIC ITALIAN FOOO
SPECIAL i
IMon.& Thurs. I
Spaghetti a la Rosalo I
Minestrone soup I
Home-made garlic bread I
Tossed salad
Tea or coffee
, $135
I U.S. 441 South I
4mi. from campus
H Closed Tues.
Cocktails

COLOR PRINTS
Students only 15 £
during October V
Flair Color Lab
1527 NW 6 th St.

r B* 4 w fl
r" m lal
ok fWPESB #BP M
BV HV^^B^V./l'y|
IrJNflliflliNr
THE HORRORS OF FLIGHT
UF education majors experiment of their classes. The Wright
with flying model airplanes in one Brothers theyre not.

At Enjay we
like people
to ask direct
questions:
Knowing something about a company is one thing:
knowing enough about a company to help you make the
best career decision is quite another matter.
We find that the more people know about ENJAY, the more
enthusiastic they become about their potential with us.
Lets look at what we make. Butyl rubber, for instance.
We invented it. And our products include plastics, fibers,
fuel additives, and many chemical raw'materials.
Enjay products are, in turn, used in many of
the things you come in contact with every day:
aerosol products, textile fibers, tire inner tubes, packaging
film even ihe brush on youi car.
Were an affiliate of Standard Oil Company,
(N.J.), and the domestic affiliate of g JB
worldw ido Es>o Chemical Companv. l^muF
w re one of the nations top ten B
chemical companies, and we re
undergoing tremendous grow th.
We have more than 5400 employees in 10 manufacturing
plants and 16 sales offices throughout the country.
Thats WHO Enjay is. It adds up to a company that can
offer your career just about everything it needs:
diversification, progressive management, the resources
required for continuous expansion, and the potential for
unusually fast professional growth.
Want more direct answers to your direct questions?
Watch for the next in this series of ENJAY advertisements
.. .or, if you're a man of action, ivrite:
RECRUITING COORDINATOR
ENJAY CHEMICAL COMPANY
* ... the domestic affiliate of
worldwide Esso Chemical Company
60 West 49tli Street, New York, N. Y. 10020
An Equul Opportunity Employer (M/F)

CONTACT
WEARERS!
I
A
EXCLUSIVE!
Free removable carrying
case! Provides hygienic,
convenient care c^ v \
for your
One solution for
complete lens care
Lensines special properties
assure a smoother, non-irritating
lens surface when inserting your
contacts." Just a drop or two
will do it. When used for cleaning,
a unique Lensine formula helps
retard buildup of contaminants
and foreign deposits on the
lenses. Its self-sterilizing and
antiseptic. Ideal for wet storage
or soaking" of lenses. Lensine
reduces harmful bacteria con contamination.
tamination. contamination.

FREE CARRYING CASE. Exclusive
removable carrying case with
every bottle of Lensine. The
scientificand convenientway
to protect your contacts.
LENSINE from
The Murine Company, Inc.
...eye care specialist for 70 yeare



Tennessee, Tigers Win;
SEC Lead Deadlocked

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
Atlanta UPI- Few fans in Ala Alabama
bama Alabama ever heard of Albert
Dorsey, a Tampa, Fla. product,
before Saturday, but theyll long
remember him scampering down
the side-lines in the final minute
on a 31-yard touchdown jaunt
with his third interception that
doomed Alabama to its first loss
in 26 games.
Tennessees victory over Ala Alabama
bama Alabama and Louisiana States 30
-7 win over Kentucky threw the
Vols and the 15th-ranked Bengals
into a tie for the Southeastern
Conference lead.
And, wouldnt you know it,
they meet this coming Saturday
at Knoxville.
Previous leader Alabama fell
into a three-way tie for third
place with eighth-ranked Georgia
and 18th-ranked Mississippi, all
with 2-1 league marks. Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee and LSU are 2-0.
Georgia toyed with visiting
Virginia Military Saturday 56-6
while Mississippi beat Southern
Miss 23-14.
Elsewhere this past Saturday,
Auburn cruised past injured
Georgia Tech 28-10, Houston
crushed Mississippi State 43-6,
Miami, Fla. shocked Pittsburgh
58-0, Florida State beat Texas
Tech 28-12, Virginia Tech rose
to 6-0 by beating Richmond 45-
14, Memphis State beat Southwest
Louisiana 28-6, the Air Force
came up with a last minute field
goal to beat Tulane 13-10, Xavier
outslugged Chattanooga 40-28 and
Tampa finally broke loose to beat
Furman 39-13.
Florida and Vanderbilt did not
play.
Alabama, trying for its second
26 game unbeaten streak in five
years, was tied with Tennessee
at 7-7 at halftime. But tailback

ore Now...
' -J^^^^uH^ioving
JJ v J i 7 Youre probably not this fat: yet. So
\1 P I why wait to get that way? If over over\l
\l over\l \ J weight is your problem, handle it
sensibly with professional help.
our. .
Pre Opening Special $38.00
Traversal ,neludin9:
I Weight gain or weight loss program
Figure or physique analysis

A %
526 M Main Call 372-3679

Walter Chadwick, who scored the
Vols* first TD, passed 11 yards
to Ken DeLong for a third per period
iod period tally and the Crimson Tide
never caught up again.
Stabler, the SEC passing
leader, completed 15 of 32 passes
for 154 yards. He has now gained
745 air yards in five games, but
had five interceptions. Dennis
Homan caught seven passes to
raise his seasons total to a rec record
ord record 36, but for the first time
this year, he and Stabler couldnt
get together on a score.
LSU led winless Kentucky only
9-7 in the third period after
Dicky Lyons of the Wildcats ran
a kickoff back 95 yards but Trig Trigger
ger Trigger Allen scored a pair of third
Falcons Lose
Another One
DETROIT (UPI) Twom Now Nowatzke
atzke Nowatzke and Bill Malinchak each
grabbed fourth-quarter touch touchdown
down touchdown passes from Karl Sweetan
Sunday to pace the Detroit Lions
to a 24-3 victory over the win winless
less winless Atlanta Falcons.
The two scoring passes by
Sweetan, who started the game
instead of regular quarterback
Milt Plum in an effort to perk
up a sagging Lions offense, broke
open a tight game that went in into
to into the last stanza with the Lions
holding a 10-3 edge.
Rookie Lem Barney pilfered
his fourth pass of the season in
the first period and zipped 44
yards for a touchdown to open
the scoring as Detroit boosted
its National Foorball League
mark to 2-3-1.
Atlanta, now 0-5-1, could only
manage a 34-yard field goal by
Wade Traynham in the second
quarter.

period touchdowns to squelch any
hopes the Wildcats might
have had.
Turtles Provide
Fire Protection
i. v
KREBS, Okla. (UPI)
This town of 1,300 persons
depends on turtles for its
fire protection.
For 31 years, the town has
been holding an annual
Labor Day Terrapin Derby
to raise money for firefight firefighting
ing firefighting equipment.
The race has raised more
more than 550.000 over the
years and most of the money
went to the Fire Depart Department,
ment, Department, which is almost en entirely
tirely entirely financed by Derby
proceeds.
The town bought a new
fire engine three years ago
with money accumulated
from the Derby.
SEC Standings
Cons. All
Team W L T W L T
LSU 2 0 0 4 1 0
Tennessee 2 0 0 3 1 0
Georgia 2 10 4 10
Alabama 2 10 3 11
Mississippi 2 1 0 3 2 0
Auburn 110 4 1 0
Florida 110 3 10
Vanderbilt 0 1 0 2 2 0
Miss. St. 0 2 0 1 4 0
Kentucky 0 3 0 0 5 0
INDEPENDENTS
Team WLT
Va. Tech 6 0 0
Memphis St. 4 10
South. Miss. 4 2 0
Ga. Tech 1 3 2 0
Miami 3 2 0
Florida St. 3 2 1
Tulane 14 0

3 RMT S

Monday, October 23/1967, The Florida Alligator,

Night Games Ended

No more night football games
are planned for Florida Field
despite adequate lighting facil facilities,
ities, facilities, it was learned Thursday.
According to UF Sports Pub Publicity
licity Publicity Director Norm Carlson,
Our primary fear is putting
so many fans out on the roads
after sunset. Night games would
force a certain percentage to
drive home after the game which
could prove dangerous."
Although the spring football
Orange and Blue game was played
under the lights in April, the
last home football game at night

Hobie Surfboards
ONeill Wet Suits
Kanvas by Katin
baggies &jackets
The Shore
Surf Shop
Anastasia St. Augustine
<0 VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC.
i h
ml 3HHBBUBKBM
nHHnnHHHnK Wt'f
m,.MM M
I ¥vffZ^m
1 S I
i j^^h^^^^hhhSbbl^SSehil
IL/ 1 I
JB
I
This Volkswagen has a door on the left to let in
the driver. (That's one.) A door on the right to let
in the passengers. (Thats two.) And a door in the
back which is like the tailgate of a conventional
wagon. (That's the third, and do you need any
more than that?)
To look at it, you'd swear our Squareback is a
station wagon. But it really isnt.
Why? Well for one thing it doesn't cost like one.
Foranother, itdoesntparklike one.(The Square Squareback
back Squareback is only six inches longer than the bug. But has
three times the storage capacity.)
And since it's a Volkswagen you can be pretty
sure it'll use about half as much gasoline as the
average wagon. (Our Squareback gets up to 27
miles per gallon.)
So if you're trying to decide between a station
wagon and a sedan, why not get the best of two
worlds? Buy the sedan that looks like a station
wagon.
MILLER-BROWN /Ov
MOTORS INC yy)
4222 N.W. 13 St., Gainesville DEALER I

was Fla. vs. Stetson over 14
years ago,
We're concerned about how
night games would draw/ said
Carlson. We might have more
people if UF were in a big
metropolitan area like Miami.
Because of the competition for
publicity with high school teams,
Friday night football would be bad
from a public relations stand standpoint.
point. standpoint.
Besides," said Carlson,
most teams travel a day in ad advance.
vance. advance. For Friday night games
the boys would miss two days
of school.

Page 15



Page 16

*, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 23, 1967

Mil Ktttottft|||Sfl H I ftl ap|A|
BILL BRIDGES
. . from Tooter to Booter.
Bridges Gets A Big Kick
Out Os Trumpet, Football
By BILL RILEY
Alligator Sports Writer
I get a kick out of playing trumpet.
Ive been playing trumpet longer than football, explained Bill
Bridges, the non-scholarship place kicker for the Gator football
team. I started playing trumpet when I was in the third grade,
but I never touched a football until I was a teen-ager.
Music for me is exciting; its an outlet of expression and emo emotion.
tion. emotion. What comes out of the end of the trumpet is ME, not just notes
printed on a page. I enjoy football too, and thats why I went out
for the team without a scholarship.
Bridges, who has kicked off seven times for the Gators this season
and who has attempted a 51 yard field goal, is also a member of
the UFs variety band and symphonic orchestra. He plays second
chair trumpet in the variety band.
The 6-foot-4, 185 pound sophomore is majoring in systems en engineering
gineering engineering and has a 2.8 grade point average. He claims he doesnt
have much trouble with daily football practice, work for the band,
and regular studies. This summer he practiced his kicking, worked
at Cape Kennedy, and played in a union dance band.
I never played football until my senior year in high school after
we moved to Florida. The high school I went to in Maryland didnt
even have a football team. All they played up there was soccer and
I never cared for that too much.
Last year Bridges kicked for the freshman team and decided to
try out for the varsity. Sprained ligaments from a summer injury
prevented him from making the first game of the season and Bridges
feels this same injury has kept him from kicking better than he
has so far.
I was kicking a lot farther than I am now; Im just starting to
feel natural again.
DIAMOND RINGS
K than puppy love
|\ MYSTIQUE, from $l5O.
I \ Its time to begin that very
1 careful selection of a lasting
1 symbol of love. An examina examina!
! examina! tion of our complete collection
I ~ of Art Carved diamond rings
I GAINESVILLE S will help you make this impor-
I tant decision. OnlyArtCarved,
/ QUALITY with a proud heritage of 50 mil milm
m milm lion rings created since 1850,
/ JEWELER offers such a wide selection,
/ each guaranteed for carat caratw
w caratw weight, color, cut and clarity.
-mi
Phone 376-2655 103 W. Univ. Ave.
a

EXTRA SPECIAL SLICED good!
SUGAR CURED BRAfID
BACONS
SUPER RIGHT FRESHLY GROUND
Dccr* LBpKG
Dbbr 3 5i.39
. SULTANA QUICIC
601 SW 2nd Ave. FROZEN AAx
1859-1987...108 YEARS YOUNG ^ ALL varieties 1U r
v. / n ll oz pk 9 Ju
jBB^IWMIUINNERS
EXTRA SPECIAL SAVE 8<
Super Right
While Beauty SAVE 22( 11 I
SHORTENING 3 I L 55' Oil ILI
Pyre Con* SAVE 6< ja ja
A&P SUGAR 5 L B b 9 49* with *Ji5/ 2 oz^Qa
BEANS 1 CANS M
Lung Groin M
A& P RICE 3t, 43< iXTRA SPECIAL LYKK
Showboat SAVE 3 lib. 8 oz. Can
PORK & BEANS J£10 BeEfStEw49<
Bright Soil SAVt LL%
LAUNDRY BLEACH SS39 0., o. t.., a.
Ann Post No Calorie SAVE 76< PKS JL,
LIQUID SWEETNER '£!r.B9 IeaPAGS 47^
aw Brand SAVE 20< Assorted Fla vors I
INST. BREAKFAST 6 & 59* AA,
f* vE o Cake Mixes/H^
INSTANT COFFEE ? 99* * w
jiAni wrrcc J a&p long grain
Soft My SAVE 10< AIAH Mf\
PAPER TOWELS J "E; 25> 1# 11 Lil/l t
AW Brand SAVE 3'/ 2 < f% |W L
SKIMMED MILK ifinc?! 10* lYulTonClub Rr Low
A&P S-Grain RPX/FDAGF^
A&P ASPIRIN -ri9* 11 5 i 2 ofc AtTs $ 1.0 0
A&P FROZEN VEGS. IN BUTTER SAUCE MIX OR
Green Beans-Green A"QAI
MixedVegs- Peas < >... ZW
Golden Corn \J PK Owl
FRESH JUICY NAVAL SPECIAL
ORANGES 0 49*
FRESH CRISP JOANTHAN COOKING SPECIAL
APPLES 4* 49<
IpOTATQESIO 391