Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 156

Legislature Sets Tuition At $125

CSBP Supports FEA Sanctions

Includes
Censure
Os Gov.
By HAROLD ALDKICH
Alligator Executive Editor
Hie State Council of Student
Body Presidents endorsed the
sanctions imposed on Florida by
the Florida Education Association
(FEA) and the National Education
Association (NEA) at its meet meeting
ing meeting here Saturday.
The sanctions, which call for
teachers to seek jobs in other
states -or face charges of un unethical
ethical unethical conduct/' also include cen censure
sure censure of Gov. Claude Kirk and the
state legislature.
UF Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, CSBP chair chairman,
man, chairman, announced the councils
stand:
The maintenance of a healthy
educational systemat any level levelrequires
requires levelrequires that the public author authorities
ities authorities meet the requirements facil facilitating
itating facilitating the operation of that healthy
system. Florida has failed to do so.
In this light, we can only sym sympathize
pathize sympathize with the teachers of Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, and concur with their pos position/'
ition/' position/' he continued.
Hank Petrlllo, Florida Atlantic
University student body president
and an education major, admitted
at a press conference following
the meeting that he did not con concur
cur concur with the CSBP stand.
I did not go along with the
sanctions/* Petrillo said. Pm
against them because there are
2,573 students in the Education
College at FAU. A large per percentage
centage percentage of these students are seek seeking
ing seeking jobs in this state. I cannot
ask them to leave Florida.
Furthermore, the average age
in the college is quite high/'
he continued. These people are
well established in the commun community.
ity. community. ITieir leaving would severely
hurt the community."
Speculation prior to the meeting
was that the CSBP would formally
censure the governor and legis legislature,
lature, legislature, in addition to supporting
the sanctions, for their attempts
to cut education expenditures for
the coming biennium.
At the press conference, Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said the question of censure
(SEE SANCTIONS P.7)
Alligator, SG
To Clash Wed.
Alligator Editor Jim White
has challenged Student Body
President Charles Shepherd to
a whipped cream fight on the
terrace of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union Wednesday at 6 p.m.
between the Alligator staffers
and members of student gov government.
ernment. government.
The fight will be a part of
Fun Week festivities.

B fl B B
HmPjjjMV
a.
CSBP MEETS AT UF

The Council of Student Body
Presidents met here Saturday to
discuss the tuition hike and other
problems. Pictured here at the

Leg. Council To Consider
Censure Os Kirk Tonight

By MARGARET O'BRIEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Legislative Council will take up
a proposal tonight to censure Gov.
Claude Kirk and may possibly act
on the student government plan to
bond student utility deposits after
it is approved by the city com commission.
mission. commission. At press time it was
not known whether the plan had
been approved by the city com-
mission at its meeting Monday
night.

Scholarships Here
Hurt By Fee Hike

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
The tuition hike passed by the
state legislature Friday will cause
many of UFs scholarship pro programs
grams programs to suffer, according to
some UF deans and professors.
Wed have to reduce the num-
Dollars For
Scholars Has
New Plans
By LESLIE LEPENE
Alligator Staff Writer
The Dollars for Scholars drive
will have a different look this year,
starting with a collection at Gator
Growl, Dwight Rogers, newly-ap newly-appointed
pointed newly-appointed Dollars for Scholars chair chairman
man chairman told the Alligator Wednesday.
Other new programs are in
the wind, Rogers said. But the
whole campaign is still in the
planning stages, and Rogers de declined
clined declined to comment on it.
The Federal govt, will match
nine dollars for every one Dollars
for Scholars gets, and this money
goes int the form of loans to stu students,*'
dents,*' students,*' explained Chairman
(SEE DOLLARS PAGE 3)

University of Florida, Gainesville

Student Body Vice President Jim
Valentine thinks the Council will
issue a statement censuring Kirk.
The resolution would be issued
probably in line with the FEA
sanctions and censure of Kirk and
the Council of Student Body Pres Presidents
idents Presidents endorsement of sanctions.
They can word it any way they
want to," said Valentine, They
think Kirk's done a bad job."
The bonding proposal will pro probably

ber of scholarships we could give
out,** said Dr. Robert S. Bolles,
acting dean of the College of Ar Architecture
chitecture Architecture and Fine Arts, unless
we can get more funds. Since pri private
vate private donors are our main source
of scholarship aid, we'd ask them
to contribute more money. Other Otherwise,
wise, Otherwise, we'd have to cut the number
of recipients.*
Scholarships will be less at attractive
tractive attractive because of the tuition
hike, said Dr. Donald J. Hart, dean
of the College of Business Ad Administration.
ministration. Administration.
Typically, our scholarships
range from $240 to S4OO per aca academic
demic academic year, he said.Theycould
not be increased to accomodate
new tuition costs, so the recip recipients
ients recipients would have to pay more.*
Primary sources for financial
aid in the College of Business Ad Administration
ministration Administration are real estate schol scholarotiips
arotiips scholarotiips ana aiu out uie r lonua
Bankers' Association.
A tuition increase would force
us to cut down the number of
students receiving grants, said
Dr. Bruce Thomason, dean of the
College of Health Related Pro Professions.
fessions. Professions. He was referring to a
federal grant, to the tune of
$195,000, for trainees in rehabil rehabilitation
itation rehabilitation counseling.
We applied for the grant in
(SEE SCHOLARSHIPS P.7)

press conference after the meeting
are, from left, Gene Stearns, FSU;
Charles Shepherd, UF; Hank Pet Petrillo,
rillo, Petrillo, FAU; and Don Gifford, USF.

bably probably be placed on the Council
agenda after its gets the city's
approval. Housing Secretary Jack
Zucker has been hesitant to pre predict
dict predict how Leg Council will act on
the bonding. He did, however, say
the council will be the greatest
hurtle the issue will have to pass.
The council must approve the
$15,000 to be put up by student
government to secure utility de deposits
posits deposits with the city for 1000 stu students
dents students next fall in a pilot program
to save students a S3O deposit
with the city for water and elec electricity
tricity electricity accounts.

FUN WEEK IS HERE!
The weeks activities includp water fights,
shaving and whipped cream fights, freewater freewatermelon,
melon, freewatermelon, free games and a wide variety of other
events. The action is from 5 to 7 every
evening this week at the J. Wayne Reitz Union.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

May Still
Decrease
To SIOO
The Florida House of Repre Representatives
sentatives Representatives adopted a Senate-passed
concurrent resolution during its
last hectic hours Friday setting a
$125 ceiling on tuition at state
universities.
The resolution, passed by a
straight party-line vote, was
vigorously opposed by Republican
legislators. They vainly sought to
increase the figure to $l5O, as
recommended by Gov. Claude Kirk.
The proposed march on the Capi Capitol
tol Capitol by university students if tuition
were set at $l5O has been called
off, at least for the time being,
according to Student Body Presi President
dent President Charles Shepherd.
Shepherd did Indicate that a
march is still a possibility if the
legislature does not find additional
sources for revenue for education
later this year.
The resolution does not have
the effect of law, according to
several legislators contacted by
the Alligator. They said the reso resolution
lution resolution is merely a recommenda recommendation
tion recommendation to the State Board of Regents.
The Regents may set tuition
anywhere up to the recommended
amount, but not over it. The Re Regents
gents Regents usually concur with the legis legislatures
latures legislatures suggestion.
However, the Regents have of officially
ficially officially supported the move to keep
(SEE TUITION P. 7)



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 18,1967

Page 2

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AT BENT CARD

Debate To Preempt Poetry?

By BRENDA LOTT
Alligator Staff Writer
Mandolins and harmonicas may
soon be exchanged for blackboards
and text books at the Bent Card
Coffee House in the Lutheran Stu Student
dent Student Center.
These academic overtones could
follow a move to extend the Bent
Card into a free speech forum.
The informal atmosphere at
the Card presents the possibility
of forum," says proprietor Robert
Souvorin. It's a place where peo people
ple people could feel free to com muni municate

Lee Evans Trio Play
At UF Monday Night

The Lee Evans TrioLee Evans
at the piano with bass and drums
will be presented as a popular
attraction by the University Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council in University Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium Monday evening at 8:15.
Evans has been making a name
for himself in the 1960s with a
career which has included suc successful
cessful successful night-club engagements; a
national concert tour with Carol
Charming; and a feature spot on
the CBS TV spectacular, The
Gershwin Years", # in which he
appeared with Frank Sinatra and
Ethel Merman. He has appeared in
England on television with Robert
Goulet and George Saunders. He
has also been seen on the Ed Sul Sullivan
livan Sullivan Show.
It has been said of Lee Evans
that he proves that jazz with mel melody
ody melody is the most listenable jazz and
Is that which is in the greatest
demand.
The us* 1 .Lyceum Council

SCIJLLS moil M|
Z WAGON MEALS |
3PENIIAM -9 PM ||
Casual Western Dining ![
mk
AKHOUBiI
Westgate Shopping Ctr. <[
ity Ave. at 34th St.
DO AND TITUSVILLE \\
The Florida Alligator riwnn the right to regulate the typos rsphlcal ton* of all advert*
IsemenU and to revise or turn away copy which It consider a objectionable.
HO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, thougi desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida AlUcator win not consider ad just menu of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertlsti*
vertlsti* Advertlsti* Manager within (I) on* day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for mor than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
It is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of FtorM, Gataasvtile, fla 32C01. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United State* test Office at Gainesville.

il i;
n I
w* \ s I J* 1 j H /jl
~7'/8 Jb*

cate municate in seminars, forums, debates,
even classes."
Souvorin is making the Bent
Card available any time for de debating
bating debating and discussion sessions.
Any group may use the facilities
as a gathering point to discuss
any topic. The only stipulation is
that the discussion be public and
free speech be allowed.
All outsiders would be encour encouraged
aged encouraged to participate. We're not
limiting it to just highly intel intellectualized
lectualized intellectualized discussion." he said.
Souvorin feels that a much bet better
ter better understanding could be reached

prices will prevail. University of
Florida faculty, staff, and school
students, $1; general public, $2;
University of Florida students ob obtain
tain obtain tickets on their I.D. cards.
Tickets are available at the new
Florida Union Box Office, the Rec Record
ord Record Bar, and Belk-Lindseys.
There will be tickets available
at the door the night of the per performance
formance performance
ALLIANCE
TV
Reliable Service
On All Make*
Os Radio,
TV,
Stereo*
815 W. Univerelty
376-9955

between students and professors if
their discussions were transfered
from a classroom to an atmosphere
as informal as that of the Bent
Card. Here the situation trans transcends
cends transcends being a class and becomes
an opportunity for closer personal
contact."
As a center for free public dis discussion
cussion discussion it wouTd function as a
communications channel serving
all students.
Souvorin proposes encouraging
diverging viewpoints so that par participating
ticipating participating individuals may make
evaluations and arrive at their own
conclusions."
Although the Bent Card is lo located
cated located in the Lutheran Student Cen Center,
ter, Center, the church would not censure
or dictate to any groups using it,
Souvorin emphasized.
If interest in the program is
great enough, guest speakers will
be invited at a later date.
Bent Card discussion sessions
will be scheduled in addition to
the weekend entertainment already
presented at the coffee house.
Groups wishing to use the rent rentfree
free rentfree accomodations are asked to
contact Souvorin in advance.

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WgMBgL, L__ Phone: 376-3516

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DEFAULTS ON INTEROGATORY

Killeen Loses Libel Suit

A default judgment was entered
last week against Bill Killeen, pub publisher
lisher publisher of Charlatan Magazine, in a
defamation suit filed last spring

Dollars For Scholars

(FROM PAGE I)
Dwight Rogers. He further stated
that one eighth of the students
attending UF are here because
of this money being made avail available.
able. available.
The total which must be raised
by all agencies is $79,200 and the
govt, will match this with approx.
$792,000, or nine times as much.
Rogers stated that the alumni are
expected to raise about $20,000
while the students also are respon responsible
sible responsible for about $20,000, but they
may have to raise more added
Doug Turner, Director of Student
Financial Aid, finished by saying
that the remaining money will
come from the University Universitys2s,ooo;
s2s,ooo; Universitys2s,ooo; the Athletic Department Departmentss,ooo;
ss,ooo; Departmentss,ooo; and the remaining $4,000
will come from various other
places.
This summer our objective
(in this program) is to get let letters
ters letters out to different service clubs
throughout the state, such as Lions
and Jaycees and ask for contri contributions
butions contributions from them," continued
Rodgers, and also send them
information telling them what the
program is like, so people in the
state will have a better under understanding
standing understanding (of our objective.)
The main element of the entire
program is the National Defense

by Mr. and Mrs. King D. White.
White, the director of student
publications, declined to comment
on the judgment. A jury trial will

Loan, of which the accumulated
$79,000 raised here is the focal
point. This money is loaned in
approximately S7OO-1,000 install installments,
ments, installments, when totaled with the Fed Federal
eral Federal money, and is repayable at the
rate of 3 per cent.
They dont have to repaid until
10 years after graduation, Rogers
said.
An important aspect of the fund
raising is the competition which
will be between sororities, fra fraternities,
ternities, fraternities, and dorms, for raising
the most money. Incentive will
further be added, in the form of
added trophies, which will be
awarded. Other clubs, such as
Circle K, a service club and the
campus religious organizations
will be included.
Another loan available to the
students, is the Economic Oppor Opportunity
tunity Opportunity Grant. In order for the money
in this particular loan to be util utilized,
ized, utilized, it must be matched by another
loan, and the University of Florida
uses the National Defense Loan.
According to Turner, the fund
raising is somewhat behind sched schedule.
ule. schedule. A total of about $264,000 will
have to be accumulated and usable
for the loans promised during first
quarterSeptember to December,
if the total sum of $792,000 is not
available before school opens.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

be scheduled in September to de decide
cide decide the amount of damages to be
awarded to the Whites.
The Whites separate suits had
been filed for alleged damages of
more than SI,OOO. They contended
that they were defamed in jokes
published by Killeen in the same
issue in which Pam me Brewer
appeared nude.
Circuit Court Judge George Pat Patten
ten Patten gave the judgment after ruling
Killeen failed to comply with a
June 8 order to answer inter interrogatories.
rogatories. interrogatories. Killeen is out of town
and not available for comment.
Interrogatories are legal ques questions
tions questions which each side in a civil
law suit may ask, and which the
other side must answer.
New Dept.
Created In
Ed. College
Dean Kimball Wiles of the UF*s
College of Education announced
last week the selection of Asso Associate
ciate Associate Professor William Travis
Loften to head the new Depart Department
ment Department of Vocational, Technical and
Adult Education.
Loften has been on the college
faculty for 30 years and is widely
known throughout the state for his
work in agricultural education.
He will chair a department which
combines his present Department
of Agricultural Education with bus business
iness business education.

Page 3



UF Press Publishes
25 Books A Year

By NICK MILLER
Alligator Correspondent
The University of Florida Press
has a new director, William B.
Harvey, who held the same pos position
ition position at New York University be before
fore before coming here.
It was time for a change and
Florida looked good. Harvey said
of his decision to take the pos position.
ition. position.
Harvey succeeds Dr. Lewis F.
Haines, who was drafted from the
faculty when the Press was founded
in 1945. Haines has returned to the
faculty to teach Humanities.
Harvey, who took over April
1, said 20 to 25 volumes will be
published by the Press this year.
Now, in its 22nd year history,
the Press has turned out 325 books.
The Press is a wholly con controlled
trolled controlled operating division of the
university.** Administration is un under
der under Vice President of Academic
Affairs Robert Mautz.
Editorial and policy matters,
Harvey said, are governed by the
Board of Managers of the Uni University
versity University of Florida Press, which
consists of 14 faculty members.
Dr. Aubrey Williams, graduate
research professor of English, is
chairman of the board.
According to Harvey, the UF
Press will publish for anyone as
long as the material has quality
of scholarship. The Press does not
publish light reading. Less than
half of the books published are

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written by members of the UF
faculty, Harvey said.
The Press is a member of the
American Association of Univer University
sity University Presses. There are about 70
university presses in operation,
but many new ones being estab established
lished established frequently, Harvey added.
After being in the attic of the
Law Building and the fourth floor
of the stadium, the Press moved
to its present location, 15 NW
15th St., in 1959.
Work is being done this summer
to renovate the building. The build building
ing building will be redecorated, new equip equipment
ment equipment will be added and central
air conditioning will be installed,
according to Harvey.

Summer Symphony Planned

The UF Summer Symphony, con conducted
ducted conducted by Edward Troupin, will
present a program in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium Tuesday evening,
August 1, at 8:15.
Willard Brask, chairman of the
piano-teaching staff of the UF,

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Humor To Tho Roscue
In Hawks 'EI Dorado

By TIM STERLING
Alligator Columnist
Like the cavalry, periodic outbursts of that
saving gracehumor.has saved another John
Wayne western. El Dorado,* a 126-minute 126-minutecount*emParamount
count*emParamount 126-minutecount*emParamount Pictures production star starring
ring starring Wayne and Robert Mitchum, has a slow
beginning but gets better as the plot developes.
Produced and directed by Howard Hawks in
Technicolor, the movie is another vehicle for
some more of those well-staged Wayne fight
scenes.
What there is of a plot revolves around an
idealistic gunfighter (Wayne) and a drunken sheriff
(Mitchum) caught in the middle of a Texas range
war in the period immediately following the
Civil War.
Wayne portrays Cole Thornton, a gunfighter

will be heard as soloist in the
Mendelssohn Piano Concerto in
G Minor. Mr. Troupin will also
conduct Leonard Bernstein's bub bubbling
bling bubbling Overture to Candide and
Prokofieffs droll Lieutenant
Kije Suite.

Y I
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chicken
all you can eat
Served with
Biscuit and 1(1
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Golden brown,
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Mmmmm! And you
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and thirds ... in
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Pardon our crowing,
but our fried chicken
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Try some tonight!
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:, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July i > 1967

Page 4

who refuses to hire out to the bad guys. Beeausp :
of the sheriff, an old friend, Thornton decides :
to fight on the side of law and order to pro- :
tect the town of El Dorado.
As J. P. Harrah, Mitchum plays the part of j:
a drunken sheriff charged with protecting the
town of El Dorado. Harrah has earned the rep reputation
utation reputation of a fast gun, but he is often too drunk
to do his job as sheriff.
At times, in the midst of Harrahs drunken J
fits, one wonders whether in fact the two, Harrah :
and Thornton, really are friends.
James Caan earns laughs as Thorntons knife- :
throwing side-kick, Mississippi, who comes on
the scene looking for revenge for the death
of a friend near a Mexican border town and :
joins Thornton to ride to El Dorado. Mississ-
ippi doesnt carry a gun until Thornton gets getshim
him getshim one and never learns to use it.

SALES I
*
I
j
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Kitts To Conduct
Summer Concert

A guest conductor and a trio
of trombone soloists will be fea featured
tured featured in this weeks twilight con concert
cert concert on the lawn of the Univer University
sity University Auditorium Wednesday at
6:45 p.m.
John Kitts will guest conduct the
band in the Commando March
by Samuel Barber; the Fantasy
on American Sailing Songs by
Clare Grundman; and the Chorale
and Alleluia by Howard Hanson.
A trio of trombone soloists
Mike Samboll, Gainesville, Steve
Terry, Bradenton, and Marvin
Abbott, Brooksville will play
Frank Cofields fast-moving nov novelty,
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Conductor Richard Bowles has
chosen for the overture of the
evening Orpheus by Jacques
Offenbach. This is the overture
which contains the bumptious
music always associated with the
cancan. Also included on the pro program
gram program will be the march by John
Philip Sousa, Hands Across the
Sea; and selections from the
musical comedy, On a Clear Day
You Can See Forever.
For the Latin flavor, Director
Bowles has chosen the paso doble,
Meseta. The entire clarinet
section will be featured in the
lively old favorite, Dizzy Fing Fingers.
ers. Fingers.
Guest conductor Kitts joined the
faculty of the UF Department of
Music last September. He has
played the bassoon, with the In Indianapolis
dianapolis Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra for
nine years. He has also been the
director of the band at the Culver
Military Academy, in Culver, In Indiana.
diana. Indiana.

' j-rt
f \ Jl|| H blb Jb Ife-
Smi DR^^IING^'
Carol Eastman, 1966 Homecoming Queen,
is still at it dreaming of winning that first
prize in the *67 Homecoming Slogan contest
a roundtrip ticket to Expo *67 in Montreal.

Neylans Gives Campus Plan
For Survival In Hurricanes

By JOE DeMEMBER
Alligator Correspondent
Hurricane season is here, and
students with knowledge of what
to do if a hurricane strikes can
prevent needless damage to lives
and property.
Hurricanes are tropical storms
which originate near the equator
where the tradewinds meet. Any Anytime
time Anytime from June through September
these tradewinds could generate
a hurricane with winds to 100
mph which normally travels north northnorthwest
northwest northnorthwest along the Florida or the
Lousiana coastal area.
William E. Neylans, assistant
director of housing, believes that
almost all of the campus buildings
will withstand the force of a hur hurricane
ricane hurricane with little difficulty.

Frederick
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APARTMENTS
I & 2 Bedroom
Furnished Apts.
1 Bedroom Apts,
available for
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Heated Pool
Bar-B-Que Pits
Ample Parking
Laundry Facilities
Cable T\
Sound-Conditioned
Apartments
1130 SW 16th AVE
CALL 372-7555

Only a few buildings, such as
those at Flavet in or Frame D
would require evacuation, Neylan
said. Plans have been made for
a smooth evacuation.
Normally at least four hours
warning is given prior to an evac evacuation.
uation. evacuation. Students should listen to
local radio and television broad broadcasts
casts broadcasts for hurricane alerts. A ra radar-tracking
dar-tracking radar-tracking station is operated by
the College of Engineering to pro provide
vide provide immediate location data of
storms within a 50-mile radius.
Residents of Flavet in would
go to the recreation room of the
Florida Gymnasium and students
in Frame D would go to the J.
Wayne Reitz Florida Union.
Students and student families
who feel insecure in their off offcampus
campus offcampus buildings are encouraged
to join campus residents in any
of the dorms.
Chief Aj. Shuler of the UF
police stressed that students
shouldnt bring anything that would
interfere with other residents
such as cooking facilities or al alcohol,when
cohol,when alcohol,when people are pent pentup.
up. pentup.
TYPEWRITER
SPECIALS
Portables*
Standard
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from $65 to $95
RECONDIHOPED and
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604 N. MAIN STREET

Vocation
Need F vji: y
Consolidate
cash...
See Marion Finance Co.
222 W. Univ. Aye.
Loans up to S6OO. 376-5333

Tuesday, July 18, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

4 Days
To Write
Slogans
Only four more days remain In
the Homecoming Slogan Contest
and nearly 1000 entries have al already
ready already been turned in. Slogans may
be humorous or serious as long
as they are no longer than seven
words. They will be judged on their
adaptability to Homecoming festiv festivities
ities festivities Oct. 27-28.
The entries will be cut to five
semifinalists*' by a panel of
judges including Jim White, Alli Alligator
gator Alligator editor, Nel Laughan, Sem Seminole
inole Seminole editor, Charles Shepherd,
student body president, Manny
James, IFC president, Bill Cross,
assistant director of the Reitz
Union and Harold Dillinger, field
secretary of Alumni Services.
In keeping with the close con connection
nection connection the UF has with the rest
of the state, the final judging
will be done by Gov. Claude Kirk
and his cabinet. Thenbarring a
veto it's off to EXPO *67 for
some lucky entrant.

The University Police Depart Department
ment Department will provide transportation on
a limited basis to those needing
medical or emergency aid.
The J. mills Miller Health Cen Center
ter Center has an auxiliary power supply
so if local power fails, medical
treatment will still be available.
Investigator Gene E. Watson of
the UF Police said that police
would assist in evacuation and men
would be located at cover points
to watch for fires and looting.
Frequent patrols will be main maintained
tained maintained to prevent traffic congestion
and keep trees and powerlines
from blocking emergency vehicles.
According to Neylans, a list of
items to bring includes food and
baby formulas to last for at least
12 hours, a flashlight, one change
of clothes, blankets, towels, and
other linens, and recreational
items for children, such as toys,
books, cards, etc.
McAlister To
Teach Again
Dr. Lyle N. McAlister is re resigning
signing resigning as director of the UF*s
Center for Latin American Stu Studies
dies Studies to return to full-time teach teaching
ing teaching in the Department of History
here.
Dr. McAlister, who joined the
University faculty in 1950, was
chairman of the Department of
History from 1959 to 1963, when
he was named to direct the Latin
American program.
a graduate of the State College
of Washington, Dr. McAlister re received
ceived received his Ph.D. from the Univer University
sity University of California, Berkeley in
1950.

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 18,1967

TO BE SEEN!!
July 28, 1967 -
;
_
IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
A mum i i i m i iin ! -- - -
advice Cy| Ea
Extension Cl
S s vn ce 1 -NeV'i' 1 P \vve __
* * co* w *iP eT Mr v^v* vxZ
_# /S& i s
NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!!
AGLUT with SO MANY PAGES we still haven't attempted to COUNT THEM! Fascinating and Awe-Inspiring rW?
NEWS of the Day, Illustrated, Illustrated, Illustrated. Illuminating Features All in the English Language to
Arouse the Interest and Inform the Mind. Matters of Monumental Interest to All New Florida Students are cj£§
g Stimulating Artwork to Titillate the Intellect and the Sense of Humor, in COLOR, in COLOR, in COLOR!
THE FALL PREVIEW 'k EDITION OF
The Florida Alligator



By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Managing Editor
The State Council of Student
Body Presidents* (CSBP) meeting
here Saturday was an explosive
mixture of success and failure
which nearly disrupted the coun council,
cil, council, UF student government
sources said following the meeting.
The CSBP took action on two
of five major items of business
which had been expected to come
before it, but dissention about
others was suffiently heated to
prevent action being taken on them,
according to the source who asked
to remain anonymous.
With only one of the four mem members
bers members who attended dissenting, the
council endorsed the National Ed Education
ucation Education Associations (NEA) sanc sanctions
tions sanctions against the state of Florida
(see lead story)success enough
for the meeting.
The sanctions forbid association
members to accept teaching jobs
in Florida and warn businesses
and people planning to move to
Florida that its educational facil facilities
ities facilities are less than adequate. By
endorsing the sanctions, the CSBP
adds it support to the teachers
cause.

Capitol March Off
or Now, Anyway

The State Council of Student Body
Presidents, meeting here Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, officially called off a pro proposed
posed proposed march on the Capitol, at
least for the time being.
The march was planned to focus
public attention on the debacle
in Tallahassee, UF Student Body
President and chairman of the
Sanctions
. (FROM PAGE I)
was v not officially discussed at
the closed session. Sources close
to the CSBP revealed that informal
preliminary discussion indicated
that Petrillo would refuse to par participate
ticipate participate in the censures. In fact,
it was reported that he threatened
to walk out of the meeting if the
subject were broached.
Although the CSBP took no of official
ficial official action, three of the repre representatives
sentatives representatives Shepherd, Gene
Stearns of Florida State, and Don
Gifford of South Floridaindi Floridaindicated
cated Floridaindicated that the legislative bodies of
their respective universities would
be asked to impose censures and
support the sanctions.

SHEPHERD SAYS

CSBP Wont Disband

The Council of Student Body
Presidents definitely will not be
dissolved although the original
reason for forming the organiza organization
tion organization is past, according to Charles
Shepherd, UF student body pres president.
ident. president.
We have benefited from the
tuition battle," Shepherd an announced
nounced announced at the news conference
Saturday. We have engendered
support, and most important, we
now have a council of presidents
to unite the universities.'
The CBSP was formed on Feb.
21, 1967 by the student body pres presidents
idents presidents of the five state univer universities

CSBP Actions Were Indecisive

The council discussed state con constitutional
stitutional constitutional revision, noting five
items which it had recommended
at the June 17 FAU meeting. The
familiar 18-year-old vote, annual
sessions of the legislature, an
appointive state cabinet, a uni unip
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SHEPHERD
cameral legislature, and guberna gubernatorial
torial gubernatorial succession were the recom recommendations.
mendations. recommendations.
But the council had been expected
to go after biggeror least more
spectaculargame.

CSBP Charles Shepherd told the
Alligator last week.
But the legislature Friday set
a tuition-ceiling of $125, setting
the stage for an expected move
by the Board oi Regents to put
tuition at SIOO per quarter.
Regents chairman Chester Fer Ferguson
guson Ferguson publicly announced June 30
the Regents support for a SIOO
tuition.
Shepherd announced at the Sat Saturday
urday Saturday meeting that the CSBP is
pleased with the actions of the
legislature in setting tuition at
$125 per quarter, allowing for a
possible reduction by the Board
of Regents.
We intend to further pursue
the matter of tuition reduction with
the Board of Regents,* the an announcement
nouncement announcement continued.
The CSBP also suggested that
if the Regents leave tuition at
$125, they work with state and
national governments to secure ad additional
ditional additional loan resources for stu students.
dents. students.

sities universities for the express purpose
of resisting any increase in the
tuition from the established SIOO
during the quarter system.
Gov. Claude Kirk had indicated
that he wanted to increase tuition
to $l5O per quarter. The tuition
for the trimester system, which
is two weeks longer, is only $l3O.
At its first meeting, the CSBP
voted to actively campaign against
the tuition hike. The organization's
consitiution calls for at least one
meeting a month. Due to constantly
changing developments in the tu tuition
ition tuition situation it has met every
week since their inception.

ALLIGATOR ANALYSIS

It was no secret that UFs
Charles Shepherd and FSUs Gene
Stearns wanted the CSBP to cen censure
sure censure Gov. Claude Kirk and the
Florida Legislaturein seperate
resolutions.
The council was thought to be
upset with Kirk because of his
apparent anti-education cam campaign-slicing
paign-slicing campaign-slicing up the education
budget and raising tuition while
killing a $4 million loan program.
The legislature incurred the
CSBPs wrath, it was thought, by
making education a political foot football**by
ball**by football**by permitting Kirk to slice
up education and hoping that he
loses votes by doing it.
Officially, the CSBP never dis dismissed
missed dismissed the censure of Kirk, the leg legislature,
islature, legislature, or anybody else,** as
Charles Shepherd put it at the
CSBP press conference following
the meeting.
But before the meeting, censure
was very much discussedunof discussedunofficallyaccording
ficallyaccording discussedunofficallyaccording to usually in informed
formed informed sources. Preliminary dis-

CSBP
Lists
5 Points I
The Council of Student Body
Presidents suggested Saturday
several specific proposals to be
included in the revision of Flor Florida's
ida's Florida's 1885 Constitution, scheduled
for legislative consideration later
this year in a special session.
' The proposals include a reduc reduction
tion reduction of the voting age in Florida
to 18.
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd, speaking in behalf of
the CSBP, said that the council
favored the following items:
1. Annual sessions with ade adequate
quate adequate compensation to assure that
the legislators will assume their
duties as a full-time public ser servant;
vant; servant;
2. An appointive cabinet sys system;
tem; system;
3. Lowering the voting age
to 18;
4. Establishing a unicameral
(one-house) legislature;
5. Allow the governor to
succeed himself.**
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STEARNS

cussions about the idea showed
three of the four CSBP represen representatives
tatives representatives attending Shepherd,
Stearns, and the University of South
Floridas Donald Giffordto be
in favor of the censure proposal.
But the fourth memberFlorida
Atlantics Hank Petrillorefused
to budge from his opposition to
the censure proposal. He was also
opposed to endorsement of the
NEA sanctions.
FAU numbers over 2,700 edu education
cation education majors among its students
this summer, he said, and it was
his feeling that the sanctions were
not in their best interests.
Petrillo*s position is directly
opposite that of Stearns and Shep Shepherd.
herd. Shepherd.
FSUs student legislative body
has endorsed the FEA sanctions

Scholarships Hurt

May, on the basis of SIOO tuition,
he said. He could forsee no pos possibility
sibility possibility of getting more money
to cover a tuition increase, blam blaming
ing blaming that on an austerity program
in Washington brought on by the
Vietnam War. Grants in rehabil rehabilitation
itation rehabilitation counseling come from the
vocational rehabilitation adminis administration
tration administration of the Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare. Originally
planned for 35 students, the money
includes SI,BOO in support money,
plus tuition costs for each student.
un the flip side of the coin,
however, are colleges whose
scholarship programs wouldnt be
damaged at all by the tuition hike.
The College of Physical Education
and Health is one of these, said
Dean Dennis K. Stanley.
Our scholarship program,ath program,athletic
letic program,athletic scholarships and partial aid
from Individuals, is not the type
that would be effected by a tuition
increase, he said.
Scholarship aid in the College
of Nursing was recently boosted
by a SIOO increase per recipient
in the Florida State Scholarship
for Nursing. According to Mrs.
Virgie M. Pafford, assistant pro professor
fessor professor of nursing, the increase
brings the total financial aid for
a student in this program to S6OO
per year. She said the boost was
possibly designed to accomodate
the quarter system, rather than a
tuition increase.
_Dean E. W. Jacunski of the Col College
lege College of Engineering sees added

tuition down to SIOO, as they origi originally
nally originally suggested to the governor.
Speculation in Tallahassee is
that the Regents will set tuition
at SIOO, leaving the door open
for the legislature to increase
university expenditures for the
next biennium in special sessions
later this year.
Kirk indicated that he plans
to call the legislature back sev several
eral several times for special sessions.
One session reportedly will con consider
sider consider revising Florida's 80-year 80-yearold
old 80-yearold constitution. Another will prob probably
ably probably take up revision of the state's
tax structure, termed by Kirk as
antiquated."
Additional revenue may result
from either or both of these spe special
cial special sessions, sources said. Then
additional monies can be appro-

Tuesday, July 18, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

(FROM PAGE I)

Tuition Hits $125

(FROM PAGE I)

(virtually the same as the NEAs)
and censured Kirk and the legis legislature.
lature. legislature.
Shepherd is thought to be con considering
sidering considering asking the Legislative
Council to take similar action.
USFs Gibbon, whose govern government
ment government was opposed to the aborted
CSBP march on the capltol, voted
to adopt the sanctions and says he
will ask his student legislative
body to adopt them.
Petrillos steadfast refusal to
consider the censure proposal was
strong enough to dissuade the
Council from formally considering
such action and chancing an ir irrevocable
revocable irrevocable split in the ranks.
The councils proposed march
on the capitolwhich actually went
into the planning stages Friday Fridaydied
died Fridaydied on the floor of the House of
Representatives when tuition was
set at $125.

competition for scholarships as the
main consequence of a tuition hike.
A tuition increase would increase
application for scholarships/* he
said, from people who would be
searching for new cources of in income
come income **
Calling scholarships good in incentives*,
centives*, incentives*, Dean Jacunski said
theyd be publicized to reach the
expected flood of applicants. Most
scholarships in engineering come
from private industry, he said.
Loans arent as popular, he
concluded. They have to be paid
back.

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PETRILLO

priated to education without vio violating
lating violating Kirk's campaign pledge of
no new taxes."
House Speaker Ralph Turlington,
D-Gainesville, told the Alligator
last week that unless tuition were
raised to $l5O, the state's univer universities
sities universities would be unable to continue
operation for the next two years.
Legislative sources said, how however,
ever, however, that Turlington changed his
mind when Kirk's aids suggested
a tax-revision session. They said
that Turlington and other legis legislative
lative legislative leaders are hopeful that
more money can be siphoned into
education improvements at all lev levels.
els. levels. Such a move may lead to re removal
moval removal of sanctions of Florida by
state and national education as associations.
sociations. associations.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 18,1967

lllflllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH
The Florida
'A Mignlfy hOu Raao* PIU^TuA #
JIM WVJTE HAROLD KENNEDY
Editor Managing Editor
808 PADECKY
Sports Editor
HAROLD ALDRICH ALLIE SMITH
Executive Editor Cq>Y Editor
Ulllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Censure Kirk
The Council of Student Body Presi Presidents
dents Presidents added another voice to the
chorus of condemnations against Gov
Kirk Saturday when it endorsed the
FEA and NEA sanctions
Tonight the Legislative Council will
consider a resolution which, if passed,
will censure Gov Claude Kirk and
the Florida Legislature for failing
to provide for the educational needs
of the state
FSU's Student Senate has already
passed a censure resolution, and the
University of South Florida*s Student
Senate is expected to act on a similar
measure this week
Speaking out against Kirk is nothing
new, and the resolutions probably
won't frighten the legislature into
any drastic remedial action to soothe
the ruffled feelings of the state*s
educational interests But neverthe nevertheless,
less, nevertheless, we would like to see UF*s
student government go on record as
objecting to the use of education
as a weapdn in the political wars
But since the Legislative Council
probably wouldn*t be able to agree
with Student Body President Charles
Shepherd on the Ten Commandments,
and since Shepherd is supporting the
censure resolution, it probably won't
pass
Included in the resolution is a state statement
ment statement of support for the FEA and
NEA sanctions
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinsi
The Alligator Staff
STAFF WRITERS: Ed Cox, Ka Karen
ren Karen Jerke, Leslie Lepene, Gordon
Mann, Roy Mays, Margaret O-
Brien, Anthe Randall, Lori Steele,
Tiro Sterling.
LAB ASSISTANTS: Peg Sneider,
Edle Aronovitz, Dave Reddick,
Candy Harden, Sherrie Braswell,
John Brett, K. Brooks Weiss, Pain
. Smith, Steve Westling.

FROM THE EDITOR S DESK

Letter-Writer Distorts Facts

In todays Alligator, on the page
opposite, Don Goodman, 7AS, takes
issue with a column I wrote a week
ago concerning Vietnam and the draft.
The Alligator usually gets two types
of letters: those which present well wellwritten,

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The CSC 111 Final Was LAST Tuesday?

U. S. Could Be Wrong
In Vietnam War

By DON GOODMAN
In Tuesday's Alligator, you viva vivaciously
ciously vivaciously (sic) attacked as moral hypo hypocracy"
cracy" hypocracy" the dissent of young men who
are unwilling to fullfill what we have
come to call their military obliga obligation."
tion." obligation." I find it difficult to accept the
premise that just being born (an act
to which I was rather an impartial
party) constitutes any obligation"
whatever to defend the region of the
world into which I was born. If this
were the case, we certainly should
hold a deep respect for the Viet Cong
who are doing just that.
It would appear that the editor has
the facts exactly reversed when he
speaks of the threat to my country's
freedom" which is presented by the
Vietnam War. I see no Viet Cong leg legions
ions legions invading my country. But how do
the Vietnamese people feel about the
intervention of hundreds of thousands
of U. S. troops in their country's
civil war. The course of the war makes
it obvious that the American presence
there is resented by the majority of
the people.
-t-
Americans condemn Soviet propa propaganda
ganda propaganda as unqualified lies without real realizing
izing realizing that it is American propaganda
to which they have submitted which
makes them feel so. Did you ever stop
to think that United States presence in
southeast Asia doesn't, in itself, make
the National Liberation Front wrong and
our commitment right? Or that while
democracy offers unquestionable ad advantages
vantages advantages in this country, Communism
may offer much more in areas of less
stable economic fpundation? Or that the
Viet Cong have the support of the
majority of the South Vietnamese people
and that's why we're not winning the
war? Or why, with so many allies"
in the world, we seem to be fighting
the war alone?
In other words, did you ever con consider
sider consider the possibility that you could
conceivably be wrong? That even the
great U. S. of A. is not above cram cramming
ming cramming propaganda down your throat
as well as those of less fortunate
peoples as we press forward in oi ,r

written, wellwritten, well-reasoned points of view
and those which simply attempt to per persuade
suade persuade by any means available. Good Goodmans
mans Goodmans letter is typical of the second
type.
After accusing me of vivaciously

efforts to make the world safe for
democracy?
Dont try to divorce the Vietnamese
situation of today from the history of
injustice which nurtured it. After
almost completely financing the French
In their attempt to reestablish their
colonial grasp on Indochina, this coun country
try country intervened to prevent free Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese elections scheduled for July,
1956 in the Geneva Accords because It
was obvious that Ho Chi Minh would
win and the chances of any other
candidate were laughable.
President Elsenhower wrote, I have
never talked or corresponded with a
person knowledgeable in Indochinese
affairs who did not agree that, had
elections been held at the time of the
fighting, possibly 80 per cent of the
population would have voted for the
Communist Ho Chi Minh as their lead leader.
er. leader.
Instead, this government established
a military dictatorship headed by Ngo
Dihn Diem who was virtually unknown
in Vietnam but who had powerful friends
in this country (notably Cardinal Spell Spellman).
man). Spellman). Ho Chi Minh alone has offered
the Vietnamese people land reforms
and other measures they badly need.
While the successive, unpopular gov governments
ernments governments in South Vietnam fell like
dominoes, why did Ho remain in com complete
plete complete power in the north? Could it be
that he actually gave this people a start
toward what they wanted? The U. S.
administrations preferred the theory
that these people were brainwashed and
enslaved. Why then did these people
not move south during the 300 day per period
iod period allowed in the Geneva Accords for
free north-south travel after the sign signing
ing signing of the Accords and the division of
the country? Why do they not now defect
en masse to join the American lib liberators
erators liberators when they get a taste of
American-style freedom and humane
treatment in the South?
North Vietnamese regulars were not
committed to battle in the South until
long after this country had sent its
advisors. The National Liberation
Front is still recruiting more than
(SEt "U.S. WRONG ?" PG.9)

(I think he means viciously'*) at attacking
tacking attacking those with whom I disagree,
he states, I find it difficult to accept
the premise that just being born .
constitutes any obligation whatever to
defend the region of the world into
which I was born."
You're right, Mr. Goodman. You
owe no obligation to the U.S. simply
because you were born here. You do,
however, incur an obligation by virtue
of having lived here and enjoyed the
benefits of our society in the years
since your birth. If you dont want
to accept the drawbacks, at least be
consistentdont accept the benefits
either. And if the bad points outweigh
the good points, what are you doing
here?
Another of Goodman's statements:
. . while democracy offers un unquestionable
questionable unquestionable advantages in this coun country,
try, country, Communism may offer much more
in areas of less stable economic foun foundation.*'
dation.*' foundation.*'
Perhaps so, Mr. Goodman. I'd like
to refer you, however, to the examples
of West Germany and Japantwo coun countries
tries countries whose economies were shattered
beyond recognition at the end of the
Second World War. They've done rather
well with some American help.
Why," Goodman asks, with so
many 'allies' in the world, do we
seem to be fighting the war alone?"
Item: those of our allies closest
to the scene seem to detect a danger
in Communist expansion into South
Vietnam. Australia, the Phillippines,
South Korea, Thailand and New Zea Zealand
land Zealand have committed fighting men to
the war, and more than 30 other
nations have committed themselves to
non-combat support in the form of
medical aid and supplies.
The biggest hole in Goodman's col column
umn column lies in his questioning why the
North Vietnamese didnt move to South
Vietnam during the 300-day period
allowed in the Geneva Accords for
free north-south travel after Vietnam
was divided.
A huge number of North Vietnamese
DID move south during that period,
Mr. Goodman. Practically all North
Vietnams Catholics, numbering in the
hundreds of thousands, left their homes
in North Vietnam. Joining them were
other North Vietnamese residents of
Chinese descent who had attempted to
escape the Communist domination of
China by emigrating to Vietnam.
Goodson suggests that the Commun Communists
ists Communists be given a chance to give the
South Vietnamese the things which we
have been unable to give them.
Have you considered the possibility,
Mr. Goodson, that the South Vietnamese
government hasnt been able to do much
for the people because of the constant
warfare with the Communists? Last
year alone the Viet Cong killed an
estimated 15,000 village leaders. Why
not tell the Viet Cong to withdraw and
give the established government a
chance, Mr. Goodman? South Vietnam Vietnamese
ese Vietnamese leaders aren't likely to assume
positions of influence from which they
can institute reforms if by doing so
they set themselves up as targets for
the Viet Cong.
Goodson also points out that if the
Communists are given a chance to help
the people and they dont quite make it,
Com munism will be replaced by another
form of government.
It is worthy of mention, however,
that no country dominated by Com mun munism
ism munism has ever been able to revert to
another form of government. Remem Remember
ber Remember Hungary?
Incidentally, the furor raised by the
critics of UJS. involvement in Vietnam
has created the impression that the
war is setting a record for unpop unpopularity.
ularity. unpopularity. That, however, isn't so, des despite
pite despite the protests of the noisy minority.
During the Korean War, for example,
the Gallup Poll showed 67 per cent of
the American people in favor of with withdrawal.
drawal. withdrawal. The Gallup Poll today shows
just six per cent of the people favoring
withdrawal from Vietnam.



Tuesday, July 18, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Honor System Ineffective Needs Revision

By WAYNE BOYNTON
Alligator Columnist
My first column on the UF
honor system drew responses from
both the chancellor and attorney
general of the Honor Court. I
regret that they have already
learned that old lawyers' trick:
when fighting a losing battle, at attack
tack attack the person's character and
then maybe his side of the argu argument
ment argument will diminish in value to
the listener.
I could, but will not, go to
great lengths in defending my myself
self myself against the personal defam defamations
ations defamations used against me (such as
pointing out that three days be before
fore before his column was published
Chancellor Welch admitted to me
that he had me mixed up with
someone else who had given him
their personal word not to reveal
the trialyet his honor failed to
correct his error.)
Attorney General Panico would
not even take issue with my rea reasons
sons reasons for calling for a revision of
the honor system. He said in his
letter to the editor, I may or
may not agree with him (Boynton),"
and then called me an "irrespon "irresponsible
sible "irresponsible journalist." I, at least, am
willing to admit my beliefs.
Welch had a point in favor of
the honor system, but he had
to fabricate an argument against
me so he could use it. At no
point in my column did I say the
problem lies in the fact that stu students
dents students have to "tattle," but Welch
says I "cant quite shoulder (that)
responsibility."

(FROM PG. 8.)
enough guerillas in the South re regardless
gardless regardless of what propaganda you
may imbibe from the soup of the
Johnson Administration which
tries to make this civil war look
like a clearcut case of agression
from a Communist North trying to
impose its will on the freedom freedomloving
loving freedomloving democratic people in the
South. Democracy and freedom
must be hollow words indeed to
those who v/ere told that these
would be the fruits of the Diem
regime.
So you ask, What else can be
done? If the U.S. removes its
troops from Vietnam now, a Com Communist
munist Communist takeover is certain." The
answer: get out and let the Com Communists
munists Communists take over and let them try
to give the people what we have
been unable to give them. If they
fail, they will be replaced by an another
other another form of government, just as
we were. Whether we stay in Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam another year or another twenty
years, we can never defeat the
type of government the majority of
the people want Communism.
Our government has chosen to
support the domino theory" for
the Communist presence in Asia,
i.e., that one nation after another
will fall to Communism (which, we
are told, is inherently evil). This
theory reduces a heterogeneous
assemblage of peoples, each with

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Could U.S. Be Wrong?

Page 9

What I did say was that "stu "students
dents "students have the unnecessary chore
of watching for cheaters while
taking an exam" plus "we pay payteachers
teachers payteachers and part of that pay is
to insure every student a fair
grade."
Welch savs "The solution to the

its own history, culture, and poli political
tical political makeup, into so many unsus unsuspecting
pecting unsuspecting victims about to fall prey
to the Communist monster
innocent dominoes ready to topple.
Or, as the Alligator editor has
called it, a belligerent Asia uni unified
fied unified under Communist rule."
As you see, I have offered rea reasons
sons reasons for my resentment of my
military obligation," Fve looked
into the war. How about you? What
are your reasons for supporting
it? But then you don't have to
give any, do you? You are in the
comfortable position of being a
member of the majority, so you
have to justify your beliefs and
feelings tc no one. You can yell
treason" and unpatriotic" from
the wings knowing full well youll
never have to take the stage and
face a hostile audience. The editor
chose to give you the same patri patriotic
otic patriotic garbage with which our be beloved
loved beloved President babbles forth at the
drop of a hat . sort of like a

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What Crib Sheet?

broken Everett Dirkson record.
Ive salted my arguments with a
few facts and have a lot more.
Which do you prefer?
I dont expect to change any
minds with this short and hastily hastilywritten
written hastilywritten editorial. But when this
war is a faded memory to you,
look into the American History
textbooks of your college fresh freshman
man freshman grandchild and see, in retro retrospect,
spect, retrospect, what is said of this dis disgraceful
graceful disgraceful episode in tills nation's
past. Then you will either realize
that this was immoral and
be ashamed to admit that you, too,
fell prey to your governments
propaganda or you will condemn
the author as another of those
ultra-liberals who so willingly
accept the advantages of living
here" but so easily ignore the
responsibilities" which go with
it, like that damned brainwashed
student who sent that outrageous
reply to the Alligators all-Ameri all-American
can all-American editorteckin67.

problem of cheating at this uni university
versity university lies in our willingness as
students to respond to the re responsbility
sponsbility responsbility we have accepted" re referring
ferring referring to watching for and re reporting
porting reporting cheaters.
I came to this university to
get an education for myself and

not play policeman for cheaters.
Secondly, speaking for myself a again,
gain, again, I find that I barely have
time enough to complete most of
my tests, much less look around
the room for cheating. (Maybe
other students have time heavy on
their hands during tests.)
To use a quote from a friend
who agreed with my first column
on cheating: We do not need
ANY system for honorable people,
but for dishonorable people we
want the most efficient punitive
apparatus available. This is one
of the reasons I believe the honor
pledge is useless.
A survey conducted by a recent
Sociology 547 class concluded the
following facts. Forty-nine percent
of the students at Florida will
admit to cheating while at the uni university,
versity, university, and of the 56 percent that
said they have never cheated, only
three percent said the reason was
because of the honor code of the
University of Florida.
.In 1966, a three trimester av average
erage average of 14 cases of cheating were
reported to the honor court while
there was a three trimester av average
erage average enrollment of 15,000 stu students.
dents. students. Barely merits the union
office space and money when you
consider that only two-thirds of
all reported infractions of the
honor code ever have a trial.
I want to publically apologize
to the student whose trial I re referred
ferred referred to in my previous column.
I honestly did not mean to imply
he was guilty (I would have ruled
him innocent had I been the judge.)
In my opinion, a revised Honor
System is needed. In this system
we need to do the following:
1. Retain the present system of
honor code and Honor Court with
ail its pledges, student reporting
rights and obligations, its trials
and penalties.
2. Incorporate into this sys system
tem system the ruling by the university
that professors remain present in
the classroom during tests.
3. Provide a test answer cor correlation
relation correlation service. I am told that a
70 percent correlation of wrong
answers on two test papers is
enough to prove cheating has oc occured.
cured. occured. If a student sees someone
cheating, he asks the teacher to
retain the class test without having
to name the suspected student. He
then reports to the Honor Court,

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THE COLLEGE LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY OF AMERICA
The Only Company Selling Exclusively to College Men"
4115 N.W. 13tb Street 'PHONE 378-2476

which has someone pick up the pa papers,
pers, papers, check the answers, and re return
turn return the papers to the teacher.
If cheating is discovered then,
a student has a good case against
the accused. Also, can you imagine
how anyone who has cheated will
worry for a day or so if the
teacher announces that the papers
have delayed until the next class
meeting because he turned them
over the the Honor Court.
4. Publish all convictions with
the accusseds name, all evidence,
and penalties in the Alligator. I
have been going to school here for
four years and I have never known
or heard of a person being pen penalized
alized penalized for cheating.
Welch talks about accepting re responsibility.
sponsibility. responsibility. Well, by God, lets
have the convicted cheater accept
some responsibility. He cheated,
so dont shelter, protect or hide
him. A published account of every
conviction and penalty will strike
some fear in the mind of every
student that considers cheating.
Law students have turned the
Honor Court into a lot of secret
proceedings. Try to imagine the
impact on society if all criminal
proceeding and punishments were
to become secret. Also, by pub published
lished published proceedings, students will
know what type of evidence is
required to get a conviction.
To conclude, lets start making
the cheating student worry more
about being caught, and help the
honest students stop worrying
about trying to catch the cheating
student during exams.
Burgers and Fries
Sold With Pride
Nationwide
715 NW 13th St.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;
for sale
#
.BUY AT COST PLUS 10%.
Air conditioners (All sizes) in including
cluding including perfect fits for Diamond,
Schuht, and Corry Villiages. Over
400 satisfied students. Local com company,
pany, company, local service. Sudden Service
Fuel Oil Co. 907 SW 3rd St.
376-4404. (A-136-ts-C)
\ MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 50*
by 10*; two bedroom. Low equity
;and assume payments. Phone 376*
0044 after 5:30 or on weekends.
(A-151-ts-c)
YORKSHIRE TERRIERS, AKC.
Precious, prestigious, precocious,
petite, pedigreed, pampered, play playful
ful playful puppies for particular people.
S2OO up. Jacksonville 1-389-2073
after 5 p.m. (A-155-st-c) ;
1958 TRIUMPH, excellentj new
tires, rebuilt engine, radio, heat,
$425.00; 1964 MOPED motorbike,
excellent, SIOO. See after 6 p.m.
(1824 NW 3rd Place #27.) (A (A---153-st-p)
--153-st-p) (A---153-st-p)
17" ZENITH PORTABLE TELE TELEVISION
VISION TELEVISION with stand, dual speakers
and control extending 15 feet. One
year old. Excellent condition. 378-
5940. (A-154-3t-c)
FOR SALE: 1966 YAMAHA 80 cc.
Approximately 5,000 miles. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Call Dale 378-
5734. (A-155-2t-p)
COOL, SPACIOUS HOMETTE,
52xlO*, Bedroom and carpeted
study. Air conditioned, part of'
equity and take up $56 payments.
Phone 378-5293^_(A-155-st-p)
* %
10x50 NEW MOON HOUSE HOUSETRAILER
TRAILER HOUSETRAILER with additional 12x14
luxurious, portable room. Air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, some wall to wall car carpeting.
peting. carpeting. Very roomy $3,100. Phone
378-4822. (A-155-3t-p)
BEST DEAL ON CAMPUS x
36**8* trailer, one bedroom, fully
furnished, air conditioned, $1,500
or best offer. Call 372-5616 after
5:30 p.m. (A-156-4t-c)
FOR SALE 60x10 TRAILER 1 1/2
BATH AND THREE BEDROOMS.
Alft CONDITIONED, NO EQUITY.
JUST TAKE OVER PAYMENTS.
CALL 904-498-3169 OR WRITE
TO G.W. STEVENS, P.O. BOX
636, CROSS CITY, FLORIDA
32628. (A-514-st-p)
1966 TAYLOR MOBILE HOME.
58 > xl2 two bedroom, excellent
condition. Carpeted. S6OO down,
take up payments of $57 per month.
Call Unlv. ext. 2140 8-5 p.m.
or 376-8119. (A-155-3t-c)
48 x 12 MOBILE HOME for sale.
Air conditioned, carpeted. Call
495-2413 after 5 p.m. (A-156-
3t-p)
- LAST pTfHH
3 DAYSjULIiIiIJ
Til.phnn. 378-2434 |
6:50-9:504?K
lIHifIHONEYi

for sale
ROOM AIR CONDITIONER, 120
Volt, 5,000 BTU, SSO. Call 378-
1845. (A-155- 3t-c)

' 1
mt p e r t I
Held Over Show Starts At Dusk
|,J(HNMM I
Wayne ICLIgI Douglas I
M "the War Wabon"!
PANAVISION^J^MB^B
~Plus Co-Feature W
"The Young^Warriors At 10:50
Co-Feature Wednesday AH O:SO J
H RICHARD IKE lm Pm W
HOSCIITA GRffn -r II 5, M M
Eri fiiminnii icmu MATURE 'wtechniscopeB
pj a l7nn llfl LHBH audiences a Universat Release j
I "STUNNING! I ACT mM I
|r timVs
lag m

Page 10

L The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 18,1967

for sale
FURNITURE SALE: Sofa, beds,
chairs, tables, & miscellaneous.
Call: 378-1190. (A-154-st-c)

| for sale |
1962 DIXIE 10*x50* MOBILE
HOME. Two bedroom, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, front kitchen, near cam campus.
pus. campus. Available August. Lot 3 Hick Hickory
ory Hickory Hill. $2,800. 372-5671. (A (A---156-2t-c)
--156-2t-c) (A---156-2t-c)
1965 TRIUMPH TIGER CUB, $495
or best offer. Blue, Scrambler
bars, luggage rack and completely
rebuilt engine. Call Harvey 376-
9420. (A-156-It-c)

* Mum %
pmmrn'i
irww j
I CO STARRINe
(JAMES CAAN CHARLENE HOLT- PAUL FIX ARTHUR HUNNICUTT
TECHNICOLOR ;
( ~~ \
COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
ELIZABETH RICHARD
Taylor Burton
{ IN THE BURTON-ZEFFIRELLI PRODUCTION OF
I The Taming
OfThe Shrew
JOW' x. BAWDY I
tjLjwr uproarious i
A HANDSOME, I Ta Y lof are
LUSTY. BUSTY ROMP I T\ brilliantt
Redbook Magazine \ ~ Tru Magazine
-jim-Mmamoi-JiraM-Aii
JfflMNill ffIUBIP ff[
technicolor
f* 1 Downtown Gainesville J
* w

for rent
HAVING TROUBLE FINDING
YOUR APARTMENT FOR SEP SEPTEMBER?
TEMBER? SEPTEMBER? Gator Town will be
open by the fall quarter. 378-
3457 or 378- (B-152-ts-c)
ROOM, quiet, comfortable, avail available
able available Aug Ist. Suitable desiring
privately furnished home. 1/2
block from University. Call 376-
5368. (B-154-4t-c)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for rent |
"tyHY LIVE IN A TRAFFIC JA'MTI
Walk to classes and be relieved
of your parking problem. Fully 1
furnished, spacious one bedroom
apartment, air condition, gas heat,,
{fully equipped kitchen Including*
washing machine. Call 372-3357
*r 376-28) fB-142-lOt-C)
WILL HAVE CHOICE apartments
and room with private bath from
August 15 to Sept. 15. Make res reservations
ervations reservations now. 321 SW 13th St.
Across from campus. (B-156-lt-c)
ONE ROOM for male student. 123 b
SW 3rd Avenue. (B-152-4t-c)
NEW, MODERN ONE AND TWO
BEDROOM FURNISHED, air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned apartments. QUIET EN ENJOYMENT
JOYMENT ENJOYMENT GUARANTEED. $lO7/
mo. one bedroom; $ 137/mo. two
bedroom. Call Ernest Tew Realty
Inc. 376-6461. (B-153-6t-ri

jS aWm V *' & jAii J I J
11 *** 'r 1 awl *,. v Ijf .. A IJH
v B Ha 9 HA bA HF_ Ht
' VBr jJbJtM I |Kf
S#ii $]R i f I ** i .^H
' m i F bVBB ||jm W
RIAhj v / \ O wA
tup kSA&RB'' 11 MS je W m Ik
Cta ? Bn| ww 1 i > bI^K
ftaA a i 1
P C 1 Bs# T t M
Ml, li rm lu *BT & B. .JBe
Jb fi N bft jiEft^^B
m-'B Wxs
*J MHI -e r afc je _l_
At least 27,000 people will read The Florida Alligator everyday next fall. Plan your advertising program now.

j autos
58 MERCEDES, new engine, good
tires, S4OO. Call: 378-5292. (G (G---154-st-c)
--154-st-c) (G---154-st-c)
1964 AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE.
36,000 miles. S6OO or best offer.
372-6887. (G-154-3t-c)
1958 CHEVY. Must sell, good con condition
dition condition mechanically, new tires, 102
NW 13th St., Room #5, 376-9389
after 7:00 p.m. (G-155-3t-p)
lost-found
DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST
FRlENDuntil she finds Blue Lus Lustre
tre Lustre for cleaning carpets. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (M-156-lt-c)
LOST: Small black coin purse.
Finder please mail to P.O. Box
14403, University Station for $5
REWARD. Include name and ad address.
dress. address. (L-156-2t-c)

Tuesday, July 18, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted, I
ul I
A' -J
MEDICAL TRANSCRIBERAIa TRANSCRIBERAIachua
chua TRANSCRIBERAIachua General Hospital has im immediate
mediate immediate openings for part time
and temporary personnel. Know Knowledge
ledge Knowledge in use of electric typewriter,
dictaphone, medical terminology
are required. Good salary for
qualified person. Apply Personnel
Director. 912 SW 4th Avenue. (E (E---154-ts-c)
--154-ts-c) (E---154-ts-c) 1
HEALTH CENTER FACULTY
MEMBER DESIRES male faculty
or graduate student, roommate to
share two-bedroom apartment and
expenses at University Gardens.
Available immediately. Call: 372-,
2828 or 376-2888. (C-152-ts-c)
wanted
WANTED: Cook with kitchen. I
will pay three/fourths meal costs
for both of us. Call: Mike 378-
4926. (C-156-2t-p)
I NEED A RIDE TO BALTIMORE
as soon after August 7th as pos possible.
sible. possible. Call: Bonnie 378-3809. (C (C---153-3t-c)
--153-3t-c) (C---153-3t-c)

Page 11

lost-found
, 1 -- J
LOSTJuneTranslucent frame
prescription men's glasses. Lens
in right eye only. Reward. Call
378-6615 and leave number. (L (L---156-It-c)
--156-It-c) (L---156-It-c)
WILL THE PERSON who found
my billfold at the Yulee phone
Saturday morning keep the money
but please turn in the papers to
Lost and Found at the Florida
Union. R. Scott Robinson. (L (L---156-lt-p)
--156-lt-p) (L---156-lt-p)

real estate
BY OWNER, Carol estates, three
bedroom, two bath. Central air and
heal. DoMble living room 1,500
aq. Ft. Automatic sprinkler. $750
down payment. 376-5616. 01-152-
ts-c)
323 NW 14th STREET. Walk to
class. Four bedroom, one bath,
furnished house, fireplace, shade
trees, garage, low down payment.
SIOO per month. Students okay.
Call 376-8565 by owner. (1-152-
ts-c)

personal (
CONGRATULATIONS Bebe & Dlno
on your baby boy. Candy and Mike.
(J-156-lt-nc)
FREE BRINDLE KITTENS. Call
372-3173 or 372-3029. (J-155-
2t-c)
FREE: Two male kittens. Call
Rick 378-6994. (J-154-2t-c)
--- 1
TERHappy fourth anniversary
of your belated birthday present
TIGER. (J-156-lt-c)
services
IN A HURRY? Passport ifligtt
fixation; application pbotoc
Westley Roosevelt Studio, 90*'N
W. 6th St Call 272-0300, (M (M---142-ts-C)
--142-ts-C) (M---142-ts-C)
~ -fe
M & R TENNIS SERVICESRacket
restrlhglng and repairs. Satls-i
faction guaranteed. Free pickup
and Delivery on and near campus*,
Call 378-2489. (M-151-12t-p)



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 18,1967

Trapp Rebounds 9
Ready For Gridiron

Richard Trapp, on the coaches'
critical list two days ago, is now
healthy and ready to play college
football again.
Trapp, All-SEC in both football
and baseball, entered J. Hill is
Miller Health Center last Thurs-

pr
STRICKEN STAR'
Richard Trapp now
healthy for senior sea season
son season in the fall.

Track Signees To 19*,
Carnes Almost Done

With recruiting virtually com completed
pleted completed the UF has signed 19 boys
to track scholarships for 1967,
Gator head coach Jimmy Carnes
announced today.
The signees include: John Bo Bogert,
gert, Bogert, Ft. Lauderdale, 100-9.9; Ken
Burnsed, Brandon, 880-1:55;.
Wayne Carroll, Eau Gallie, mile mile-4:24;
-4:24; mile-4:24; Roger Carson, Winter Park,
220-21.7; Jerry Fannin, Tampa,
HR* 14.1; Mac Hammond, Winter
Park, mlle-4:26; Grover Howard,
Macon, Ga., triple jump-45*0;
Steve Keller, Lexington, Ky., 880-
1;5S; Don La Rene, South Brow Broward,
ard, Broward, mlle-4:25; Charles Lendzian,
Largo, 440-49.7; Barry MacDon MacDonald,
ald, MacDonald, Jacksonville, 220-22.1; Brian
Pappas, Miami, pole vault-13*8;
Travis Poythress, Jacksonville,
UF To NCAA
Three UF swimmers were
named to the NCAA all-America
team, for the 1966-67 season.
This is a record number for
one year. Setting the pace was
captain Tom Dioguardi of West
Palm Beach who made the team
in the 50-yard freestyle with a
time of 21.4. This was Dioguardi's
third year.
Two sophomores, Steve Macri
of Jacksonville and Barry Russo
of Devon, Pa., were picked. Macri 1
swam tne 100-yard butterfly in
51.6, sixth-best time in the coun country.
try. country. Russo's 1:56.9 in the 200-
yard butterfly placed him on this
honor squad.

FOR the f;nest in dairy products
ASK FOR FOREMOST AT YOUR FAVORITE
FOOD STORE OR CALL 376-5293
'FOR EARLY MORNING DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME
FOREMOST DAIRIES, Inc.
534 S.W. 4th Avenue

day for a routine check-19. At the
time, Trapp was feeling a little
whoosy and decided to undergo a
physical examination.
Diagnosis revealed that Trapp
had a growth on his lower abdo abdomen
men abdomen and that surgery would be
required. But the operation was a
simple and successful one and the
doctors now predict that Trapp
will be 100 per cent sound for
Gator football in the fall.
Trapp came 19 especially from
his home in Bradenton because of
his sickness" and was released
Sunday afternoon with a clean bill
of health.
Trapp had contracted a case of
walking mono" in the spring
playing baseball for coach Dave
Fuller. Trapp sat out two weeks'
of games at the time, shaking off
the after-effects. Part of the
reason for the growth was his
past troubles with mono.
Trapp is the second UF football
star to undergo severe doctor's
tests within two weeks.
Larry Rentz, another Florida
stalwart for the coming season,
contracted a touch of mono mononucleosis
nucleosis mononucleosis and his weight dropped
to 130 pounds on his 6-2 frame.
But under doctor's care in Miami,
Rentz has recuperated and gained
the weight back. And just like
Trapp, Rentz is expected to be
back at full strength in the fall
for head coach Ray Graves.

880-1:56; Ron Purdom,St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, high jump-6'6; Joel Sarrett,
Hollywood, pole vault-14'0; Billy
Taylor, Berrlan, Ga., bj-22'11;
Ricky Vogel, Vinter Park, shot put,
-59*8; Bill Wieand, Miami, 440-
49.5; and John Younger, Garden
Grove, Calif., 880-1.58.
"I am real pleased at the boys
we have signed,** says Carnes.
"Six of the 19 were state cham champions."
pions." champions."
Bishop Signs
Golf Ace
Coach Buster Bishop strong golf
program got another shot in the
arm Tuesday as Bishop signed jun junior
ior junior college standout KempGohlson
from Chlpola JC.
Gohlson, who will be a junior
in the fall from Chattahochee,
is rated a blue-chip prospect by
Bishop.
"Kemp is one of the finest
golfers around, bar none," said
Bishop, "and I am extremely hap happy
py happy to have Kemp a Gator."
Gohlson, a 6-foot, 180-pounder,
is the last prospect, for the mo moment,
ment, moment, that Bishop has signed.
BENSON CUT
SAN DIEGO, Calif. Jim Ben Benson,
son, Benson, a three-year star for the
UF football Gators, was cut in the
first round at the New Orleans-
Salnts' practice camp here for its
first season.

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J. Donnelly gets set to smash the handball while Mark Cosgrove
waits for return.

Hinson And Resnick Pace
Intramural Handballers

Tom Hinson and Marty Resnick
swept to first-round victories in
Intramural singles handball last
Thursday on the courts off of Uni University
versity University Avenue.
Hinson beat Mike James, 21-15,
21-8 while Resnick had a much
harder time with Mark Cosgrove,
21-13, 21-20. Three other players
had first-round byesRick Pier Pierson,
son, Pierson, Robert Lally and Mike No Nodell.
dell. Nodell. Frank Hazourl won by for forfeit
feit forfeit over Jerry Lebas.
There are still two remaining
matches to be played at press
time. On Friday, Jim Valentine
met Lou Tally and Robert Gaitley
was to square off Charlie Roberts.
In doubles handball, Resnick and
Lally defeated John James and
Hazourl, 21-10, 18-21, 21-8. Jim
Hartman and J. Donnelly bounced
Joe Goodllng and Cosgrove, 19-21,
21-17, 21-10. Five other teams
drew byes to move into today's
second round.
First round tennis singles found
George Kaufman smashing Gator
Bob Beck, 62, 3-6, 64. Mike
Freed beat Bob Mandell, 7-5, 6-3.
Robert Kennedy trounced Mike No Nodell,
dell, Nodell, 6-0, 6-4. George Fry swept
past Dan Rogers, 8-6, 6-0. Robert
Hilaredes won be forfeit over Rich Richard
ard Richard Klicpera. Joe Stepp and John
Fountain drew byes.
In softball, the Law League got
ready for its final action today with
five games last Thursday. Joe
Forbes led the Underdogs 11-4
win over the Tortfeasors, with
three hits. The Nads edged the
Scratchers, 13-12, with Bill Horn Hornbrook
brook Hornbrook and Bill Matthias pacing the

*

winners with three hits each. Joe
Kerr collected three for the losers.
The Bull mooses found the vic victory
tory victory road a little easier to travel
as Joe Kahliss' three singles spur spurred
red spurred the 'Mooses to a 13-2 licking
of the Clowns. The Roundballs
trounced Team I, 15-1. Joe HLrsch
and Bill Edwards paced the winners
with three hits each. The Legal
Mets defeated the Bombers, 10-5.
Joe Powell led the victors with
three safeties.
Thursday softball action in the
Independent League found the P.
E. Petes beating the Oldtiroers,
4-3. Joe Hawkins paced the win winners
ners winners with two hits in the low lowscoring
scoring lowscoring game. Microbiology
scored 17 times against King Rich Richards
ards Richards 14. Four players for Micro Microbiology
biology Microbiology had three hitsBill Cor Correy,
rey, Correy, Dan Boyd, Bill Bates and
Joe Patrick. Bill Spinloe of Rich Richards
ards Richards took individual honors with
four safteties. Bill Tallerlco used
four hits, including two home runs,
to lead Correy Village over Dia-.
chipped in with three hits. SC&
BA tripped Phi Delta Theta 7-3,
to round out the Bracket One
action.
In Bracket Two, the Shaggers
used Bill Stark's two home runs
to rout University Lodge, 9-2.
Buds, with Bill Parson's three hits,
beat the Physics, 8-5. Jow Swlnt
rapped three hits for tbe losers,
r -""-f
j**rn the latest in" dances as
well as the old standards.
FRANS DANCE STUDIO
ioi3w.univ.ave;
classes now forming

The Phi Taus brought its record
to 2-2 with a 5-4 decision over
Flavet m. Roger Ball sparked the
winners with three hits and Joe
Batey added three more for the
losers. The Middle Schoolers won
by forfeit over the Braves, 7-0.

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