Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
BOARD OF REGENTS MAY MAKE DECISION

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Managing Editor
A bill to authorize the State
Board of Regents to set tuition for
university students, has apparently
been pigeon-holed in two Senate
committees, according to assist assistants
ants assistants of three senators.
The bill, Senate Bill 1719, had
been introduced last Friday by

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 155

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KEEPING KOOL
(Photo by Nick Arroyo)
Sanctions Causing
Teacher Shortages

Sanctions imposed by the Florida
Education Association will make it
difficult to staff 70 per cent of
the Florida schools in September,
Assistant State School Supt. John
Seay said here last week.
SG To Light
Norman Field
By ED COX
Alligator Staff Writer
q\it of $33,000 to be spent on
aa overall campus recreation im improvement
provement improvement program, 14,000 will
go to lighting Norman Field, Stu Student
dent Student Body President Charles Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd told the Alligator yesterday.
It will cost $14,000 to light
the tennis courts, one softball
diamond, and a touch-football
area.* Shepherd said.
The money will be budgeted by
student government this term and
construction will begin this fall,*
he added.
Legislative Council has already
approved SISOO for purchasing of
supporting poles for the lighting
of the field.
The remaining money will be
budgeted by student government
this term and construction will
begin in the fall,** he added.
We hope to have the courts
and field ready before the new
Twin Towers* dormitory opens,*
Shepherd said. The recreation
area will serve the students of
Diamond Village, sorority row,
and the new dormitory.*
(SEE LIGHTS PAGE 2)

Tuition To Hit $l5O ... Maybe

Senator Henry Sayler (R) of St.
Petersburg and would have changed
Florida Statute 240.062 relating to
the setting of state university tu tuition.
ition. tuition. It would have authorized
the Regents instead of the legis legislature
lature legislature to set tuition.
As of Thursday afternoon, it
was still in committee. The ses session
sion session ends today.
In the past, although the leg legislature

Filling in for State School Supt.
Floyd Christian, the originally
scheduled speaker, Seay spoke to
an overflow crowd in Norman Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium at the UF*s College of
Education.
Christian had to cancel his
speech earlier in the day to attend
an unexpected Board of Education
meeting.
Seay made the prediction, ad admittedly
mittedly admittedly hesitating, in answer to
a question from Dean Kimball
Wiles of the College of Education.
Seay said 4,000 teaching vacancies
existed before the sanctions were
announced May 28.
Seay disclosed that Christian has
circulated an opinion from Flor Florida
ida Florida Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth
among county superintendents,
noting that a teachers contract
will be in jeopardy*' if he par participates
ticipates participates in a September walkout.
Christian asked for the opinion
in the wake of persistent reports
that teachers might take a so socalled
called socalled professional day or
strike in September.
Seay also disclosed that officials
of the State Department of Edu Education
cation Education had been prepared to plead
for a lifting of the sanctions to
the FEA before Gov. Claude Kirk
vetoed some $l5O million in edu education
cation education funds. Consideration of the
request was abondoned after Kirks
veto.
I dont see our asking for re removal
moval removal of sanctions until some of
the causes are removed,** Seay
added.
(SEE SANCTIONS PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

islature legislature usually accepted the un universities
iversities universities recommendation for the
size of tuition, it retained the final
word on tuition.
A concurrent resolution passed
by the legislature has for years
set the maximum charge that can
be made for tuition. The resol resolution
ution resolution informs the Board of Regents
of the highest figure it can ask
legislators to name as the tuition.

Utilities Deposit
To Be Dropped
By MARGARET OBRIEN
Alligator Staff Writer
The proposed Student Government plan to bond students for
city utility deposits goes before the Gainesville City Commission
Monday night in its first hurtle" towards relieving students of
a S3O deposit with the city for electricity and water, according to
Secretary of Housing Jack Zucker.
Zucker met Wednesday with City Finance Director Charles
Oakley to iron out legal problems abd did come to an agreement.*
Zucker said he could not release specifics on the plan until It is
approved by the commission. He is optimistic for the citys approval,
but speculated that the greatest opposition might come from Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council, which must approve the plan.
He said Leg Council would be next to determine to what extent
and how far it could go.* Zucker said he couldnt make assumptions
on how the council would act, but it has not always been in agree agreement
ment agreement with the executive branch of student government.
According to the plan, student government would put up a $15,000
bond in a pilot program for 1,000 students to secure their utility
accounts instead of the students paying the usual S3O deposit. Stu Students
dents Students would pay as 2 fee for the bond on a first come, first served
basis.
Zucker said no definite plans have been made for collection
of a defaulted bill, but that student government could, if necessary,
take the offender to a small claims court, or handle the matter
through the Honor Court. The bond would be considered as a loan.
We have to know the program exists,* he said, before we can
plan for this.**
If the bill is approved by the commission, it will be drawn up
as soon as possible to be presented to the Leg Council, although
there is no guarantee it could be acted upon before the end of B
term.
If the bill had to wait until the fall quarter for legislative action,
Zucker said it would reduce the effectiveness of the program for
next year.
The default rate for utilities accounts in the city is around
15%, Zucker estimated, although the city has not been able to say
what percentage involves students.
Commenting on the first come, first served basis for the 1,000
students who would be in the original group, Zucker said this was
the only feasible plan, since it would be impossible for either student
government or the city to look up the record of each individual on
any basis, for instance, which would give preference to students
who have good credit ratings.
We hope the first students who come are the ones who are
pressed for money,*' he said, adding he hoped the program would
be expanded as soon as possible.

...Or You Can Pay It Now
By ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff Writer
Off-campus students now can save both time and worry in ar arranging
ranging arranging for their utility needs, according to Mike E. Vollmer of
the Utilities Operations Center.
By coming in tc pay their utilities deposit now, students can
be assured that their lights wi be on when they arrive this fall,*'
said Vollmer.
In addition, they will save a long wait in line down at the City
Hall,* he added.
Vollmer pointed out that students who wait until they arrive
can be given no definite time when their utilities will be turned
on and will have to wait their turn.
By filling out an application now, along with paying their deposit,
the utilities Department will guarantee that the lights will be on
when the student arrives, Vollmer continued.

Such a resolution, setting max maximum
imum maximum tuition at $l5O for state
universities, was pidgeonholed by
the Senate late Thursday when
it was sent to a committee for
study, a representative of State
Senator J. Emory Red Crosss
Tallahassee office told the Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator.
It was still there as the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator went to press. Such a reso-

Friday July 14, 1967

lution, If passed by both houses
before they adjourn today, and
combined with Gov. Claude Kirks
slim budget would make a $l5O $l5O
- $l5O almost certain.
The offices of Senate President
Verle Pope, Cross, and Sayler re reported
ported reported that bill 1791 had been re referred
ferred referred to the Committee of Higher
Education and Learning and the
Committee of Financing and Tax Taxation.
ation. Taxation. It stood little chance of
being brought out of committee
during session, the offices told
the Alligator.
The Board of Regents* Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor Chester Ferguson went on
record June 30 as favoring a
SIOO per quarter tuition because
any hike would ** deprive thousands
of students** of a college education.
As it stands now, tuition re remains
mains remains at SIOO per quarter, but
with the budget passed by state
government, a minimum tuition of
$l5O is required, one UF official
said.
If the legislature takes no action
on tuition before the session ends
today, the board will be forced
to set tuition, the UF official said.
Sources in Tallahassee called the
bill an attempt to pass the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility for any tuition increase
from elected state officials to
educators.
Blue Key
Sponsors
'Dialogue
Dialogue, a Florida Blue Key
sponsored program to help stud students
ents students air their grievances with cam campus
pus campus administration, will officially
begin Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. with
an organizational meeting in Room
355 of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
The program, directed by
Charles Egerton, will be an open
forum in which students join stud student
ent student leaders to talk over problems
with university officials.
When the program is initiated
in the fall, eight or nine students
will comprise a panel. Three
student leaders and five or six
students off the street will serve
on the panel. Three members
of the administration, faculty, or
deans of colleges will be asked
to take part in each discussion,
depending on what area the topic
for that meeting is scheduled to be.
The first discussion in the fall
will cover registration in connec connection
tion connection with University College. Dr.
F. A. Doty, dean of the college,
R. H. Whitehead, director of ad admissions,
missions, admissions, and Vice President Rob Robert
ert Robert B. Mautz have all agreed to
attend, Egerton said.
Clif McClelland, Dialogue
spokesman, said some of the topics
in the future would include pro programs
grams programs on each of the colleges,
the university examiners, and
others.
He said that a program on uni university
versity university counseling was needed
from what some students have told
the Blue Key office about their
counseling experiences.
The program will run every two
(SEE DIALOGUE PAGE 2)
Models Needed
Students both male and fe femaleare
maleare femaleare wanted to model fall
fashions for pictures for the
Alligators Fall Preview Ed Edition
ition Edition which will be mailed to
incoming freshmen.
Applicants should come to the
Alligator office in room 330
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union
at 4 p.m. this afternoon.
There will be no payonly
prestige.



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

Page 2

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
A total of $3,831,400 in fed federal,
eral, federal, state, and local funds was
parceled out in scholarships and
loans to UF students last year.
That figure does not include
outside grants and private loans
and grants, said I.D. Turner, of
the Financial Assistance office.
Also excluded are scholarships
and fellowships from colleges
within UF, he said.
Scholarships are awarded on the
basis of academic achievement,
with the stipulation that recipients
maintain a 3.0 average at UF.
A 2.0 average is mandatory for
loan recipients. All students are
required to carry the minimum
hour Schedule load.
Os the non-repayable financial

Sanctions Hurt Recruiting

(FROM PAGE I)
He advised educators not to be
misled into thinking Gov. Kirk
has lost public support because of
his no new taxes* stand.

'Dialogue Program Opens

(FROM PAGE I)
weeks during the regular school
year and intermittently during the
summer.
Lights
(FROM PAGE I)
H. Spurgeon Cherry, assistant
dean of the College of Physical
Education and Health, said that
about five years ago it cost nearly
SIO,OOO to light the Broward area
tennis courts.
The biggest expense is the dis distance
tance distance from the nearest electrical
source to the area to be lighted,
he added.
The remainder of the $33,000
will be spent on a student park
behind Graham Hall, six hand handball
ball handball courts, and some all-purpose
courts behind Hume Hall.

The Browse Shop I
THEY'RE IN!! I
SUMMERHILL Neill I
HOW TO AVOID PROBATE Dacey I
HOW TO SCORE HIGH ON THE GRAD RECORD I
CRC STANDARD MATH TABLES I
CRC HANDBOOK OF CH6M & PHYSICS I
VALLEY OF THE DOLLS (paper) Suzanne 1
GAMES PEOPLE PLAY Berne I
THE SECRET OF SANTA VITTORIA Crichton I
WASHINGTON D.C. Vidal I
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (paper) I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
Campus Shop & Bookstore |
The Florid* Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertlsements
lsements advertlsements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
MO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florid* Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (I) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
It Is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gadoosvtlle, fla J2COI. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United Stole* to* Office at Gainesville.

Scholarships Near $4 Million

aids, the Educational Opportunity
Grant is sponsored by the fed federal
eral federal government. A total of
$230,000 was allocated for UF
students from low-income brack brackets.
ets. brackets. Other non-repayable scholar scholarships
ships scholarships are furnished by private
donors.
The majority of financial aid
comes in the form of loans from
federal, state, and local sources.
Os these, the most far-reaching
is the Other Student Employment
project, which encompasses 1,600
UF students. This work-study plan
is supported by $1,500,000 instate
moneys. A similar project, the
College Work Study Program, aids
360 students and is supplied with
$330,000 from matching federal
and state funds. T
The National Defense Loan sup supplies
plies supplies funds on a federal-local

Seay, former Marion County
school superintendent, asserted,
The people of Florida want good
schools and they are willing to
pay for them. But I dont believe

We hope to get faculty members
and administrators to come and
listen to our problems. We realize
that these things cant be changed
overnight, but if some of these
men will listen to our proposals,
then we may be able to help
other students in years to come,
he added.
Dialogue is designed to help
the average student on the street
let somebody know just what his
problems are. We feel we are
going to succeed, he concluded.

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20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AYE

match plan, whereby the govern government
ment government pays 90 per cent and local
sources, 10 per cent. The Finan Financial
cial Financial Assistance office asked for
SBBO,OOO, but the government cut
it back to $774,000, according to
Turner. The additional $77,400,
the amount needed to match the
federal funds, was raised by
alumnae, the athletic association,
UF funds, and the Dollars for
Scholars drive.
The United Students Aid Fund
operates through commercial
banks in the state. A student may
borrow money from a bank and
repay it starting ten months after
he graduates. The federal govern government
ment government backs the loan by paying the
six per cent interest the first
ten months after graduation, if
the students family income is
less than $15,000.

they are willing to pay at the local
level. He referred to school board
opposition to increases in property
taxes.
Seay sum med up the current con conflict
flict conflict between educators and the
governor as stemming from Kirks
campaign promise to put Florida
first in education in the nation
while at the same time promising
no new taxes.**
Phil Constans, executive secre secretary
tary secretary of the FEA and a leader
in the sanctions controversy, will
be the next speaker in the College
of Educations summer lecture
series at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

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Loan recipients who go into
Florida banking do not have to
pay back the loan. Turner said
that UF students received $300,000
in such aid last year, with an
expected increase to $750,000 this
year.
The other loan programs are the
Florida. Scholastic Loans, UF long longterm
term longterm loans, and UF short-term
loans. The first project supplies
SBO,OOO, the long-term program,
$350,000, and the short-term pro program,
gram, program, $190,000.

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102 new units in the SW 16th Ave area, wall to wall carpeting,
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furnished and unfurnished, kitchens by:
CALL 378-3457 or i j

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See Marion Finance Co. I
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Loans up to S6OO. 376-5333

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Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

Page 4

Greeces
Government
Right Wing?
Greece, the birth place of dem democracy
ocracy democracy and classical drama, lost
its democratic government earlier
this year when a military coup
overthrew Prime Minister An Andreas
dreas Andreas Papandreaus liberal admin administration
istration administration and imposed a strict
censorship.
The ageless plays of Euripides,
Aristophenes, and other ancient
Greek masters have been banned
as controversial by the pre present
sent present regime.
But a UF international relations
professor says the army coterie
in control there is oriented to
the right but not fascist.
Instead, it represents the tra traditional
ditional traditional segments of the Greek
society, and at present they have
no other ideology than king and
country, says Dr. Keith R. Legg,
a UF international relations in instructor
structor instructor who recently spent a year
in Greece.
The main objective in Greece is
to restore the army to the dom dominant
inant dominant position it enjoyed from 1946-
49, Legg continued.
Legg sees King Constantine as
the single symbol of unity in
Greece. The kings reluctant ac acquiescence
quiescence acquiescence to the army coup, he
believes, probably saved Greece
from all-out civil war.
Yet the position of the monarchy
remains delicate.
It is difficult to assess how
much of a moderating influence
the king will be able to exert on
the force which seized power in
his name, Legg noted.
Speaking of the Union-Center
party of George and Andreas Pap Papandreou,
andreou, Papandreou, Legg said that it would
be inaccurate to say the party
is communist dominated, although
it has occasionally courted the
support of communist and left leftwing
wing leftwing elements.
What the Papandreous repre represent
sent represent is an attempt to modernize
the parliamentary system and the
local bureaucracies, which have
traditionally been inaccessible to
the vast majority of Greek citi citizens,
zens, citizens, Legg pointed out.
Lege attempted to explain the
implications of the overthrow of
the Greek parliamentary govern government
ment government by a small cadre of army
officers on April 21.
The new government has impris imprisoned
oned imprisoned several thousand Greek citi citizens,
zens, citizens, including George and An Andreas
dreas Andreas Papandreou, leaders of the
major opposition party.
Legg feels that it would be im impossible
possible impossible to predict the future for
democracy and parliamentary gov government
ernment government in Greece.

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SET FOR JULY 25

Gainesville Police
To Auction Vehicles

Ten automobiles, a motorcycle,
a motorscooter, and 18 bicycles
will be auctioned off to the highest
bidder at 12 noon July 25 at
Gainesville Police headquarters,
according to Police Chief Wil William
liam William D. Joiner.
The vehicles are those which
have been found abandoned within
the city limits during the last
year, Joiner said. Anyone wish wishing
ing wishing to bid on any vehicle is in invited
vited invited to come to the auction at
department headquarters at 721
Northwest sixth st.
The vehicles are as follows.
MOTOR VEHICLES: 1. Honda
50 Motorcycle, ID # Cl 10454116.
2. Cushman Motorscooter, ID #
8119435. 3. 1956 Chevrolet 2 dr
HT, ID # UC 56A009282. 4. 1958
Pontiac 4 dr, ID # A858H6739.
5. 1953 Buick 4 dr HT, ID #
66413663. 6. 1957 Plymouth 2 dr,
ID # 1002E8395. 7. 1960 Hillman
4 dr. ID # 0005592. 8. 1954 Pon-
Burgers and Fries
Sold With Pride-
Nationwide
715 NW 13th St.

TUMBLEWEEDS

ttac 2 dr, ID # PBZH-13784. 9.
1954 Chevrolet 2 dr, ID # 458-
M 123404. 10. 1958 Lincoln 4 dr,
ID# H8Y8421677. 11. Dodge truck,
ID # 82350156. 12. 1956 Plymouth
sedan, ID # 16026478.
BICYCLES: 1. Boys, Dunelt,
ID # 623978. 2. Boys, Dunelt,
no ID #. 3. Boys, Western Flyer,
ID # N 160799. 4. Boys, Amer American
ican American Flyer, ID # A356705. 5. Boys
Western Flyer, ID # A35831. 6.
Boys, A.M.F., ID # 142736. 7.
Boys, English, ID # 92909 RA.
8. Boys, Schwinn, ID # KA35020.
9. Girls, Western Flyer, no ID #.
10. Boys, no name, ID # AO7-
14792. 11. Boys Hawthorne, ID
# C 333112. 12. Boys, J.C. Hig Higgins,
gins, Higgins, ID # 529088. 13. Boys,
Western Flyer, ID # 295312. 14.
Boys, Dunelt, no ID #. 15. Girls,
Sears, ID # 50347380. 16. Boy's,
Sears, ID # A5170660825. 17.
Boys, Schwinn, ID # KA11135.
18. Girls, Astro Flyer, ID #
113694.
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the blare of sirens as you stop traffic in
this stripped voile charmer from Franklin*s
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/N HC SLOGAN CONTEST

Eight Days Left

With only eight days remain remaining
ing remaining in the UFs Homecoming Slo Slogan
gan Slogan Contest, more than 600 entries
have been submitted to Florida
Blue Key, the universitys lea leadership
dership leadership fraternity which sponsors
Homecoming.
Bruce Harlan, chairman of the
slogan contest, said entries this
year are only naif the 1,218 total
received in 1966. He expects a
late flood of suggested phrases to
begin arriving before the July
21 deadline.

The heaviest response has been
from the Crlando and Jacksonville
areas. Only one out-of-state
entryfrom Arcadia, Calif.has
been sent.
Top prize for the best slogan
is an expense-paid weekend for
two at Montreal and Expo 67
via Eastern Air Lines, Oct. 6-8.
Other awards include weekends
in Miami Beach and Cape Coral
and a four-day Nassau cruise.
Gainesville businessmen have do donated
nated donated an additional $250 in gift
certificates and merchandise.
Entries must be seven words
or less and postmarked no later
than midnight on July 21. They
will be judged on originality, wit
and adaptability to a Homecoming
theme. In case of a tie, the ear earliest
liest earliest postmark will determine the
winner. The contest is open to
anyone.
Fun Week
4
Is Here
Be prepared for a free-for-all
at the J. Wayne Reitz Union ter terrace
race terrace this Monday, Fun Week's
kick-off day.
Water and shaving cream fights
are the order of the day, as well
as free watermelon for partici participants
pants participants in the 5 -7 p.m. activ activities.
ities. activities.
Free bowling, ping-pong, and
billiards are offered in the union
games room on Tuesday, also from
5-7. Prizes for contest winners
include passes to the union theater
and free games in the games
room. Jack Vaughn, chairman of
the Union recreation committee,
said, We hope many students
will take this opportunity to use
the game facilities for free.
Wednesdays contribution to Fun
Week is a hootenanny on the ter terrace,
race, terrace, also from 5-7 p.m. Ice Icecream
cream Icecream eating contests with prizes
are in store for Fun Week par participants
ticipants participants on Thursday. Three sing singing
ing singing groups are to perform in the
Union cafeteria on Friday, from
5-7. Door prizes, including
movie passes and SSO in gift cer certificates,
tificates, certificates, will wind up Fun Week
activities.
r TS5wSr*
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see Venice, Florence. ROME. Pisa)
THE RIVIERA (NICE, plus Monte
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PENSIVE PONDERING
Carol Eastm an, *66 Homecoming sweetheart,
pensively ponders a slogan for Homecoming
*67.
Constans To Speak
On FEA Sanctions

H. Phil Constans Jr., execu executive
tive executive secretary of the Florida Ed Education
ucation Education Association, will speak on
SanctionsPurpose and Effect
at UFs College of Education at
1:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Constans, who received his doc doctorate
torate doctorate in education from the VF,
is the third speaker in the col college's
lege's college's summer faculty lecture ser series.
ies. series. The public lecture will be
in Norman Hall auditorium.
Shortly after Constans assumed
his post, the FEA imposed sanc sanctions
tions sanctions on Florida, threatening to
brand as unethical" any teacher
who accepted a state position.
The sanctions are a move by the
FEA to secure higher appropri appropriations
ations appropriations from the state government
learn the latest in" dances as
well as the old standards.
FRANS DANCE STUDIO
1013W.UNIV.AVE.
classes now forming

Finest Selection Os
Levi's, Jeans, And Casuals
In Gainesville
*guns itim
*BOOTS jmtf
MENS AND JfJ5
WOMENS IRW/mj
ill al l
4821 N.W. 6th Street At Hiway 441
Open BAM to 6PM Mondays through Saturday.
Open Fridays Till 9 PM

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

for education.
Constans is a former principal
of Cocoa Beach Junior-Senior High
School.
Goggin Named
Dr. Margaret Goggin, UF's
assistant director of libraries,
has been named librarian in
charge of university libraries.
University library director
Stanley West has resigned to
accept a position as professor
of library sciences at the Uni University
versity University of Hawaii.
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Robert B. Mautz said
Mrs. Goggin will be responsible
for library operations and that
the UF is deeply apprecia appreciative
tive appreciative of her willingness to as assume
sume assume the responsibilities."

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

The Florida
U Ou Rmik T-iiit.
a!M WHITE HAROLD KENNEDY
Editor Managinf Editor
808 PADECKY
Sports Ed'tor
HAROLD ALDRICH ALLIE SMITH
Evocutiv* Editor Ccpy Editor
Ullllftllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
What ?
When the Alligator went to press
last night, a bill and a resolution
before the Florida Legislature af affecting
fecting affecting university tuition were dead deadlocked
locked deadlocked in committee.
Only one day todayremains be before
fore before the Legislature recesses o
The bill is Senate Bill 1719, and
would leave the setting of university
tuition to the Board of Regents. It
was introduced last Friday and re remains
mains remains pigeonholed in two Senate com committees.
mittees. committees.
The resolution, originally intro introduced
duced introduced to limit tuition to $125 per
quarter and later revised upward to
$l5O, is likewise locked in com committee.
mittee. committee.
The Legislature, it would appear,
is dead set against doing anything
at all with tuition. The legislators
don't want to set tuition, it seems,
and neither do they want to let the
Regents do it.
That's fine with us. If the Leg Legislature
islature Legislature doesn't act, tuition will re remain
main remain at its present statutory limit
of $390 per academic year (based
on the trimester system) and con converts
verts converts to $97.50 per quarter, $2.50
less than the Regents' recommended
SIOO.
*
We rarely ever find ourselves in
the position of cheering for some someone
one someone to do nothing at all, but in this
case we're all for the Legislature's
sitting on its collective hands all
day.
That, of course, isn't likely. But
no one in Tallahassee quiet seems
to know what's going to happen next.
The office of one legislator tells us
that the $l5O resolution is as good
as passed. Another office assures
us that the Legislature intends to
wash its hands of tuition and drop
the problem in the Regents' laps.
At any rate, whatever happens has
to happen today.
Thought for the day: what happens
if the Legislature passes Bill 1719
on the last day of the session and
Gov. Kirk vetoes the bill?

The Care And Training
Os Toy Soldiers

By 808 MORAN
Alligator Columnist
Good morning, sir.*'
Good morning. How are you this
fine day?
Oh just fine, thank you. Is there
something youll be needing this fine
morning?
Yes, there is. Im looking for a
present. For my son. Its his birth birthday.
day. birthday. A fine lad he is too. I want to
get something nice.
How old is your boy, sir?
Ten. 1

mi.rr If
Lighting For Norman
Field Inappropriate

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator t r<'i V
Student Body President Charles
Shepherds proposal to light Norman
Field at a cost $ $14,000 demon demonstrates
strates demonstrates poor judgement and reeks with
political overtones.
The $14,000 is just an installment
on a two-phase project costing $33,000
and termed, by Shepherd, the campus
improvement plan.
Although the suggestion does have
its meritssuch as allowing the con concentration
centration concentration of students who live around
Norman Hall to play tennis at night
and permitting night intramural
gamesit is ridiculous at present.
First, the money could much better
be spent as a donation to Dollars
for Scholars, which is currently run running
ning running thousands of dollars behind its
expected goal for 1966-67.
Just that $14,000 c~uld return
$266,000 from the federal government
for scholarships for needy students.
But Shepherd is apparently more
concerned with important matters,
like playing tennis at night.
The real poison in Shepherds pro proposal,
posal, proposal, though, is politics. Its no secret
that Shepherd is seriously considering
seeking re-election next spring.
Providing lights for nighttime ten tennis
nis tennis will probably have a mystique
appeal to several hundred independents

Oh, yes sir. We have a fine se selection
lection selection for the boy. If youll just
follow me, well go back to the toy
section.
Click. Click. Thump. Click.
Here we are, sir. How about this?
Its the newest thing in toy guns. It
fires 2,000 rounds of caps either in
a burst or singular. Italso fires plastic
grenades by compressed air. Completly
harmless, I assure you sir.
Or your lad can toss the plastic
grenades at his little friends by hand.
They can be loaded with caps and make
a most satisfactory pop when they
hit something.

living in Twin Towers dormitory. And
it wont hurt him at Sorority Row,
either.
The money for campus improvement
will come from excess enrollment
funds. SG is allotted money on the
basis of anticipated enrollment. If more
students register than was anticipated,
the excess money goes into a re reserve
serve reserve account.
So Shepherds arguement that his
project will be financed BY the stu students
dents students FOR the students is a valid one.
But his real reasons for spending
the money on this particular project
are primarily politically motivated.
The plan will gain him votes, and it
will remove $14,000 from the SG tills
that cant be spent by the opposition
majority party in Leg Council to mete
out political favors or finance its
own platform.
Soliciting votesby hook, crook or
favorsis a necessary heartbeat for
continuing political life. And Shepherds
proposal is not without merit.
But I think the Student Body Presi President
dent President could have exercised more re responsible
sponsible responsible judgement, especially in view
of the facts that tuition will appar apparently
ently apparently climb to $l5O per quarter with
no accompanying loan relief.
For $14,000, a lot of students could
have had a better chance in life. Too
bad. Tennis, after all, is much more
important.

Look at this lever on the stock
sir. When you pull it straight down it
launches a plastic anti-tank missle. It
too is completly harmless, sir. Just
think of the fun your little boy can
have attacking his little friends* houses
with this.*
Yes. That is a fine toy. My son
loves to play grown-up. Do you have
any other harmless toys to go with
this?**
Yes sir, here we have an authentic authenticlooking
looking authenticlooking G. I. helmet. It has real camou camouflaging
flaging camouflaging on it. You son can hide in the
bushes and surprise his friends with
his new gun.**
My! That is a splendid toy.
Also we have a complete camou camouflage
flage camouflage uniform for the tyke.*
Yes. Ill take that too.*
Also we have a pistol just like
real soldiers carryand it fires 250
caps without re-loading.*
Yes. That too.*
And the boots, rubber bayonet, cap capfiring
firing capfiring bazooka, walkie-talkie and play
barracks?**
Oh yes. Everything. This will be the
best birthday my son ever had.
Fine sir. Now if youll follow me
to the front of the store well gift giftwrap
wrap giftwrap it all for you. We have one of
the best gift-wrappers in the state.
Shell make it look beautiful.
Say. That is nice. I want nothing
but the best for my son. I really love
that boy.**
Would you please give me a hand
with these presents?**
Sure.*
Click. Click. Thump. Click.
Miss Clayton, would you wrap these
extra-nice for this gentleman? Theyre
for his son. Its for his birthday.
While your gifts are being wrapped,
sir, you can sit in our entertainment
center and watch one of our many
color television sets.
Thank-you.
In the entertainment center a morning
quiz show is just going off the air
as the man sits down. After a few
advertisments, all in living color, the
noon news comes on
~K.
Good afternoon. Today we have an
on-the-spot report from Vietnam with
our man-on-the-scene, Jay Harth Harthworth.
worth. Harthworth. We now switch to Jay Harth Harthworth
worth Harthworth in Vietnam, all in glorious
color.*
The color camera pans a field. Men
lie dead in many positions of pain.
The reporters voice begins.
Today, in one of the bloodiest
battles to date, 435 men died as waves
of men . .
Sir?
Yes.
Your packages are ready.
Thank-you.
On the way ous. he stops to pur purchase
chase purchase a happy birthday* card.
Click. Click. Thump. Click.
v
PLEASE
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 250 Words
And Make Sure
They're Signed. We
Will Omit Names
At Writer's Request.



BUT NOT IN VIETNAM
War Sometimes Necessary

EDITOR:
I am glad that you agree with
roe that war is sometimes neces necessary.
sary. necessary. I think, for instance, that
WW n was a necessary war. It
was necessitated by WW I, which
was NOT a necessary war.
The important question to ask
about the war in Vietnam is not
whether or not any wars are neces necessary.
sary. necessary. It is whether this one is.
We are fighting to stop the spread
of Communism in Southeast Asia,
or so we are told. We are fight fighting
ing fighting to support the freedom of
choice of the South Vietnamese.
We are fighting to stop China, to
contain her advance. Thus, we
are told, the war is necessary.
But this analysis neglects three
very important facts about the sit situation:
uation: situation: first, we are not fighting
a Communist enemy; second, we
have supported and are supporting
governments unpopular with the
people, governments whose mem members
bers members collaborated with the French
during the 1945-54 war; third, the
Vietnamese, whatever their politi political
cal political leanings, are fiercely indepen independent
dent independent of China.
I say we arent fighting Com Communists.
munists. Communists. Severity per cent of the
National Liberation Front is non-
Communist. They belong to other
political parties; the Fronts pro program
gram program is Sweden-style Socialist
more than anything else.
We arent supporting free
choice. Sure, theyre having elec elections
tions elections in Vietnam. They arent let letting
ting letting just anybody run, though.
Theyre too afraid some neutral neutralist
ist neutralist or somebody else they didnt
like might actually WIN. They may
be right.

___ wiw
FBI Director Says
Campus Agitation Motivated
By Communist Influence

(Reprinted from
F. 8.1. Law Enforcement Bulletin)
By J. EDGAR HOOVER
F. 8.1. Director
This is a revolution which will be fought every everywhere
where everywhere and we will win because there are more of
us than there are of them.
The rallying cry of the Hungarian uprising of
1956? Not at all. These words were shouted by a
young agitator in December 1966 during riotous
disorder on the campus of a large American
university. In a continuing series of events, the
academic community has been bombarded with civil
disobedience, assaults, threats, and riots of un unprecedented
precedented unprecedented magnitude.
I think it is appropriate to quote two warnings
from statements which appeared here in October
1964 and February 1966:
This academic year will undoubtedly see
intensive Communist Party efforts to erect
its newest facade (the W. E. B. Duois
Clubs of America) on the Nations campuses
to draw young blood for the vampire which
is international communism. (Octover 1,1964)
The unvarnished truth is that the commun communist
ist communist conspiracy is seizing this insurrectionary
climate to captivate the thinking of rebellious rebelliousminded
minded rebelliousminded youth and coax them into the communist
movement itself or at least agitate them into
serving the communist cause. (February
1, 1966)
Has this strategy paid off? The answer, unfor unfortunately,
tunately, unfortunately, must be a definite yes. Today the com communist
munist communist conspiracy is reaping large dividends from
its persistent efforts to gain a toehold on college
and university campuses and from its dogged deter determination
mination determination to desrupt, through mass agitation, the
orderly processes of our educational systems.

As for containing China, a fed federated
erated federated independent Vietnam, the
north noriHnally Communist, the
South socialist, would give China
acute indigestionespecially if the
U. S. and the U. S. S. R. combined
to guarantee Vietnamese indepen-
against ANYBODY, which
would be workable because of both
our national interests.
No, the war in Vietnam is not
necessary. The only war needed
right now is the anti-Portuguese
revolution in the African col-

ft y

The great majority of college students are proud
of their American heritage and loyal to the tra traditions
ditions traditions of democracy. However, it is basic com communist
munist communist strategy to further communist objectives
with noncommunist hands, and this is exactly what
is happening on some college campuses. The ideal idealism
ism idealism of many American students is being cynically
exploited for communist purposes; youthful exu exuberance
berance exuberance is being channeled into unlawful riotous
conduct; mocking disdain for democratic processes
and moral values is being fed to inquisitive young
mindsall under the guise of seeking equal justice
or some other noble cause.
At the core of these campus disorders, and
often below the surface, we find agitator personnel
from organizations such as the communist- W. e.
B. Duois Clubs of America and their comrades
in the Students for a Democratic Society, a so socalled
called socalled New Left group; members of the Progres Progressive
sive Progressive Labor Party, a pro-Red Chinese group; and
individuals associated with organizations under the
control of the subversive Socialist Workers Party
and similar groups.
The university graduate of today will tomorrow
guide the destiny of this nation. We want our young
people to be able to think for themselves and to
be active participants in community life, but we
also want them to realize that freedom and jus justice
tice justice are secured by law and order; that lasting
rights and privileges are possible only by accep acceptance
tance acceptance of responsibilities and obligations.
By the same token, the demand of the hour is
for educators with courage, dedicated to the su supremacy
premacy supremacy of law, unafraid to support American
principles, and determined that the communist con conspiracy
spiracy conspiracy shall not dictate the policies of free in institutions.
stitutions. institutions.

oniesand there we DONT need
to support Portugal; and that war
I would fight in, as I would have
fought Franco in 1936, as I would
have fought Hitler and Mussolini,
as I would have fought the Rus Russians
sians Russians in Budapest in 1957. The
only necessary war is the war
AGAINST tyranny, NOT and NEV NEVER
ER NEVER in SUPPORT of it.
Vietnam for the Vietnamese!
Yours for peace and freedom,
B. R. ASHLEY 4AS

SPEAKING OUT
Editors Column
Wrongs Protestors
By RON L. SEC KING ER
In the column From the Editor's Desk of July 11, Jim White
repeats the familiar charge that young men who decline to be drafted
are irresponsibly shirking their duty to protect this country's freedom.
He gratuitously rejects the ethical standards of the anti-war pro protesters
testers protesters as moral hypocrisy and affirms the morality of national
self-protection.
Freedom Not Defended
I would like to suggest that, fora large portion of the draft resisters
and other opponents of the war in Vietnam, the necessity of defending
freedom in not the issue. The relevant question is whether, in fact,
freedom in being defended by U.S. actions in Vietnamand the answer
of the protesters is no.
Certainly the freedom of the Vietnamese is not being defended,
for that is a commodity they have never enjoyed. And the new con constitution,
stitution, constitution, heralded by the Johnson administration as a step toward
democracy, indicates that they will not enjoy it in the near future.
The constitution contains sharp restrictions on all civil rights (except,
of course, property rights), which will permit the continued sup suppression
pression suppression of the freedoms of speech, press, and free assembly.
U.S. Supports
Rather than foster the democratization of Vietnam, the U. S.
supports a coterie of wealthy landowners who have traditionally
exploited the peasantry, and perpetuates the rule of the military
leaders who earlier fought with the French against their own people.
Since 1954 the U.S. has frustrated a nationalist revolution which
promises a more equitable distribtuion of the nations material and
educational benefits and, if not increased political freedom, at
least freedom from foreign domination for the first time in four
centuries.
As for protecting the freedom of this country, that point is also
debatable. The picture of communist hordes sweeping through South Southeast
east Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and Indonesia to the beaches of Florida
may seem very real to Mr. White, but some people (including
a few military figures) have rejected the domino theory. It has
even been suggested that the best bulwark against Chinese expansion
would be a strong, unified Vietnam (under Ho Chi Minh, if necessary),
since the Chinese and the Vietnamese have been traditional enemies
for several hundred years.
Freedom Denied In U.S.
Within the U.S., the net effect of the intervention has been the cir circumscription,
cumscription, circumscription, rather than the protection, of freedom; this is evi evidenced
denced evidenced by the quasi-hysterical reaction to dissentfor example,
the new draft law, the flag-desecration law, the trial of Capt. Howard
Levy, and the advocation by members of the House Armed Services
Committee that the Justice Department ignore the First Amendment
in order to prosecute the proponents of draft resistance.
The increasing intolerance of minority opinions resurrects the
spectre of McCarthyism and poses, in my opinion, a greater threat
to personal liberty in this country than would the victory of the
Viet Cong.
Mr. White urges those who refuse to fight in this war to journey
to Canada and accept Glendon Colleges offer of sanctuary. An
estimated 1,500 have already crossed the border and found sanc sanctuary
tuary sanctuary at Glendon or elsewhere; others have chosen prison.
The irony of tills exodus, apparently unrecognized by Mr. White,
is that the United States--home of the free and land of the brave,
formerly a haven for political refugees from the entire world--has
come to represent values so repugnant to some young men that they
choose prison or permanent, self-imposed exile rather than bear
arms in a war they consider injust and immoral. Like others who
have adhered to their moral principles in the face or public and
governmetal vituperation, these men may someday become folk
heroes.
The fact that professional killers are today deemed more heroic
than men of principle is a sad commentary on the values of our society.
Monolithic Communism Unlikely
One additional point of Mr. Whites editorial deserves comment.
It might be hoped that a person in the process of acquiring a univer university
sity university education would 'be too sophisticated to lean on the out-moded
notion of a unified, monolithic communismespecially after the con contrary
trary contrary testimony of such authorities as George F. Kennan, noted
scholar and former ambassador to the Soviet IT nion, and after the
example of maverick Yugoslavia and the recent independent actions
of Rumania. Alas, not so: Mr. White warns that the next generation
may face a belligerent Asia unified under a Communist rule if
this generation refuses to fight now.
EDITORS NOTE
The war in Vietnam, like it or not, is a fact of life and a reality
which touches every American. It is a matter of particular concern
to college students, many of whom may eventually find themselves
fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia.
The reasons we are thereor the reasons why we should not
be there--are desperately important to a public whose understanding
of the issues involved is, at best, vague. Serious analysis and dis discussion,
cussion, discussion, without name-calling or bias, is a powerful clarifying agent.
The Alligator invites its readers to make their opinions known.
Whether your arguments are pro or con, whether you are a student,
faculty member, or a private citizen, we urge you to comment.
Materials for publication should be addressed to: Editor, The
Florida Alligator: J. Wayne Reitz Union; The University of Florida.

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f for sale
S* x 45* TRAILER with 14* x 30*
cabana. Air conditioned. For sale
now or Sept. Price: Open but rea reasonable.
sonable. reasonable. 376-3120. (A-149-6t-p)
BUY AT COST PLUS 10%.
Air conditioners (All sizes) in including
cluding including perfect fits for Diamond,
Schuht, and Corry Yllliages. Over
400 satisfied students. Local com company,
pany, company, local service. Sudden Service
Fuel Oil Co. 907 SW 3rd St.
376-4404. (A-136-ts-C)
GRJSTSCH GUITAR AND GIBSON
AMPLIFIER. MUST SELL! Phone
372-1280 days or 372-2710 after
5 p.m. (4-148-Bt-C)
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 50*
by 10*; two bedroom. Low equity
and assume payments. Phone 376*
0044 after 5:30 or on weekends.
(A-151-ts-c)
1966 TRIUMPH TIGER CUB
SCRAMBLER 200 cc; good con condition;
dition; condition; also aqua lung set, 71.2
ft. tank, regulator, back pack, and
pressure guage. Call 378-1006 af after
ter after 6 p.m. Monday thru Thurs.
(A-152-4t-c)
1958 TRIUMPH, excellent, new
tires, rebuilt engine, radio, heat,
$425.00; 1964 MOPED motorbike,
excellent, SIOO. See after 6 p.m.
(1824 NW 3rd Place #27.) (A (A---1
--1- (A---1
FOR SALE 60x10 TRAILER 1 1/2
BATH AND THREE BEDROOMS.
AIR CONDITIONED, NO EQUITY.
JUST TAKE OVER PAYMENTS.
CALL 904-498-3169 OR WRITE
TO G.W. STEVENS, P.O. BOX
636, CROSS CITY, FLORIDA
32628. (A-514-st-p)
FURNITURE SALE: Sofa, beds,
chairs, tables, & miscellaneous.
Call: 378-1190. (A-154-st-c)
SUZUKI 120 CC MOTORCYCLE
for sale. One year old. 830 N. W.
55th St (A-154-2t-p)
*64 MOPED, good condition, $55.
Call: 378-6306. (A-153-3t-c)
1962 CUSHMAN HIGHLANDER
MOTOR SCOOTER. Inexpensive.
Call David Hague 378-3314. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1
17* ZENITH PORTABLE TELE TELEVISION
VISION TELEVISION with stand, dual speakers
and control extending 15 feet. One
year old. Excellent condition. 378-
5940. (A-154-3t-c)
48* x 12* MOBILE HOME for sale.
Air conditioned, carpeted. Call
495-2413 after 5 p.m. (A-156-
3t-p)
FOR SALE: 1966 YAMAHA 80 cc.
Approximately 5,000 miles. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Call Dale 378-
5734. (A-155-2t-p)
COOL, SPACIOUS HDMETTE,
52*xl0*, Bedroom and carpeted
study. Air conditioned, part of'
equity and take up $56 payments.
Phone 378-5293. (A-155-st-p)
Fla. Union Aud.
Saturday
7:00 & 9:30
COUNTERFIT
TRAITOR
William Holden
Lilli Palmer
IN COLOR

I for sale
MAGANA VOX STEREO CONSOLE
AM/FM RADIO and seperate
speaker cabinet, $100; Table Verdi
Antique marble, 40 x 40 inches
$75; Foam rubber cushion 33 x 72
inches with bolsters and covers
sls. Call 372-2173. (A-155-lt-c)
17** PORTABLE TV, good picture,
audio doesnt work. $lO. Call Tom
or Mary 376-0890. (A-155-lt-c)
YORKSHIRE TERRIERS, AKC.
Precious, prestigious, precocious,
petite, pedigreed, pampered, play playful
ful playful puppies for particular people.
S2OO up. Jacksonville 1-389-2073
after 5 p.m. (A-155-st-c)
1966 TAYLOR MOBILE HOME.
58*xl2* two bedroom, excellent
condition. Carpeted. S6OO down,
take up payments of $57 per month.
Call Univ. ext. 2140 8-5 p.m.
or 376-8119. (A-155-3t-c)
ROOM AIR CONDITIONER, 120
Volt, 5,000 BTU, SSO. Call 378-
1845. (A-155-3t-c)
20** PORTABLE HOME COOLER
(FAN) sl2, in good condition. Call
378-6723 after sp.m.(A-155-lt-c)

lENDS -MONDO BALORO [ SUNDAY
ISAT. 7 & 91
\ "STUNNING!SUPERB! /
MOMEHt\ JBTOITING! /
11 AT* U X -Bosley Crowther,
* VP N.Y. Times
mrth UIGUfI mu omul UN w
Special guest tor LINDA CHRISTIAN

|NTM3Sta(2Mlto!d|
I Tfphorn 378-2434 |
m Take twelve condemned men.
fuse 1,18,1
V, violence. Ignite it.
When ire ready
to explode explode-6:50
-6:50 explode-6:50 T
fItHMHpAIbHMHVVVI
._, Based on the exciting best-seller.
5*"" MM
ERNEST CHARItS JIM JOHN RICHARD
HUME MUNSON BROWN MSSAffiTES JAECKEL
6EON6E TRMI RALPH ROBERT TELLY CLINT ROBERT
KENNEDY UPEZ MEEKER RYAN SAVAIAS WALKED WEBBER
Saeaiob*b* Producedby Dected!)*
NUNNALLYJOHNSONmLUKAS HELLER m KENNETH HYMAN ROBERT ALDRICH
<> K MEIROCOtOO ~~

Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

for rent
AIR CONDITIONED APART APARTments,
ments, APARTments, three blocks from campus.
1, 2 and 3 bedroom for the fall.
$77.50. to $l2O per month. Call
372-8840 or 378-3291. (B-147-
ts-c)
WHY LIVE IN A TRAFFIC JAM?'
Walk to classes and be relieved
of your parking problem. Fully
furnished, spacious one bedroom
apartment, air condition, gas heat,
fully equipped kitchen including
washing machine. Call 372-3357
or 376-2818. (B-142-lOt-C)
NEW, MODERN ONE AND TWO
BEDROOM FURNISHED, air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned apartments. QUIET EN ENJOYMENT
JOYMENT ENJOYMENT GUARANTEED. $lO7/
mo. one bedroom; $ 137/mo. two
bedroom. Call Ernest Tew Realty
Inc. 376-6461. (B-153-6t-c)
HAVING TROUBLE FINDING
YOUR APARTMENT FOR SEP SEPTEMBER?
TEMBER? SEPTEMBER? Gator Town will be
open by the fail quarter. 378-
3457 or 378-1755. (B-152-ts-c)
ROOM, quiet, comfortable, avail available
able available Aug Ist. Suitable desiring
privately furnished home. 1/2
block from University. Call 376-
5368. (B-154-4t-c)

\ ~ Downtown Goiooviflo |
J J
| 232 W. Umvnify iv. |
FINAL
WEEKEND
TO SEE THIS OUTSTANDING PICTURE!

[ toctif Chair Twin {
*
STARTS TODAY
IT'S THE BIG ONE ONEWITH
WITH ONEWITH THE BIG TWO!
IS THE GUNFIGHTER
: $Kr \ %. oBiL. TjHS£i... :::-. : ::'v ':'SB
H fj v ,j
ROBERT |
Q^itMIDHI
(*****% IS THE SHERIFF
fin a story of
Man, Woman, Gunfire!
m WMBDO jl
.1H
y >s^Hwmklhh6
- -- Ifcl PBH&fK
MS CAAN CHARLENE HOLT RAULFIX ARTHUR HUNNICUTT
wwah- 1



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
UNFURNISHED ONE BEDROOM
UPSTAIRS APARTMENT. Extra
large closet and bath. Walking
distance to Business District. Set Settled
tled Settled people only. $68.50/mo. Call
372-3621 before 4:30 p.m. or 372-
5937 until 10 p.m. and weekends.
(B-154-2t-c)
wanted
ELDERLY GENTLEMAN (23) DE DESIRES
SIRES DESIRES ROOMMATE for Village
Park Apartment. Call 378-2864.
(C-155-lt-p)
I NEED A RIDE TO BALTIMORE
as soon after August 7th as pos possible.
sible. possible. Call: Bonnie 378-3809. (C (C---153-3t-c)
--153-3t-c) (C---153-3t-c)

Horseback Riding $1.50 per Hour
Canoeing SI.OO per Hour
Sail Boats SI.OO per Hour
Camp Bellridge
20 Minutes From Gainesville
481-2387

ST. 372-9523
SHOW STARTS AT 9:00
GAINESVILLE FIRST RUN
John Kirk
WsyneM^j^Douglas
" ,i ? A
Fb^w
ROLLS AND THE SCREEN
TECHNICOLOR PANAVISION
HOWARD KEEL ROBERTWALKER KEENAN WYNN BRUCE CABOT JOANNA BARNES
PLUS 2nd ACTION HIT AT 10:50
They Paved The Way For D-Day!!!
fit Si JAMES DRURY
Star of "THE VIRGINIAN TV Series
the young
K. WARRIORS
smf J*
Hr Z / a

wanted
HEALTH CENTER FACULTY
MEMBER DESIRES male faculty
or graduate student, roommate to
share two-bed room apartment and
expenses at University Gardens.
Available immediately. Call: 372-
2828 or 376-2888. (C-152-ts-c)
help wanted
MEDICAL TRANSCRIBERAIa TRANSCRIBERAIachua
chua TRANSCRIBERAIachua General J Hospital has im immediate
mediate immediate openings for part time
and temporary personnel. Know Knowledge
ledge Knowledge in use of electric typewriter,
dictaphone, medical terminology
are required. Good salary for
qualified person. Apply Personnel
Director. 912 SW 4th Avenue. (E (E---154-ts-c)
--154-ts-c) (E---154-ts-c)

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
BABYSITTER WANTED to care for
church nursery. 10-12 a.m. every
Sunday. Must have own transpor transportation.
tation. transportation. 376-8523. (E-154-lt-c)
HIGHLY QUALIFIEDSECRETARY
for Builders office. Shorthand,
good typing and other secretarial
skills essential. Permanent job,
excellent pay. Do not apply un unless
less unless well qualified.. Phone 376-
9950 days or 378-2000 evenings.
(E-152-ts-c)
MEDICAL SECRETARY-RECEP SECRETARY-RECEPTIONIST,
TIONIST, SECRETARY-RECEPTIONIST, salary commensurate
with ability. Send complete resume
to P. O. Box 12427, Univ. Sta Station
tion Station stating training and exper experience.
ience. experience. (E-f49-tf-c)
STUDENT EXPERIENCED IN
HANDLING CATTLE; tractoring
plus other ranch chores to work
part time at his convenience. Phone
376-6339 after 8 p.m. (E-132-
4t-c)
autos
PONTIAC, 1964 LeMans conver convertible,
tible, convertible, V-8, power brakes & steer steering,
ing, steering, automatic tip, radio & heater,
electric clock, good tires, top
condition. Must sell; will accept
SI2OO. Days, univ. ext. 2766, even evenings,
ings, evenings, 378-3989. (G-154-lt-p)
1964 AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE.
36,000 miles. S6OO or best offer.
372-6887. (G-154-3t-c)
58 MERCEDES, new engine, good
tires, S4OO. Call: 378-5292. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1 st-c)
1958 CHEVY. Must sell, good con condition
dition condition mechanically, new tires, 102
NW 13th St., Room #5, 376-9389
after 7:00 p.m. (G-155-3t-p)
1965 OPEL two door sedan, good
condition, S9OO. Call University
Ext. 3239 between 8:30 & 5:30
p.m. or 372-2033 weekends and
after 6 p.m. (G-153- ts-c)
Once in too great a
while there appears
a motion picture of
truly poignant beauty,,
Such a film is
LOSS OF INNOCENCE
Susannah York Kenneth More
Danielle Darrieux
Filmed in Color
in the Champagne
Country of France
SUNDAY 7 & 9
AT THE UNION
\
Also Chapter 10 of Capt. Marvel

Page 9

lost-found j
LOST: Small black coin purse.
Finder please mail to P.O. Box
14403, University Station for $5
REWARD. Include name and ad address.
dress. address. (L-156-2t-c)
real estate
BY OWNER, Carol estates, three
bedroom, two bath. Central airand
heat. Double living room 1,500
sq. Ft. Automatic sprinkler. $750
down payment. 376-5616. (1-152-
ts-c)
323 NW 14th STREET. Walk to
class. Four bedroom, one bath,
furnished house, fireplace, shade
trees, garage, low down payment.
SIOO per month. Students okay.
Call 376-8565 by owner. (1-152-
ts-c)
personal
*
FREE: Two male kittens. Call
Rick 378-6994. (J-154-2t-c)

Pnowl
I B Puppy To Bel
Given Away I
I' l Pl&fej&f" ; JD3S JULY 19, 1967
B Show Starts At Dusk J

-v
%>
' 1 Vr
/
'mm,
Advertise
Its good business.
5 ? i
}

personal
FREE BRINDLE KITTENS. Call
372-3173 or 372-3029. (J-155-
2t-c)
services
M & R TENNIS SERVICES Racket
restringing and repairs. Satis Satisfaction
faction Satisfaction guaranteed. Free pickup
and Delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-151-12t-p)
IN A HURRY? Passport identi identification;
fication; identification; application photographs.
Westley Roosevelt Studio, 909 N.
W. 6th St Call 372-0300. (M (M---142-ts-C)
--142-ts-C) (M---142-ts-C)
t
for sale
10x50 NEW MOON HOUSE HOUSETRAILER
TRAILER HOUSETRAILER with additional 12xl4*
luxurious, portable room. Air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, some wall to wall car carpeting.
peting. carpeting. Very roomy $3,100. Phone
378-4822. (A-155-3t-p)



i, The, Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

Page 10

' ak

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus Calendar

Friday, July 14
Student Government Childrens
Recreation Program: Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday, 10 a.m.-
noon. Buses leave from village
stores at 9:25 a.m. Married
students children only.
UF Moslem: prayer meeting, 347
Union, noon
Student Government Secretary of
Bousing, 331 Union, 1 p.m.
Florida Union: entertainment, Un Union
ion Union Cafeteria, 5 p.m.
Chess Club: chess games, 118
Union, 7 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: enter entertainment,
tainment, entertainment, 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
two shows nightly, 9:30 & 11:30
p.m. Admission 50?, free coffee.
Saturday, July 15
Baptist Student Union: beach party,
Crescent Beach, leave B.S.U.
at 9 a.m. Lunch and transpor transportation
tation transportation provided, 50?/person. All
interested please sign up at
BJS.U.
Union Films Committee: The

ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES:
All notices for Orange & Blue
Bulletin roust be received by noon,
Wednesday, for Friday publication.
Notices should be typed and signed
and sent to the Division of In Information
formation Information Services, Building H,
campus. Items for the Campus
Calendar should be sent to the
Public Functions Office, Florida
Union.

j- NEED A DIFFERENT CAR? Sf Sfto***'
to***' Sfto***' V CONTACT MRS. LOUISE HINTON TREASURER Auto Loons
l\ GAINESVILLE FLORIDA^ CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Specialty
|M PROGRAM OF
1 '/ a
Counterfeit Traitor, Union
Aud., 7 & 9:30 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: enter entertainment
tainment entertainment 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
two shows nightly, 9:30 & 11:30
p.m. Admission 50?, free coffee.
Sunday, July 16
Program Office: duplicate bridge,
Union 150 C & D, 1:30 p.m.
Rawlings, open house, 2 5 p.m.
Fla. Cinema Society: Loss of
Innocence, Union Aud., 7 &
9 p.m.
Monday, July 17
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Program; Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 10a.m.-
noon. Buses leave from village
stores at 9:25 a.m. Married stu students
dents students children only.
Union Board: Fun Week, free shav shaving
ing shaving cream and water fight, free
watermelon, Union Terrace, 5
p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
7:15 p.m.

Administrative Notices

STATE TEACHER SCHOLAR SCHOLARSHIP
SHIP SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS: Scholar Scholarship
ship Scholarship funds are now available,
Scholarship Section, Student Ser Service
vice Service Center for the Spring Trimes Trimester.
ter. Trimester.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM EXAMINATION:
INATION: EXAMINATION: Spanish reading know knowledge
ledge knowledge examination and all func functional
tional functional examinations will be given
on Saturday, July 15, 18 Ander Anderson
son Anderson Hall, 10 a.m, 12 noon.

BLUB BULLETIN
%

Tuesday, July 18
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Program: Gym Gymnastics
nastics Gymnastics Class, Gym, 9 a.m.
Children 8 and up, parents pro provide
vide provide transportation. Married
students children only.
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Program: organi organized
zed organized play, Diamond and Flavet
111, 10 a.m., Cory, 3:30 p.m.
Children 3 to 7.
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Program: sketch
class, 118 Union, 1 p.m. Child Children
ren Children 8 and up, married students
children only.
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Program: swim swimming
ming swimming classes, camp Wauburg,
1 p.m. Buses at all village
stores at 12:25 p.m. Married
students children only.
Fla. Education Association Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Phil Constans, Sanc Sanctions
tions Sanctions Purpose and Effect,
Norman Aud., 1:30 p.m.
Union Board: Fun Week, free bowl bowling,

DEADLINE FOR REMOVAL OP
V GRADES: July 19 is the dead deadline
line deadline date for removal of incom incomplete
plete incomplete (I) grades (excluding 699
or 799) for all graduate students
who wish to receive their degrees
on August 12.
UNION TRIPS: Trip to Mexico
City, Acapulco and Taxco Aug.
12-31, sponsored by the J. Wayne
Reitz Union. For information, call
Ext. 2741.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

ing, bowling, billiards and ping pong, Un Union
ion Union Games Area, 5 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: meeting, 355 Un Union,
ion, Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: auditions,
1826 W. Univ. Ave., 8 p.m.
Every Tuesday. Talent wanted,
come by or call Bob, 372-9663.
Wednesday, July 19
Student Government Childrens
Recreation Program: 10 a.m.,
buses will leave from village
stores at 9:25 a.m. Married
students children only, ages
6 16.
Union Board: Fun Week, free hoot hootenanny
enanny hootenanny and watermelon, Union
Terrace, 5 p.m.
Univ. Summer Band: Twilight Con Concert,
cert, Concert, Plaza of the Americas,
6:45 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 363 Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: dancing, Un Union
ion Union Cafeteria, 8 p.m.
Thursday, July 20
Student Government Childrens

STATE NURSING SCHOLAR SCHOLARSHIP
SHIP SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS: Scholar Scholarship
ship Scholarship funds are now available,
Scholarship Section, Student Ser Service
vice Service Center for the Spring Tri Trimester.
mester. Trimester.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Students must be registered with
the Placement Service to inter interview.
view. interview. Sign-up sheets are posted
two weeks in advance of the in interview
terview interview date at J. Wayne Reitz
Union, Room 22.

Recreational Program: Gym Gymnastics
nastics Gymnastics Class, Gym, 9 a.m. Par Parents
ents Parents provide transportation to
gym, children 8 and up
Student Government Childrens
Recreation Program: organized
play, Diamond and Flavet HI,
10 a.m., Cory 3:30 p.m. Child Children
ren Children 3-7.
Student Government Childrens
Recreation Progarm: Swim Swimming
ming Swimming lessons, camp Wauburg,
1 p.m. Buses leave all village
stores at 12:25 p.m. Married
students children only, ages
4-7.
Student Government Childrens
Recreational Progarm: sketch
class, 118 Union, 1 p.m. Mar Married
ried Married students children only, 8
yrs. and up
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
7:15 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE:
Tickets go on sale Monday, July
17 for the Lee Evans Trio,
students, 2/ID, Faculty and Staff,
SI.OO, General Admission, $2.00

PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following coux ses
are expected to take these tests.
Each student must bring a No.
2 lead pencil and will be re required
quired required to use his SOCIAL SECUR SECURITY
ITY SECURITY NUMBER.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST (B
Term): Tuesday, July 18, 7 p.m.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST (B
Term); Tuesday, July 18, 7 p.m.
in Walker Auditorium.



The UF Jt£h&oCCollege Os Journalism

Now Eighth Largest
UF Academic Unit

The UFs School of Journalism
and Communications officially
gained college status last Friday
following approval by the Board of
Regents at its regular meeting in
Peasacola.
The new unit is the second larg largest
est largest journalism college in the na nation,
tion, nation, according to Dean Rae O.
Wdimer who has directed the pro program
gram program since 1949. The eighth larg largest
est largest academic unit in the University,
it is second only to the University
of Missouri in national enrollment,
Weimer reports.
During its first 10 years, the
school was recognized by the na national
tional national trade publication, Editor
and Publisher, as the fastest grow growing
ing growing school in the journalism field,"
he said.
In the last 10 years, the school,
its students and faculty have won
national awards. Attainment of this
national recognition, coupled with
demands for graduates of' the
school, has continued to force en-

I 4
Every Tuesday
fried
chicken
oil you can eat
Served with Tj
Biscuit and I 111
Honey I W
Golden brown,
country fried...
Mmmmm! And you
can have seconds .
and thirds ... in
fact you can keep
eating chicken
*til youre ready to go
home and roost.
Pardon our crowing,
but our fried chicken
is really delicious.
Try some tonight!
j o
11212 N. Main St.
Gainesville Shopping Center I
SERVING HOURS: 1
11:30 AM to 2 PM b 1
4:30 to 8 PM I

rollment figures up. In each of the
last two trimesters, enrollment
was up more than 40 per cent
over a year ago," Dean Weimer
noted.
Sheltered under the west stands
of Florida Field stadium, the new
college is experiencing growing
pains with no relief in sight. The
school moved twice from tempor temporary
ary temporary buildings, and then in 1955
moved to larger quarters in the
stadium. Now it has outgrown its
facilities in the stadium and is
urgently in need of a new home,"
Dean Weimer reported.
Growth of the undergraduate
program and expansion of the grad graduate
uate graduate program are resulting in
sharp curtailment of admissions
because of lack of space.
I believe journalism education
will continue to grow as business
and industry recognize the need for
personnel with education and train training
ing training in communications. Presently
we do not graduate a sufficient
number to meet the demand of
prospective employers from an
ever-widening area of interest who
recruit our graduates," he stated.
The college won first place in
the 1964-65 William Randolph
Hearst Foundation Awards pro program
gram program for a series of published
stories written by undergraduate
journalism students competing
against their colleagues through
the country.
Recognition of success is al always
ways always gratifying," Dean Weimer
said. In all modesty, I think the
School of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications achieved many suc successes.
cesses. successes. Now that it has grown and
developed into a college, It re reflects,
flects, reflects, I think, the caliber and
dedication of an outstanding fac faculty
ulty faculty and staff. It also reflects the
very fine support of the univer university
sity university administration."
Frederick
yj GARDEN
APARTMENTS
I & 2 Bedroom
Furnished Apts.
1 Bedroom Apts.
available for
September
Air Conditioned
Heated Pool
Spacious Courtyard
Bar-B-Oue Pits
Ample Parking
Laundry Facilities
Cable TV
Sound-Conditioned
Apartments
1130 SW 16th AVE
CALL 372-7555

m
ALA A I
i */ Vs I I VS I
! 1 of
Journalism
and
Communications

THE CHANGE
The most immediate impact of the UF
School of Journalism and Communications*
upgrading to college status? A hastily hastilyimprovised
improvised hastilyimprovised revision to the colleges main
entrance!

UF Birth Defects Clinical Study Center
Awarded $66,700 Grant For Research

The National Foundation-March of Dimes has
announced an award of $66,710 to the Birth De Defects
fects Defects Clinical Study Center at the UF Shands Teach Teaching
ing Teaching Hospital and Clinics and the College of Medicine.
The hospital and college are units of the univer universitys
sitys universitys J. Hlllis Miller Health Center.
The grant, announced jointly by Dr. Emanuel
Suter, dean of the College of Medicine, and Basil
OConner, president of the National Foundation, pro provides
vides provides funds for research into the causes of birth
defects, research related teaching and patient care.
It became effective July 1.
With this grant, March of Dimes support for
birth defects research and treatment at the Uni University
versity University of Florida enters its eighth year and totals
$680,520.
Dr. William B. Weil Jr., director of the National
Foundation-March of Dimes Birth Defects Center
at the health center, said this increased support
promises a significant step in our growing under-

I ENGINEERING SENIOR... I
I campus on Thursday, July 20 and we invite you engineer,n g facilities. I I

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

standing of the way human beings develop and of
the irregularities which cause birth defects. Dr.
Weil is A. I. DuPont Professor of Pediatrics for
the Handicapped Child in the Department of Ped Pediatrics,
iatrics, Pediatrics, College of Medicine.
Three clinical scientists will be investigating
fundamental questions related to birth defects under
the National Foundation grantDr. Charles U. Lowe,
professor of pediatrics and director of the new
Human Development Center; Dr. J. Russell Green,
assistant professor of medicine and head of the
colleges genetics laboratory, and Dr. Andrew E.
Lorincz, associate professor of pediatrics and re research
search research director for the Sunland Training Center,
a Florida care institution for the mentally retarded.
The research program is designed to uncover
the basis of various inherited birth defects. One
aspect of this work will bring the scientists face
to face with some little understood questions about
the ways in which food is converted into tissues
and epergy by different body organs.

Colleges
Enrollment
To Hit 600
When the fall quarter begins, it
is anticipated that 600 students will
be enrolled in the College of Journ Journalism
alism Journalism and Communications. This
will be a new high for the school.
Enrollment last fall reached 567
students.
Part of the increase is due to
the fact that the professions man manpower
power manpower is suffering, partially be because
cause because of the large number of grad graduates
uates graduates lost to the draft, accord according
ing according to a recent poll.
The poll, of 106 of last years
graduates, disclosed that 60 either
had Joined the military, accepted
offers in other career fields or
were continuing their education.
The increase in the colleges
size will allow the addition of
several new advertising courses to
the curriculum. Extra sections of
courses will be opened in other
sequences.
Finding space for all the stu students
dents students is quite a problem, accord according
ing according to Dr. Glenn A. Butler, as assistant
sistant assistant professor of journalism and
communications. In addition to new
students, seven new instructors
will be added to the staff of the
college.

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

| STP Fact Or Fantasy?
By 808 MORAN >
Alligator Correspondent
STP means standard temperature and pres pressure
sure pressure to the scientist. To the hot-rod enthusiast
it means an oil treatment for his car. But,
to the hippie, STP means like wow.
When LSD made the scene a few years
ago, there was an accompanying explosion
of publicity, but not so with STP. So quietly
has it appeared that on the UF campus
most students still think it goes in their
cars.
Dr. Lea Gene Gramling, chairman of
the UF department of Pharmaceutical
Chemistry conceded that he knew very little
about the drug.
The Food and Drug Administration doesnt
know what it is, Gramling said. One time
they test it and its like peyote, but then
another time it isnt. Right now its a dead deadends
ends deadends bjeet.
FDA officials said yesterday, however,
that STP has been conclusively identified
as an extremely potent drug. The FDA
announcement strongly recommended that
STP not be experimented with because it
may cause death.
Widespread rumors about the drug have
been heard on campus, though. For example,
some students; who admit that their know knowledge
ledge knowledge is based mostly on lewspaper ac accounts,
counts, accounts, say that an STP trip lasts only
three days. Others rumor that the drug is
so powerful, users will completely, and
literally, lose their minds.
Another rumor is that as marajuana is
to heroin, so LSD is to STP. Still another
rumor contends that an extrasensory per perception
ception perception breakthrough, hoped for by LSD
users, is realized bv STP users.

Holiday In Mexico
Tickets Still Selling

By BRYAN HOWELL
Alligator Correspondent
Deposits of SSO for ten days of
traveling called Mexican Holi Holiday
day Holiday should be turned in immed immediately
iately immediately at the program office on
the third floor of the J. Wayne
Reitz Union, according to Dr. D.
E. Sterrett, union staff director.
This is an excellent oppor-
JM Student
Wins Award
Roland J. Scott, 4JM, has been
named the 1967 winner of a S4OO
scholarship award from the Min Minneapolis
neapolis Minneapolis Triburn.
Scott receives the annual award
as the outstanding journalism
student at the end of his junior
year. It is one of 50 awards
given throughout the country by the
Minneapolis Star and the Minne Minneapolis
apolis Minneapolis Tribune to the nations ac accredited
credited accredited journalism schools.
Scott, who finished his junior
year with a B-plus average in his
professional program, is a na native
tive native Oklahoma where he worked
on the Tulsa Tribune before re returning
turning returning to college. He serves as
Gainesville correspondent for the
St. Petersburg Times while at attending
tending attending the University of Florida.
ALLIANCE
TV
Reliable Service
On All Makes
Os Radio,
TV,
Stereos
815 W. Univeisity
376-9955

tunity to go first class ana see
Mexico City, Taxco and Acapulco,*
he said. A group of 35 students
will make the trip. There are 16
vacancies left.
The cost of the trip, $330, de deposit
posit deposit included, must be paid by
August 1, he said.
Mexican Holiday begins Aug August
ust August 12 when the group takes off
from Miami International Airport
bound for Mexico City.
During the four-day stay at Mex Mexico
ico Mexico City, Sterrett said, the tour
will include a visit to Chapultepec
Castle, an afternoon at a bull bullfight,
fight, bullfight, and an evening at the bal ballet.
let. ballet. Two days will be left open
for individual sight-seeing.
The next stop is Taxco, the
famed silver and silver-smiths
city. There will be a guided tour
through the University City and
Santa Presca Church, Sterrett
pointed out.
The first evening in Acapulco,
often called the playground of the
world, will be spent in the glam glamorous
orous glamorous La Perla night club at El
Merador Hotel, where cliff divers
will perform their famed feats.

| ROBBIES I
The Best In
I Q J
[COLOR T.V. & BILLIARDSI
11718 W. University Ave.l
I *On The Gold Coast 1 I

BUT ANOTHER PROF DISAGREES

No Tax Increases
Needed, Prof Says

By DAN KOPELS
Alligator Correspondent
One of the biggest questions fac facing
ing facing the present session of Congress
is taxes. Steadily rising inflation
and the costs of financing the war
in Vietnam are putting pressure
on the U.S. economy.
Prompt action by Congress rais raising
ing raising taxes is essential if the nation
is to avoid another severe round
of inflation, according to William
McChesney Martin, chairman of
the Federal Reserve Board.
But J. Fremon Jones, a UF
instructor of economics, disa disagrees.
grees. disagrees. Dr. Charles W. Fristoe,
also a UF professor of economics,
agrees with Martin, though.
Jones told the Alligator that
although he believes something
should be done to curb inflation,
taxing is not the answer.
It would be quicker and more
flexible if the government were
to cut expenditures on the anti antipoverty
poverty antipoverty programs and other dom-
Entomology
Laboratory
To Be Here
By MICHAEL McDERMOTT
Alligator Correspondent
The U. S. Department of Ag Agriculture
riculture Agriculture (USDA) will build a
$1,592,300 entomology research
laboratory on the UF campus,
according to Dr. Carroll Smith,
newly appointed director of the
laboratory.
The facility, entitled The In Insect
sect Insect Attractance Behavior and
Basic Biology Laboratory, will
explore improved methods to con control
trol control insects by utilizing the agents
that control their behavior, Smith
said.
He pointed out that the studies
will range around baits that cause
insects to feed on chemosteria chemosterialants
lants chemosterialants or insecticides which could
be exposed in restricted places.
Luring an insect to this re restricted
stricted restricted area will do away with
having to distribute insecticides
over the insects entire habitat.
This will lessen the danger of
contamination over the area af affected
fected affected by the insect. Under the
study, the insect is given feed feeding
ing feeding stimulants which force it to
eat much more than usual, he
added.
Flair Color lab
1527 N.W. 6th St.
19< color prints I

estic spending while we are spend spending
ing spending in excess of $1 million a day
in Vietnam, Jones said.
He did admit, however, that the
threat of a tax hike has a very
beneficial psychological affect in
that it curbs spending.
Fristoe took a slightly different
view of the subject, however.
Raising taxes would be quicker
and more effective than a cut
in government expenditures, he
pointed out.
Fristoe feels, however, that now
is not the time to invoke a tax
hike.
Watch it (the inflationary
for the next few months. If it
continues, then raise the taxes,
he concluded.
Martin, who began fighting for
a tax increase nearly two years
ago, indicated that the sooner taxes
are raised, the better it would

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be for the economy.
He added that he is prepared to
support an even higher tax in increase
crease increase than the one per cent sur surcharge
charge surcharge on individual and corporate
.ncome taxes which President
Johnson proposed last January in
his State of the Union message
to Congress.
The deficit for the fiscal year
beginning July 1 is estimated at
$13.6 billion instead of the $B.l
billion forecast last January, Mar Martin
tin Martin said. Some congressional lead leaders
ers leaders expect the deficit to soar even
higherto $29 billiona postwar
record.
I am firmly convinced that we
must have adequate, effective and
prompt tax action that would whit whittle
tle whittle down the prospective deficit
for the coming fiscal year to one
of manageable proportions, 1 Mar Martin
tin Martin said.



TO BE SEEN!!
July 28, 1967 1
IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
i I I .Il . I, Ll, - l I ! I II. I I I II II Mil W I * 11.
* M '
\ IS t* 5 ** VTV oi B Y>S r C QtV *** W* e Jr
V > V>> Uy '' V ) 1 \i* ve ve te V l,> totve ' eV^ ct, a p\s w jjf
\ V Vu V * tvo *> SO ev*^; ed l (jjMr
NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!!
AGLUT with SO MANY PAGES we still haven't attempted to COUNT THEM! Fascinating and Awe-Inspiring
&$> NEWS of the Day, Illustrated, Illustrated, Illustrated. Illuminating Features All in the English Language to 7&>
QjuK Arouse the Interest and Inform the Mind. Matters of Monumental Interest to All New Florida Students are
c&l EXPLAINED for the Edification of All. Vital Messages Communicated, Provoking Opinions Given Voice, !§&> Stimulating Artwork to Titillate the Intellect and the Sense of Humor, in COLOR, in COLOR, in COLOR!
THE FALL PREVIEW 'k EDITION OF
The Florida Alligator
- >

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

Nats Win Longest
All-Star Game

The National League pushed its
record to five straight victories
over the American League Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night in the longest All-Star
game ever played. The 2-1 de decision
cision decision came with a homer by third
baseman, Tony Perez, after a
15-inning battle.
A record of 30 strikeouts were
posted in the pitching dominated
game before 46,309 fans in Ana-
Brain Damage
Claims Son Os
Athletic Head
Stan Holden, former UF stu student
dent student and son of Floridas academic
counselor for athletes, died late
Monday night at J. Hillis Miller
Health Center from brain dam damage
age damage received from a car accident
almost three weeks ago.
* Holden, 19-year old son of Dr.
Edmund Holden of the Athletic
Association, was driving with two
companions on Rocky Point Road
west of Gainesville on the morn morning
ing morning of June 24. An approaching
car forced the Holden auto off
Hie road and a surfboard in the
victim's car hit the back of Hol Holden's
den's Holden's head, knocking him uncon unconscious.
scious. unconscious.
Holden remained in a coma at
the Health Center until he died.
Services were held Wednesday at
St. Michaels Episcopal Church in
Gainesville with burial rites fol following
lowing following the ceremony.
Holden, a sophomore at Sante
Fe Junior College and a Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville High School graduate, at attended
tended attended UF his freshman year.
He planned to return as an upper upperdivision
division upperdivision student after his junior
college graduation.

..1

Larry Rentz, a male Twiggy two weeks ago, has
been given a clean bill of health by his coach Ray
Graves.
Rentz, a 6-2 deep safety off of last year's Florida
football team, weighed just 140 pounds a few weeks
ago.
But I sent Urn to a Miami doctor," said Graves,
and now he reports Larry's gaining 8-10 pounds and
on his way to a full recovery.''
Larry bad a case of mononucluosis but the doctor
called me in Naples a few days back and said Larry
is making rapid improvement,* continued Graves.
After-effects are sometimes present with the cure of
the illness. But the physican mentioned he is very
optimistic Rentz will suffer no side effects from his
sickness, emphasizing he should be 100 per cent healthy
in the fall for Graves.
All Graves would say after he. found out Rentz was
healthy was, Whew."
UF SPECIALIZES
No doubt about it, this is the age of specialization.
And UF's sports, that great relaxer, is affected just
as much as the computerized Royal Castle.
v.
It's just too bad that the past Florida sports year
couldn't have happened ten years ago. The Gators would
have probably grabbed every award possible.
Now with the possible exception of Michigan State,
Southern Cal and UCLA, every major college in the
United States is content to excel in one sport.
This year the Gators did it in eight. And they did
it so well that they are claiming an unofficial national
all-sports championships with a 110-21 record. That
measures out to be a .839 percentage, quite an accomp accomplishment.
lishment. accomplishment.
And the oddity of it is, Florida did it without the big
stud leading the way.
Sure, Steve Superior provided the backbone for the
footballers. But take away Larry Smith and Dick Trapp,
and odds are his Heisman Trophy crown might be on
Bob Grieses head. Take away Graham McKeels block blocking
ing blocking and it's a safe bet.
Gary Keller is ready to make his pro basketball bid
with the Denver Rockets of the yearling American Bas Basketball
ketball Basketball Association. But take Keller off the squad and
you will still have a formidable array of talent left.
With quick-shooting Dave Miller (when he's not break-

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

helm Stadium. A total of 12 pit pitchers,
chers, pitchers, seven for the National and
five for the American tossed the
30 strikeouts in the three-hour,
41-minute duel.
All three runs were homers and
were hit by third basemen. Phil Philadelphia's
adelphia's Philadelphia's Rich Allen hit a homer
in the second inning off Dean
Chance of Minnesota. Brooks Rob Robinson
inson Robinson of Baltimore tied the game
in the sixth inning with a homer
off of the Chicago's Cubs Fer Ferguson
guson Ferguson Jenkins.
Perez, in his first All-Star
game, came off the bench in the
10th inning to replace Allen at
third base. Striking out in his first
trip to the plate in the 12th in inning,
ning, inning, Perez came back to bat in
the 15th to slug the second pitch
into the left field bleachers for
the win.
"This was possibly over-all the
best pitching in any All-Star game
I've ever seen, said National
League Manager Walter Alston.
"I never saw so many good swings
in my life and nothing happened.
Roberto Clemente of Pittsburgh
set an All-Star record for fu futility
tility futility striking out four times. Willie
Mays, also with the winners, fan fanned
ned fanned three times.
Possible damage was prevented
a couple of times when Tony Con Conigliaro,
igliaro, Conigliaro, AL right fielder from
Boston grabbed a pair of shots
off the bat of Orlando Cepeda,
once in the 10th Inning and in
then in the 15thjust before Pe Perez
rez Perez home red.
The Dodger's Don Drysdale
picked up the victory, his first
in an All-Star game. Hunter, a
Kansas City right-hander, was
given the loss. Ihinter was allowed
to go five innings because the
game went into extra innings and
gave up only two hits when Perez
came up to bat.

BY SC AND BA
Timers Pushed For Title

The SC&BA kept pace with the Oldtimers for
the Independent League softball title with asmash asmashing
ing asmashing 16-3 win over King Richards Wednesday after afternoon
noon afternoon on the Drill Field.
SC&BA was led by Jim Packwood's five hits,
Jim Traywick four bingles and Jerry Spradley's
three safeties. SC&BA now sports the same 3-0
slate as the Oldtimes, who drubbed Diamond Vil Village
lage Village by 6-2.
In other Independent action, Corry Village, (1-2)
rapped Microbiology by 15-5. Kelly Prior, Skip
Higley and Jim Jurgas all tapped three hits for
the winners. The Shaggers, (3-0) with three hits
apiece from Joe Howell and Ray Farris, topped
Physics, 6-4.
The Brahama Braves brought its record to 1-2
by whipping University Lodge, 5-4, paced by A1
Weiderholtd's three hits. The Phi Taus also brought
its record to 1-2 with a eight-inning 6-5 decision
over the Middle Schoolers. Rich Fleming rapped
safely three times, including a home run. Bob
Padecky went two-for-two and scored twice for the
winners.

f
W lIM llr
:
******* v '''

..., ~ 9k
Wm§
ROLL YOUR OWN
Intramural bowling begins with the women outscoring the men.

ing his neck) and guard Skip Higley (who coach Tommy
Bartlett calls his best ballhandler ever), you still have
a potent team.
Baseball was to find Kelly Prior making the differ difference
ence difference but it came down to the play of shortstop Trapp
and the consistent hurling of soph Jim Courier to pace
the team. Not to mention the .500 pinch-hitting done by
all-around Danny Orr. Nor the times Terry Stroemer
won five games with clutch hits.
Swimming has Tom Dioguardi in a repeat All-Ameri All-American
can All-American performance but Bill Harlan couldnt deny other
All-American performances from Steve Macri, Blanchard
Tual and Andy McPherson, to mention a few.
PadeckySSS
jrt
SPORTS EDITOR
Tennis has Armi Neely as the SEC's best single
player but the play of Jamie Pressly and frosh Greg
Hilley gave coach Bill Potter his finest team ever here.
Never was a teams versatility so obvious in this
school's golf team. Every one of coach Buster Bishops
top five players placed or won a tournament during the
season. It was Steve Melynk leading the national tourn tournament
ament tournament for two rounds but it could easily have been
David Oakley, Walter Armstrong, John Darr or Richard
Spears.
So there are standout names sprinkled throughout
UF's sports program. But these are not of the Steve
Spurrier class. They combine their talents as a co cohesive
hesive cohesive unit.
But many people grip and say, Look at our sport
record. Sure it's great but we haven't won anything,
all we got are second places."
For me, I'll take the second places and team-work
rather than first places and the Spurrier's that go
with them.
SPURRIER COMES LATELY
You wonder sometimes, What's with Steve Spurrier?"
Spurrier, long known for his Johnny-Come-Lately

The PE Petes moved up to second place with a
2-1 slate with a convincing 14-4 bouncing of Phi
Delta Theta. Wendall Davis led the victors with
four hits.
Law League Softball action on Tuesday saw the
Bullmooses clip the Tortfeasors the Scratchers
push past the Underdogs, 7-4; the Nads edged the
Roundballs, 7-5; Team I beat the Legal Mets 4-2
and the Clowns blitzed the Bombers 11-1.
In mixed bowling at the lanes in Reitz Union
Tuesday, the Brian Jetters rolled the high series
with a 604 score. Linda Jetter took the high series
for women with a 326 set and the high game with
a 201 game.
Dave Huskey dominated the mens scores with
a high game of 162 and the top series with 320,
failing to match the top womens score.
In first round action, the David Brittons defeated
the John Gwynes, 410-403; the Dave Huskeys over
the Ken Rosses 571-0 (forfeit); the Brian Jetters
topped the George Hasses 604-0 (forfeit); the Roger
Vickery slipped past the A1 Burtons, 393-0 (for (forfeit);
feit); (forfeit); the Eric Taylors smashed the John Wagners
508-0 (forfeit) and the Jerry Sullenbergers defeated
the Frank Akins, 514-492.

touchdown passes that win close football games for
Florida, experienced rough treatment last Saturday night.
The game was the Coaches All-American Classic
in Atlanta and Spurrier was in the process of playing
his worst game as collegian.
The cracker-town fans thought that Spurrier was
playing his worst game ever. And they let our Heis Heisman
man Heisman Trophy winner know it, all the time, too.
Well, almost all the time.
After Spurrier botched up his first series with a
pass interception, the 29,145 spectators began booing.
And Booing. All throught the game they put the verbal
finger on Steveexcept the last time Spurrier had
his hands on the ball.
Then everybody shut up.
Said one fan, Steve's going to do it now; dont you
worry about it. Steve's going to throw a touchdown pass."
Sure enough, Spurrier did. A 40-yard bomb to Gene
Washington of Michigan State to pull the East ahead
with just three minutes left in the game.
But I still wonder if Spurriers human and all.
RETIRE AT 35?
How many people do you know that can retire at 35?
Phil Mulkey can.
Mulkey was supposed to defend his USTFF Decathlon
championship a week back at the UF track but declined,
saying that he was retiring.
Says track coach Jimmy Carnes, Phil thought
that since he was graying, since he was a father of
two, and SINCE this would have been his 50th deca decathlon,
thlon, decathlon, he found that be had enough.
Nuff Said.
f>
THIRD SACKERS THUMP
Many records were set in Tuesday's All-Star game
in Anaheim. The longest game, 15 innings and the most
strikeouts for both teams, 30, were accomplished.
But even another rarity occurred, even though this
one isn't present on the record books.
All three runs in the 2-1 contest were home runs,
all by third baseman. The National League won because
it had that one more third baseman and the home run.
Just think if there werent any third basemen in this
36th All-Star Classic; the way the pitchers were firing,
they might have still been playing a 0-0 game.



UF*s Potter
*
Pens Two
To Tennis
UF has signed a pair of tennis
stars to athletic scholarships, one
a prep standout and the other
a junior college transfer.
Gator tennis coach Bill Potter
announced today that Bruce Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett of Jesuit High School in New
Orleans, La. and Glenn Cox, of
Pomona, California will do their
coHegiate tennis playing at Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
Bartlett, who lives in Metairie,
La. is tabbed by Potter, an
outstanding young player who
should show great development
in the next few years. Bartlett
will enter UF as a freshman next
September.
Cox, who attended Coronado SW
Junior College in California,
should give a big boost to Ga Gator
tor Gator Southeastern Conference title
ambitions next season.
Cox is an excellent and ex experienced
perienced experienced player who can move
right in and be one of the best
players in the league, Potter says.
He gives us much help in pro providing
viding providing some depth and quality along
with our returning boys.
Potter added the Gators will
announce more tennis signees
soon.
, **
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1214 1/2 NW 4th St.
976-0917
5 age groups, Infant through
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Air Conditioned New building

Crossword by Jennie Lemmo

1 Became
distasteful.
7 "To be" with
Caesar.
11 Pitchman's
utterances.
16 Tonsorial
leather.
21 Elaborately
bedecked.
22 Hermits
abode.
23 Irish county.
24Trash: si.
25 Haile
Sellasies
title.
27 One of the
go-go-go boys.
29 Viper.
30 impres impressionism.
sionism. impressionism.
31 Spikelet
bristle.
32 Sgt.
33 Fresh.
34 Campus
attraction.
36 Remainder.
38 Letter.
39 Discovery.
41 Boredom.
43 Horse opera
homesteader.
46 Tremble.

1 Consolation.
t ,2 Prayer.
- 3 Close.
4 Managed.
5 jacket.
6 Postpone.
7 Medieval
shield.
8 Unruffled.
9 Did in.
10 Joie de vivre.
11 Decor.
12 Site.
13 Baritone role
in "Otello.
14 Before.
15 Celtic sea god.
16 Stow: naut.
17 Vestige
18 Shatter.
19 Frank.
20 Jaunty.
26 "Petticoat
Junction
character.

Sky DivingFun From 40,000 Feet

- By ED COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Sky-Diving, the sport of jumping
from a high-flying airplane and
falling for a long distance be before
fore before parachuting to safety, is not
as hair-raising as it first seems,
according to Harold D. Stewart,
jumpmaster and acting president of
the University City Sport Para Parachute
chute Parachute Club.
It gets in your blood just like
any other sport," said Stewart.
People jump because they en enjoy
joy enjoy it."
The club, composed of about
75 per cent students, uses the
Williston Airport for its jump jumping
ing jumping area.
Membership Is open to anyone
over 21 years of age (or 16
with parental permission in good
physical condition.
The casualty rates are sur surprisingly
prisingly surprisingly low," Stewart said, I've
seen ovef 800 jumps and saw only

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1430 SW 13TH ST.
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Pampering student appetites in: Florida,
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Kansas, lowa, & Nebraska.

ACROSS

Greek letter.
50 "It Happened
One Night
director.
53 Commisera Commiseration.
tion. Commiseration.
54 French river.
55 Indo-Chinese
language.
56 Make alencon.
59 Recess.
60 Pothouse
quencher.
61 Wooed..
62 Sing.
63 Reverberate.
65 Pullover, e.g.
67 Function.
68 U.S. Cavalry
cry.
69 Oloroso.
71 de Jesus,
Can.
72 "The
Tempest
spirit.
74 Coat style.
75 Laugh.
76 Emmet.
77 Inlect.
78 Sherbet.
80 Shrew.
81 Ready.
83 Beg.
84 Steps.

DOWN

28 Out of funds.
35 French
nobleman.
37 Traitor.
38 Prokofiev
classic.
39 Famous
Disney
characters.
40 100 cents in
So. Africa.
42 Form of John.
44 Flood.
45 Tessera.
46 Tippler
extra extraordinaire.
ordinaire. extraordinaire.
47 Elia.
48 Airport
structure.
49 Have in mind.
51 Bouquet.
52 Quarrel.
55 Old-time
dance.

PUZZLES*
Edited by William Gant

87 Thai measure.
89 Powdered
lava.
90 Ceremony.
91 Porkers
enclosure.
92 Heliacal.
95 Printers
bane.
98 Aqaba.
100 ammoniac.
101 Genoa is one
style.
02 First Oscar
winning
actress.
103 Understand.
104 Factor.
107 Arabian VIP.
108 Incensed.
109 Scottish
hillside.
110" Guerra in
Italy.
11 :
si.
113 Quilting
. party.
114 Back of the
neck.
115 Lamentation.
116 Fountain
treat.
117 Mechanical
insertion.

56 Trial run.
57 To suffer
pain.
58 1922 O'Neill
offering.
61 Retinue.
62 Kind of tea.
64 Russian city.
66 High: mus.
68 Manitoba
Indian.
70 Electrical
unit.
73 Frenetic
state.
76 Roman
bronze.
77 Canter.
79 Emotional
release.
82 European
river.
83 Jalopy.
85 Jehoshaphats
predecessor.

119 Consumed.
120 Tummys
circum circumference.
ference. circumference.
121 Wielding
diligently.
123 circle.
127 Gloomy
aspects.
128 Ring arbiter:
si.
129 Villa d.
132 Phraortes, e.g.
133 Classify.
136 Poetaster's
adverb.
137 Early church
vessel.
139 Last queen of
Spain.
141 Surprise!
142 "Very good:
circa 1920.
145 Shrewd
bargainer.
148 Expunge.
149 The 400.
150 Region.
151 Withstand.
152 Was dad to.
153 Russia's
Republic.
154 Person.
155 Harvested.

86 Trouble: poet.
87 Saskatche Saskatchewan's
wan's Saskatchewan's capital.
88 Biblical
mountain.
91 Americano's
uncle.
93 French
"lady friend.
94 au monde.
96 Price paid.
97 Brogan part.
99 Inclined.
100 Turkish inn.
101 Halt.
105 Femme.
106 Sine quit .
109 Seethe.
112 Baby basenji.
115 Anciently
called Melita.
116 English poet.
118 "The piper's
son.
120 Aberrant.

one person break his leg. It turned
out that his leg hadnt healed from
a previous break."
The club has a ground train training
ing training program for prospective mem members
bers members which includes jumping from
a four-foot platform to learn the
landing skills.
The first five jumps are made
from a high wing aircraft using
a static line" which
tically opens the parachute. Hjthe
student is ready after the Hive
jumps, he or she may begin free
fall" in which the chute is opened
manually at a desired altitude.

KfiIONLY COFFEE HOUSE IN
CENTRAL FLORIDA/
lliHrif PMIIII V FCATUftiNt:
ffiffil'lnSSfok anne.coles
HONEYCOMBS
BSBff frRHSAr) 930+13:30 PM. PLUS HMT OF OTHER TRLEWT

ii e is [s [s is WKF is [ ii2 is nrTrr*fsnrrii ii 120
SST H 27
29 IjjBVSo Mpl 2
34 M wJm 40
SO 51 52 ITS ss
56 57
83
69 70 Tn mf7 2 73
75 jjj76 79 ]|MjF U
82 35 B 6
87 88 jjj^eT 94
lOO lOl lOl-10
-10 lOl-10 4 105 106 iW
no
122 BTSS 124 125 126
l 29 130 13^HmT32
l37 138 14^*141
|142 143 144 146 147
_ Ug 7sl
15 2 3

122 Approached.
124 Prepare the
way.
125 Cling. /
126 Constructed.
127 Sheriffs men.

128 Vaqueros
rope.
130 Pagoda
ornament.
131 Penetrate.

The chutist" progresses from
3,000 feet, jumping at six different
intervals, until he jumps from
7,200 feet. At this point he may
free fall from any altitude up to
20,000 feet.

FOR THE FINEST IN DARY FROOUCTS
ASK FOR FOREMOST AT YOUR FAVORITE
FOOD STORE OR CALL 376-5293
F o EARLY MORNING DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME
W FOREMOST DAIRIES, Inc
534 S.W. 4th Avenue

5 akicva/cd mv i o _a_i_di?_s_i__vTjJT?ss ||
AiMbWtK Tir d n TMY a o sMIY v oj|3 dYjlfl
t ¥TW bUtYT hTYtBtT 9|ifb]o7T7|j)j i|
B th th v i TtfiiT v v Y Yfl] !
c 1 w b v i o sMT i sWT I i hh sIYMi f v| a] i
i! mis o vfTlb ihT 9av oMiirsnnnnMi !i
I an fURITo di V H 9|fi H m 3| 3| H 3|i] [ I
! rposswoD Y77"7rnin 3 iyywl !
;,
;> mllliil!iziSfci" l SifiiinHH !
i! mmn ao a iji3 ? jpi's] 3i Hirrarora i,
| 1 N 3 3 3 blBBo 3 YflltfMTYflOllirdlSlYl
K 7 Tl7 T 97 ~3Jvj 3lgjny Jj opi| o| ijT| |i

133 First-rate:
colloq.
134 Kalmus
operetta.
135 Theatrical
luminary.

Friday, July 14, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

136 Send out.
137 King of
Israel.
138 Italian
premier.

A jumper needs at least 1,500
jumps before be becomes an ex expert
pert expert and before anyone begins to
take notice of him, according to
Stewart.

140 Rule
Britannia
composer.
143 Nozzle.
144 Wing: Lat.

Page 15

146 Expression of
opinion.
147 City in
Oklahoma.



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 14, 1967

Page 16

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