Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Shepherd Proposes Revised UF Constitution

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Executive Editor
UF Student Body President
Charles Shepherd has designed
a constitution which he says cor corrects
rects corrects the defects which I felt
were in the old one, and present presented
ed presented it to his Constitution Com Commission
mission Commission for consideration.
Shepherds document provides
for a more unified executive branch
in an attempt to reduce factional factionalism
ism factionalism in student government and
ambiguities in the constitution.
Although Shepherd said his con constitution

Tlie Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 135

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Math Professors Say
Grading System Poor

By AGGIE FOWLES
Alligator Correspondent
Several UF professors in the
mathematics department have ex expressed
pressed expressed discontent with the Uni University
versity University Examiner multiple choice,
machine graded testing system for
the math courses. The system was
set up by the University and not
by the department.
Quakers
To Conduct
Talk-Out
By GRACE SPILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Policies ranging from my
country be damned to my coun country--right
try--right country--right or wrong will be dis discussed
cussed discussed at a 24-hour talk-out be beginning
ginning beginning Saturday morning at 11
a.m., according to Mrs. Marilyn
J. Fregly, Quaker Peace Vigil
committee member.
The talk-out will be held at
the Friends Meeting House,
1921 NW 2nd Ave.
We are concerned with open
and free discussion, Mrs. Freg Fregly
ly Fregly said. We welcome and want
to hear all points of view dis discussed,
cussed, discussed, even- though they might
not agree with our Quaker view viewpoint.
point. viewpoint.
We cant be silent any long longer;
er; longer; we must talk out against war
and at the same time find a solu solution
tion solution to conflict other than by con confrontation,
frontation, confrontation, she said.
Mrs. Fregly noted that the peace
vigil is open to all but is solely
Quaker sponsored.
We have previously been
aligned with Students for a Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Society (SD6) in our peace
views, but we now prefer to stand
alone, she said. Our views have
not changed; we merely prefer to
be regarded as a separate group.
The program Includes panel dis discussions
cussions discussions by UF faculty and stu students,
dents, students, a dramatic reading, silent
vigils and folk singing.

stitution constitution contained the provisions
necessary for UFs Student Body
Constitution, he told commission
members Monday the document
was only a suggestion.
He has no intention of dictating
a constitution, Shepherd said.
The commission is, however,
expected to have the final draft
of its constitution ready within
two or three weeks, Shepherd said.
Shepherd wants to present a
workable constitution to the stu student
dent student body before the end of A
Term. He intends to do it by
referendum or by initiation --

Miss Geraldine Jensen, assis assistant
tant assistant professor of math says that her
complaint is with the manner in
which the University Examiners
handle grading. A student can fail
in all his class work and still get
a C out of the courses, she said.
This is because 50 per cent of
the grade is determined by the
final, less than 25 per cent is
given by the instructor.
Approximately 2,000 students
will be involved in the University
Examiner grading of math next fall.
The main problem is that it is
hard to make good multiple choice
questions in mathematics, accord according
ing according to Dr. John E. Maxfield, mathe mathematics
matics mathematics department chairman.
Usually a multiple choice exam examination
ination examination tests verbal capacity first
then mathematical skill, Dr. Max Maxfield
field Maxfield said.
Another disadvantage of the Uni University
versity University Examiner system,
Maxfield said, is that the instruc instructors
tors instructors have little control over the
final grade.
The system does introduce uni uniformity
formity uniformity in grading, he added.
Dr. Frank A. Smith, assistant
professor of math, contends that
the multiple choice testing puts
the instructor and student in con conflict.
flict. conflict. The students are not inter interested
ested interested in learning, he said.
Repeatedly the question, Will this
be on the test?, is raised.
A system of testing out should
be set up for those who dont
need to learn what is taught in
these math courses (205, 206,207,
& 208), Dr. Smith said.
At least half of a math test should
be hand-graded, he said.
Its too easy to make a math
error, Dr. Smith said, and the
key thing must be to know how to
work a problem.
I dont believe that math should
be taught on the basis of a race,
Dr. GeorgeStrecker, Postdoctoral
fellow, mathematics, said.
The University Examiner tests
tend to discriminate against those
who are slow, he added. Speed
shouldnt be of the essence.

with or without the help of the
Legislative Council.
A constitutional referendum re requires
quires requires that the council pass the
constitution and that two-thirds of
the students voting in an election
vote for it.
Through the initiation process,
a constitution may be drafted and
placed on an election agenda by any
group of <6tudents who can muster
a certain number of signatures on a
petition. It by-passes the council
entirely.
Shepherd, a former law student,
drafted the constitution which he

University of Florida, Gainesville

Florida Union Facilities
Finally BeginningTo Open

By DIANN DEVINE
Alligator Staff Writer
The new Florida Union, after
ten years planning and three years
waiting, has been active now for
five days.
The Union snack bar and cafe cafeteria
teria cafeteria have been operating since
Monday, the Arts and Crafts Cen Center,
ter, Center, at the Union since April 24,
is ready to serve any student
seeking help in art endeavors,
and the painting exhibit has been
on display since April 30, day of
the staff open house.
According to William J. Os Osborne,
borne, Osborne, assistant director of oper operations
ations operations at the Florida Union, the
games area billiard tables may be
open in another week. But, Os Osborne
borne Osborne said, the area will not be
fully operating until June 1.

f ij expo
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THE UF CHOl...ended its annual spring
concert tour by singing at the opening of
Expo 67, Montreal, Canadas Worlds Fair.
See story and pictures of the tour on pages
4 and 5.
-
Shepherd Promises
Tuition Hike Fight

Charles Shepherd, UF student
body president, leaves today for
Tampa and a meeting of the Council
of Student Body Presidents at the
University of South Florida.
The meeting was called to dis discuss
cuss discuss the proposed tuition hike
and the education budget, Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said.
Declining to comment upon how
other representatives felt about
Kirks plan to increase tuition,
Shepherd said he was against it.
During my campaign, he said,
I was asked how I would react
if it seemed as though such an
increase might be passed. I said
I would raise Hell, and thats what
I'm going to do.

presented to the commission. He
called it only something to hack
on, and expects the commission
to search for ideas in other college
constitutions.
The commission was appointed
by Shepherd to draft a constitution
after the chief executive vetoed a
constitution sent to him by the
Council in March.
The present constitution badly
needs revision, Shepherd said.
It stinks, he said and denied
that constitutional revision was
necessary because of changes
caused by the approaching quarter

The University Placement Cen Center
ter Center and Alumni Services are sche scheduled
duled scheduled to be open and functioning
May 11 and 12 respectively, Os Osborne
borne Osborne reaffirmed.
Monday marks official opening
for the Barber Shop, Union Store
and Arts and Crafts Center. Os Osborne
borne Osborne said the second floor Brows Browsing
ing Browsing Room may also be opened Mon-

Fergus on Opposed To
Kirks Tuition Propsal

By THELMA MOSSMAN
Alligator Correspondent
Board of Regents Chairman
Chester Ferguson said Tuesday

Governor Claude Kirk recently
urged the State Legislature to in increase
crease increase state university tuition by
SSO per quarter, and to cut back
Floridas education budget.
The Florida State Board of
Regents, the State Budget Com Commission,
mission, Commission, and the State Cabinet
have opposed such a hike but the
legislature has the power to make
such an increase.
The council, which was created
to combat such an increase, agreed
to meet at USF Saturday morning
and plan action.
Shepherd, who will represent
both UF and Florida State, said
Florida Atlantic and Florida A&M
will be represented, as well as
USF.

system.
Students can live with the quar quarter
ter quarter system/' he said, but that
doesn't make the constitution smell
any better."
However great the need lor re revision,
vision, revision, Shepherd called the con constitution
stitution constitution he vetoed more muddled
than ever."
When he vetoed the council's
constitution, Shepherd said, he took
on a responsibility to present a
constitution to the students that
met his requirements.
(See Constitution, Pg. 7)

Friday, May 5, 1967

day, but the Music Listening Room
is awaiting arrival of a sound sys system.
tem. system.
TV* First use of the Union Audi-
torium is scheduled for May 14
when the film The Wild One
will be presented.
The second floor ballroom, is
now open for banquets and meet meetings
ings meetings and the fifth and sixth floor
guest rooms are available.

that he approved of an increase
in state tuition rates only as a
last resort for quality education
in Florida.
By quality education, I mean
enough facilities, classrooms and
competent faculty to meet the needs
of a growing student body," con continued
tinued continued Ferguson in a telephone
interview from his Tampa home.
Ferguson responded to Gov.
Claude Kirk's television proposal
last week to raise tuition SSO
more per quarter. Kirk said this
would give the state a needed
additional $16.6 million for ed education.
ucation. education.
Stated Ferguson, I am against
any increase that will create a
hardship to an? student desiring
an education." With a tuition in increase
crease increase Ferguson admitted that
some Florida students would face
a significant money problem.
I am not against a reasonable
Increase, however, so long as
there are funds available for
loans," he added.
A bill which would call for $4.5
million dollars for student loans
is currently before the Florida
Legislature.
Ferguson suggested this bill be
enlarged to provide funds for needy
students if the tuition increase is
passed.
Florida educational needs could
be met with the proposed Board
of Regents budget also before the
legislature, Ferguson added.
0
The budget called for $161.5
million, a 99 percent increase In
general revenue over the last bi biennium.
ennium. biennium.
When the Cabinet-Budget Com Commission
mission Commission slashed the budget 19 per.
cent early this year, a bill was
submitted to the legislature to re restore
store restore the cuts. However, Gov.
Kirk could veto this bill.
I hope he doesn't veto the
bill," said Ferguson. Our Job
is to expose the needs of Florida
education. Our budget is realistic
and will help meet these needs."
If the Florida Legislature raised
funds for education by a tuition
increase, the proposal would go in into
to into effect this September.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

Rising Costs Send
Milk Prices Higher

By GINNIE DILLIN
Alligator Correspondent
Recent increases in personnel
and supply costs have resulted in
a boost in campus cafeteria milk
prices, according to Robert Over Overton,
ton, Overton, director of food services.
Overton explained the two cents
per halfpint increase as an ad adjustment
justment adjustment to the rising costs en encountered
countered encountered by Servomatlon, Inc.,
the university food service.
Overton stated that the minimum
wage law and the Increased cost
of paper and cleaning supplies have
made recent food price adjust adjustments
ments adjustments necessary.
Unless something unforeseen
happens to the national economy,
all price adjustments for the un university
iversity university food centers have been
made,*' Overton said.
Servemation, Inc. is under con contract
tract contract with the University and so
all price increases must be ap approved
proved approved by UF officials. Overton
said he feels that no student pro protest
test protest will be made for this reason.
A greater increase would have
been made if milk weije not sup supplied
plied supplied by UFs Dairy Science Dept,
because of the national price rise,
Overton stated.
Dr. Charles B. Browning, chair chairman
man chairman of the Dairy Science Depart-
DJ To Air
Campus News
The Pepsi College Hour, with
Bob Kaye, will integrate music
with two topical subjects, The
Proposed Increase in Student
Fees*' and the Friends Society
anti-War Demonstration, for on onthe-alr
the-alr onthe-alr discussion this Saturday.
The new radio program on Radio
WUWU, 1390, will give the Uni University
versity University of Florida student a chance
to vocie his opinions every Sat Saturday
urday Saturday from 12-1 p.m.
The student may call the radio
station and in between records will
voice his viewpoint over the air
on the subject being discussed.
He may comment on a previous
call by a student or faculty mem member,
ber, member, interject new information or
just give a general opinion.
A running tally will be taken
of the pros and cons for the pro proposed
posed proposed fee hike and the statistics
passed on to Student Body Presi President
dent President Charles Shepherd for future
reference as an authoritative poll.

-
fin
4jj :
TO ALL STUDENTS ju
iffijki and university personnel j
fir
'V CAFITERIA
The Florid* Allflkjor reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert- \
lsements and to rAlse or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertlsemer
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to ryn several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
TttE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July
It Is published semi- weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors
Addrec correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla., 32C01. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

ment, stated that a federal mar market
ket market order forced private milk pro producers
ducers producers to raise their prices this
year.
Dairy Science operates through
federal and state funds. Milk and
milk products are by-products of
its research, teaching and train training
ing training programs.
Over 500 gallons of milk are
produced daily by the Dairy Science
herd.

WUFT Gets First
Mobile T.V. Truck

By WILLEY ELLIOTT
Alligator Correspondent
WUFT goes mobile! At long
last WUFT, the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida educational television station,
has the facilities to do remote
pick-ups.
Tal Bray, facilities manager of
WUFT, said that the mobile unit
would be used to cover various
cultural events in the area. Until
now all the shows produced by
WUFT had to be produced in their
own studios located in the School
of Journalism and Communica Communications.
tions. Communications. 1 r
The truck was acquired from
WJXT, Channel 4, in Jacksonville.
Broadcasting students will use the
mobile unit to gain experience
in remote pick-ups. But a staff
engineer will always be on duty
when the mobile unit is in use.
The truck will not be able to
bring the viewers a live broad broadcast,
cast, broadcast, said Bray, because we
dont have a microwave transmit transmitter
ter transmitter to get the signal back to the
station. All of our remote pro-
ALLIANCE
TV
Reliable Service
On All Makes
Os Radio,
TV,
Stereos
815 W. University
376-9955

Gramling Gets
Top Accent Job

Accent General Chairman Wayne
Rich has resigned his post to
graduate from UF, Student Gov Government
ernment Government officials announced re recently.
cently. recently. Frank Gramling, a former
assistant public relations chair chairman
man chairman in Accent was appointed to
replace him.
Rich plans to enter law school
at Florida State University next
fall.

ductions will be taped on a porta portable
ble portable video tape recorder carried
on the truck.
The truck will be to roll
into action by the fall of this year.
Alligator Cops
Top ACP Award
An All-American award was
given to the Alligator for its
creativeness and style during the
fall trimesters publication, the
Associated Collegiate Press
announced recently.
The Alligator received superior
ratings for feature stories, edi editorial
torial editorial page features and sports
writing in the competition spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the University of Min Minnesotas
nesotas Minnesotas Collegiate Digest.

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Former Ambassador
Warns Against Apathy

By ROY MAYS
Alligator Staff
Understanding of foreign af affairs
fairs affairs must begin with an under understanding
standing understanding of the nature of society
both here and the rest of the
world, according to Harold B.
Minor, former United States Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador to Lebanon.
Minor, a 40-year veteran in the
foreign service said that Ameri Americans
cans Americans suffer from apathy and mis misunderstanding
understanding misunderstanding of foreign affairs.
We must see where we our ours
s ours elves are going, American
leadership was followed because
there was reverence for it. As-
ter the war we had power and
set about to accomplish great
things. We were successful in
reconstruction of Europe and help helping
ing helping put an end to colonialism.
But now the people of West
Europe want to be independent
and go their own way.
Minor, presently serving as con consul
sul consul to the State Department, spoke
Wednesday night at McCarty
Auditorium as guest of the Arab
Club and the International Com Committee
mittee Committee of the Florida Union.
Minor believes that one trouble
of the United States foreign policy
is that it puts forth two faces.
The first face is that of Theo Theodore
dore Theodore Roosevelt, filled with pride,
self-esteem and arrogance. The
second is that of Lincoln, showing
reason, concern, understanding
and humility. It is when the world
sees both these faces at the same
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Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

time that they become confused.
I have never seen a time when
our position was worse than to today.
day. today.
The American foreign aid poli policy
cy policy was criticized by Minor as
being, a handmaiden given in
absence of any policy.
Foreign policy is based on
our internal politics. Authority
is not given to those who know.
I wr
W Bp
MINOR
If a policy fails it is blamed on
the diplomat, if successful the
credit goes to the White House.
Minor, who is a former minis minister
ter minister to Greece and now an honor honorary
ary honorary citizen, used that country as
an example of Americas two
faced policy.
We do not understand this re recent
cent recent revolution. We are mainly
interested in gaining military
bases in Greece. The major party
is now allowed to form a gov government
ernment government because we dont like
them. This type policy was used
in Cuba and results in revolution
that turns the country against us.
It has happened before and will
happen again.
The Arab-Israel dispute is the
burning issue of this area but not
the only one. Among the other prob problems
lems problems are religion, education and
poverty, but progress is being
made.
The image of the Arab, says
Minor, has been blackened. This
is the area which gave the spark
that led to the Renaissance in
Europe. Now the greatness of this
society is not being recognized.
No book about the Arab side has
gained wide circulation, but one
like Exodus can do great dam damage.'
age.' damage.'
Ambassador Minor believes that
our interest is so broad that it
transcends anything nationalistic.
Although our foreign policy has at
times been selfish and pragmatic,
it has helped raise standards of
living for the good of mankind.
We must value people as people.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

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STILL ONLY 15t
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GO GO GATOR ADS

See What's ew *"""1
The Browse Shop I
r
THE CHEMISTRY OF THE NON-METALS I
.. .William Jolly I
THE LIFE OF THE GREEN PLANT I
.. .Arthur Galston I
ASYLUMS v ...Erving Goffman I
AMERICAN RACE RELATIONS TODAY I
... Earl Raab I
THE PRINCIPLES OF ART ...R.G. Collingwood I
OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN SOLID FILMS I
... O. S. Heavens
FRENCH FOR PLEASURE ...Joseph Harvard I
PREHISTORIC ART ... T.G. E. Powell I
MASS SPECTROMETRY ...McDowell I
ADVANCED' INORGANIC CHEMISTRY . .Cotton I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
Campus Shop & Bookstore |
Streits
World of BICYCLES...
NEW & USED BICYCLES
* NEW & USED MOTORCYCLES
# ALL PARTS & ACCESSORIES FOR BIKES & CYCLES
# KEYS FITTED
STUDENTS!! If you would like to place a new or
used bicycle on reserve and avoid the rush, write:
STREIT'S BICYCLE SHOP
818 W. University Ave.
Gainesville, Florida

THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR

3,600 Miles Os Music

To a Floridian, traveling the
route from Gainesville to Mon Montreal,
treal, Montreal, Canada, in late April, is
like sliding backwards through the
seasons.
The trip starts in the bikini bikiniand-bermuda
and-bermuda bikiniand-bermuda heat of an early
Florida summer. Then, moving
north through Georgia and Ken Kentucky,
tucky, Kentucky, some of rampant green dis disappears
appears disappears from the hillsides and the
chill of the air in the early morn morning
ing morning leaves goose bumps on short shortsleeved
sleeved shortsleeved arms.
Farther north, in Ohio and New
York, almost none of the trees
and flowers have begun to bud.

Less than a days travel later,
across the Canadian border, the
rocky hillsides are bleak and for forbidding.
bidding. forbidding. Theres no snow on the
ground, but the chill is still there.
A harsh wind burns exposed faces
and hands, and Florida-acclimati Florida-acclimatized
zed Florida-acclimatized lungs begin to protest at the
unaccustomed bite of 30-degree
air.
Then, in the French-Canadian
city of Montreal, frostbitten ears
and sniffling noses are forgotten.
In Montreal, growing out of three
islands in the St. Lawrence River,
is the reason for the trip. Expo
67 -- the newest, biggest and most
spectacular Worlds Fair of them
all.
The University Choir, almost a
year ago, was invited to sing at
Expo 67 on the fairs opening
day, representing the United
States.
After a months-long struggle to
find enough money to finance the
trip, the choir finally accepted
Expos invitation midway through
the winter trimester. Gov. Claude
Kirk stepped in and added $3,200
to President J. Wayne Reitzs
$1,200, hours before a time limit
would have forced choir officials
to cancel plans for the tour_
At 7 a.m. April 21, after re rehearsing
hearsing rehearsing throughout the final exam
period, the choir gathered at the
foot of the Century Tower, climbed
sleepily aboard two chartered
buses, and roared off on a 3,600-
mile, 10-day concert tour.
The first stop was at De Land,
where the UF singers presented
a concert at Stetson University.
Then, back into the buses and on
to St. Augustine with a stopover
at Daytona Beach for a two-hour
break on the beach.
Leaving St. Augustine the next
morning, the choir stopped in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville long enough to tape a half halfhour
hour halfhour television show for WFGA WFGATVs
TVs WFGATVs Compass 12 series, then
boarded the buses again and set
out for Atlanta.
The following day, Sunday, was
a traveling day. A concert at At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta opened the day and one at
Cumberland College in Williams Williamsburg,
burg, Williamsburg, Ky., closed it.
And the tour continued. Colum Columbus,
bus, Columbus, Ohio -two concerts, Canton,
Ohio the home town of choir
director Dr. Elwood Keister
another concert.
Finally, April 27 found the choir
singing in Montreals First Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian Church -a prelude to the
next days final concert at Expo
67.
April 28 was bitterly cold.
Wrapped in sw-eaters, scarves and
heavy coats, the choir arrived at
the fair at 9 a.m. -- half an hour
before Expo opened its doors to
the public.

Announces the arrival
7? of the 'WILD SIDES
//It \ by Victor
/J Kffi of Coral
Vea&c%swSSSS&

Shivering and sneezing, the UF
singers splintered into groups and
scattered, determined to see as
much as possible before meeting
again at 1 p.m. for their last
concert.
An exhaled breath becomes a
stream of frosty air, and bulky
sweaters are barely enough to fight
off the still-powerful grip of a
winter reluctant to leave.
After the concert the choir
scattered again, wandering help helplessly
lessly helplessly from exhibit to exhibit,
trying to decide where to go and
what to see in the few hours re remaining.
maining. remaining. Finally, by nightfall, the
numbing wind and cold had driven

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AT NIAGARA FALLS -- Like many other
choir members, Sally Bendroth took advan advantage
tage advantage of a short rest stop to take a picture
of one of North Americas most famous
honeymoon spots.

roost of the visiting Floridians
back to the warmth of their rooms.
At 8 a.m. the next morning, the
choir started home. Those with
enough energy to enjoy it found
themselves with an evening in
New York after a final day-long
ride on the buses.
Sunday afternoon marked the
beginning of the last leg of the
tour, as an exhausted choir climb climbed
ed climbed aboard a train in New Yorks
Penn Station.
Twenty-three hours later it was
over. A weary, sleepy-eyed choir
stumbled off the train and onto
Florida soil again, 3,600 miles
and ten days after it left.
It was worth it.



Worlds Fair Tour
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BOARDING THE BUS ... The choirs two
chartered buses were literally homes on
wheels for the singers for 2,000 miles and
eight of the ten days of the tour.

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THE CHOIR ... at the international band shell on the Expo 67 grounds

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SCULPTURE ... such as this choir couple
is looking at was a predominant character characteristic
istic characteristic of the fairs decorations.

Sixty-four handsome, tan- 4
7 ned young students from the 4
T Department of Music of the
T University of Florida made the j
first of their two Montreal 4
Y appearances last night at the 1
Y First Presbyterian Church. 4
Y They are members of the 1
I University of Florida choir J
I which will be performing to- T
I day as representatives of the {
X United States during theopen-
X ing day ceremonies at Expo.
X The mixed voice choir, I
X under the direction of El wood Y
X Keister, is well trained and I
X the fresh, youthful voices pro- X
X duce a powerful and exhil- X
X arating sound of impressive X
X richness and variety..." X
X The Montreal Star, April 28 X

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CATCHING UP -- Too many late concerts added to early morning
departures took their toll on tour manager Saylor and many
other choir members, who caught as much sleep as possible on the
buses.

igtffl
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if Iff" HIM HH
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THE U.S. PAVILION -- The one exhibit
almost everyone in the choir visited.

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THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH ... of Montreal was the
site of the choirs first concert
in Canada.

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

The Florida
Alligator
A AKw/vUli Ou Rajo*
Rtw'nie'TAult
JIM WHITE 808 BECK
Editor Managing Editor
HAROLD KENNEDY BILL DOUTHAT
Executive Editor Assistant Managing Editor
Opinions of columnists do not neces necessarily
sarily necessarily reflect the editorial viewpoint of
the Alligator. The only official voice of
the Alligator staff is the editorial in
the left column.
Broken Circle
A familiar question often
batted around most college
campuses, including our own,
is the student apathy-student
government controversy. Is a
do-nothing student govern government
ment government the result of a lethargic
student body, or does a student
body become apathetic be because
cause because it finds itself saddled
with an incompetent student
government?
Whichever the answer may
be, the circle has been broken
here.
If Charles Shepherds ad administration
ministration administration lives up to the
early promise it has shown,
the UF student body will find
itself reaping the benefits of
its most vital, concerned and
outspoken student government
in many years.
Traditionally, the image of
the typical UF student body
president has been that of a
Tigert puppet, a dont-rock dont-rockthe
the dont-rockthe -boat politico or a self selfseeking
seeking selfseeking individual whose main
concern is to use the presi presidency
dency presidency as a stepping-stone to
bigger and better things.
Charles Shepherd fits none
of those images. Certainly,
his stand on the Pam me Brew Brewer
er Brewer issue has dispelled any
thought that he is afraid to
fly in the face of the admin administrations
istrations administrations policies when he
believes that they are wrong.
Nor has he been afraid to
take an action which could
cause him political damage,
as when he vetoed the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Councils proposed
constitution.
None of his critics can ac accuse
cuse accuse him of being overly reti reticent.
cent. reticent.
If they try to pass a tu tuition
ition tuition hike, Shepherd said in
his campaign for the presi presidency,
dency, presidency, m going to raise
hell.
True to his word, Shepherd
is leaving for Tampa today
to discuss how to fight Gov.
Kirks proposed tuition hike
at a meeting of the Council
of Student Body Presidents.
Along with the other Florida
college students who would
feel the painful bite of a SSO
tuition increase, we hope he
raises hell.

OUR MAN HOPPE
GREAT DEBATE IS EVERYWHERE

By Arthur Hoppe
We have our commitments in
Vietnam and we must honor them,
said The Hawk, slapping his palm
on the table for emphasis. Its as
simple as that.
But what about the danger of
escalation? asked The Dove
mildly. Dont you worry about
. that?
'f

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More, More and More Os More

By DON FEDERMAN
Alligator Columnist
There isnt too much one can add to the seemingly
endless list of plaudits accorded the Zinneman pro produced
duced produced and directed picture, A Man For All Seasons,
presently at the Florida. Comments thus will be casual.
The character of Thomas More is a great emblematic
figure of the Renaissance. More, like Shakespeare,
felt the order of the world was more important than
any particular order imposed by mortals, for the world
reflects the strife among men.
More upheld this view in a rigorous personal morality
and in silence above the calling of family ties and
friends. He seems almost inhuman in his uncompro uncompromising
mising uncompromising ways, and yet he is the only free man in the
moviea married Soren Kierkegaard.
He is thus hounded and finally sentenced to* die be because
cause because he is guilty of being free. If More seems like
an Existential exemplum, perhaps it is better to com compare
pare compare him, befitting the Renaissance, with Cordelia
in King Lear, for she, seeing the folly of a king,
could only **love and be silent.
If the character of More is intriguing, the movie

It wont happen, said The
Hawk firmly. They dont want
to get involved in a vast land war
in Asia any more than we do.
All we have to do is meet every
aggressive act of theirs with a
measured response. And if we hold
firm to our ideals and purpose,
their resistance will eventually
crumble.
Maybe, said The Dove doubt-

is not nearly on the same plane. Photography and
attention to details are very impressive, but are also
a problem.
The movie clearly demonstrates that zinneman is
a better producer than directorhe did not deserve
the Academy Award for best directorhis presence
is felt technically.
He conveys polished props rather than images or
metaphors. The whole film is so tight that it would
have taken but a single missed cue to ruin a scene.
Indeed, if plaudits must be given, then to Bolt's
screenplay and to a great cast they must go. So A
Man For All Seasons" lacks artistic greatness, for it
is a brilliant transcription of a stage play rather than
an original piece of cinema.
* *
Starting at the Center today is "Is Paris Burning?"
A hard drama with massive and spectacularly staged
battle scenes between the Nazis and French under underground.
ground. underground.
Recommended.

fully. But it would save a lot of
bloodshed if we agreed to nego negotiate
tiate negotiate with the opposition in South
Vietnam. After all, they control a
good half of the country and if we
offered to let them take part in an
interim government, pending elec elections.
tions. elections. .
Why, cried The Hawk angrily,
that would be like letting a fox in
the chicken coop! Anyway, they
arent a real government. We all
know whos pulling the strings.
Remember the lesson of Munich.
* *
Oh, come now, protested The
Dove, it isnt like Munich at all.
It certainly is, said The Hark.
The appeasers sold out to the
Nazis at Munich and only whetted
their appetite. Are you blind to
the lessons of history? Dont you
realize the forces of aggression
must be contained at the outset?
Well, conceded The Dove,
theres some merit in that.
Its the key to the whole thing,
said The Hawk. Think of the
nations that are now straddling
the fence. If we dont honor our
commitments in Vietnam, what win
happen in Thailand? As South Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam goes, so goes Thailand. Then
Laos. Do you want the forces of
aggression to overrun all of South Southeast
east Southeast Asia?
No, of course not. But. .
Do you want us to withdraw
completely from Vietnam and leave
those loyal Vietnamese who have
counted on our support to the
tender mercy of their enemies?
The Dove sighed. I guess
theres no easy way out. But there
are so many unanswered ques questions.
tions. questions.
The easiest way out, said The
Hawk with a paternal smile, is
to stop asking questions. Os course,
you have a perfect right to ask
them. Even though questioning our
Vietnam policy gives aid and com comfort
fort comfort to the enemy. And makes him
think we are divided, thus en encouraging
couraging encouraging him to continue the
war.
Youre right! said The Dove,
lifting his shoulders as though re relieved
lieved relieved of a burden. The quickest
path to peace is to fight harder.
Why, I feel better already.
* *
The Hawk put down his chop chopsticks,
sticks, chopsticks, took a sip of tea and beamed
proudly at The Dove.
Let us never forget, he said,
that if we citizens of The Peo Peoples
ples Peoples Republic of China march for forward
ward forward together in unquestioning
solidarity, the American aggres aggressors
sors aggressors can never win in Vietnam.



By George!
o
(Send your problems to George,
the nations No. 1 Worry Wart.)
* *
DEAR GEORGE:
I think the craze among hippies for smoking bananas is the
roost disgraceful thing I ever heard of. What is the nation coming
to when just anybody can go into a fruit stand and buy something
which presumably gives a narcotic effect?
I demand that bananas be outlawed! After all,its taken me years
to build up my business. Where is the fair trade law when we
need it? Pm a marijuana pusher.
HURT AND ANGRY
DEAR PUSHER:
You cant stop progress.
4o O
* *
DEAR GEORGE:
I have been having quite a bit of trouble since graduating from
journalism school and entering the newspaper business as a
reporter.
My city editor is somewhat of a boor. He insists that I ask
people a lot of nosy questions and pry into their business seek seeking
ing seeking facts, as* he calls them. I have always been taught it is
not a bit polite to be nosy, but when I try to express my view viewpoint
point viewpoint to my city editor he just turns purple and makes funny
noises.
Could you put something in your column which might help to
straighten him out?
CUB
DEAR CUB:
Certainly. I think it is disgraceful that a man in the high
position of city editor should go around attempting to stick his
nose in other peoples business!
That should straighten him out I wish I could watch. I
dont believe Ive ever seen a city editor faint.

How Fast
Can You
Read ?
A noted puilir'-r in Chicago
reports there a simple tech technique
nique technique of rapid reading which
should enable you to double your
reading speed and yet retain much
more. Most people do not rea realize
lize realize how much they could in increase
crease increase their pleasure, success
and income by reading faster and
more accurately.
According to this publisher,
anyone, regardless of his pres present
ent present reading skill, can use this
simple technique to improve his
reading ability to a remark remarkable
able remarkable degree. Whether reading
stories, books, technical matter,
it becomes possible to read sen sentences
tences sentences at a glance and entire
pages in seconds with this meth method.
od. method.
To acquaint the readers of
this newspaper with the easy easyto-follow
to-follow easyto-follow rules for developing
rapid reading skill, the company
has printed full details of its
interesting self-training method
in a new booklet, How to Read
Faster and Retain More mail mailed
ed mailed free. No obligation. Send your
name, address and zip code to:
Reading, 835 Diversey, Dept.
164-015, Chicago, 111. 60614.
A postcard will do.
GET YOUR POIKrI
/"use GATOr ad^^l

Jl mm HAND FOR Till KNIT!

l & Ls
Stag n Drag
J
13 W. University Ave.
1

By BILL DOUTHAT
Assistant Managing Luiior
Life magazine readers must
have been in for a shock this
week when they realized the skin skinny
ny skinny girl on the cover was not really
Twiggy, but none other than Mia
Farrow, 22-year-old mini wife of
Frank Sinatra.
Mia, who boasts of a 20-20-20
figure, which she calls an ele elephants
phants elephants graveyard, is often mis mistaken
taken mistaken for the 17-year-old English
stringbean, Twiggy. It is hard to
believe that these figures are
really new sensations; UF men
have been stumbling over them for
years.
Although much of the chatter
about fashions, marriages and such
are ordinarily left to the society
writers, the Presley-Beaulieu
marriage mystery was just too
much for us as we slurped coffee
at the C.l. earlier this week. It
seems like good guy Elvis met
his 21-year-old army brat in Ger Germany
many Germany in 1959. According to an AP
report, Miss Beaulieu was his
longtime sweetheart. Only the

Amazing Swiss Sports Watch
Equipped With Automatic Calendar and Rotating Bezel
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J^f 1 with 2 yr. service guarantee
Read what else you get: Waterproof*. Pressure-tested
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Shock resistant Luminous hands and dial markings
Electronically time-tested for accuracy Stainless
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*case, crown and crystal intact New York 10538

Twigs Are For Trees

naive. or perhaps perverted,
could fail to question their court courting
ing courting relationship if, assuming the
figures are correct, Presley was
then 24, and she 13.
Before we are to quick to spout
cries of damnation, we must calcu calculate
late calculate that Mia was yet a gleam in
her fathers eye when Frank was
24.
Rather than give moral obser observation
vation observation about the shape of our world,
we can only offer advice. If coeds
want to be a smash they should
throw away all that rubber padding

- NEW COURSES AT
N S 513 E UNIV. AVE.
W Hiw LOW RATES
M m Be On Time!

Applause is in order for knits such as these. The fibres
are fresh-to-last, the styling simple and flattering, the
comfort incomparable. A choice of these choice knits
is recommended. Shirt up, this very day!
FROM $3.50

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

and get some used mummy wrap wrappings
pings wrappings to hide those unsightly
curves. The only protruding ob objects
jects objects should be hip bones, elbows
and knees. They then will be un undoubtedly
doubtedly undoubtedly in* and will seldom
worry about going out.
t e ddy bear MJrSeRy
1214 1/2 NW 4th St.
376-0917
5 age groups, infant through
kindergarden Classes.
Open six days a week
Air Conditioned New building

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

Student Award Changed
5
To Honor President Reitz

Hie Outstanding Student Leader
Award presented each year by
Florida Union Board to a UF
student was officially changed to
the J. Wayne Reitz Student Lead Leadership
ership Leadership Award at a dinner Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday honoring President Reitz with
Union employees as the audience.
Bruce Flower, president of the
-Constitution -Constitution(From
(From -Constitution(From Page 1)
One controversial section of
Shepherds constitution would
place the treasurer on the same
ticket as the president and vice
president. This would assure that
the president and treasurer would
be from the same party and should
eliminate much friction, Shepherd
said.
The document also calls for the
impeachment and recall of mem members
bers members of Legislative Council and
takes away the presidents right
to appoint replacements to the
council when members leave for
the summer. Under Shepherd's
plan, members would name their
own replacements, subject to
council approval.
The document also attempts to
resolve ambiguities around the
presidents veto power, by permit permiting
ing permiting him to veto acts, bills, and
charters, including the Student
Government budget. It also allows
an itemized veto.
Shepherds constitution will re restrict
strict restrict party jumping* by making
party lines more rigid.
The commissions constitution
roust include guidelines for over overseeing
seeing overseeing the work of the Leg
Councils Budget and Finance
Com mittee, Shepherd told the com commission,
mission, commission, and for greater coopera cooperation
tion cooperation between Student Government
and the Florida Union Board.
Whj
Cant You
Control Your
Memory ?
A noted publisher in Chicago re reports
ports reports there is a simple technique
for acquiring a powerful memory
which can pay you real dividends
in both business and social ad advancement
vancement advancement and works like magic
to give you added poise, neces necessary
sary necessary self-confidence and greater
popularity.
According to this publisher,
many people do not realize how
much they could influence others
simply by remembering ac accurately
curately accurately everything they see,
hear, or read. Whether in busi business,
ness, business, at social functions or even
in casual conversations with new
acquaintances, there are ways in
which you can dominate each sit situation
uation situation by your ability to remem remember.
ber. remember.
To acquaint the readers of this
paper with the easy-to-follow
rules for developing skill in re remembering
membering remembering anything you choose
to remember, the publishers have
printed full details of their self selftraining
training selftraining method in a new book
Adventures in Memory,* which
will be mailed free to anyone who
requests it. No obligation. Send
your name, address and zip code
to: Memory Studies, 835Diversey
Parkway, Dept. 164-014, Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, 111. 60614. A postcard
will do. I

Florida Union Board for Student
Activities, presented the award.
The Leadership Award will be
presented in March of each year
to the most outstanding student
leader.
The dinner was the first offic official
ial official function to be held in the
new Union banquet room.
As Union Director Bill Rion
introduced the guests at the ban-

Things
Happen fl£29jjk
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Use
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Gator f
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Ads.
2832 feggiyh, I

J M Mm m M
IHi A far-out group of Beil Telephone Labs scientists have come up with a great new sound
... a singing computer!
HI it began several years ago by singing "Daisy, Daisy." Hardly a folk-rock smash, but
RH| lately its voice has been improving. And even though you may not care for the sound, it s 9^H
big in the scientific field.
Simply put, our scientists study speech and express the way we speak words by means
HR of numbers, then make a computer process the numbers. The fmai result is a tape of music
you could play on your tape recorder.
Giving voice to a computer may mean a lot in providing better communications services.
RU The more we know' about voices and tones of all sorts, the better we can make your telephone IHUi
R' and other cbmmunications services.
H And our curiosity may find uses for computer speech that nobody's thought of yet. That's the
H way it \s with a lot of basic research, it can lead to some far-out ideas, that end up way-in HHj
R At Bell Labs, and throughout the Bell System, we find it pays to be curious about everything.
I (2) AT&T I
and Assoos'Pd
---

quet, he asked for applause *for
each one. As the audience applaud applauded,
ed, applauded, technicians outside the dining
room checked to see if the sound soundproofing
proofing soundproofing in the walls worked.
It did. But a piece of unbreak unbreakable
able unbreakable china did fall on the floor
and break.
Many of the guests present had
worked for the new Union as far
back as 1948.

UVING RIGI^UF^
mm B
DI7MT ADTT COFFEE HOUSE O PM^
II rirJAl I v^/\KU&art gallery ~fri&sat

WHITE RAIN
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Regular or Hard -To-Hold
$1.19 VALUE ONLY 77< l
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QUIK-SAVE
ifejO W. ifci .^Ave. j j



Public Welcome At Recitals
Leah Russell, flutist, will present a senior recital in University
Auditorium Sunday afternoon at 4.
Charles Durward McDonell, tenor, will present a senior recital
in the P, K. Yonge Auditorium the following Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.
The general public is invited to attend without charge.
Whites
n i. i rtrl iVk 312 w. univ. ave.
P fill ilill Nex T s Sea i e Bld9-
free p Ol^ 1^
EXPERT REPAIR & SERVICE
DIAMOND SETTING
ENGRAVING
ALL KINDS OF JEWELRY & WATCH REPAIR
COMPLETE LINE OF FINE JEWELRY
We specialize in ACCUTRON, ROLLEX,
and all high-grade watch repair.
f Al and Colen, formerly of Windy's,
| announce the opening of their own
j barker shop, the ...
GATOR GROOMER
Behind the Fla. Book Store
Have A Real Meal!
Potato 20$ mashed
Veqetable 20$ choice of 3
Cole Slaw 20$ tart & tangy
Tea or Coffee 10$ all v u wan
Rolls A Butter 10$ all you want
Roast Beef delicious!
All This Less Than $1
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, AND SUNDAY
A
WONDBBtl?
HOUS E '1
RESTAURANT (T
14 SW First St. Jg*'
Parking For 2CX) Cais Within 150 Feet

Fraternity Row Quiet
" - '
BUT APARTMENTS GO GREEK

By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Society Editor
The Greek life is in full swing
during this summer term, but most
houses along Panhellenic drive,
University Avenue, and Fraternity
Row will remain dark, empty, and
locked until the new fall quarter
beings.
Where has everyone gone? To
apartments!
All sorority houses have rulings
that prohibit them from opening
their doors during the summer
months. Most fraternities find that
it is expensive and lnpractical to
keep their houses open to the few
brothers who stay for summer
term.
There are a few fraternity
houses which do stay open, but
their fraternity life is slowed down
to a summer pace els there are
no funds for organized fraternity
parties or the.regularly scheduled
events held during fall-winter
terms.
Tickets For
Frolics Here
Tickets go on sale for the an annual
nual annual Summer Frolics Monday at
the Information desk in the new
Florida Union.
Famed dual pianists Feranteand
Teicher will highlight this years
frolics, May 19 in the Florida Gyro.
Tickets will sell for sl, $1.50,
and $2.
The Frolics is sponsored by the
Florida Union Board and all pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds go to the universitys dol dollars
lars dollars for scholars program.
Society News
Groups, organizations or
individuals wishing to place
announcements on the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator Society PsLge should type
them and drop them in the
Society box in the Alligator
office.
Announcements can be
mailed to the Alligator in care
of the Society Editor, Florida
Alligator, the Florida Union.

I, mt:
yo u.
ISJ HOUSE
tfgggJ Qp 378-1601
travel
ISP| ,IVMYCL W. UNIV. AVE

As a result, the Greek caravan
has moved out to Gainesvilles
apartments. Throughout the park parking
ing parking lots, stickers from almost
every single organization is rep represented.
resented. represented.
Whole groups of fraternities and
sororities are renting In almost
block like fashion. They turn out
in droves to the swimming pools
and socialize over every morning
task.

20,000 Vehicles Congest
Main Campus Area Daily

Its not certain just what the
solution will be, but UF has the
problem 20,000 moving vehicles.
Thats
Thats the total for a 12-hour
survey of traffic entering and leav leaving
ing leaving the main campus area.
Add to that another 6,900
traveling in the area around the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
These figures and other data
were provided by a recent survey
conducted by a firm engaged to
find a solution to traffic and park parking
ing parking problems.
For a $24,000 fee, Ramp Con Consulting
sulting Consulting Services, Inc., of Manhas Manhassett,
sett, Manhassett, N.Y., will study the data
provided by the survey and recom recommend
mend recommend possible solutions to the
University for the most reasonable
cost.
The final report may not be
complete until August or later.
Meanwhile, students, faculty,
staff find visitors surge on and off
campus, hunting for the elusive
parking place.
The survey showed 2,000
vehicles parked on the main cam campus
pus campus area at all times. At the
Health Center, 1,671 vehicles were
parked during the 2 p.m. peak
hour.
The 20,000 vehicles mentioned
previously Include many of the
same ones. For instance, one
car made 18 entrances and 18
exits in the 12-hour period of
the traffic survey. Many others
made three or four trips during
the period.
The survey was conducted by
students stationed at 14 campus

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

As one sorority coed said, "It
took roe over an hour to take out
the garbage yesterday morning!
Parties begin almost spontan spontaneously
eously spontaneously whenever three or four
couples get together. Excitement
is plentiful within the friendly,
relaxed atmosphere near the pool.
Radios and stereos blare from al almost
most almost every room, and converti convertibles
bles convertibles and sports cars line the
drives.

entrances. The main campus study
was directed by Col Robert G.
Sherrard, civil defense coord coordinator
inator coordinator for the University; and the
Health Center survey director was
Howard King, assistant to the pro provost.
vost. provost.
Col. Sherrard noted that the most
heavily traveled entrance to the
campus is at the intersection of
Radio Road and SW 13th St., where
3,500 vehicles passed during the
12-hour period.
In the Health Center study, it
was found that the hospital en entrance
trance entrance rated as the primary traf traffic
fic traffic area, with 2,275 vehicles en entering
tering entering and leaving.
The North-South Drive and Uni University
versity University Ave. entrance was the
second busiest area on the main
campus with 3,000 vehicles while
the Center Drive and Archer Road
area ranked second at the Health
Center.
SUMMER GATOR
STAFF MEETING
There will be a mandatory
meeting of the summer Al Alligator
ligator Alligator Staff in Room 330 of
the New Florida Unioji 4:30
p.m. today.
Staffers must fill out W-2
forms for tax purposes, as
well as pick up forms for their
press cards, which will be
issued next week.
Any student interested in
working for the summer Ga Gator
tor Gator is urged to attend the
meeting.
SPECIAL
SUMMER
COURSES
BERKLEE
ickool mu&ic
SPECIAL CLASSES IN:
modern harmony arranging
improvisation stage bond
combo jazz workshop
PRIVATE INSTRUMENTAL
INSTRUCTION
REGULAR FACULTY IN
RESIDENCE INCLUDES:
John LaPorta Herb Pomeroy
Ray Santisi Al Dawson
Joe Viola Phil Wilson
ENTIRE SCHOOL IS AIR AIRCONDITIONED
CONDITIONED AIRCONDITIONED AND
HUMIDITY-CONTROLLED
For complete information write
now to:
Director of Summer Studies
BERKLEE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
1140 Boylston Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

Lack Os Brackets Close Library Floor!

ByNICKTATRO
Alligator Correspond- | t
Many shelves in the UF Research Library still await parts
ordered for last October because of the failure of the Esty
Corp., N.J., to meet shipment deadlines.
44 They have not provided us with brackets to assemble many
of the shelves and some of the carrell desks, said Margret
Goggin, Assistant Director .for Reader Research. Carrells are
the individual study sections allotted to graduate students.
We dont know when the brackets will arrive, she said,
but we cant get them elsewhere because we are bound by
contract. The brackets were due in October 1966 but were not
needed until December because of construction delays.
Floors affected by the lack of brackets are the third and sixth.
These shelves will contain books in Social Sciences and the
Humanities (300s and 900s). Carrells on the third floor also
cannot be used until the brackets arrive.
Visible progress has been made since finals, however. The
reference room is no longer cluttered with parts of furniture
and shelves. The rare books collection on the fifth floor and
the faculty classrooms on the fourth are in operation.
44 Plans for the future are in a rough state, she said. Goggin
would not comment on the effect Gov. Claude Kirks proposed
budget cuts would have on UF libraries until the Appropria Appropriations
tions Appropriations Committee (of the Fla. Legislature) has made a decision.
She did say that the UF needs around $2 million from the

Undergraduates Take Over Library

By CARLOS DAVILA
Alligator Correspondent
Since the opening of the new
Research Library, the old library
has taken on a new look and will
never be the same.
It will now be called the College
Library, the library for the un undergraduates.
dergraduates. undergraduates.
The books that will remain in
the College Library will be those
used mostly by undergraduates.
Also, the Latin American and Bus Business
iness Business Administration collections
will remain there.
Paint
Lessons
Begin
44 Paint for fun classes will
be held in the New Florida Union
beginning May 8, announced the
Florida Union Fine Arts Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
Fees are $6 per person which
covers six lessons scheduled for
May 8,9, 11, 15, 16 and 18.
Those interested can pre- register
In Room 315 of the old Florida
Union or call extension 2741.

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s£s&&%? y*' '^f f, *%v >-'
THAT FRANKLIN GIFL
Smooth and sleek, timely as tomorrow. She's ahead of the fashion pictureiin this MINI molded in
acetate knit. The color, Poppy Pink....the highlight, long tapered sleeves banded with a touch of
gold braid. You'll find this and numerous others at Franklin's
4 Bolley Shop*
BT/mawi im

Undergraduates will find things
more easily now, said Miss Fran Frances
ces Frances Parker, who is in charge of
Reserves and Circulation in the
College Library. She also said that
it would be to the benefit of
undergraduates to use the College
Library, because it will be simpler
for them.
The card catalog will be smaller
than the one in the Research Li Library,
brary, Library, and there wont be the
enormous amount of material found
in the Research Library.
The arrangement of the College

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ipEROSA |
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legislature to finish the Research library. The money would
be used to build a wing in back of the present building.
Even with the shelves up and the books moved over, we
would still be short of space, Goggin said, and this building
is filled to capacity already.
Books are still being stored in Century Tower, she said.
Little-used reference books such as telephone directories, gov government
ernment government documents and research sets are referred there.
Another of the problems is that we are trying to operate
two libraries with the same staff we operated one, she said.
Goggin cited lack of qualified staff as one of the major problems.
Low pay scales (an M.A. starts at 6,660 a year), opportunities
elsewhere and lack of fringe benefits were listed as reasons
staff was scarce.
She said that students now had access to all books and this
called for more shelving and records people. She added that in informing
forming informing students and faculty of where things are located is also
a problem.
The IBM machines used to check out books in the College
library could be a help in the future, Goggin said, but they
are still in the experimental stage. If they are economical, she
hinted an IBM 360 could be used as a master control over all
library units.
UFs total book collection ranks 35th in the U.S. of all public
and private libraries with over one million books according to
statistics from the Association of Research Libraries.

Library has been changed. The
University College Reading Room
has been divided, and the reserve
books have been put on the East
side of the room. It will be an
open area.
The student looking for a re reserve
serve reserve book can go in and check
it out for reading in the room.
The old Humanities room will
be used as a Humanities and
Science reference room, while the
Social Science Reading Room will
be used for Business Administra Administration
tion Administration references.

On the thrid floor will be found
the periodicals formerly scattered
all over the library. Maps will
also be found there.
The Browsing room will contain
the periodicals of the Latin Am American
erican American collection.

fcvoi KSWACCN OF AMmiCA. incJ
V
Do you earn too much to afford one?
For many people the Volkswagen would be an
ideal car. Except for one thing.
It doesn t cost enough.
They're afraid nobody will realize they have
any money, if it doesn't show in their car. In other
words, they buy their car for other people. Not
themselves.
Then there are those who earn enough to buy
a much better car than the VW. But they doa't.
Because they cant find one.
For them the best car is one thats simply com comfortable
fortable comfortable and economical. One they don't have to
worry about. That doesn't make many stops for
gas. And rarely needs repairs.
A car where the rare repairs dont cost a lot. A
car where the car doesn't cost a lot.
They feel they can afford to save money with a
Volkswagen.
... .^.? Xt t,me you see s m ebody driving a
VW don t feel sorry for him.
Who knows? Someday the bank might use his
money to give you a new car loan.
MILLER-BROWN A
MOTORS INC
4222 N.W. 13 St.. Ooincsville authorized
DEALER

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SUNSHINES...
get a summer
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workers to work as White Glove
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and were paying the highest rates
in our history. Stop in at your
Ideal Manpower office when you're
home on vacation and let us help
plan your summer schedule.
MANPOWER*
An Equal Opportunity Employer
gator ads sell
call univ ext 2832
--



Florida Utilities Expansion
Continues Through Summer

By JOHN MONKUS
Alligator Staff Writer
Construction work on campus
seems to have done more damage
to uF than the Air Force has
done to North Vietnam. But its
only temporary.
Power will be interupted

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Selected Groups Os Fine
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DRESSES
2 and 3 piece
COORDINA TES
Now "1 i O
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An opportunity to save on
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SELECTED GROUP 0 0
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Values to 10.00 _____
Odd and Ends Jewelry
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USE YOUR STUDENT CHARGE
one hour free parking on the huge lot at rear of store
siAwwM
225 w. university ave.
o{ Spo/itswea/i

throughout A term and more
ditches will be dug as the 2.75
million dollar expansion of elec electric,
tric, electric, steam, sewage and water lines
is completed.
Power will be interupted only
to a few buildings at a time this
summer while new high voltage

lines are connected underground.
The Poole Construction Company,
which is doing the work, will warr
the people affected whenever pi as asible,
ible, asible, especially where power is a
necessity. Trenqhes and ditches
will be dug which will interupt
streets one at a Itime as the dig digging
ging digging advances. Right now the steam
conduits are being' laid.
Warren T. Michael, the utilities
director of the Physical Plant
Division, said that the project is
about on schedule and he expects
that it will all be finished in Octo October.
ber. October. The digging is to be completed
in September.
*
Michael said that new power
lines are being laid and the new
substations will form a current
net. A current net uses the prin principle
ciple principle that if an area is over overloaded
loaded overloaded and its power is switcher*
off, it can be isolated from al
the other areas. This allows the
other areas to have power. Some
of the switching needed for this
system will be automatic, with
other manual.
Sewage and water lines for the
new buildings south and west of
the campus are being laid and the
capacities of the steam and sewage
treatment plants are being en enlarged.
larged. enlarged. The utilities department is
building for the future and they
know the sites of buildings that
wont be built until 1972.
Michael said that when new
buildings are built, they are sim simply
ply simply tacked on to the existing util utility
ity utility system until it is pushed to
its limits. That is why every
ten or so years the utilities have
to be expanded and this project
is one of those periodic updatings.

S'djmMMJhJ
ladies dept
mezzanine f I oor
-ti I
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THE SPOTLIGHT IS ON PANCE
Coolest news to hit the summer scene.
Comfy to wear this MINI dress with
shorts attached is all in one piece 111
Solids, Stripes, Flowered.
from 16.00
ditwmm
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wjg&o*KUKm*m^g^LMg£g' *-
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" M -~
ANOTHER TRENCH IN VIETNAM?
. . just a new steam line
Stinky Water Attracts
\

More Insects Than Sex
V i

XX) you find yourself being bit bitten
ten bitten by more mosquitoes and en enjoying
joying enjoying It less?
Well, It could be that stinky
water" you are using to attract
the opposite sex. Unfortunately,
all that is usually attracted is an
unwelcome Insect.

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

In recent years, researchers
have found that these obnoxious
pests like the smell of perfumes,
colognes, and after shave lotion.
i
Any person In good health, very
active, dark-skinned, warm skin skinned,
ned, skinned, or wearing dark clothing Is
also a prime target.
And dont breathe heavily. Ap Ap
Ap parently carbon dioxide attracts
them too.

Unfortunately most people are
not going to radically change them themselves
selves themselves to suit a pesky critter,
the best advice still seems to
be to SWAT EM!
THE GAINESVILLE
\ COMPACT
of Hie United Church of
Gainesville, Florida
i j
(Prepared by the members of
the church and accepted by the
congregation, June 19, 1966.)
We join as a spiritual commun community
ity community in this compact:
to worship God,
however, known,
to welcome into our church
those of differing under understanding
standing understanding and theological
opinibn,
to learn from our religious
heritage yet to grow by
seeking new dimensions of
truth,
to follow, even imperfectly,
the way of Jesus
jn personal involvement
with each other
...!
and strengthened by this bond
to act in Christian concern
for the welfare of oilmen.
THE UNITED CHURCH
OP- GAINESVILLE
11 V
to affiliated nationally witfi the
United Chutch as Christ,
the denomination which resulted
from the 1957 morse, as the
Consre national Church with the
Evenaelicol Cr Reformed Church.
Its Sunday services are held at
the Presbyterian Student Canter,
1402 W. University Ave.
| 9:45 Worship service
10:45 Coffee break
10:55 Seminars for adults and
Sunday School for children.
A
Rev. Kenneth Stokes, Ph D., pastor
Phone 378-3500

Page 11



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, I <#67

Page 12

Auditions Today
movie director will review
talent for Screen Gems

Outstanding young actors and actresses in
the University of Florida's Department of Speech
audition May 15 as part of a national talent
search.
The Florida Players were among theatre
groups throughout the nation elected by Screen
Gems, Inc., of Hollywood, Calif., as a source
for potential stars in a television series.
Preliminary auditions will be conducted from
3 to 6 p.m. today in Norman Hall Auditorium.
Anyone interested in auditioning may call Ext.
2671 on the University campus.
Eddie Foy 111, executive director of Screen
Gens* new talent program, will conduct the cam campus
pus campus auditions personally, according to Dr. Gil Gilbert
bert Gilbert N. Lazier, assistant professor of speech
and theatre and advisor to Florida Players
Labratory Theatre.
Foy was appointed talent executive for the

N£W HONORARY founded
Coed Leadership Limited

By GALE WOLLY
Alligator Correspondent
There is a limited area of
leadership for women on campus/*
said Dean Betty Cosby in discus discussing
sing discussing SAVANT-UF, the new wo women's
men's women's honorary organization on
the Florida Campus.
Dean Cosby explained that SA SAVANT
VANT SAVANT is purely a recognition
and service organization/' It is
made up of a group of girls who
have banded together to serve
the University in some way.
Much has been said concern concerning
ing concerning the effect SAVANT-UF may
have on Mortar Board. Dean
Cosby pointed out that Mortar
Board is principally an academ academic
ic academic organization a think group"
and that SAVANT is composed
of women leaders whose primary
interest lies in outside activities.
The suggestion of founding an another
other another woman's honorary on cam campus
pus campus has been debated for several
years. At the 1965 President's
Retreat, Florida Blue Key pro proposed
posed proposed such an organization whose
structure would be similar to its
own. The main opposition fell on
the politically orientated aspect of
this idea. Mortar Board, however,
Huge discounts
with the
International
Student ID Card
Air travel throughout Europe, Israel
at 60% less. Same huge savings on
accommodations, admissions, etc.
The ID Card is a must for every
traveling student.
The Official Student Guide
to Europe
Lists student hotels, restaurants,
discounts, local tours, and complete
routes, schedules, prices of student
flights, trains, etc. An essential com companion
panion companion to the ID Card. $1.95
Also
4-Day s3l Expo '67 Tour
Includes 4 nights accommodation, 4
breakfasts, 3 Expo passes, a French
dinner, and sightseeing tour of
Montreal.
U.S. National Student Assn., Dept. CP I
I 265 Madison Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10016 I
f Please send info on ID Card The
Official Guide (payment enclosed)
Details on Expo 67. a
H
g Name
I Address

J City State- j
a USNSA is nen-prefit far students.

is now looking favorably uqpon this
new group.
Any organization recognizing
outstanding students will be bene beneficial
ficial beneficial to the school. I would hope
that Mortar Board would cooperate
and help get them on their feet/*

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studio in February by Jackie Cooper, vice
president in charge of the television production
division of Screen Gems. He is visiting prin principal
cipal principal theatrical centers of the nation to scout
new talent.
At this time we wish to establish liaison
cooperation between drama departments of uni universities,
versities, universities, small theatre groups, and this com company,"
pany," company," Foy said. The purpose is to inaugurate
a plan to develop a coordinated relationship
that will enhance the future careers of those
young people over 18 who, in our opinion,
have an abundance of talent and potential dra dramatic
matic dramatic knowhow."
During his visit to the University of Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, Foy will meet and interview drama stu students
dents students and hold a number of regular auditions
for those interested in light comedy or medium
drama.

said Lee Ann Draud, past presi president
dent president of Mortar Board.
In Dean Cosby's opinion, these
girls are not going to need outside
aid. The members have proven
themselves both capable and re responsible.
sponsible. responsible.

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a
The Baptist Student Union will
have a picnic, SAT., MAY 6
at Juniper Springs. Trans Transportation
portation Transportation and lunch will be
furnished. There will be
swimming, hiking and games.
Cost is 50£ per person. We
will leave the BJS.U. promptly
at 8:30. Sign up at the B.S.U.
or call 372-4711 by noon
Friday.
Gator Ads Sel I

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9 3 Locations: 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 |jj
I 114 NW 34rh St. 372-3649 II 9
207 NE 16th Avo. 378-2959

SAYS CHAIRMAN OF MEDICINE

By ROLAND SCOTT
A'ligator Correspondent
No drug is completely harmless,
a UF physician contends.
Dr. Leighton E. Cluff, profes professor
sor professor and chairman of the Depart Department
ment Department of Medicine in the Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys College of Medicine, said
there is growing concern over the
present use and misuse of med medicines.
icines. medicines.
Even when taken in the pre prescribed
scribed prescribed manner, the potential risk
of taking more than one drug at
a time is obvious and should be
avoided, he said.

No Drug Is Harmless A

Dr. Cluff is a consultant to the
Food and Drug Administration.
He is also a member of the Coun Council
cil Council on Drugs of the American Med Medical
ical Medical Association, the National
Academy of Sciences Drug Re Research
search Research Board and the National Re Re
Re search Council.
The physician conducted a four
and a half year study on drug
reactions at Johns Hopkins Univer University,
sity, University, Baltimore, before coming to
Gainesville last year. He plans to
initiate similar drug studies at the
University of Florida.
Drugs, Dr. Cluff said, can cause
chemical reactions and allergies,
and can create diseases similar
to those naturally produced.
When anyone takes a pill there
is a possibility a chemical reac reaction
tion reaction will cause adverse effects,
Dr. Cluff said.
Most medications, he said, do not

have a specific bullet-like ef effec
fect effec that is the ability to attack
one certain problem.
An aspirin may cure a head headache
ache headache but that result is only one
of many chemical actions. It could
also cause irritation of the stomach
or other disturbances, he said.
Dr. Cluff said the only drugs
with somewhat of a bullet ef effect
fect effect are antibiotics.
Penicillin (an antibiotic) has
been called the magic bullet as
its action is directed almost ex exclusively
clusively exclusively to the germs intended.
But there still can be side
effects from penicillin.
Both overdosage and idio idiosyncrasy
syncrasy idiosyncrasy (a persons'peculiar re reaction
action reaction to drugs taken in normal
dosage) could result in serious
reactions, he said.
Drug reactions can affect every
system of the body.
Dr. Cluff, who was professor of
medicine at Johns Hopkins Uni University
versity University and head of its Division
of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
before coming here in June, 1966,
said the reasons for drug reac reactions
tions reactions are not entirely clear.
One of the most important
questions we face is why some
people have trouble with drugs and
others dont.
The Johns Hopkins study showed
that five per cent of the patients
admitted to the medical service
of the hospital were admitted be because
cause because of adverse reactions to med medicines,
icines, medicines, he said.
Adverse reactions, mostly
mild, were experienced by about
10 per cent of hospital patients,
said Dr. Cluff.
The study also showed a link
between the number of drugs taken
and the likelihood of ill effects.
We found that 50 per cent of the
patients who took over 10 drugs
during hospitalization had adverse
reactions.
But only 10 per cent of those
who took fewer than six different
drugs had adverse effects, Dr.
Cluff said.
Two drugs, he said, can produce
adverse reactions that would not
be created by either drug taken
alone.
He said doctors can control the
medicines taken by hospital pa patients
tients patients but have no way to control
persons not in the hospital.
Quiet
FRIGIDJURE
multi-room
cooling!
A-15K, ""El
15,000 BTU/hr (NEMA)
VOYLES VOYLESAPPLIANCE
APPLIANCE VOYLESAPPLIANCE
CENTFH
The Business That Service Built
419 N.W. Bth AVE.
Phone 372-5303

COLLEGEMASuR |
...from coast to coast the lec ir l
, "*- L f K-fff """7 n sa es * c U e g e men* I
IJC # REPRESENTATIVES 1
rViWgfe^ ** Mel Ward Paul DuFresne 1
Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Unly. Ave. 376-1208 |

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Storage of medicines on the
shelf is another problem, Dr.
Cluff said.
Many drugs have a shelf life*
and deteriorate after the expir expiration
ation expiration date of the drug, he said.
The Food and Drug Adminis Administration
tration Administration and the American Medical
Association, said Dr. Cluff, help
keep physicians informed of ad adverse
verse adverse drug reactions to help pre prevent
vent prevent them.
In addition, drug manufact manufacturers
urers manufacturers send out drug warnings to
every licensed physician in the
United States, he said.
Dr. Cluff also said the National
Academy of Sciences Drug lie liesearch
search liesearch Board is seeking new ways
to inform doctors of recent drug
developments.
Should drugs be found to cause
adverse reactions, a doctor in informed
formed informed of the ill effects would not
be likely to prescribe these drugs.
The most commonly misused
drugs, Dr. Cluff said, are lax laxatives,
atives, laxatives, pain-killers, cold reme remedies,
dies, remedies, salves, ointments and lotions.
Sedatives and tranquilizers
cause the greatest problems, he
said.
Many people get the idea that
if one pill works, two will do it
better, said Dr. Cluff.
It is important that the public
realize there are safety limits for
drugs.
A person never should exceed
the dosage prescribed or listed
on the label.
Under the category of allergic
reactions, Dr. Cluff said penicil penicillin
lin penicillin is the most frequent offender.
About 300 persons die in the
United States each year from al allergies
lergies allergies to penicillin, he said.
Chemical reactions, the physi physician
cian physician said, can be controlled by
reducing the drug dosage. Allergic
reactions can return if the prob problem
lem problem medicine is taken again.
Once a person develops an al allergy
lergy allergy to a drug, he never should
take the drug again, said Dr.
Cluff.
Allergic reactions can caus.'
meningitis, arthritis, kidney
trouble, rash, paralysis, pneu pneumonia
monia pneumonia and other distrubances, he
said.
However, only a small percent percentage
age percentage of allergic reactions are life lifethreatening,
threatening, lifethreatening, he added.
Two Professors
Explore Education
To help put a personal dim dimension
ension dimension in educating students, two
UF professors and their wives
have been named Danforth Founda Foundation
tion Foundation Associates.
Chosen were Dr. and Mrs. Wal Walter
ter Walter A. Rosenbaum and Dr. and Mrs.
Bruce E. Mathews. Dr. Rosenbaum
is associate professor of political
science and Dr. Mathews is as associate
sociate associate professor of electrical en engineering.
gineering. engineering.
During four-year terms, the
foundation provides the couples
with materials and encourages
them to explore higher education
in teaching. In doing this, the
Danforth Foundation helps the pro professor
fessor professor help his students.
The couples are provided by the
foundation with money which may
be i sed to entertain students and
to purchase books to help them
1 >:

Page 13



CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
REFRIGERATOR, COMPLETELY
REFINISHED. A-l condition $35.
Call 372-0083 or see at 1105 NW
4th Avenue. (A-133-3t-nc)
17 foot sailboat, perfect for family,
plywood-fiberglass construction,
good condition, ready to go,
$500.00. Phone 372-1962. (A-133-
4t-c)
BSA, 1963, 500 cc Twin, Sharp,
$595.00. Phone 378-1697 after 5
P.M. and weekends. (A-133-st-c)
1966 Suzuki, 150*, Absolutely per perfect
fect perfect condition. Only 14 months old
and 3,700 miles,s3so. also 1965
Suzuki 'so* only 2,500 miles and
$l5O. Like New, Phone 378-4944.
(A-135-It-nc)
FENDER SHOWMAN AMP (sngl)
with matching REVERB UNIT,
COVERS, tremendour R&RSound..
J. B. Lansing Speakers (15)...
EIGHT MONTHS OLD...NEW
PRICE SBSO. NEED $550.-CASH
CALL 372-2749 nights. (A-133-
3t-nc)
Old English Sheepdog, AKC, 10
months old, male, healthy, hand handsome
some handsome and loving. Excellent Eng English
lish English pedigree, championship lines.
$225. 376-9975. (A-134-lt-p)
For Sale: 1/2 carat emerald cut
diamond engagement and wedding
ring set, S3OO value, $l5O. 376-
9711 between 5-6 P.M. (A-134-
3t-c)
For Sale: Golf clubs, bag, cart.
Six irons, Two woods, $75.00 val value,
ue, value, S4O. Phone 376-9710 between
5 and 6 P.M. (A-134-3t-c)
For Sale: 10 xSO Trailer with
10 x 30 insulated redwood cabana,
central a/c, Call 376-0283 or see
at #l3 Glynwood Trailer Park.
(A-134- 5t- c)
SRV7C
"DELIGHTFUL AND
UNUSUAL. A COMEDY
OF THE GRANDEST
SORT!* Crowther. N V Times 1
\m V
A PLEASURE TO WATCH
-A PLEASURE TO
RECOMMEND!"
Archer Wmsten, New York Post
V V"MARVELOUS!"
"MARVELOUS!" V"MARVELOUS!"
William WoH, Cue Magazine
1-3-5-7-9

(ii 1 2:55 3:05
flj 5:15-7:30 m &2
' and 9:40 W

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

k .1
for sale
1966 Yamaha 250 cc Big Bear
Scrambler with Bell helmet. Like
new. $495. Come and see it. Call
376-3679. (A-134-lt-p)
For Sale Poloron Hummingbird
Boat. SSO. Phone 378-6634. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 3t-p)
New and used furniture AND An Antiques.
tiques. Antiques. Huguleys Furniture Barn,
214 NE 16th Avenue. Open Sun Sunday's
day's Sunday's from one to five. Regular
hours: 9:30 thru 6:30 P.M. (A (A---134-lOt-c)
--134-lOt-c) (A---134-lOt-c)

i| I l|J|M B
M 8 PIV" g i
M SHOWN AT |W{i
M 8.42 &. 12:44 f.
MATURE K
m michaei mine. ALHE m
m muwne m m
ygasa-gj Me
Kk NEXT WEEK 1
VANESSA REDGRAVE
GENERAL
jNfINCY KWfIN B9BC#/ |
J
I AMERK^AN^NTERNATIONAL
fS A i 10 35 O NLY-" AT 12*10 O NJI Y IBflfe

for sale
1963 Vespa scooter 125 cc, W Wshield,
shield, Wshield, buddy seat, spare tire and
tube. New tune up, good condition,
$125. 372-7123. (A-134-3t-p)
Sophisticated S6OO stereo in very
good condition. Must sell soon.
$195. 378-6963. (A-134-st-C)
Greeks! Your house cansave mon money.
ey. money. Reduce food cost with your
own meat grinder and meat si leer.
372-5240. (A-134- 3t-C)

Downtown Gainesville j 1
/ WrSTWTTTWWTWTWm.
IfllflJlTl Sat. Sun. 2:00-4:10-7:15-9:25
| 233 VV. (/ii/versify 4v Mon ttrU Frl 2:00-7:15-9:25
ONLY A FEW
MORE DAYS
£& DON T
JQkf MISS IT!
P* WINNER OF 6 ACADEMY
. AWARDS INCLUDING
BEST PICTURE
:G|jypi OF THE YEAR!
..
A MAN
FOR ALL
SEASONS I
NOW YOU CAN SEE IT! oooooooooooooooooooooocoooooooodooo
THE WORLD-ACCLAIMED §l^P C K I N G C H Ajg^ll
RECORD-BREAKING § PTj in JJJI §
> EXPLOSIVE FILM 81H k 3 k J |
THAT HAS PROVOKED § r I
MORE EXCITEMENT AND miMiiiiiM 8
TRIGGERED MORE TALK o
j i rr^B n jwwi'%
*££ t^^^BUBWIIC
and Slbert
, |fim 1 m |



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for rent |
Furnished room, private home,
central air conditioned, Male Stu Student,
dent, Student, 3820 NW 17 Terr. Phone
376-4478 $40.00/month (B-133-
2t-c)
Looking for reasonable off campus
living? See the Cooperative Living
Organization, lblock from campus,
3 meals per day, comfortable, low
cost living. Room and Board S6O/
month. Summer or fall. Inquire
117 NW 15th St. or call 376-6203.
(B-133-4t- c)
One minute walk to campus, pri private
vate private air conditioned room in four
bedroom duplex apartment. Kent
|May 1 to August 31. Phone 376-
13211 ext. 5453, Harry or leave
Message. (B-133-2t-c)
Air conditioned double room for
men. Private entrance and bath,
refrigerator. Three blocks from
campus. 327 N. W. 15th Terr.
Phone 372-8929 after 3:30 P.M.
(B-134-3t-c)
Two and Three bedroom furnished
apartments. Each with living room,
dining room, kitchen combinations.
Private bath and entrance. Lights
land water furnished. Four blocks
[from campus. $75 and SIOO per
month. Phone 372-9704 or 378-
5811. (B- 134-ts-c)
[Comfortable and convenient suite
[of rooms. Suitable for two peo people,
ple, people, across from campus, aircon-
Iditioned, television. Apply 321 SW
|l 3th Street. No Car Needed. (B (B---11
--11- (B---11 lt-c)
Large bedroom, near University
Iwith private bath. Phone 376-
0404. (B-134- 5t- c)
toR RENT: Single Room for rent,
1714 N. W. 3rd Place. Phone:
172-8227. (B-134-lt-c)

\ )r
I Ik
' B t f %t;
fff#V S^B
I And discover a Career
I in Nursing
I at
I TOURO INFIRMARY
I NEW ORLEANS, LA. 70115
I Write:
I Sally R. Fenton, R.N., for Details
I YOUR NAME __
I address:
GRADUATION DATE

for rent
Garage Parking, three blocks from
campus, $lO per month. Call 378-
3291 or 372-8840. (B-134-lOt-c)
DESIRABLE 2-ROOM SUITE with
kitchenette for men. Utilities furn furnished
ished furnished private entrance, Quiet. 311
NW 15th Terrace. 376-2072. (B (B---134-lt-c;
--134-lt-c; (B---134-lt-c;
Air conditioned apartment, three
blocks from campus, $65 per
month. All utilities paid except gas
for cooking. Phone 372-8840 or
378-3291. (B-134-ts-c)
wanted
One male roommate needed to
share two bedroom apartment for
the summer term. Air conditioned
and pool. Summit House. Call
378-3502. (C- 134-3 t-c)
Cash for your 8 wide house trail trailer
er trailer for young couple. SI,OOO to
$1,500. Phone 376-0522 % (C-134-
lt-c)
ROOMMATE spacious one bed bedroom
room bedroom house. Quiet neighborhood.
Call Steve 378-3977. (C-134-lt-c)
Roommate upper division or
graduate male, to share Apt. 206
at Olympia, 1100 SW Bth Ave.
SSO per month. 376-0537. (C (C---134-lt-C)
--134-lt-C) (C---134-lt-C)
Graduate student wanted to share
large modern apartment with three
other male students. Air condition conditioning,
ing, conditioning, S3O month, one block from
campus. Call 372-7805, 131(f NW
First Avenue. (C-134-lt-p)
Wanted roommate to share large
seven room house, $35.00 per
month, utilities included, l/2 block
from campus. Phone 378-4790.
(C-134-2t-c)

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

wanted
Male roommate wanted to share
modern one bedroom, air
conditioned apartment at Summit
House, 1700 SW 16th Court, be behind
hind behind new VA Hospital. Phone 378-
6848 or 372-3572, Apt. D-25. (C (C---133-4t-c)
--133-4t-c) (C---133-4t-c)
help wanted
PART TIME HELP WANTED:
Work your own hours, two to six
evenings per week. Must be able
to lead other students. 372-2730
evenings. (E-133-2t-c)
Part time waitress wanted for work
noon hours. 11:30 thru 2:30 P.M.
No experience necessary good
hourly pay. Apply Kings Food Host,
1430 SW 13th Street. (E-134-3t-c)
Full time waitress Wanted. Even Evenings,
ings, Evenings, 5 nights a week, good hourly
pay, no experience necessary.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1430 SW
13th Street. (E-134-3t-c)
LISTENERS WANTED Will pay
$2.00 for 1 hour listening session.
Must have good hearing and be
native English speaking. Please
contact Miss Nolin, Ext. 2307 Com Communications
munications Communications Science ANNEX for
Appointment. (E-133-4t-c)
situations
wanted
Babysitting Loving care for
your child in my home, day or
night. Experienced mother, fenced
yard. 378-5003. (F-134-10t-C)
autos
Dependable transportationl9ss
Plymouth in good shape, New bat battery,
tery, battery, etc. Complete with .38 cal caliber
iber caliber bullet hole in right side, good
tires. $125. See car at Billys
Shell Station Near Gatorland. (G (G---133-3t-c)
--133-3t-c) (G---133-3t-c)
1960 Ford, 4 door sedan, 6 cyl.
one owner, S3OO. Phone 372-8553.
(G-134-3t-c)
1964 Impala Super Sport Conver Convertible,
tible,- Convertible, light green, beige top, 4
barrel, 327 hp, air conditioned,
automatic transmission, power
steering and brakes, $1,500. Call
Mrs. John Wilcox, ext. 5117 Health
Center before 5 P.M. (G-134-2t (G-134-2tc)
c) (G-134-2tc)
personal
EUROPE -- $325 Flight-in NY-
London-Round Trip-June 26 Sep September
tember September 13 (Flexible). Students,
faculty, staff, relatives. Dick Ma Matherly,
therly, Matherly, 378-1965. (J-134-3t-c)
WANTED: A few hundred more
students to enjoy Spudnuts--the
bigger donut thats better. THE
SPUDNUT DONUTSHOP 1017 West
University Avenue, Open til mid midnight.
night. midnight. (J-l 34-lot-c)
ACTING CAREERDue to the vast
expansion of television theatre
productions and the motion picture
industry, Hollywood and Broadway
are opening their doors wider and
wider to fresh new talent in the
fields of drama, music, dancing
and modeling. Interested? WRITE:
THE ARTISTS ASSOCIATES, 8050
SOUTH MAIN HOUSTON,* TEXAS
77025. (J-133-2t-c)

Page 15

services
CARPET colors looking dim?
Bring em back--give em vim.
Use Blue Luster! Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture
Co. (M-134-lt-c)
TYPING Expert, quick service.
Very Reasonable rates, Remington
Standard Electric Typewriter.
Phone 372-7722. (M-133-st-c)
ALTERATIONS of all kinds on
mens and women's clothing. Mrs
Dora Mannokian, 35 years of ex experience,
perience, experience, 24 hours service on
R.O.T.C. Uniforms. Phone 376-
1794, or see at 1824 NW First
Avenue. (M-134-st-c)

PEOPLE ON
LIST

Marice Sothern
Mary Sperry
Linda Dinunddie
Carol Riley
Pat ODonoghue
Eric Kangras
Linda Hamn
Beth Wilson
Jim White
Eugene Brooks
John Charles Dodd
Natalie Sabak
Glenn Thompson
Dave Reddick
Mac Stein
Larry Williamson
Paula Seiler
Diana Cole
Donna Klendt
0 i
Marcia Dugan
Michael Thursky
R. Lynn Kirk
Andrea Patterson
Dick Afexnader
Gerald Fry
Ronald Henry
Dennis O'Connor
Jay Lynn Smith

May Pick Up Your 1967 Seminole
Today and
Monday
Rm. 9, Old Florida Union
AND
Thurs. May 11
and
Fri., May 12,
Rm. 330, New Florida Union

GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
DEADLINES FOR THE
SUMMER TERM ARE:
TUESDAYS PAPER:
Fri., 5 p.m.
FRIDAYS
Tues., 5 p.m.
CALL UNIV. EX:
2832

William Brown Jr.
Michael Morang
Paul Mott
Patrick Borthwicks
Michael Bordon
Lynda Scott
Dorthy Kane
Ethel Kuchheimer
Myriam Cumbie
Jerry Windle
Peter Til son
George Jones Jr.
Andrea Dickson
John Smith Jr.
Linda Kruse
Ceciala Vazquez
Shartyi Hillman
Sandy Smith
Mary Gordom
Jay Gildersleeve
Bobbie Kampschultz
Sandra Lee
Bill Bridges
Hank Schneider
Betty Veldhues
John Calnon
Gray Laney
Bill BLue



16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

Orange a d

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Friday, May 5
Baseball: Fla. vs. Tennessee, Perry Field, 3 p.m.
Saturday, May 6
6 1
X
Gator Sailing Club: meeting-training program, Lake
Wauburg, for transportation meet in front of the
old Fla. Union at 10:00 a.m. Everyone welcome.
UF Track: Fla. Invitational, 2:00 p.m.
Baseball: Fla. vs. Tennessee, Perry Field, 2:00 p.m.

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM: A memor memorandum
andum memorandum regarding the implementation of the Faculty
Development Program for 1967-68 has been sent
to all Deans, Directors and Department Chairmen,
interested faculty members should read the instruc instructions
tions instructions and prepare proposals for these grants as
soon as possible. The deadline for nominations by
the various University units is June 1, 1967. Grants
will be announced by the University Selection Com Committee
mittee Committee by June 15, 1967.

u. need a different car?
Rates 6 *' V CONTACT MRS. LOUISE HINTON TREASURER # Auto Loans
On ' l\ GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Specialty
\ Serving U of F Employees Since 1935
THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE

Florida Union Administrative Of Offices
fices Offices including Reservations
have moved to the new building.
Student Government Offices and
the Program Office will operate
this week in the old building and
will move at the end of the week.

Administrative Notices
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar
0

Movie: Comedy of Terrors, MSB Aud., 7:00 &
8:45 p.m.
Baptist Student Union: Planning Picnic, Juniper
Springs, leave B.S.U. at 8:30 a.m. Everyone in interested
terested interested invited.
Sunday, May 7
Senior Recital: Leah Russell, flute, Univ. Aud.,
4:00 p.m.

General Notices

Located in the old building:
General Office ext. 3180
Information Desk 2021
Program Office 2741
Mr. William Cross 2743
Barber Shop
PEACE CORPS TEST: Peace Corps Placement Test
will be held on Saturday, May 20, at 1:30 p.m. in
the new Federal Building (in downtown post office).
Prior to takng the test, Peace Corps applications
may be picked up at the International Center south
of Walker Auditorium.

ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES: All notices for
the Orange & Blue Bulletin must be received by
noon two days prior to publication. Deadlines are
Friday for Tuesday publication, Wednesday for Fri Friday
day Friday publication. Notices should be typed and signed
by the person submitting the notice and sent to the
Division of Informational Services, Building H, Cam Campus.
pus. Campus. Items for the Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office, Florida Union.
Â¥**W
to
FLORIDA PLAYERS AUDITIONS: Preliminary aud auditions
itions auditions will be held Friday, May 5, from 3-6 p.m.,
in Norman Hall Auditorium for Screen Gems talent
search on the University campus. Final auditions
will be held May 15.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Monday, May 8
Painting for Fun, 118 Union, 7:15 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets go on sale
Monday, May 8 for Ferrante & Teicher. Tickets
are $2.00, $1.50 and SI.OO.
Fla. Cinema Society, season tickets SI.OO.

Located in the new buildings:
Union Offices ext. 2951,
2952, 2953
Arts and Crafts 2084, 2085
Business Offices 3481
Cafeteria and
Food Service 3405, 3046
Cashier and Guest Desk 3486
Maintenance 2081, 2082
Public Functions Office 3484,
3485
Reservations 3482

NO BELLS OR CLOCKS: The entire campus is
without a class bell system and without clocks for
the summer. The Physical Plant Division is in the
process of converting to the new electrical distri distribution
bution distribution system. The bell system and most of the
clocks cannot be adjusted manually, therefore they
have been deactivated. The Century Tower carillon
will continue to chime on the quarter hour. The
class bell system and clocks should be back in
operation by the fall quarter.



"
DINE AT THE L&W CAFETERIA
CHOOSE FROM A WIDE SELECTION OF TOP
QUALITY MEATS, FISH AND POULTRY POULTRYFEATURING
FEATURING POULTRYFEATURING DAILY A 49$ ENTREE. TRY OUR
FRESH GARDEN VEGETABLES, DELICIOUS
HOME-MADE PASTRIES. GREAT FOOD,
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE, LESS COST!
SELF-SERVICE
DOWNTOWN LOCATION
I
313 W. UNIVERSITY
Half block west of Florida
Theatre a short walk from
campus.

.
Summervacationitis.
(How to spot and get rid of)
c
There's no sparkle in those baby-blue
llav a eyes. It's been knocked out by all those
vf n7 exams. Get that vitality back. See what
Fluorescent fade-out. vl_ ;r good js sti }| | e ft in the world. Go to
That's from being cooped up all winter. V Expo 67, Montreal.
What you need for that sallow pallor
is some sunshine Vitamin D. There's a X^Knf[
whole lot of it available at Sunset
/ They're letters from good buddies
The good books. i7j|H / .Racquet squad.
They have the possibility of being fflrk ij| II I / That's the tennis team in your
good symptoms. That's if you 111 \/ neighborhood during the summer,
seek summer scholastics. Say in 1 (I| I[l[| Slf Jr' You'd find snorkelihg or scuba diving
Mexico City. Or Acapulco. 1 J in the Bahamas would make playing
uniform you wore all semester. P- jttiluYill LT Down
Get rid of those o.d.'s (olive drabs'. ( \f TOll.lll'H That s all you e known summer
Break out the white levis. And throw on \ 1 J alter summer. A change of potato
a colorful Mexican serape. \/ V \ would do you good In Bermuda a
o \ / ijl\ few savory morsels ot Hopping John
Vs I I with a sauce of Paw-Paw Montespan
FI
EASTERN
Note: If symptoms get worse, see your travel agent or call Eastern.
i,....

TONIGHT'S SPECIAL
Delicious
PERCH 58C
with french fries
OR
Smothered
Salisbury
STEAK 49<
with white rice
SATURDAY SPECIALS
T-Bone qo >
STEAK
with french fries
Tasty
BEEF & 48<
MACRONI

Florida Legislature
Has Many UF Grads

By BILL DOUTHAT
Asst. Managing Ed.
Floridas state legislators who
have attended the I7Fl 7 F form a strong
minority in both the Senate and
the Houise. Almost one-third of
all members are former UF stu students.
dents. students.
Sixteen of the Senates 48 mem members
bers members have attended the UF, but
only eight left with degrees. Four
majored in law, three in business
administration and one in liberal
arts.
In the house, 36 members at attended
tended attended the UF, with 21 receiving
degrees. Thirteen of the House
Alumni majored in business ad administration,
ministration, administration, six in law and two
in arts and sciences.
The legislators attended from
1925 to as recent as 1964. Sen Senate
ate Senate President Verle Pope,St. Aug Augustine,
ustine, Augustine, attended the UF in 1925
while Richard Bird, House Re-

Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

publican, got a law degree in
1964.
Ralph Turlington, the current
speaker of the House, received a
degree in business administration
in 1942. While at UF, he was
business manager for the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator and a member of Florida
Blue Key. After graduating from
Harvards graduate school of bus business,
iness, business, Turlington taught in the
UFs college of business admin administration.
istration. administration.
Sen. J. Emory (Red) Cross,also
from Gainesville, received his de degree
gree degree in business administration in
1945. During the summer of 1945,
Cross served as president of the
student body.
Another former student body
president, Rep. Terrell Sessums,
Tampa, graduated in 1952.
Other ex-students of the UF
are as follows:
House
Paul Danahy (Tampa), Charles
Davis (Orlando), Murray H. Dub Dubbin
bin Dubbin (Miami), Thomas Gallen (Brad (Bradenton),
enton), (Bradenton), E. C. Rowell (Wildwood),
Robert Mann (Tampa). James Red Redman
man Redman (Plant City), Guy Spicola
(Tampa), Clifford McNulty (Mel (Melbourne),
bourne), (Melbourne), Donald Reed Jr. (Boca
Raton), William James (Delray
Beach), Richard Pettigrew (Mi (Miami),
ami), (Miami), John Wayne Mixon (Mari (Marianna),
anna), (Marianna), Donald Tucker (Crawford (Crawfordville),
ville), (Crawfordville), Eugene Shaw (Starke), Dan
Scarborough (Jacksonville),
George Stallings (Jacksonville), F.
H. Schultz (Jacksonville), R. John
Crider (Jacksonville), A.T. Alva Alvarez
rez Alvarez (Jacksonville), Gifford Grange
Sr. (Jacksonville), S. Gordon Bla Blaluck
luck Blaluck (Jacksonville), William Chap Chappell
pell Chappell (Ocala), Donald Nichols (Jack (Jacksonville),
sonville), (Jacksonville), Joseph Kennedy (Jack (Jacksonville),
sonville), (Jacksonville), Henry Land (Tangerine),
John Savage (Ft. Myers), A.S.
(Jim) Robinson (St. Petersburg),
Raymond Mattox (Winter Haven),
Bill Andrews (Gainesville), James
Beck (Platka), A.H. (Gus) Craig
Jr. (St. Augustine).
MR. PRESIDENT:
STOP THE BOMB BOMBING.
ING. BOMBING. ..END THE
WAR.
Respect for that of God in
all persons has led Quakers
for more than 3 centuries to
denounce wars and to work for
peace. The murder of a human
being is simply murder, even
if it is required by ones gov government.
ernment. government. Quakers in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville oppose the cruel war con conducted
ducted conducted by our government and
people against the government
and people of North Vietnam.
For purposes of meditation and
articulation of their peace tes testimony,
timony, testimony, local Quakers are con conducting
ducting conducting a Vigil for Peace on
Saturday and Sunday, May 6
and 7th, at the Friends Meeting
House, 1921 N. W. 2nd Ave.
May 6, Saturday
11 a.m. Panel of Veterans for
Peace Now
4 p.m. Lecture: The Roots
and Ramifications of the
Peace Testimony
8 p.m. A Happening and Folk Folksing
sing Folksing
Midnight and After Discus Discussion:
sion: Discussion: The Moral Responsi Responsibility
bility Responsibility of the American Anti-
War Movement*
May 7, Sunday
"Vrir
9:30 a.m. Panel: MY Kind
of Pacifism
11 a.m. Silent Meeting for
Worship
Refreshments available
throughout the 24-hour period.
All are welcome to join in si silence
lence silence and in discussion.

Page 17



1 jjjjp B^jfiF
* . f&*' I
* 'll # '9HHHHHHBHBH9Hp.
GARY KELLER DRAFTED BY NBA
. . sixth round choice
Athletes Compile Best
Grade Averages Ever

UF football and basketball play players
ers players have compiled the best tri trimester
mester trimester averages in the schools
history, Director of Athletics Ray
Graves announced Wednesday.
Counting every boy on football
scholarship during the just-con just-concluded
cluded just-concluded winter trimester the over overall
all overall honor-point average of the
squad was 2.30. No Florida grid gridders
ders gridders ran into academic ineligi ineligibility.
bility. ineligibility.
Coach Tommy Bartletts bas basketball
ketball basketball team also came through in
record academic fashion with the
entire squad recording an aver average
age average of 2.75. Setting the pace for
the cagers were senior Edd Poore
(3.60) and sophomore Andy Owens
(3.16).
Lowest average on the entire
basketball team was a most re respective
spective respective 2.24.
There were 18 football players
whose average exceeded 3.00. Top
freshman was linebacker Wayne
Compton (3.50).
Top sophomore was defensive
back BUI Mcride (3.50).
Best junior was tight end Jack
Coons (3.28) and the highest av average
erage average among seniors was record recorded

1^
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ed recorded by defensive guard Ed Warner
(3.60).
This is the finest academic
trimester weve yet had, says
Graves. Its a tribute to the cal calibre
ibre calibre of boys weve had, to their
work, the concentration on your
recruiting program and the ef efforts
forts efforts of people like Dr. Ed Moore,
who has worked closely with
our athletes.

It's simply e matter
of economies ...
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SPORTS BRIEFS
By Bill Douthat
Assistant Managing Ed'^r
~The UF baseball team will meet
Tennessee Friday and Saturday
hoping to recoup from the 4-2
setback suffered against Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville University Tuesday.
The slamming Gators will host
Tennessee Friday at 3 p.m. and
at a double header Saturday be beginning
ginning beginning at 10 a.m.
Florida, sporting a 19-5 season,
will duel for the SEC title in
this last important series.
Auburn is currently leading the
SEC scramble by one game over
UF. Auburn must beat Georgia
at home this weekend to wrap up
the eastern division title.
TRAPP TOP HITTER
Richard Trapp, who doubles as
flankerback and top hitter, depend depending
ing depending on the season, is well on his
v/ay to becoming the first Gator
ever to make both first team SEC
in football and baseball.
Trapp is the leading hitter among
Florida regulars with a .321 aver average
age average on 25 hits in 78 times at
bat, despite a months moratorium
with mononucleosis.
He is one of the finest pro probaseball
baseball probaseball prospects Ive ever had,
said Gator baseball coach Dave
Fuller.

SPORTS

Page 18

(, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

Gary Keller, 6-9 UF forward,
was drafted by the Los Angeles
Lakers Wednesday, but said he
will wait and see what they
have to offer.
Any offer would have to be
commensurate with the business

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3 BIG LOCATIONS
1605 SW 13th ST. 16th DRUGS
12 WEST UNIV. AVE. GRESHAM'S
1522 NW 13th ST. 13th PHARMACY
good May 5, 6 & 7.

PISTONS DRAFT KELLER

world, with whatever business op opportunities
portunities opportunities I may have.
Keller,* who was earlier drafted
by the Denver Pistons, starred
at Dixie Hollins High School at
St. Petersburg.



Gators Sign JC Cager

The UF has signed Robert Agee,
Tennessee prep basketball star,
Gator basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett announced this week.
Agee, a 6-5, 225 pounder will
forego his final year of junior
college to transfer to Florida which
will make him ineligible next fall.
Agee averaged 17.1 points per
games for Marion Institute last
year and 13.2 rebounds. He was
first noticed by Bartlett, who was

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GYM CLOTHES FOR MEN & WOMEN

FOR MEN
* Shorts
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* Supporters
* Sweat Pants
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* Shoes by
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impressed with his shooting and
rebounding abilities.
Agee brings to four the new
signees which include Skip Lewis
of Jacksonville, Jeff Miller of Can Canton,
ton, Canton, Ohio, and Mike Leatherwood
of Pensacola. Bartlett who indi indicated
cated indicated that more signees would be
announced in the near future said,
I am most encouraged about the
results thus far and indications
say we are getting on several
potential signees."

FOR WOMEN
* Bermudas
* Jamaicas
* Shirts
* Socks
* Sweat Pants
* Sweat Shirts
* Shoes by
Converse
Keds
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HAND BALLS
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JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
Northcentrol FJorMo'l Sportiof Goo* Htodawo*trs
tits am One Block Off

TENNIS EQUIPMENT
* Balls by Pennsylvania
Tre-Tom & Slazenger
* Rackets
* Covers
* Presses
Short s
(men & women)
* Shoes
(men & women)
* Ladies Skirts
* Ladies Shirts V

RACKET
RESTRINGING

1 '"l '" dfcf
GATOR RALLY FALLS SHORT AGAINST JU
. . Pitcher David Kahn hits into double play
GATORS FAVORED FOR SEC TITLE
Tennis, Golf Playoffs Here

UF will host the SEC Tennis
and Golf Championships here May
11, 12, and 13.
Defending champions Tennessee
will be the favorite along with
Florida and Mississippi State in
the tennis competition.
The golf tournament is slated

Harlan Signs Top
Swimming Propects
Coach Bill Harlan has signed live top swimmers for next
years Gator team. The UF squad has dominated SEC compe competition
tition competition for the past 12 years.
Harlan said that Bruce Williams of Eustis, a student at St.
Andrews Prep in Boca Raton heads a list of impressive signees.
Williams is the blue chip swimmer in the State of Florida,
says Harlan. He is a great prospect in many events.*
Joining Williams are Jim Murphy of Winter Park High School,
a standout 50 and 100 meter freestyler who was national age
group champion two years ago in his events.
Others in the Gator fold are diver Bob Link of Roswell, New
Mexico, sprinter Kim Bolton of Overland Park, Kansas and Mitchell
Roffer of Yonker, New York, outstanding butterflyer and individual
medley star.

4M*

for May 12 and May 13. Georgia,
Florida and defending champion
LJS.U. will share the favorites
role.
SEC A.M. Tonto Coleman and
Floridas President Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz will be the honorable ref referees
erees referees for the tournaments.

Gator Ads:

dtiSjk
OF
k class ring
\ Now Available off-campus
I A college degree is an earned asset
I worthy of pride. Wear your achievs-
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Friday, May 5, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Included in the two tournaments
will be: Alabama, Auburn, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, L.S.U., Mis Mississippi,
sissippi, Mississippi, Mississippi State, Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee and Vanderbilt.
Over 100 athletes will compete
in the two tournaments.

Run For Fun
At Invitational
During the Florida Invitational
track meet being held this Satur Saturday
day Saturday on the Florida track, there
will be a timed run set up for
anyone who wants to compete.
Florida track coach Jimmy
Carnes urges anyone who wants
to participate to be at the track
at 1:45 p.m.
Each contestant will quote a time
he will run in the mile, before
the race, the one nearest to run running
ning running the mile in the time quoted
wilL be the winner. It doesn't
matter whether you run the mile
in 5 minutes or 15.
Carnes said he has already had
several members of the local
Gainesville Joggers Club indicate
they would run.

Page 19



Page 20

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 5, 1967

BASKETBALL TEAM
Miller Chosen Captain

I
David Miller, a senior from
Delray Beach will captain UFs
basketball team next season*
The lanky 6*5 guard was the
second leading scorer for the Ga-
Track Team
Hotels Meet
Saturday
The UF track team will host its
final home meet here this Saturday
at 1:30 p.m.
Ibe Gators will hold the UF,
Invitational which will include
Florida State, Miami, Miami-Dade
Junior College and Manatee Junior
College.
The Gators who are undefeated
this season will be heavily favored
in the meet.
Led by high jumper Frank Saier
and distance star Frank Lagotic
the Gators will be in their last
home meet before traveling to
Knoxville, Tenn., to take part in
the SEC meet May 12-12. Florida
and Tennessee are co-favorites
to win the SEC title.
A TERM SERVICES
c
FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES
7 P.M.
SATURDAY
MORNING SERVICES
10 A.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
16 NW 18th STREET

CrOSSWOrd by Robert Rowe

1 Flower loaf.
6 Hecuba's son.
11 Pass.
16 Trouble.
21 Harangue.
22 Marble.
23 ('heap
street show.
24 Uncanny.
25 Visages.
26 Doctrine.
27 delated on
mother's side.
28 Confuse.
29 Petition.
30 Contaminate.
32 Steinbecks
"The Way Wayward
ward Wayward
34 Danish
trumpet.
36 Birthday:
Jan. 19.
37 Genuine.
39 Pithy remark.
40 Adhesive.
42 Stubbornly
contrary.
44 Yawns.
46 Food staple.
47 Behold!
49 Assembly.
50 Stage settings.

1 To this point.
2 Rub out.
3 Vacationer's
bargain.
4 Goddess of
infatuation.
5 For fear that.
6 Local dialect.
7 Representa Representative.
tive. Representative.
8 Declaim
wildly.
9 Follower: suff.
10 Reversal.
11 Wave top.
12 Operated.
13 Spoken.
14 Treat: si.
15 Become
very angry.
16 Legume.
17 Memorable:
comp.

PUZZLE ...

52 Nonsense: si.
53 Be concerned.
55 Complete.
59 Change.
60 Stinging
inst*ct.
61 Inventors
right.
63 Evil spirit.
64 Nation in
S.E. Asia.
65 Portray by
gestures.
67 Flaxen.
69 Fit of anger.
70 Australian
ostrich.
71 Novel Shoe
the Wild
72 Electrified
particle.
73 Black eye: si.
76 Precious
stone.
77 Germinates.
79 Come in.
81 Fruit sherbet.
82 Each of all.
84 Wrath.
85 Fixed price.
86 Cyma.
88 Australasian
pepper.

18 Command.
19 City in Ohio.
20 Farm fowls.
31 Singer
Nancy .
33 Employ.
35 New York
canal.
38 Bowling
alleys.
40 Locate
precisely.
41 Fills with joy.
43 Sell.
45 For each.
46 Oxidize.
48 Danish coin.
50 Some are
bargains.
51 Fastening
device.
52 Cause of
harm.
f

tors this past season with a 13.8
average. Miller, whose speciality
is a long jump shot helped lead
the Gators to a 21-4 record, their
best ever.
I V
m
DAVID MILLER
. .hard worker

EMcDAVIDS
BARBER SHOP
and
SHOE REPAIR
Come In and Meet Gary.
The Youngest and Fastest
Shoemaker in the Country.
HEELS & SOLES IN 10 MIN
MEN'S HEELS 98$ l/2 SOLES $2.49
WOMEN'S HEELS 49$ 59$ l/2 SOLES $1.79
across from the dorms on the 'Gold Coast

Across

89 Songstress
Reese.
92 Roman
bronze.
93 Ear parts.
95 General
Procedure,
'em. name.
100 Shelves.
103 Backet.
104 Infatuated:
coll.
105 And not.
106 Makes fun
of: si.
108 Grassy
meadow.
109 Formerly.
112
statesman.
113 Slip away.
115 Splinter.
117 Wander
about.
118 Melodies.
119 Peons shawl.
121 Actress
Adams.
122 Sheep disease.
123 Bead.
124 Torn place.
126 Forward.
127 Debauchee.

Down

53 Eccentric
wheel.
54 Tempt.
55 Likeness.
57 deceived
0.k.: si.
58 Foe.
60 Armed
conflicts.
61 Long for.
62 Quality of
sound.
65 Head.
66 Tourist court.
68 You and I.
71 Type of arch.
74 Hastens.
75 Medley of
songs and
dances.
78 Lubricate. ;'
79 Comfort.
80 Large thrush.

128 Smallest
amount.
129 Police trap for
criminals.
133 Advantages.
135 Indian weight.
136 Actual being:
Lat.
139 Find fault
pettily.
140 Air gun
missile.
142 Decay.
143 Witchcraft.
145 Pronoun.
146 Soap plant.
148 Angry.
150 Nimble.
152 As regards.
154 Monkeylike
mammal.
155 N. C.
mountain.
156 Actress
Leslie .
157 Sweet and
soft.
158 Scented trails.
159 Animal trap.
160 General
course.
161 Spends time
loafing.
83 Brewers tub.
85 Feast
sumptuously.
87 Magnani Magnanimous.
mous. Magnanimous.
88 First-rate.
89 Challenges.
90 Boman judge.
91 Travail.
92 Fruit drinks.
94 Scent.
95 Georgia City.
96 Concise.
97 Brief letters.
98 Irregular..
101 Paso.
102 Except. -
104 Donate.
107 Player who
puts spirit
into his teams
efforts.
110 Golf peg.
I

CROSSWORD SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 12

Dave should make an excellent
captain, says Gator basketball
coach Tommy Bartlett. He is a
real hard worker and leader.
Pro scouts are keeping a close
watch on Miller. He has the speed,
; shot and size to play guard in the
pros.
j The taller your guards are the
better off you are, commented one
pro scout. Miller has the size
to make an excellent pro guard.
Along with Miller the Gators
will have six returning lettermen.
They are: 6-11 center Neal Walk,
Miami; 6-6 forward Gary Mc-
Elroy, Clearwater; 6-3 forward
Mike Rollyson, Plant City; 6-0
guard Boyd Welsch, Gainesville;
6-2 guard Kurt Feazel, Harris Harrisburg,
burg, Harrisburg, 111.; and 6-3 forward Harry
Winkler, West Palm Beach. The
Gators will also have the services
of junior college transfer Mike
Leatherwood, a guard from Pen Pensacola.
sacola. Pensacola.

r T p p p Hp p [5 p hi |I4"TTSB- 6 | l7 118l 18 | l9 1 20
f I" B* B.
He
29 ' 30 31 32 3^"34
_ 4o
HH|H44 45 Hf* jjpT -^
>0 51 s2
_ Bl
64 6 s 66 e? 6^
To Jti 73 t
77 78 JiT 83
|||ps JUJFi 87
89 90 91 WttK2 93~ 94 "~ 9 s 96 97 98
99 poo 101
108 ToTtafor JBBoT 110 111
Til WIMTs BKT7
Til kHP ^P
129 130 131 l3s me
m ho ~ iMpo H^MpTs
TTe
B;

111 Lacerated.
112 Swear.
114 Fencing blade.
116 Bachelors
last words.
118 Social.
Cfc

120 Son of Seth.
122 Touch.
123 Persian elf.
125 Flowers from
Holland.
127 River: Sp.

Now take the newest
multi-sensory trip:
Walk to any soft-drink
machine and have some Sprite.
THE jp It happens as soon as you
pay your money and take your
bottle. Suddenly, Sprite
takes you, the hedonist, on
your way to a sensually
satisfying tactile-aural tactile-auralpalatable-optical-oral
palatable-optical-oral tactile-auralpalatable-optical-oral
experience.
wm First, you observe the
refreshing green bottle. A tempting sight. Then you
reach forth and touch it. Very cool. Finally, you
uncap the cap. Now
you're ready to
drink in that
delicious tartness H
regressing Y
delightful
I infantile pleasure^^*^p^J^^^^^j
% % of taking your bottle,
VV% stop. And listen.
the Because Sprite is so utterly noisy.
AAA Cascading in crescendos of effervescent
flavor. Billowing with billions of
ebullient bubbles. And then sip. Gulp.
Guzzle. Aaaaaaaaaaa! Sprite. So tart
JkTTtaSjBV and tingling o'er the taste buds.
And voila! You have your
multi-sensory experience.
But what about the olfactory
factor, you ask? Well, what do
you want for a dime--a
mjUJUM SPRITE, SO TART AND
JUST COULDN 1 T KEEP I

128 Tale from
the past.
129 Burn with
water.
130 More docile.
131 Fragrance.

132 City in Italy.
134 Mountain
crest.
135 Beauty parlor.
137 From that
time.

138 Colorado
park.
141 Festive.
143 Deep mud.
144 Moslem
judge.

147 Bitter vetch.
149 Rocky
pinnacle.
151 Union army
veta.: abbr.
153 Grow sleepy.